Friday, June 25, 2021

Chennault International Airport (KCWF) breaks ground on new air cargo facility

Mitch O'Neal,  Director of Operations at Chennault International Airport



Lake Charles, Louisiana (KPLC) - Chennault International Airport.

It’s been making history in the lake area for decades, and now they are continuing to do just that.

“I kind of woke up today and said, I can’t believe this is actually happening,” said Denis Rau, president of the board of commissioners at Chennault.

It’s breaking ground for its new ten-thousand-square-foot air cargo facility.

“So many people have worked hard to make it happen over decades, and it will offer growth, it will offer all new kinds of opportunities that we’ve never seen here,” she said. “It’s a new line of business.”

And opportunities it will bring, principal for the DVW aviation advisor David Whitaker says this is an economic initiative for the city of Lake Charles.

“Landing fees would be generated by the activity that comes here, there are jobs associated with the activity that we’re pursuing, and a number of ripple-down effects with this activity,” he said. “So it’s an economic move.”

Costing about four million dollars, he says it’s a great time for Chennault to get into the air cargo industry.

“There are not enough airplanes in the world actually right now to move all the air cargo and meet the demand,” he said. “So airplanes sitting in the desert have been resurrected. Companies are looking to buy new planes, all to move cargo.”

Denise Rau says they started talking about air cargo back in 2012.

“We have talked at conferences and all of these places with industry leaders about why Lake Charles should be a place for air cargo,” she said. “It just makes sense, you know, Houston’s a busy, busy airport, and they fly around in a queue for a while trying to get that cargo down here,” she said. Here you buzz in, buzz out.”

And while the facility is expected to take about a year to complete, Whitaker says it might take a little longer due to a shortage of supplies following the pandemic.

Wynnae Dyess, formerly a competitive ice-skater, now teaches people how to fly at the Baker City Airport (KBKE)

Wynnae Dyess 


Wynnae Dyess feels the most free in flight.

The 28-year-old flight instructor, who works for Baker Aircraft, the fixed base operator at the Baker City Airport, earned her pilot’s license in Driggs, Idaho, when she was just 17.

Originally from Jackson, Wyoming, Dyess lived in Idaho and at Mesa, Arizona, before moving to Baker City in June 2020.

“Going into school, I thought I was probably going to be an airline pilot,” Dyess said. “But now coming here to Baker, I’ve realized I really liked the small airplane general aviation stuff and the more personal connections I make.”

Growing up, Dyess said she was always around military aircraft, going to air shows and the Air Force Museum with her family, where she fell in love with vintage military aircraft.

She was also a competitive figure skater, and one day Dyess’ friend, who is a pilot, asked her if she would like to take a “Young Eagles” flight to Utah for a skating event.

“She let me take the controls and fly and I fell in love with it,” Dyess said. “And I just knew I wanted to keep pursuing that.”

As an instructor with Baker Aircraft, Dyess helps people who want their private pilot’s license learn the ins and outs of aviation. Every day she comes to work, meets her students and makes a game plan for the day.

She starts by teaching student pilots how to pre-flight an airplane — making sure the craft is airworthy.

They then fly for about an hour and work on whatever maneuvers are needed for a certain certificate or rating.


Some days Wynnae will take her students on flights to John Day or Pendleton. The training takes anywhere from 50 to 60 hours, depending on how quickly students digest the information and hone their skills until they’re ready for their initial solo flight.

“It’s so rewarding because you get to see the students’ first time soloing an aircraft by themselves,” Dyess said. “When they take those controls, it’s a very proud moment as an instructor, to see them meet those accomplishments.”

Dyess’ favorite part of flying is seeing the country from an entirely different perspective than the ground. Sometimes the job is hard, she said, but it never feels like work because she loves flying so much.

On days when Dyess doesn’t have a student pilot to work with, she pursues another goal — obtaining her airplane mechanic’s license.

Dyess also wants to learn to fly helicopters and to further her education by learning everything she can about aviation.

No prior knowledge is needed for those who want to learn how to fly, she said. The most important attributes are a willingness to learn and to review the concepts over and over again to avoid mistakes. There are several factors that keep pilots on their toes, such as weather, landings and different air spaces.

A long-term goal for Dyess is to fly internationally in Africa and help deliver medical supplies. She also wants to do more charter and backcountry flights.

“I really love the freedom of flying,” she said. “It reminds me a lot of skating. You just go out there and you’re in your own little world. It’s a freeing experience.”



Lear 35A, N95JN: Hammond North Shore Regional Airport (KHDC), Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana

 Leonard Lopez 






HAMMOND - A private plane loaded with marijuana was seized at a small airport in Tangipahoa Parish after it made a stop in the middle of its cross-country flight.

The Hammond Police Department said the aircraft landed at the Hammond Northshore Regional Airport Wednesday evening. The department said it had received a tip that the plane was heading from California to Miami with a load of illegal drugs. 

Police surveilled the landing strip and moved on the private jet after it stopped to fuel up. After getting permission to search the aircraft, officers found duffel bags and suitcases full of suspected marijuana, marijuana vape cartridges and pre-rolled marijuana cigars.

The department estimated the street value of the drugs to be around $750,000 in total. The plane, a Learjet 55, was also seized by the district attorney's office and is pending forfeiture. The total value of the seized items was said to be more than $1.6 million. 

A passenger, identified as 40-year-old Leonard Lopez of Miami, was arrested. The two pilots of the aircraft were interviewed and released. 

Cessna 172C Skyhawk, N8366X: Incident occurred June 24, 2021 near Apple Valley Airport (KAPV), San Bernardino County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aircraft ran out of fuel and landed in a river bed.  


Date: 23-JUN-21
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N8366X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: APPLE VALLEY
State: CALIFORNIA



APPLE VALLEY, California (VVNG.com) — A small plane made an emergency landing in the Mojave riverbed near the community of Spring Valley Lake after running out of fuel.

At about 4:20 pm, on Wednesday, June 23, 2021, Apple Valley Fire Protection District firefighters were dispatched to reports of an aircraft down.

