Friday, August 4, 2017

Half Moon Bay Airport (KHAF) to be named in honor of Eddie Andreini

Edward August Andreini




Eddie Andreini is remembered as a man whose feet were firmly rooted in the Coastside soil. After growing up in a farm family, his construction company would help develop countless public and private projects on the coast. His head, however, was always in the clouds.

And it is his love of flying that will be the focus of ceremonies later this month to rename the airfield at Half Moon Bay Airport in his honor. The renaming is the work of the San Mateo County Public Works Department, which manages the airport, and comes with the full support of an army of Andreini fans all around the coast.

The county plans a ceremony to unveil the new name at 1 p.m. on Aug. 26 at the 3-Zero Café. The public is welcome to attend. Andreini was a regular at the café, which overlooks the airport’s landing strips.

After becoming enamored with flight by watching the local crop dusters, Andreini got his first airplane — a Piper Super Cruiser — at the age of 14. Over time, he would become an expert pilot with a particular love for vintage aircraft. He performed in World War II-era equipment like his Stearman biplane and his P-51 and Yak-9 fighters.

Coastsiders could often hear his aircraft as he practiced maneuvers that would quicken the pulse of any pilot. In 2013, he was inducted into the International Council of Air Shows Hall of Fame.

Andreini died a year later, at the age of 77, while performing maneuvers during an air show at Travis Air Force Base.

Air-show announcer Bill Vasilovich spoke of Andreini at his funeral. He described why the pilot was beloved by many in the community.

“He was a true gentleman, a barnstormer,” Vasilovich told the Review at the time. “He made people look up into the skies and smile.”

Story and comments ► http://www.hmbreview.com

Cessna 180, N9455C: Accident occurred August 03, 2017 in Skwentna, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N9455C

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA473
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Skwentna, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N9455C

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft was the subject of an ALNOT and crashed under unknown circumstances.

Date: 02-AUG-17
Time: 06:52:00Z
Regis#: N9455C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 180
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: WASILLA
State: ALASKA




ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) A pilot was rescued by the Alaska Air National guard after his plane crashed 130 miles northwest of Anchorage.

On the morning of August 3rd the pilot’s brother contacted the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center with concerns about his brothers expected return on Tuesday, August 1st.

According to a press release today aircraft wreckage was found within a few hours of the call in the area of Ptarmigan Pass. The pilot did not appear to have sustained serious injuries.

“The pilot was traveling with a satellite tracking device that can be used to send emergency messages via text and also sends a signal of the aircraft location periodically,” said Lt. Col. Scot Milani, director of the RCC. “The last known coordinates provided by his brother assisted in identifying a general area where the plane was when it last submitted a transmission.”

The Alaska Rescue Coordination Center along with support from the Alaska National Guard’s 176th Wing were able to spot the wreckage in mountainous terrain at about 3,000 feet in elevation.

The survivor was helped into a helicopter, treated at the Mat-Su Regional Medical Center, and later released.

“It’s important for pilots to have a plan—letting someone know where they are going, their planned route, when they plan to depart and return—and be packed with food, gear and shelter,” said Milani. “They should be equipped to spend an extended period of time surviving until rescue forces are able to locate them in the event of an emergency.”

http://www.ktuu.com

Robinson R44 II, N4138M, registered to and operated by Bering Air Inc: Accident occurred August 03, 2017 in Solomon, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Bering Air Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N4138M

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA040
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Solomon, AK
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44, registration: N4138M
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 3, 2017, about 1032 Alaska daylight time, a Robinson R-44 Clipper II helicopter, N4138M, impacted water and sank while dropping mineral claim markers about 1 mile south of Solomon, Alaska. The commercial pilot and passenger sustained no injury, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to, and operated by, Bering Air, Inc., Nome, Alaska, as a visual flight rules flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 on-demand charter flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight originated from the Nome Airport, Nome, about 0845. 

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to place mineral claim markers, which involved maneuvering the helicopter over a Global Positioning System (GPS) point where the passenger can drop the marker from the rear left seat of the helicopter. Some of the mineral claim corners are in water, and the placement of those markers must be offset to the nearest land mass. The pilot departed from the Nome Airport and arrived at the passenger's private residence about 4 miles east of Nome. The helicopter was shutdown, the pilot briefed the flight to the passenger, 23 markers were loaded onboard the helicopter, and the helicopter departed. 

