Friday, August 3, 2012

Weatherly 620B, Rgd. Farmers Aviation Inc., N2008S: Accident occurred August 03, 2012 in Holcomb, Kansas

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA514
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, August 03, 2012 in Holcomb, KS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/13/2014
Aircraft: WEATHERLY AVIATION CO INC 620B, registration: N2008S
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot noted that the engine rpm during the takeoff was about 30 rpm lower than normal but was still within the normal operating range. He reported that the airplane's engine then lost partial power as it climbed through about 50 feet above ground level after takeoff. After the airplane lost power, the pilot attempted to drop the chemical load to remain airborne; however, the airplane impacted an open field about 1 mile from the departure airstrip. Subsequent examinations of the airplane’s engine and its systems did not reveal any anomalies that would explain the loss of engine power. The weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to carburetor icing at glide and cruise power and were within the range of susceptibility for serious icing at glide power. Glide power settings yield a throttle angle similar to low power settings used for taxi operations; therefore, it is likely that the airplane’s carburetor accumulated ice after engine run-up and during taxi, which was not detected by the pilot. The pilot did not mention using carburetor heat during the pretakeoff engine run-up or during the power loss event; thus, based on the available information, it is likely that the airplane's engine lost power due to carburetor icing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to use carburetor heat while operating in conditions conducive to carburetor icing, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power shortly after takeoff.

On August 3, 2012, about 0919 central daylight time, a Weatherly 620B, N2008S, sustained substantial damage when it impacted the ground following a loss of engine power during takeoff from a field near Holcomb, Kansas. The pilot received minor injuries. The aircraft was owned and operated by Farmers Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that he completed a preflight examination and pre-takeoff run-up of the airplane with no anomalies noted. He stated that the takeoff roll was normal and the airplane lifted off in a reasonable distance. He did notice about a 30 rpm drop during takeoff compared to other takeoffs but the engine speed was still within the normal operating range. After gaining about 50 feet of altitude the airplane started losing power. The pilot attempted to drop the chemical load in an effort to stay airborne but the airplane impacted an open field about one mile north of the airstrip. The pilot stated that he thought the engine had lost almost all power by the time the airplane impacted the field. The pilot did not mention using carburetor heat during the pre-takeoff run-up or during the power loss event.

Examination of the airplane and engine revealed no preimpact anomalies that would explain the loss of engine power. Subsequent re-examination of the engine also revealed no anomalies. The carburetor and magnetos were sent to the NTSB investigator-in-charge for further examination. The carburetor was disassembled and no anomalies were noted. The right magneto was broken due to the impact; however, no anomalies were detected upon examination. The left magneto was intact and produced spark when rotated.

At 0854, the weather conditions recorded at the Garden City Regional Airport, Garden City, Kansas, about 15 miles east of the accident site included a temperature of 22 degrees Celsius and a dew point of 19 degrees Celsius.

According to the carburetor icing chart found in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35, entitled "Carburetor Icing Prevention", the reported temperature and dew point fall in the range of susceptibility for icing during glide and cruise power settings, and within the range of susceptibility for serious icing during glide power.


http://registry.faa.gov/N2008S

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA514 
 4 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, August 03, 2012 in Holcomb, KS
Aircraft: WEATHERLY AVIATION CO INC 620B, registration: N2008S
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 3, 2012, about 0919 central daylight time, a Weatherly 620B, N2008S, sustained substantial damage when it impacted the ground following a loss of engine power during takeoff from a field near Holcomb, Kansas. The pilot received minor injuries. The aircraft was owned and operated by Farmers Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an agricultural application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.


 

A pilot suffered severe injuries after crashing his plane in Finney County.  It happened just before 10 a.m. in field about 15 miles south of Scott City. Officials say the pilot was flying a crop-dusting plane. He had taken off from a nearby airstrip and had flown about a mile when his plane lost power and he crashed. He was transported to a nearby hospital with several broken bones.

The Kansas Highway Patrol is investigating the crash. Their report identifies the pilot as John Crist, 64, of Garden City.