Steve Colucci, heard about the crash on Facebook and rode his bike along the Mojave River trail to get a closer look at the Cessna 172 in the sand. When he arrived the male pilot and male passenger were already walking towards him.

“He and a passenger were in route to Oceanside from Las Vegas when they started running out of fuel just north of the mountains. He turned around and tried to make it to Apple Valley but ran out of fuel,” stated Steve. “He turned into the wind and landed safely with the only apparent damage being a bent propeller.”

Steve said there was an element of irony. “I asked how they were going to get it out of there and with a puzzled look of frustration, he responded, I have no idea.”

A group of local residents that are part of a Facebook group called Desert Recovery SOS accepted the challenge to help the owner remove the plane from the riverbed. No injuries or damages were reported as a result of the incident.

Piper PA-28-180, N9277J: Accident occurred June 24, 2021 near Northern Colorado Regional Airport (KFNL), Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colorado













This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Iron Sights Aviation LLC 


Location: Loveland, CO
Accident Number: CEN21LA291
Date & Time: June 24, 2021, 18:45 Local 
Registration: N9277J
Aircraft: Piper PA-28-180
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N9277J
Model/Series: PA-28-180 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FNL,5016 ft msl
Observation Time: 18:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0.5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C /13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1200 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots / 17 knots, 270°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 8500 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Loveland, CO (FNL)
Destination: Loveland, CO

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.451827,-105.01133 (est)

Yakovlev Yak-52, N2208Z: Incident occurred June 24, 2021 in Waianae, Honolulu County, Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aircraft lost power and made emergency landing in the water. 

Affordable Casket Outlet LLC


Date: 24-JUN-21
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N2208Z
Aircraft Make: YAKOVLEV
Aircraft Model: YAK 52
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: WAIANAE
State: HAWAII

The Honolulu Fire Department and other first responders assisted Claus Hansen after he ditched his plane Thursday in the ocean off of Maili Point.

The Yakovlev Yak-52 is seen in flight this morning.



A 57-year-old pilot who swam safely to shore Thursday after ditching his private plane said he was mostly disappointed that he lost his single-engine aerobatic aircraft.

Honolulu’s first responders assisted the pilot, whose plane lost power and landed in the ocean off of Maili Point on Oahu.

The emergency call came in just after 9:10 a.m. for the downed plane and pilot.

Honolulu Ocean Safety, Honolulu Emergency Medical Services and the Honolulu Fire Department responded to the call. Although lifeguards paddled out and responded by personal watercraft, the man was able to swim to shore on his own.

HFD said the plane initially floated, then sank in an area about 10 feet deep and about 50 yards offshore.

EMS evaluated the man on shore and found he had no injuries. He declined further medical treatment.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane involved is a two-seat Yakovlev Yak-52. The FAA is investigating the incident.

The U.S. Coast Guard will work with the pilot on salvaging the plane.

KITV news identified the pilot as Claus Hansen of Makiki, ex- husband of KITV anchor Diane Ako.

Hansen told the TV station he was doing aerial stunts and had just finished a loop when he felt something go wrong.

“I lost partial power. I kept trying to nurse the throttle. I radioed, then looked for a place to set down. I spotted a big field but it had antennae and wires,” Hansen said.

Hansen said he decided the safest place to come down was in the water. “The prop that hit the water first split apart. As far as I can tell, the airplane was intact.”

“I opened the canopy, stepped out, stood on the wing. It was sinking. I stepped into the water, away from the airplane,” Hansen said. “I’m bummed more than anything else that it happened.”

Hansen’s plane was manufactured in 1982. The Yakovlev 52 was developed in the Soviet Union before its production was transferred to Romania, according to RED Aircraft GmbH, an aviation engine manufacturer in Germany.

“The Yak 52 was developed as a basic training aircraft for pilots in the former Warsaw Pact countries,” RED Aircraft said.

The aircraft is the descendant of a long line of radial- engine aerobatic trainers used to train Soviet pilots for nearly 50 years, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association said in a past feature on the plane.

“It’s a big Russian Bear of an airplane, a ‘get out of my way’ heavy-gauge aluminum brute that is almost truck-like in sound, ride and power,” AOPA said, adding that “raw power, a warbird ambiance and crisp aerobatic performance are all hallmarks of the Yak 52.”

Airbus A321, N926UW: Accident occurred June 25, 2021 near Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (KMSY), Louisiana

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

American Airlines Inc


Location: New Orleans, LA
Accident Number: DCA21LA164
Date & Time: June 25, 2021, 01:31 UTC
Registration: N926UW
Aircraft: Airbus A321-231
Injuries: 1 Serious, 8 Minor, 185 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air carrier - Scheduled

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Airbus
Registration: N926UW
Model/Series: A321-231 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:  (DFW) 
Destination: (TMP)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 4 None 
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: 7 Minor, 181 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 8 Minor, 185 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.598704, -89.948252 

Piper PA-28-161 Warrior II, N2143G: Accident occurred June 24, 2021 near Easton Airport (KESN), Talbot County, Maryland

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland
Piper Aircraft Inc; Vero Beach, Florida 
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Trident Aircraft Inc


Location: Easton, MD 
Accident Number: ERA21LA267
Date & Time: June 24, 2021, 11:15 Local
Registration: N2143G
Aircraft: Piper PA-28-161
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On June 24, 2021, about 1115 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-161, N2143G, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Easton Maryland. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

According to the student pilot, he conducted a preflight inspection before he and his instructor completed the engine run-up and takeoff roll with no anomalies noted. They stayed in the pattern conducting three takeoffs and landings before stopping to let the instructor out so the student pilot could attempt three solo take-off and landings.

After the second take-off the student pilot was turning onto the downwind leg of the traffic pattern when he heard a reduction in engine power and could see the propeller slowing down. He was at an altitude of about 700 ft on downwind and had to pitch the airplane forward so it would not stall. The pilot did not think he could make it back to the airport, so he picked a field and set up for a forced landing. He made one last turn before landing with an airspeed of about 60 knots at touch down and then recalled striking a pile of metal on the ground.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the airplane after the accident and confirmed that the airplane had been consumed by a post-impact fire.