With about half the markers left to drop, the helicopter was operating over a lagoon between the mainland and a sand barrier, at about 10 to 15 feet above the water. The pilot reported that he was lower than he should have been and lost situational awareness when he was working with the GPS unit. He inadvertently allowed the helicopter to descend into the water "in a more level or slight nose low attitude" and the helicopter was not maneuvering at the time. He further reported that he must have pushed forward on the cyclic as he leaned forward to manipulate the GPS unit. After the helicopter impacted water, the helicopter rolled, and came to rest on its right side in about 4 feet of water. The pilot and passenger egressed without further incident and waded to the shore with the helicopter occupant survival bag and satellite phone. The pilot contacted the operator with the satellite phone and a second company helicopter was dispatched to pick up the pilot and passenger about 1200.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main rotor system, the fuselage, the tail boom, and the tail rotor system.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 


At the time of the accident, the helicopter was not equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved radio altimeter or a FAA approved device that incorporates a radio altimeter as required by 14 CFR Part 135.160 Radio Altimeters for Rotorcraft Operations. The operator was operating with a Letter of Deviation Authority approved by the FAA.

Eurocopter AS-350B-3, N351SH, Soloy Helicopters LLC: Accident occurred August 03, 2017 in Delta Junction, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC17CA041 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Delta Junction, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/22/2017
Aircraft: AIRBUS AS350, registration: N351SH
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The helicopter pilot reported that he was transporting a passenger to a remote drilling site where a tracked drilling unit was stationed. He reported that he landed into the wind, which necessitated descending over bordering trees into the drilling site. The helicopter touched down on the dirt, and upon lowering the collective, he reported that he heard a “bang,” and the helicopter slowly started to “pick up a ground wobble.” The pilot shut down the helicopter, and both occupants exited without further incident. 

A postaccident inspection revealed that the blue and red main rotor blades sustained substantial damage from impacting a black 1.5-inch steel frame attached to the tracked drilling unit, which is used to mount a canvas weather shelter for the drilling crews. The pilot reported that the steel frame was not visible to him from above as he was descending into the drilling site. The pilot further reported that he had made multiple landings at the drilling site in the past 3 months and that, with the previous landings, he had landed farther past the tracked drilling unit, and the steel frame was always behind the helicopter.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

The Federal Aviation Administration Helicopter Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-21A, 2012) discusses high and low reconnaissance procedures and states, in part:
The purpose of conducting a high reconnaissance is to determine direction and speed of the wind, a touchdown point, suitability of the landing area, approach and departure axes, and obstacles for both the approach and departure.

A low reconnaissance is accomplished during the approach to the landing area. When flying the approach, verify what was observed in the high reconnaissance, and check for anything new that may have been missed at a higher altitude, such as wires and their supporting structures (poles, towers, etc.), slopes, and small crevices.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain clearance from a steel frame attached to a tracked drilling unit. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s failure to visually identify the steel frame during the reconnaissance process. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska
Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses; Paris
Airbus Helicopters (Technical Advisor); Grand Prairie, Texas
Safran Helicopter Engines (Technical Advisor); Grand Prairie, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Operator: Soloy Helicopters LLC

Operator Does Business As: Soloy Helicopters LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N351SH

NTSB Identification: ANC17CA041
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Delta Junction, AK
Aircraft: AIRBUS AS350, registration: N351SH
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The helicopter pilot reported that he was transporting a passenger to a remote drilling site, where a tracked drilling unit was stationed. He reported that he landed into the wind, which necessitated descending over bordering trees into the drilling site. The helicopter touched down on the dirt, and upon lowering the collective, he reported he heard a "bang" and the helicopter slowly started to "pick up a ground wobble." The pilot shutdown the helicopter and both occupants exited without further incident.

A postaccident inspection revealed that the blue and red main rotor blades sustained substantial damage from impacting a black 1.5-inch steel frame attached to the tracked drilling unit, which is used to mount a canvas weather shelter for the drilling crews. The pilot reported that the steel frame was not visible to him from above as he was descending into the drilling site. The pilot further reported that multiple landings have been made to the drilling site in the past 3 months, and that with the previous landings he landed further past the tracked drilling unit and the steel frame was always behind the helicopter.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. 

The Federal Aviation Administration Helicopter Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-21A, 2012) discusses high and low reconnaissance procedures and states in part:

The purpose of conducting a high reconnaissance is to determine direction and speed of the wind, a touchdown point, suitability of the landing area, approach and departure axes, and obstacles for both the approach and departure.