GARDEN CITY, Kansas — The Kansas Highway Patrol is investigating after a small plane went down northwest of Garden City.  
It happened around 9:15 a.m. near 19550 North Big Lowe Road. It is three miles south of the Scott-Finney County line.   According to the KHP, the crop duster had mechanical issues and lost power upon taking off and crashed in a field.   The pilot, 64-year-old John Crist, was taken St. Catherine Hospital in Garden City.

A pilot was critically injured after crashing his plane in Finney County.
It happened just before 10 a.m. in field about 15 miles south of Scott City.  Officials say the pilot was flying a crop-dusting plane and crashed for unknown reasons. He is being taken to the hospital by helicopter. 

Piper PA-28-161 Warrior III, N5319X: Aircraft engine caught fire during refueling - Penn Yan, New York

 
Provided by Michael Linehan 
Penn Yan Firefighters responded to the Yates County airport Thursday evening to extinguish a fire in this 2001 Piper.

Penn Yan, N.Y. — The Yates County Fire Investigation Team and the Federal Aviation Administration are working to determine the cause of a fire that damaged a small airplane at the Yates County Airport Thursday evening. 

 At 8:22 p.m. Penn Yan Fire fighters were called to extinguish the blaze that damaged a 2001 Piper owned by Prior Aviation of Buffalo.

The Yates County Sheriff's Office reports the aircraft was flown to Penn Yan by Gary L. Stevens, 69, of Corfu, and his passenger was Kimberty M. Hanley, 28, of Buffalo.

According to information available on flightaware.com, the aircraft left Buffalo Niagara International Airport at 7:32 p.m. and arrived in Penn Yan at 8 p.m.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 5319X        Make/Model: PA28      Description: PA-28, WARRIOR
  Date: 08/03/2012     Time: 0100

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: PENN YAN   State: NY   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ENGINE CAUGHT FIRE DURING REFUELING. PENN YAN, NY

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Standing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ROCHESTER, NY  (EA23)                 Entry date: 08/03/2012 

http://registry.faa.gov/N5319X  

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N5319X 

 http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/photo  
 
http://www.chronicle-express.com


Caribbean Airlines, Flight 523, Boeing 737-800, 9Y-PBM: 1 year later

 

NTSB Identification: DCA11RA092
Scheduled 14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial operation of Caribbean Airlines
Accident occurred Saturday, July 30, 2011 in Georgetown, Guyana
Aircraft: BOEING 737, registration: 9Y-PBM
Injuries: 1 Serious,161 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors.

On July 30, 2011, at 1:25 am local time (0525 UTC), a Boeing 737-800, Trinidad & Tobago registration 9Y-PBM, operated by Caribbean Airlines as flight 523, overran the runway upon landing at Cheddi Jagan International Airport, Georgetown, Guyana. Of the 156 passengers and six crew on board, there was reportedly one serious and multiple minor injuries. Weather was reported as raining at the time of the accident. Preliminary details from local authorities indicate that the airplane fractured in two pieces as a result of the overrun. The flight was a scheduled passenger flight from Piarco International Airport, Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago.

The accident is being investigated by the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). The NTSB has designated a U.S. Accredited Representative as the state of manufacture. All inquiries should be directed to the Guyana CAA at:

Civil Aviation Authority
Fairlie House Lot 96
Duke St
Kingston
Georgetown

Farmer fed up with crop duster, fires shotgun

EDGAR, Wisconsin - An Edgar man says he was fed up with a low-flying crop duster when he fired his shotgun to send a message to the pilot. Now he’s facing a Disorderly Conduct Charge. 

Louis Olson tells NewsChannel 7 the plane was passing less than 30 feet above his house, and spooking his cattle. He told deputies the plane even went under some power lines, and says it wasn’t the first time.

Louis called 911 to try to report the plane, but a dispatcher told him that without a tail number, they couldn’t help him.

That’s when Louis says he told the dispatcher he’d shoot the plane down to get his tail number. He says he didn’t shoot at the plane, but fired a shotgun into his field.