The was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N2143G
Model/Series: PA-28-161
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ESN,72 ft msl
Observation Time: 11:13 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C /10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 6000 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / 14 knots, 100°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.4 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Easton, MD
Destination: Easton, MD

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious 
Latitude, Longitude: 38.813886,-76.065659







EASTON — A small airplane crashed in an open field Thursday morning as it was departing from Easton Airport.

The pilot, a Naval Academy midshipman who was conscious upon landing, suffered a severe leg injury but was able to extricate himself from the burning plane. Two employees from Barkers Landing Corporation, who were working on a construction site further down Technology Drive, rushed to the crash area and carried the pilot to safety.

With a belt, the workers, Robert Bridge and Derek Hoffman, then applied a tourniquet to the pilot’s leg before he was airlifted to the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore.

The plane was executing a test flight as part of the Naval Academy’s Powered Flight Program – a summer program conducted by Trident Aircraft that provides prospective naval aviators the opportunity to learn how to fly prior to beginning Naval Flight School.

According to a press release from the Naval Academy, participants in the Powered Flight Program undergo weeks of intensive training, memorization, and instructor-led flights. If qualified, midshipmen may fly solo.

The Naval Academy did not identify the midshipman in the Easton crash, but did confirm that there were no other persons in the plane.

The single-engine PA-28 model plane left Easton Airport shortly after 11 a.m. on June 24. According to Easton Airport manager Micah Risher, the facility was notified of the emergency landing at approximately 11:15 a.m.

Three fire and one rescue engines dispatched by the Easton Volunteer Fire Department arrived at the scene at 11:20 a.m., and the flames were extinguished less than five minutes after that, 3rd Lt. Justin Jones said.

According to Hoffman, who overheard the pilot’s call to 911, the plane had lost power before crashing. Neither Hoffman or Bridge saw smoke coming from the aircraft as it was coming down, though they described its flight as “wobbly.”

After hearing the crash, both men ran all the way down Technology Drive. The plane landed just past the end of the road in a field littered with steel beams.

Hoffman and Bridge found the pilot, who had managed to exit the cockpit, sitting on the ground next to the plane. He was on the phone with 911.

“He was well aware of what was going on,” Hoffman said of the pilot.

Without the patient’s name, the Shock Trauma Center was unable to provide an update on his condition at this time.

The crash is currently under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration’s Flight Standards Office in Linthicum Heights. Further investigations will be conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Easton Airport, as well as the airport’s Air Traffic Control Tower, which will run through its own list of investigative procedures.

Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage, N110ST: Accident occurred June 24, 2021 at St. Louis Lambert International Airport (KSTL), St. Louis County, Missouri

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Ann, Missouri


Location: St. Louis, MO
Accident Number: CEN21LA312
Date & Time: June 24, 2021, 13:20 Local 
Registration: N110ST
Aircraft: Piper PA 46-350P
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N110ST
Model/Series: PA 46-350P 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSTL,531 ft msl 
Observation Time: 13:25 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C /21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots / , 240°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 13000 ft AGL 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Blountville, TN (TRI) 
Destination: St. Louis, MO

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.745331,-90.353213 (est)

Airborne Australia XT582, N8003K: Accident occurred June 24, 2021 in Carson City, Nevada

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Location: Carson City, NV
Accident Number: WPR21LA246
Date & Time: June 24, 2021, 08:30 Local 
Registration: N8003K
Aircraft: AIRBORNE AUSTRALIA XT582 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AIRBORNE AUSTRALIA 
Registration: N8003K
Model/Series: XT582 
Aircraft Category: Weight-shift
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.192306,-119.73258 (est)

Grumman American AA-1B, N9261L: Fatal accident occurred June 24, 2021 in Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas


Nick Duran, left, and Felipe Lopez 


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Arlington, Texas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 


Location: Cleburne, TX
Accident Number: CEN21FA290
Date & Time: June 24, 2021, 17:14 Local
Registration: N9261L
Aircraft: American Aviation AA-1A
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On June 24, 2021 at 1714 central daylight time, an American Aviation AA-1A airplane, N9261L, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Cleburne, Texas. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Preliminary radar and ADS-B data showed that the airplane departed Cleburne Regional Airport (CPT), about 1658 and proceeded south, then northeast toward Keene, Texas. After the airplane made one full circle over Keene, it proceeded west and overflew CPT. The airplane continued west about 2,600 ft mean sea level (msl) for another 3 miles. During the last 10 seconds of the recorded data, the flight track showed a hard right turn followed by a left descending spiral toward the ground.

A witness who was located about 1/2 mile south of the accident site, stated that he observed the airplane “going straight down,” but he did not see it impact the ground.

The airplane was located in a field next to a gravel road as seen in Figure 1. 


All major components of the airplane were found at the accident site with the main wreckage.

The engine remained partially attached to the airframe and sustained significant impact damage. The propeller remined attached to the crankshaft flange via two bolts. The propeller blades exhibited damage and scoring on the blade faces. One blade was bent aft about mid span with no leading edge damage. The other blade was mostly straight and exhibited leading edge gouges and chordwise scratches near the tip. The sliding canopy frame was found separated from the fuselage and the plexiglass was fractured and scattered around the area.

An engine data monitor was retained for data extraction and analysis.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: American Aviation 
Registration: N9261L
Model/Series: AA-1A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCPT,854 ft msl
Observation Time: 17:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 35°C /21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Cleburne, TX (CPT)
Destination: Cleburne, TX

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 32.352429,-97.493799 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.





The two men killed in Thursday’s plane crash have been identified as Cleburne High School graduates.

Nick Duran, 20, and Felipe Lopez, 20, were the pilot and passenger in the plane.

Bono firefighters responded at 9:29 p.m. to reports of a plane down, Bono Fire Chief Ralph Vaquera said.

Vaquera said the plane — an American Aviation AA-1A owned by Duran — apparently went down earlier in the day but was not reported for several hours.