A low reconnaissance is accomplished during the approach to the landing area. When flying the approach, verify what was observed in the high reconnaissance, and check for anything new that may have been missed at a higher altitude, such as wires and their supporting structures (poles, towers, etc.), slopes, and small crevices.

Enstrom F-28F, N503PD, Airwest Aviation Academy LLC: Incident occurred August 03, 2017 in Lake Pleasant, Arizona

Airwest Aviation Academy LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N503PD

Emergency landing.

Date: 03-AUG-17
Time: 20:45:00Z
Regis#: N503PD
Aircraft Make: ENSTROM
Aircraft Model: F28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: LAKE PLEASANT
State: ARIZONA

Phoenix, Arizona 
September 30, 2014

PRELIMINARY INFORMATION FROM FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION OPS: PHOENIX, AZ/UAS INCIDENT/1215P/N503PD, ENSTROM EN28, REPORTED A UAS (QUAD-COPTER) HOVERING 300 FEET BELOW WHILE ORBITING AT 1,600 FEET, 3 WNW PHX. NO CONFLICT REPORTED.

9/30/14 12:15 phoenix arizona prelim info from faa ops: phoenix, az/uas incident/1215p/n503pd, enstrom en28, reported a uas (quad-copter) hovering 300 feet below while orbiting at 1,600 feet, 3 wnw phx. no conflict reported.

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N1129K, registered to American Airplane Exchange and operated by Orange County Flight Center: Accident occurred July 29, 2017 at John Wayne-Orange County Airport (KSNA), Santa Ana, Orange County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Operator: Orange County Flight Center

American Airplane Exchange dba American Aircraft Sales

http://registry.faa.gov/N1129K


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA479
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 29, 2017 in Santa Ana, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N1129K
Injuries: Unavailable

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector reported that, during a preflight inspection, the student pilot and designated pilot examiner observed propeller damage during their preflight inspection. Subsequently, a further inspection by maintenance personnel revealed substantial damage to the firewall and fuselage. The airplane was flown by numerous renter pilots prior to the damage being found, and none of them claimed responsibility for the damage.

Beech D17S Staggerwing, N44562: Accident occurred August 03, 2017 at Colorado Springs Airport (KCOS), El Paso County, Colorado

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA301
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Colorado Springs, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/14/2017
Aircraft: BEECH D17S, registration: N44562
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot was landing in the tailwheel-equipped airplane in right quartering tailwind conditions. After touchdown, with the tailwheel on the runway, the airplane drifted to the right and the pilot applied left brake. The right landing gear collapsed, and the airplane ground looped and came to rest upright near the right edge of the runway. The pilot stated there were no mechanical malfunctions with the airplane, and that, "it got away from me, I guess."

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll with a quartering tailwind.

On August 3, 2017, about 1130 mountain daylight time, a Beech D17S airplane, N44562, ground looped during landing at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (COS), Colorado Springs, Colorado. The pilot and one passenger were not injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Gallup Municipal Airport (GUP), Gallup, New Mexico, about 0900. 

The pilot stated during landing the right quartering tailwind was 10 to 13 mph. He made a normal landing with a lot of left rudder application to keep the airplane straight. After touchdown, with the tailwheel on the runway, the airplane drifted to the right and he applied left brake. The right landing gear collapsed and the airplane continued to the right edge of the runway where it came to rest upright. The pilot stated there were no mechanical malfunctions with the airplane and that "it got away from me, I guess."

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane landed on runway 35L and ground looped during the landing roll. The right main landing gear collapsed (figure 1), the lower right wing struck the ground. A postaccident examination revealed no anomalies with the landing gear.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N44562

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA301
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Colorado Springs, CO
Aircraft: BEECH D17S, registration: N44562
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 3, 2017, about 1130 mountain daylight time, a Beech D17S airplane, N44562, ground looped during landing at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (COS), Colorado Springs, Colorado. The pilot and one passenger were not injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Gallup Municipal Airport (GUP), Gallup, New Mexico, about 0900.

The pilot stated during landing the right quartering tailwind was 10 to 13 mph. He made a normal landing with a lot of left rudder application to keep the airplane straight. After touchdown, with the tailwheel on the runway, the airplane drifted to the right and he applied left brake. The right landing gear collapsed and the airplane continued to the right edge of the runway where it came to rest upright. The pilot stated there were no mechanical malfunctions with the airplane and that "it got away from me, I guess."