Louis tells NewsChannel 7 he overreacted, but says he’s glad he got law enforcement’s attention about his problems with the plane.

No word yet on whether deputies have identified the pilot.


http://www.wsaw.com

Now that's fly fishing! Amazing vintage footage shows anglers catching shark from a BLIMP

 

 This incredible footage shows daring anglers taking fly fishing to the next level - by capturing a shark from the cabin of a huge aircraft. 

The black and white video shows a baby shark caught on the hook of a fishing line.

But as the camera pans out, there is no boat to be seen and the line extends up to show a huge blimp attached to it.

The shark is then slowly winched up, flying through the air, before it is eventually pulled into the aircraft.

The proud fisherman and the aircraft pilots are then seen next to the dead shark - which must measure at least 5ft-long as it's body length is as tall as the men standing next to it.

The 57 second clip was filmed in 1934 in Fisher Island in Miami, Florida, America.

Traditional fly fishing is actually completely different to this adaptation - and is an angling method that uses an artificial 'fly' to catch fish.

The fly is cast using a fly rod, reel, and specialized weighted line and can be used in fresh or salt water.

Read more, photos and video: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Pollution around transport plane crash site

 
The crash site on top of Kebnekaise. (Photo: Forsvaret)




The Hercules C-130J military transport plane with five Norwegian officers on board was on its way from Evenes in northern Norway to Kiruna in the far north of Sweden when it went missing on March 15. The plane was participating in the Cold Response military training exercise. The aircraft was found two days later, on top of Sweden’s highest mountain Kebnekaise. 

As a result of the strong crash and the following explosion, the wreckage was scattered over a large area and buried in an avalanche.

The crash site is polluted with some 10.000 liters of petrol. Brooks running down from melting glaciers in the mountain have been found to contain traces of the fuel, Norrländska Socialdemokraten writes.

The level of pollution in the brooks is small and does not constitute any health hazard for humans or animals, but authorities warn people not to melt snow from the glaciers to use as drinking water.

Police, the aircraft accident investigation board and personnel from Norwegian and Swedish armed forces are currently at the crash site, searching for the airplane’s black boxes and remains of the crew. The work on the more than 2000 meters high mountain top is extremely hard and dangerous. 

 Lieutenant Colonel Truls Audun Ørpen (46), Captain Bjørn Yngvar Haug (40), Captain Siw Robertsen (45), Captain Ståle Garberg (42), and Captain Steinar Utne (35) were killed in the accident.
 

Singapore Airlines Unit SilkAir Orders US$4.9 Worth of Boeing Jets

SINGAPORE: SilkAir, the regional wing of Singapore Airlines (SIA), said Friday it would buy 54 new Boeing planes in a deal worth US$4.9 billion, with an option to buy a further 14 aircraft. 

The airline said the order is the largest in its history and "remains subject to the negotiation of a final purchase agreement".

SilkAir said the firm orders will cover 23 Boeing 737-800s and 31 Boeing 737 MAX 8s.

The deal for the 54 aircraft is worth US$4.9 billion based on Boeing's current list prices.

The B737-800 is the best selling variant of Boeing's popular next generation family of single-aisle aircraft, and the 737 MAX is currently in development.

"Deliveries are due to begin in 2014 and continue to 2021, by which time the airline's fleet will have more than doubled in size," the carrier said.

SilkAir currently operates 21 Airbus A319s and A320s, with three more A320s due for delivery by the end of 2013. It said the new orders will cater for both growth and fleet renewal.

"We continue to see very strong growth within the region and these new aircraft will position SilkAir well," said SilkAir chief executive Marvin Tan.

"They will enable us to spread our wings to even more destinations and increase capacity on existing routes, contributing to the overall SIA Group network," he added.

"The selection of the B737 follows detailed evaluations and extensive negotiations with both Airbus and Boeing."

SilkAir is a wholly owned subsidiary of SIA and flies to popular holiday destinations in the Asia Pacific region.