Bono firefighters traveled county roads 1123 and 1124 looking for the plane. A Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper who was also helping in the search found the crashed plane near a private oil field road. The plane crashed about a mile from County Road 1123, Vaquera said.

Vaquera added that the plane sustained heavy damage but did not catch fire.

Duran was a cadet at the United States Air Force Academy. He obtained his pilot’s license in 2020.

“The impact of losing Nick has been felt throughout our Academy,” USAFA Superintendent Lt. Gen. Clark said. “He was our brother — a friend, teammate, and classmate — and will always be a part of USAFA. I am so proud of how our cadets have leaned on each other and honored Nick’s life.

“While words cannot lessen the loss felt by his family, we want to send our heartfelt condolences to Nick’s family and friends — you are in our thoughts and prayers.”

Duran played baseball for Cleburne High School from 2015-18. He was the 2018 All-Johnson County defensive player of the year and the 2018 District 9-5A defensive player of the year.

Lopez played soccer and participated in cross country and track for Cleburne High School from 2015-18. He was a two-time all-district and All-Johnson County selection in soccer and also a key part of the Yellow Jackets’ cross country program.

As a senior in 2018, Lopez served as a team captain for Yellow Jacket soccer, earning first-team all-district honors and first-team All-Johnson County recognition that season. Lopez helped Cleburne cross country win the 2017 district championship as he finished 14th overall at the district meet.

“Our teachers, coaches and administrators who had the opportunity to know Nick Duran and Felipe Lopez are deeply saddened by the loss of these two remarkable young men and Cleburne High School graduates of 2018,” Cleburne ISD Director of Community Relations Lisa Magers said. “Both competed for the Jackets as student athletes. 

“It was wonderful to see Nick achieve his dream of continuing his baseball career at the college level — and not just any college — the US Air Force Academy. Nick was also an academic leader among his classmates, graduating in the Top Ten. 

“We were so proud to see Felipe experience the international spotlight for his vocal talents, which were truly amazing. Whether in the classroom, on the cross country course or the soccer field, on the job — or on the stage — his work ethic and dedication to giving his best were always present. 

“Those of us who knew Nick, Felipe — or both — remember students who were bright, polite and respectful, friendly and very generous with their smiles. Our thoughts and prayers for their families will continue.”

GoFundMe pages have been set up for both of the men. Duran’s, which was created by Alyssa Naused on behalf of Cadet Squadron 29, had raised almost $10,000 as of Wednesday afternoon.

“Nick was passionate in all aspects of his life,” Naused said. “He worked ceaselessly towards earning his private pilot’s license and aspired above all to be an Air Force pilot upon graduation from USAFA. As dedicated as Nick was to his dreams, he was more passionate towards his commitment to those around him, especially his family.”

Naused said that Duran was described to be “the most positive cadet I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting.”

“Nick was a brother, exuding constant joy and bearing an infectious smile, eager to share his love with everyone around him,” she said. “He cared for those around him in action and word, regardless of whether he knew them. He was a catcher for the Air Force Baseball Team where he impacted not just his friends, but every individual with whom he interacted. 

“To describe Nick as inspiring would be an understatement; Nick was one of the best. It was easy to see how much the underclassmen of CS-29 looked up to and respected Nick. He consistently checked in with cadets who were struggling and used what he learned during his time as a cadet to help others be their best.”

Funds raised will be used to create a gift for Duran’s family, create a memorial case to be built at the squadron and go towards the CS-29 support fund.

Lopez was a talented singer who recently appeared on the Spanish musical competition “Tengo Talento, Mucho Talento.”

He began singing as a teenager, inspired by his dad, who also loved to sing and bought him a karaoke machine. He was multi-faceted, able to sing everything from opera and R&B to reggaeton and mariachi.

He won second and third place at La Gran Plaza’s annual singing contest.

Lopez’ GoFundMe was created by Edalia Aguilar to help with funeral expenses.

“Felipe, lovingly known as Pancho, graduated from Cleburne High School in 2018,” Aguilar said. “Felipe was as talented as he was kind. He played soccer and ran cross country for CHS, and was pursuing his lifelong dream of a career in music. 

“In 2020, Felipe competed in several episodes of ‘Tengo Talento, Mucho Talento,’ a popular Spanish singing competition TV show. 

“Felipe is deeply loved and missed by his family, his friends and everyone who had the pleasure of knowing him.”

Lopez’ cross country coach, Alicia Johnson, said he was an amazing human being with a beautiful soul.

“Felipe was on the varsity cross country team, and qualified for regionals individually and helped lead his team to qualifying for regionals as a team,” she said. “He was naturally gifted in all he did and was an exceptionally gifted runner.

To donate, visit Duran’s page at gofund.me/578d03d0 or Lopez’ page at gofund.me/741b4554.


CLEBURNE, Texas -- An U.S. Air Force Academy cadet was one of two people killed in the crash of a small plane south of Fort Worth, Texas, this week, a military official said.

Lt. Gen. Richard Clark, superintendent of the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, said on Twitter that Nick Duran, a junior, died in the crash Thursday while home in Texas on leave.

“He was our brother — a friend, teammate, and classmate — and will always be a part of USAFA,” Clark said. “I am so proud of how our cadets have leaned on each other and honored Nick’s life.”

The Tarrant County medical examiner's office said Duran, who was 20, died of blunt force injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the wreckage of the Grumman American AA-1B with two people aboard was found Thursday near Cleburne after it had been declared missing.

The Texas Department of Public Safety said two people were confirmed dead. DPS said the plane was located just west of Cleburne Regional Airport.

Cleburne is located about 30 miles (48 kilometers) south of Fort Worth.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the accident.


Air Force cadet Nick Duran died in the crash of a Grumman American AA-1B south of Fort Worth, Texas, on June 24, 2021.
 


Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Cessna P337H Pressurized Skymaster, N337LJ; fatal accident occurred June 24, 2013 in San Luis Obispo, California

Scott Metzger, 44, of San Luis Obispo

Scott Metzger
~

"I am the friend in the report who is also a pilot that helped the NTSB fill in the gaps. NTSB showed up late that day, I helped them piece everything together, one guy, good person and listener. I had all the answers, I was his best friend, kitesurfing, travelling, consulting work together on a daily basis.  I thought some information could help others."