The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane landed on runway 35L and ground looped during the landing roll. The right main landing gear collapsed (figure 1), the lower right wing struck the ground. A postaccident examination revealed no anomalies with the landing gear.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA301
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Colorado Springs, CO
Aircraft: BEECH D17S, registration: N44562
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 3, 2017, about 1130 mountain daylight time, a Beech D17S airplane, N44562, ground looped during landing at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (COS), Colorado Springs, Colorado. The pilot and one passenger were not injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Gallup Municipal Airport (GUP), Gallup, New Mexico, about 0900. 

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane landed on runway 35L and ground looped during the landing roll. The right main landing gear collapsed and the right wing struck the ground (figure 1). 

The airplane has been retained for further examination.

Cessna 152, N5276M, RE Airways Corp: Incident occurred August 02, 2017 in Miami, Florida

RE Airways Corp: http://registry.faa.gov/N5276M

Aircraft went off runway and back to taxiway.

Date: 02-AUG-17
Time: 23:28:00Z
Regis#: N5276M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C152
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Diamond DA-20C-1 Eclipse, N634DC, Falcon Aviation Academy LLC: Incident occurred August 01, 2017 at Newnan–Coweta County Airport (KCCO), Georgia

Falcon Aviation Academy LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N634DC

Hard landing.

Date: 01-AUG-17
Time: 19:45:00Z
Regis#: N634DC
Aircraft Make: DIAMOND
Aircraft Model: DA20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NEWNAN
State: GEORGIA

Autogyro MTO Sport, N571UJ: Accident occurred August 03, 2017 at Mentone Airport (C92), Kosciusko County, Indiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket: - National Transportation Safety Board:
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N571UJ

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA302
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Mentone, IN
Aircraft: JAMES F HAKE MTO SPORT, registration: N571UJ
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 3, 2017, about 0917 central daylight time, a Hake MTO Sport gyroplane, N571UJ, was substantially damaged when it tipped over on landing at Mentone Airport (C92), Mentone, Indiana. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The local flight originated about 0930.

According to the pilot's accident report, when he touched down on the main landing gear, he applied "moderate" right rudder to maintain runway alignment and to avoid slipping. He stated he should have raised the nose to reduce airspeed, but instead he lowered the nose and struck the runway. The pilot explained that on this particular gyroplane, the nose wheel and rudder are interconnected; that is, the nose wheel does not pivot on a caster. When the gyroplane touched down, it 'jerked" abruptly to the right and tipped over. The pilot concluded, "This accident was the result of pilot error. There was no malfunction [of the gyroplane, flight controls, or engine]."

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA302
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Mantone, IN
Aircraft: JAMES F HAKE MTO SPORT, registration: N571UJ
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 3, 2017, about 0917 central daylight time, a Hake MTO Sport gyroplane, N571UJ, sustained minor damage when it tipped over on landing at Mantone Airport (C92), Mantone, Indiana. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. The pilot sustained a serious injury. The local flight originated at an undetermined time.

Witnesses reported the pilot flared too high and landed hard on runway 36. The gyroplane bounced and tipped over. The pilot later told a Federal Aviation Administration FAA) inspector that he had applied right rudder on landing. The rudder pedals remain connected to the steerable nose gear. When the nose wheel touched down, the side load caused the gyrocopter to tip onto its side and the rotor and propeller both struck the ground. The pilot said the accident was due to pilot error and that there were no mechanical or weather issues.





MENTONE – A Michigan man was transported to a Rochester hospital this morning after his Autogyro MTO Sport tipped over while landing at the Mentone Airport.

James Hake, 71, had a compound fracture his wrist, according to Kosciusko County Sheriff’s Department Sgt. Rick Shepherd. Mentone Town Marshal Jim Eads said Hake had a broken left arm and lots of abrasions, but had a helmet on when he crashed before 10 a.m. today. Hake was the only person in the plane.

Based on the information Shepherd gathered at the scene, as Hake was landing his Autogyro MTO Sport a front wheel tilted and caused the whole plane to rollover.

Since there was a crash with injury, Eads said the Federal Aviation Administration had to be contacted. Popular Rotorcraft Association President Brent Drake said he made that contact. 

“It just tipped over. It is just a rollover accident,” Drake said, identifying the gyroplane as “an Autogyro MTO Sport.”

He said the association is having it's yearly convention at the Mentone Airport this weekend and will be there through Sunday. Drake expected 300 members to be in attendance, with people coming from all over, including as far away as Alabama and Tennessee. In 2016, a man came from China for the convention.