SIA also has a long-haul budget carrier called Scoot and owns nearly 33 percent in low-cost carrier Tiger Airways. 


http://www.channelnewsasia.com

Cessna 180G, US Registry N4695U: Accident occurred August 01, 2012 in Kenora/Trout Lake, Ontario, Canada

NTSB Identification: CEN12WA528 
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 01, 2012 in Kenora/Trout Lake, Ontario, Canada
Aircraft: CESSNA 180G, registration: N4695U
Injuries: 2 Serious,1 Minor.


On August 1, 2012, about 1453 UTC, a Cessna 180G, US Registry N4695U collided with terrain while departing from Trout Lake, Ontario. The float-equipped airplane was substantially damaged. The pilot and one passenger were seriously injured, and one passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorlogical conditions prevailed for the personal flight in the local area.

This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Canadian government. Any further information may be obtained from:

Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB)
335-550 Century Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3H0Y1

Telephone: 204-983-5548
Facsimile: 204-983-8026
E-mail: airops@bst-tsb.gc.ca

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada.


 
The scene of a plane crash near Trout Lake, north of Kenora, Ont., on Wednesday morning. The 78-year-old pilot and a 62-year-old passenger were seriously injured in the crash. 
(Submitted by Kelly Huff)

JEFF Martin was too shaken Thursday to speak at length about the plane crash he survived a day earlier along with his father and his dad's friend near Kenora.

He and his family are desperately trying to get his dad, Art Martin, the plane's pilot, back to Minnesota for surgery. The elder Martin, in his mid-70s, was transported in serious condition from Kenora to a hospital in Thunder Bay on Wednesday.

His father's friend, Linda May, was taken to hospital in Duluth, Minn. She was also reported to be in serious condition.

"There's too much bureaucracy in getting a plane to bring him across the border," Jeff Martin said of his dad. "He needs that operation and we want it in the States."

Art Martin was at the controls of the Cessna 180 float plane when it crashed shortly after takeoff in a wooded area near Trout Lake. All three are from Minnesota.

They were initially rushed to Lake of the Woods Hospital in Kenora. Jeff Martin, who suffered only minor injuries, was soon released.

When reached by telephone on Thursday, he did not want to elaborate on his father's injuries or talk about the accident.

The Transportation Safety Board is still investigating the cause of the crash, said Peter Hildebrand, regional manager for the TSB in Winnipeg. Witnesses said they heard the float plane's engine cut out before it crashed into the woods around 8:30 a.m. Wednesday.

"I noticed when (Art) was up in the air and I couldn't hear the engine anymore," said Kelly Huff, a Winnipegger who has a cottage on the lake. "Instead of the noise fading off into the distance, it just stopped."

Soon after, he said, he heard a thrashing noise as the plane hit the trees in the woods across the lake. He then saw his neighbour, Jay Gard, and Gard's friend, Larry Ingram, jump in a boat and race over to the remote crash site.

Huff and his other neighbour, Laurie Bush, soon followed in another boat.

"We could hear this faint voice of someone saying 'Help, help.' " Huff said.

That faint voice was Jeff Martin, who emerged from the crash scratched and bruised, while May and Art Martin were trapped inside. The plane, Huff said, was torn to shreds.

"The tail of the plane was 60 feet (18 metres) up in a pine tree. Both wings were sheered off... fuel was pouring out of the plane," he said.

The plane was about 1.5 metres from a rock wall, he added.

"If it had hit that rock wall, no one would have survived," Huff said.

The four people worked to free May and then Martin. Martin was trapped beneath the fuselage and Gard and Ingram had to push against it using their feet to free him, Huff said.

Huff then returned to the other side of the lake to call emergency services. He had to ferry them over to the crash site when they arrived around 9:30 a.m., since it was too rocky for their helicopter to land in the woods, he said.

Otto Kemerle used his pontoon boat to take emergency crews and then the wounded to and from shore.

When he arrived at the crash site, he said, the plane looked as if it was split in half.

"The wings are gone. The tail is high up in a tree," he said.