"The summary is close but not correct, so I added where things need to be corrected." 

Flight Path I made for the NTSB 

He traveled 1.07 miles to the first point of impact.  This is my interpretation from the accident photos, which is only an interpretation of the photos from the accident. In the news photos, the FedEx driver was missed getting killed and got out of the truck by 30 seconds turning the corner.  I was on the scene and asked to ID'd him - just a burnt torso - very hot fire. The engine pics were taken before by me.  I have a text saying the throttle issue is going to be fixed when he gets to PA - he was told they could not find a big enough anomalie as I was told the Friday before over a long discussion.  I was unaware of detailed mechanic instructions, but know of them and know they are all good mechanics. 

1 = Telephone Pole - broke 3 main electrical cables
2 = Struck pine tree, sheared 14" dia. trunk
= Block wall - nose first 
= Resting place

His plane flew along this path.  I calculated the following in the hour following his crash - not the 95+/- I speak to it later.

Topographic Height of Hills = 254' 

Estimated Aircraft Height = 254' x .65 = 165' AGL

Telephone/Power Pole Height 60' 

Safety  margin = 95' +/-

** Attached Pics & Video

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA289
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 24, 2013 in San Luis Obispo, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/10/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA P337H, registration: N337LJ
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The NTSB 

The pilot/owner had recently purchased the multi-engine, high-performance, complex airplane. He had obtained his private pilot certificate 15 years before the accident and had limited flight experience, having amassed a total of about 118 hours of flight time. He had obtained his multi-engine rating 5 weeks before the accident, and his total flight experience in multi-engine airplanes was about 40 hours. Of that time, 18 hours were logged in the accident airplane of which 3 hours were while acting as pilot-in-command.

On previous flights, the airplane's rear engine had been "stuttering" as the throttle was advanced. The pilot was able to forestall the problem by advancing the throttle slowly; however, the symptoms had been getting worse. (Scott described the anomaly only during cruise - I was supposed to be on the plane when it crashed - I am his closest friend). A maintenance facility at the departure airport attempted to troubleshoot the engine problem but was not able to resolve the issue (We talked through many times the issue and he did cross talk to the mechanics, but they did not - I default all belief to the mechanics first what Scott told me second in any statement I make). Thus, the pilot intended to reposition the airplane to another airport where a different maintenance facility had agreed to continue the diagnosis.(Scott was dot com, worked in San Jose commuted weekly, he would be up north 3 days mechanics had it vice versa.  I believe the SLO mechanic 2x and PA 3x, first visit sure a talk not look, but not sure). 

(This is my statement to the NTSB what he and I planned to do the day before the crash.  I went through a detailed list of questions with him about potential issues and what mechanics said, again that conversation was 8 years ago, but clear - never heard anything about RPM drop like described.  BTW Scott was brilliant, you could take a stack of 1 100 non sequential bills he would read the serials once, pull any bill out he could remember the complete series, only bill numbers - lol but a brilliant businessman. His "uh" while typed is actually different like uhmmmmmmm, but I would type the same thing you did, when he does this he is working a problem, on the boat or car or home, so I know at that point he had an issue he was trying  (We)  He planned to fly the airplane in the traffic pattern (Sat before the crash at SBP), perform a touch-and-go landing. (I did not pick up the phone - I looked at the blue sky and said nah go tomorrow, going to waste time - I lived) we kitesurfed - live in the same town, traveled together, worked in parallel career goals, he was a brother to me and vice versa) and proceed to the other maintenance facility if the airplane performed correctly. He had also made plans to depart that night on an important and time-sensitive business trip to Europe from an airport close to the second maintenance facility.

The departure for the initial flight appeared uneventful; however, during the approach for the touch-and-go landing, the pilot seemed distracted, missing multiple landing clearances issued by an air traffic controller. (Good assessment - for Scott the smarts were his pitfall - overfocus) The airplane landed and used the full runway length for the ground roll, while making "popping" sounds similar to an engine backfiring, indicative of at least a partial loss of engine power. Having reached the end of the runway, the airplane lifted off and climbed to about 150 feet above ground level (I made my calculation within hours of the accident - I actually was on scene coming back from a business trip - helped ID the body with the detectives), and a short time later the pilot issued a mayday transmission. The airplane maintained the runway heading and the same altitude for about a mile and then began a descending right turn, striking a set of power distribution lines and a building. The length of the runway and its overrun area would have provided ample stopping distance for the airplane after the landing. Further, the area between the runway and accident site was comprised of level fields which would have been adequate for an emergency landing. (This area is actually a death trap - the worst - abandoned Chevron field oil saturated - they finally cleaned it up - our history is amazing if you look up Tank Farm Road, Avila Beach Clean-up, all from the 20s.  The fields were all planted and tilled for strawberries, I have a degree in Landscape Architecture - lol another great story for NWA.  The cuts are 2' deep and the fields were running perpendicular to the landing straight.  In the crash video you will see him bank right, he was trying to catch the street, straight ahead 30 second nowhere to land, last resort left (better choice to Madonna Plaza - than right, but that tells me he was working the problem not thinking solutions (lack of experience).

Another factor I discussed with his 337 instructor many times was about the landing gear, once during training. The 337 drops 100' to 150' depending on the plane and weather, my understanding from memory is the wheel swing creates the drag, and to keep the gear down until 2-300 feet, so Scott was acting under training - I discussed this with the NTSB, who was great.  The individual they sent had worked on another if I remember correctly, and we had many discussions about limitations.  I did discuss with a retired major, and my business partner a CMDR Naval partner agreed, while a great plane whey said it was a death trap for some because of the read engine issues of not seeing it. 

The majority of the airplane's structure was consumed by post-impact fire. The front engine's propeller displayed considerable rotational damage, consistent with it producing power at the time of the accident. The rear propeller exhibited less significant rotational damage signatures, consistent with it operating at a reduced power level. The rear engine sustained thermal damage, which precluded a determination of the reason for the loss of power.