Shepherd said before the gyroplane could be moved from the runway, the FAA had to clear it. 

Along with KCSD and the Mentone Police Department, responding to the scene was the fire department. 

http://www.timesuniononline.com

Cessna 172R, N91966, Beers Investment Group Inc: Accident occurred August 02, 2017 at Kearney Regional Airport (KEAR), Buffalo County, Nebraska

Beers Investment Group Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N91966

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA482
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 02, 2017 in Kearney, NE
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N91966

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck airport sign during landing.

Date: 02-AUG-17
Time: 21:30:00Z
Regis#: 91966
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KEARNEY
State: NEBRASKA

CZAW SportCruiser, N777NG, N M G Aviation LLC: Accident occurred August 03, 2017 at Rowan County Airport (KRUQ), Salisbury, North Carolina

N M G Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N777NG

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA465
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Salisbury, NC
Aircraft: CZECH AIRCRAFT WORKS SPOL SRO SPORTCRUISER, registration: N777NG

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Landing gear collapsed on landing.

Date: 03-AUG-17
Time: 12:00:00Z
Regis#: N777NG
Aircraft Make: CZECH SPORT
Aircraft Model: SPORTCRUISER
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SALISBURY
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Air Tractor AT-301, N23811: Incident occurred July 30, 2017 -and- Incident occurred April 20, 2016 in Malheur County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho 

http://registry.faa.gov/N23811

Emergency landing impacting a berm.

Date: 30-JUL-17
Time: 15:25:00Z
Regis#: 23811
Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Aircraft Model: AT-301
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 103
City: ADRIAN
State: OREGON

Aircraft force landed on a road. 

Date: 20-APR-16
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N23811
Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Aircraft Model: AT301
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NYSSA
State: Oregon

Cessna 170A, N1241D: Accident occurred August 03, 2017 near Canyonlands Field Airport (KCNY), Moab, Grand County, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

http://registry.faa.gov/N1241D

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA468
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 03, 2017 in Moab, UT
Aircraft: CESSNA 170, registration: N1241D

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
  
Nate Rydman and Rani Derasary, Moab

Rani and I would like to extend our sincerest thanks to all of the fine people in our community who aided in the rescue from our plane crash Thursday night. From the nice woman who answered my several 911 calls to the entire crew from the Grand County Sheriff's Department, Search and Rescue, Canyonlands field airport, EMTs, ambulance, and the ER and entire staff at our hospital. My apologies if I've missed anybody else who contributed to the effort. And a second thanks to the same ambulance crew that moved me to Grand Junction for further work later that night. I hope we didn't make any of your evenings too long, but we are sure glad you are all there and ready to roll. You are tax money well spent as you do these things on a regular basis. Many thanks, in general, and for your professionalism, kindness and compassion, and for seeing that the third member of party, our dog, got taken home as well.

Our injuries are on the mild side when considering what one thinks of in an airplane crash (or even an auto accident for that matter). We are at home, moving around (although not fast) and we will heal and recover. Many thanks also to all that have wished us well and offered help and food and favors.

On the crash itself, the details released by the sheriff's department are basically correct. It appears many news outlets around the state used that information. I could elaborate a lot more on the finer details of how wind-shear and small aircraft mix (or not), but I won't. The only details I saw that I'd like to clear up are that 1) Rani and I are married and have been for more than 10 years and hope to stay that way forever and ever; and 2) this was our own flight in our own airplane and we were heading up north to visit my parents for the weekend.

Lastly, I feel terrible that the day of our accident was the same day I announced I'd give any kid in Grand or San Juan county an airplane ride if they wanted one. That is still my goal although it will be delayed somewhat with healing, aircraft insurance, et cetera. Many apologies to those who were looking to take me up on it. Stay tuned.

Thank you all again.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.moabsunnews.com

That Drone Hovering Over Your Home? It’s the Insurance Inspector -- About 40% of car insurers no longer use employees to physically inspect damage in some cases



The Wall Street Journal
By Nicole Friedman
Aug. 4, 2017 5:30 a.m. ET


When Melinda Roberts found shingles in her front yard after a storm, her insurer didn’t dispatch a claims adjuster to investigate. It sent a drone.

The unmanned aircraft hovered above Ms. Roberts’ three-bedroom Birmingham, Ala., home and snapped photos of her roof. About a week later a check from Liberty Mutual Insurance arrived to cover repairs.