"(Art's) head was wrapped and he had a gash in his left side," Kemerle said, adding one arm also looked broken.

Huff said Art Martin flies the plane once or twice a week in the summer to fish in remote areas. He said Martin has had a cottage on the lake for more than 40 years.

The Transportation Safety Board was still on the scene Thursday investigating the crash and have not yet figured out the cause, said Hildebrand.

He said they have no further information than the initial reports.

Story: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com

Piper PA-22-160 Tri Pacer, N3442Z: Accident occurred August 01, 2012 in McKinleyville, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N3442Z

NTSB Identification: WPR12CA340
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 01, 2012 in McKinleyville, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/09/2012
Aircraft: PIPER PA-22-160, registration: N3442Z
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot said that he had just acquired the airplane and was flying his first cross-country flight in it. He was not monitoring the fuel quantity in the left and right fuel tanks, because he thought the fuel selector was positioned to both tanks. However, the fuel selector was positioned to the left tank for the entire trip. On short final at his destination, the airplane’s engine lost power due to fuel starvation. The pilot performed a forced landing, which bent and wrinkled the fuselage and wings. The pilot had a total flight time of about 150 hours of which only 5 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper fuel management, which resulted in a loss of engine power due to fuel starvation. Contributing to the accident were the pilot’s lack of experience in the accident airplane make and model and his lack of knowledge regarding the fuel system.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 3442Z        Make/Model: PA22      Description: PA-22 Tri-Pacer, Caribbean, Colt
  Date: 08/02/2012     Time: 0155

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: MCKINLEYVILLE   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR MCKINLEYVILLE, CA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: OAKLAND, CA  (WP27)                   Entry date: 08/02/2012 




Small plane crash in McKinleyville wounds pilot's pride 

The Humboldt County Sheriff's Office released Friday the name of the Chico pilot whose small single-engine plane made an emergency landing Wednesday in McKinleyville.

Aaron Andrus, 33, piloted the plane that was attempting to land at the Arcata/Eureka Airport in McKinleyville on Wednesday night when the plane's engine quit, according to the sheriff's office.

Law enforcement officials said it was later discovered that the plane had run out of fuel. Andrus was unable to make it to the runway and instead returned to a pasture near the airport, where he made an emergency landing. Officials said he escaped the crash with a small bump on the head.

The incident was forwarded to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board for further investigation. 


---------

A small single-engine plane crash this evening in McKinleyville left a 33-year-old Chico man with just a small bump on the head, according to local law enforcement officials.

Arcata Fire Protection District Fire Chief John McFarland said he received a call about the crash around 7 p.m. He said the pilot was from Chico, and had flown to the Arcata/Eureka Airport in McKinleyville to show off his new plane to some Humboldt County relatives.

McFarland said the pilot -- the single occupant of the plane -- was trying to take off from the airport runway when things went awry.

”When he approached the end of the runway in Arcata, the engine quit,” McFarland said.

Thinking he could make it off the runway, McFarland said the pilot took off and then made an emergency landing.

”He doubled back and landed in a field of clover that been mowed,” McFarland said.

The plane hit the ground hard, and did a little cartwheel before coming to rest upright on the field -- which is near Martin Road. McFarland said the man was shaken, but basically unhurt.

”He climbed out and had a goose-egg bump on his head,” McFarland said.

That's when the Arcata Fire Protection District, Humboldt County Sheriff's Department, California Highway Patrol, Arcata Ambulance and an airport crash crew arrived at on scene, McFarland said.

The Federal Aviation Administration has already interviewed the pilot, McFarland said, who is fairly new to flying and had just purchased the pre-owned plane about one month ago. He said the pilot was embarrassed when it was discovered that his engine quit due to a lack of gasoline. He said the plane had one gas tank empty and one full, and that the pilot had forgotten to switch to the filled tank.

A press release from the Humboldt County Sheriff's Department said the pilot was treated and released on scene. The investigation has been turned over to the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board for further investigation.


http://www.times-standard.com