Postaccident examination of the front engine revealed that the right magneto was set to an incorrect timing position. The left magneto had broken free during the impact sequence, so its timing position could not be ascertained. If the left magneto had been set to the correct timing position, the incorrect timing of the right magneto would have resulted in a minimal loss of engine power. Additionally, although no damage was noted to the right magneto, it is possible that it became misaligned during the impact sequence. Lastly, because the engine was producing power at the time of impact, it is unlikely that both magnetos were misaligned.

Performance charts indicated that at the airplane's takeoff weight, a total loss of engine power from the rear engine should have allowed for an adequate takeoff profile, assuming the emergency procedures detailed in the Pilot's Operating Handbook for the airplane had been followed. However, examination revealed that the procedures had not been followed because at the time of impact, the flaps were not completely retracted, and the rear engine's propeller was not feathered. Although the pilot had the minimum experience required to fly the multiengine airplane, he had only acted as pilot-in-command of this airplane for 3 hours; and when he was faced with an emergency, he likely did not have the proficiency and confidence to readily deal with it. The pilot was likely distracted during the landing (as supported by the missed radio calls), failed to abort the landing and continued with his original plan to takeoff despite the loss of engine power, and was unable to appropriately configure the airplane for flight with only one engine operable after the takeoff.



































Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California 
Cessna Aircraft Company; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors Incorporated; Mobile, Alabama 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

 
Location: San Luis Obispo, California 
Accident Number: WPR13FA289
Date & Time: June 24, 2013, 12:55 Local
Registration: N337LJ
Aircraft: Cessna P337H
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial) 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot/owner had recently purchased the multiengine, high-performance, complex airplane. He had obtained his private pilot certificate 15 years before the accident and had limited flight experience, having amassed a total of about 118 hours of flight time. He had obtained his multiengine rating 5 weeks before the accident, and his total flight experience in multiengine airplanes was about 40 hours. Of that time, 18 hours were logged in the accident airplane of which 3 hours were while acting as pilot-in-command.

On previous flights, the airplane's rear engine had been "stuttering" as the throttle was advanced. The pilot was able to forestall the problem by advancing the throttle slowly; however, the symptoms had been getting worse. A maintenance facility at the departure airport attempted to troubleshoot the engine problem but was not able to resolve the issue. Thus, the pilot intended to reposition the airplane to another airport where a different maintenance facility had agreed to continue the diagnosis. He planned to fly the airplane in the traffic pattern, perform a touch-and-go landing, and proceed to the other maintenance facility if the airplane performed correctly. He had also made plans to depart that night on an important and time-sensitive business trip to Europe from an airport close to the second maintenance facility.

The departure for the initial flight appeared uneventful; however, during the approach for the touch-and-go landing, the pilot seemed distracted, missing multiple landing clearances issued by an air traffic controller. The airplane landed and used the full runway length for the ground roll, while making "popping" sounds similar to an engine backfiring, indicative of at least a partial loss of engine power.

Having reached the end of the runway, the airplane lifted off and climbed to about 150 feet above ground level, and a short time later the pilot issued a mayday transmission. The airplane maintained the runway heading and the same altitude for about a mile and then began a descending right turn, striking a set of power distribution lines and a building. The length of the runway and its overrun area would have provided ample stopping distance for the airplane after the landing. Further, the area between the runway and accident site was comprised of level fields which would have been adequate for an emergency landing.

The majority of the airplane's structure was consumed by postimpact fire. The front engine's propeller displayed considerable rotational damage, consistent with it producing power at the time of the accident.

The rear propeller exhibited less significant rotational damage signatures, consistent with it operating at a reduced power level. The rear engine sustained thermal damage, which precluded a determination of the reason for the loss of power.

Postaccident examination of the front engine revealed that the right magneto was set to an incorrect timing position. The left magneto had broken free during the impact sequence, so its timing position could not be ascertained. If the left magneto had been set to the correct timing position, the incorrect timing of the right magneto would have resulted in a minimal loss of engine power. 

Additionally, although no damage was noted to the right magneto, it is possible that it became misaligned during the impact sequence. Lastly, because the engine was producing power at the time of impact, it is unlikely that both magnetos were misaligned.

Performance charts indicated that at the airplane's takeoff weight, a total loss of engine power from the rear engine should have allowed for an adequate takeoff profile, assuming the emergency procedures detailed in the Pilot's Operating Handbook for the airplane had been followed. However, examination revealed that the procedures had not been followed because at the time of impact, the flaps were not completely retracted, and the rear engine's propeller was not feathered. Although the pilot had the minimum experience required to fly the multiengine airplane, he had only acted as pilot-in-command of this airplane for 3 hours; and when he was faced with an emergency, he likely did not have the proficiency and confidence to readily deal with it. The pilot was likely distracted during the landing (as supported by the missed radio calls), failed to abort the landing and continued with his original plan to takeoff despite the loss of engine power, and was unable to appropriately configure the airplane for flight with only one engine operable after the takeoff.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
Loss of engine power from the rear engine for reasons that could not be determined because of the postimpact thermal damage to the engine. Contributing to the accident were the pilot's decision to continue flight with a known deficiency, his failure to abort the takeoff during the ground roll, his failure to follow the correct emergency procedures following the loss of power, and his lack of experience in multiengine airplanes and the specific airplane make and model.

Findings

Not determined (general) - Unknown/Not determined
Personnel issues Decision making/judgment - Pilot
Personnel issues Incorrect action selection - Pilot
Personnel issues Total experience w/ equipment - Pilot

Factual Information

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 24, 2013, at 1255 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna P337H, N337LJ, collided with a power distribution line, building, and delivery truck following takeoff from San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport, San Luis Obispo, California. The airplane was registered to CSC Solutions LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot/owner sustained fatal injuries; the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post impact fire. The cross-country personal flight departed San Luis Obispo at 1254, with a planned destination of Palo Alto Airport of Santa Clara County, Palo Alto, California. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

According to a friend of the pilot, during the month leading up to the accident, the rear engine was "stuttering" as the throttle was advanced from idle to full power. The pilot reported that he was able to forestall the problem by advancing the throttle slowly. The friend had not experienced this problem, having flown with him on a number of occasions; however, the pilot stated to him that it had been getting worse during the 2-week period leading up to the accident.