“It took a lot less time than I was expecting,” Ms. Roberts said.

Drones, photo-taking apps and artificial intelligence are accelerating what has long been a clunky, time-consuming experience: the auto or home-insurance claim.

Traditionally, an insurance claim associated with minor home damage or fender-bender auto accidents started with a phone call from a customer and ended days or weeks later with a mailed check. In between the insurer often would send an inspector to investigate the situation in person.

But about four in 10 car insurers no longer use employees to physically inspect damage in some cases, according to a LexisNexis Risk Solutions survey of insurance executives. Claims that rely on greater automation can be handled in two to three days compared with 10 to 15 days for a more traditional approach that involves an in-person visit, according to the survey.

One new home insurer, Lemonade, drew attention in January when it said it took just three seconds for its artificial-intelligence claims bot to settle and pay a claim for a stolen jacket.

Insurers typically guard their claims-handling times as industry secrets. But some said the time for a customer to get a price estimate and receive a payment is speeding up, and the change could make it more likely that policies are renewed.

A faster process can also save insurers money. About 11 cents of every premium dollar in personal property-and-casualty insurance is spent on investigating and settling claims, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence.

Automation can reduce the size of payouts, too. “The faster you can settle a claim, typically the less you can settle it for, so there is a direct financial incentive,” said Matthew Josefowicz, chief executive of insurance-technology consulting firm Novarica. Claims like water damage can get worse if they aren’t addressed quickly, he said.




Speed can have drawbacks. Some auto-repair shop industry groups have argued that photo-based appraisals can overlook significant damage and actually slow the claims process.

“It’s great to speed up certain parts of the process, [but] to think that one photograph, one piece of code or one algorithm is the Holy Grail, I think is a bit of a misnomer,” said Andrew Newman, president of reinsurance broker Willis Re.

Delaware, Pennsylvania and Virginia changed their regulations last year to allow appraisers to base car-repair estimates on photos or videos, but Massachusetts and Rhode Island still have some restrictions on photo appraisals.

Chicago startup Snapsheet helps car insurers with photo appraisals, using artificial intelligence to speed up the process. It takes up to three hours for the company to produce a price estimate after a customer submits photos of a damaged car, according to CJ Przybyl, the company’s president.

For claims involving more minor damage, the processing time is expected to drop dramatically as automation continues. A car-insurance claim is currently handled by an average of three employees, said Bill Brower, vice president of claims at RELX Group’s LexisNexis Risk Solutions—the same number as when he started working in the industry in the 1980s.

Soon, the entire claims process—from notifying insurance companies when damage occurs to estimating repair costs based on photos—could be done with no human input, he said. LexisNexis Risk Solutions helps insurers streamline their claims processes.

“We’re on the cusp of this major, major change” in claims handling, Mr. Brower said. “Consumers’ expectations have changed.”

At Lemonade, customers already file claims by chatting with a bot through the Lemonade app, uploading relevant photos and recording videos of themselves describing the loss. The company’s algorithms run 18 antifraud tests, said Daniel Schreiber, Lemonade’s chief executive.

The New York company said about one-fourth of its claims are settled and paid automatically, with the rest being passed on to a team of humans to assess. Lemonade launched in September and now sells policies in four states.

Allstate Corp. told car-repair shops in March that it is asking customers to send photos of car damage through its app rather than using drive-in inspection centers. The switch cut the time for a customer to get an estimate from several days to about 13 hours, an Allstate executive told repair shops in a May letter.

“We give customers their money in hours, not in days,” Allstate Chief Executive Tom Wilson said in a May conference call. “It’s cheaper, better and faster.”

At Liberty Mutual, adjusters are now using drones daily to photograph home damage, said Lily Wray, the company’s vice president of claims innovation for U.S. consumer markets. It is one of several insurance companies that have received federal approval in recent years to use or test unmanned aircraft to inspect everything from hail-damaged roofs to collapsed buildings.

“We’re taking something that takes hours down to minutes,” she said.

Insurers say drones will improve their ability to swiftly respond to claims from hurricanes, tornadoes and floods by providing aerial images of places claims adjusters can’t always access. They also see drones as a way to reduce injuries from risky roof inspections.

Ms. Roberts, the Liberty Mutual customer with roof damage in Alabama, was relieved that the insurer’s drone saved a claims adjuster a climb to the top of her house.

“I would much rather have it done that way than have him call me and tell me he’s fallen off my roof,” she said.

Original article can be found here ► https://www.wsj.com