PCF Aviation, at the pilot's home base of San Luis Obispo, began troubleshooting steps on the rear engine about 1 week prior to the accident. Although they could reproduce the problem, they could not definitively determine its cause, and the pilot asked them to discontinue the diagnosis.

Another mechanic at a maintenance facility (Advantage Aviation) located at Palo Alto Airport, stated that the airplane was brought to him about 2 weeks prior, and that he had attempted to diagnose the same problem. He briefed the pilot on the most likely cause, and was subsequently approached again by the pilot, who agreed to fly the airplane back to his facility on the day of the accident for further diagnosis.

The pilot had also made plans to depart on an international commercial flight from San Francisco International Airport (20 miles from Palo Alto by automobile) at 1925 later that evening. According to his wife, the reason for the flight was so that he could attend a time sensitive business meeting in Europe.

According to the pilot's friend, the pilot planned to fly the airplane in the traffic pattern, and if all was well, continue the flight to the maintenance facility in Palo Alto.

The airplane departed uneventfully and flew a single circuit in the traffic pattern. The pilot requested a touch-and-go landing, and while on the final approach leg for runway 29, an air traffic controller issued landing clearances to the pilot on three different transmissions. The pilot responded to the last transmission, accepting the clearance for the touch-and-go.

A series of security cameras were located at various positions along the length of runway 29. They captured video of various segments of the flight sequences. The recordings revealed that during the touch-and-go, the airplane appeared to utilize almost the full runway length for the ground roll. As it reached the runway overrun, it climbed to about 70 feet above ground level (agl) with the landing gear retracted. The climb progressed to about 150 feet agl and a short time later, the pilot transmitted, "Mayday Mayday". The tower controller responded, and a broken transmission of, "uh" was then received.

A camera located at a tire service center, about 1 mile west-northwest of the departure end of runway 29 recorded the airplane's departure path. The camera was facing northeast, and recorded the airplane flying on a northwest track at an altitude of about 150 feet agl. The airplane remained level and then began to descend out of view, and 4 seconds later, power to the camera was lost. About 20 seconds later power was restored, and a plume of smoke was seen in the vicinity of the airplane's descent path. The airplane collided with a power distribution line during the descent, temporarily shutting off power to multiple local businesses.

Multiple witnesses located at various locations within the airport perimeter recounted observations similar to the video recordings. They recalled that their attention was initially drawn to the airplane because it was producing an unusual sound during the departure roll of the touch-and-go. An air traffic controller reported that she heard the sound of a "bang," and looked below towards the airplane as it passed the control tower at midfield. Another witness described the airplane as making a "popping" sound, with another stating the sound was similar to a radial engine. A witness located at an FBO at midfield, stated that he looked up when he heard the sound of "propellers out of sync" and when he did so, he observed the airplane traveling northwest along the runway.

A witness who was in an airplane holding short of runway 29 was cleared to "line up and wait" by air traffic control personnel just after the accident airplane passed him on the runway after landing. The witness stated that as he looked up he perceived that the airplane was continuing on the runway for a long time. It finally rotated as it approached the runway end, and continued at a low altitude, flying in what he described as ground effect. It eventually transitioned to a shallow climb, with a steep angle of attack such that he could see the entire upper wing surface. The airplane then began to "mush" back down, remaining in the nose-high attitude, and rocking from side to side. It then began a rapid descent, followed a short time later by a flash.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 44-year-old pilot was originally issued a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land in 1998. In May 2013, about a month before the accident, he was issued an additional rating for multiengine land. At that time he reported his total flight experience in airplanes was 82 hours, of which 23 hours he acted in the capacity of pilot-in-command, primarily in a Cessna 152. He also reported 29 hours of rotorcraft experience, with 1.1 hours as pilot-in-command.

The pilot's logbooks indicated his multiengine training utilized about 22 hours of flight time, and occurred in a Piper PA-44 during the period from April 6, 2013, through to his check ride on May 16, 2013. Over the following month he received about 14 hours of dual instruction in the accident airplane culminating in his high performance and complex-airplane endorsements. His last logbook entry was dated June 3, 2013, and indicated a total flight experience of 118 hours, of which 2.8 hours was logged as pilot-in-command time in the accident airplane.

A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records revealed that the pilot held a third-class medical certificate issued in March 2013 with no limitations.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

The pressurized, high-wing, centerline-thrust multiengine airplane was manufactured in 1978, and purchased by the pilot 2 months prior to the accident. It was powered by two Continental Motors Incorporated TSIO-360 series turbocharged-engines and equipped with McCauley two-blade constant-speed propellers.

The last entry in the airplane's maintenance logbooks was a 100-hour/annual inspection, which was recorded as being completed on March 22, 2013. At that time, the airframe had accrued 2,096.2 total flight hours. The front and rear engines had accumulated 1,110 and 616 hours, respectively, since their factory rebuild.

A work order dated 1 week before the accident was provided by PCF Aviation, which documented the diagnosis of the rear engine. The order indicated that the engine stuttered at 2,000 rpm, and that maintenance personnel could duplicate the problem, but were unable to resolve the discrepancy. The "Action Taken" section of the order specifically stated:

"Adjusted aft idle mixture and check aft engine fuel pressures per Teledyne Continental SID97-3E. Fuel pressures satisfactory. Swapped fuel pump and flow divider from forward to aft engine. No change in aft engine. Returned fuel pumps to original configuration. Inspected aft engine for induction leaks, no discrepancies found. Stopped troubleshooting at owners request.... Found excessive play in prop governor assembly linkage. Notified owner that prop governor needed to be sent out for repair/overhaul."

The owner of PCF Aviation stated that he informed the owner that the airplane had not been repaired. The pilot stated that the problem was, "manageable" and that he would take it to another repair facility. The airplane then remained on the ramp, and was not flown again until the day of the accident.

In a post-accident interview, the mechanics at PCF Aviation who performed the diagnosis stated that the propeller blade pitch angle did not change while the engine was stuttering, and they therefore discounted a governor problem as the cause. They further stated that if the throttle was rapidly advanced the engine speed would reach 1,900 to 2,100 rpm, and then stutter and "oscillate" but not reach full speed.

A mechanic from Advantage Aviation in Palo Alto stated that he had performed troubleshooting steps about 2 weeks prior to the accident for the same problem, and that he recommended the governor control be sent to a repair facility for overhaul. Work orders for that visit indicated that the tachometer for the front engine was providing intermittent readings, and that this discrepancy was resolved by repairing the right-hand magneto ground. 

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Runway 29 at San Luis Obispo Airport was 6,100 feet long, by 150 feet wide, and comprised of asphalt. A 600-foot-long blast pad/stopway projected beyond the runway's departure end, and the area from the runway to the accident site was comprised of level open fields, transected by a two-lane road.

Following the accident, the runway was examined for remnants of foreign objects or recent propeller strike damage; none were found.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was conducted by the San Luis County Sheriff-Coroner's Office. The cause of death was reported as the effect of multiple blunt force trauma injuries, with significant contributing conditions including smoke inhalation, and extensive thermal injuries.

Toxicological tests on specimens recovered from the pilot were performed by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. The results were negative for all screened drug substances and ingested alcohol. With the following findings for carbon monoxide, and cyanide:

18 (%) CARBON MONOXIDE detected in Blood
0.41 (ug/ml) CYANIDE detected in Blood

Refer to the toxicology report included in the public docket for specific test parameters and results.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The main wreckage came to rest adjacent to a building in a business park, 1 mile beyond, and directly in line with, the departure end of runway 29. The initial point of impact was characterized by damage to a series of three power-distribution lines located on the border of the street, which divided the building and a strawberry field. Two of the lines had become separated from their insulator supports on top of the 35-foot-tall wooden power pole. Two pine trees adjacent to the distribution lines were topped at the 35-foot level. A second tree, 50 feet to the northwest, exhibited a 40-foot-wide swath of cut branches at an angle 45 degrees relative to the ground. The debris field, consisting of tree branches and limbs, continued another 25 feet to the building. The building's east-facing wall was about 30 feet tall and constructed of cement blocks. The right wing was located on the roof of the building, just above a series of diagonal white, blue, and black paint transfer marks on the face of the wall. Additionally, the debris field, consisting of the rear engine's turbocharger inlet wheel and shroud, as well as cowling fragments, continued to the main wreckage, which had come to rest impinged against the front of a truck. The entire cabin area was consumed by fire and a fuel odor was present at the site.

The entire cabin structure and wing center section was consumed by fire, with burnt wire remnants, seating structure, and lower frame components remaining. The flap actuator jack screw displayed 2.9 inches of thread between the screw and actuator housing, which corresponded to 10-degree (1/3) flap deployment. The main and nose gear were in the stowed position. The engine controls within the cabin were in the full forward position, with the exception of the rear engine mixture control, which was about 10 degrees short of full forward.

The horizontal stabilizer had separated from the tailbooms and sustained crush damage along the entire length of its leading edge. The elevator and associated trim tab remained attached to the stabilizer; the elevator trim tab actuator position could not be determined accurately due to its cabling having been pulled through the structure during the impact sequence.

The propeller for the front engine remained attached to the crankshaft and exhibited leading edge gouges, chordwise scratches, and tip twist to both blades. The spinner along with the propeller hub dome sustained radial gouge marks.

The rear engine's propeller had separated at the crankshaft and was located behind the truck. Both blades remained attached to the hub; one blade exhibited 15 degrees bending along its entire length, the second blade had twisted about 60 degrees forward and exhibited chordwise scratches at the tip.

Both propeller domes contained markings consistent with the counter weights making contact with it during impact. The orientation and position of the markings were consistent with the propeller blades being at a flat pitch (power) setting.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Engine Examinations


Both engines were removed from the airplane and transported to the facilities of Continental Motors Incorporated (CMI) for examination by the NTSB investigator-in-charge and representatives from the FAA, Cessna Aircraft Company, and CMI. A complete examination report is contained within the public docket.

Rear Engine

The rear engine sustained thermal discoloration and sooting throughout.

Both magnetos remained attached to the crankcase; the spark plug leads were thermally damaged and continuous to the spark plugs. The propeller governor remained attached to the forward crankcase, with its control linkages continuous through to the firewall. The propeller synchronization motor and gears remained attached. The governor unit was removed and the input shaft rotated smoothly by hand. A brown-colored oil flowed from the passages of the unit and the screen was noted to be free of debris. The control arm moved freely. Disassembly revealed the pump gears, fly weight, and drive gear to be intact.

The engine driven fuel pump remained attached to the forward crankcase. An external examination revealed that it appeared undamaged, was coated in black soot, and all fuel lines were firmly attached at their fittings on the pump. The mixture control arm was bent; its control cable and eyebolt remained attached and continuous through to the firewall.

All upper ancillary components, including the fuel manifold valve, induction manifold risers, and fuel metering unit exhibited black discoloration. All lines to the fuel injection nozzles were intact with their fittings tight. The fuel pump and metering unit exhibited thermal damage to all internal components consistent with post-impact fire.

Due to the thermal damage sustained, an engine test run could not be performed. As such, the engine core was disassembled and the turbocharger examined; no anomalies were found that would have precluded normal operation.

Front Engine

The front engine remained partially attached to its mounts and had sustained varying degrees of impact damage to the sump, left magneto (which had broken away from the pad), both magneto harnesses, starter motor, and the number one cylinder.

The right magneto remained attached to the engine case, and did not display any obvious indications of damage. Its timing to the engine was tested utilizing a magneto synchronizer. The test revealed that the magneto points opened at 1 degree after top dead center (TDC) instead of the nominal 20 degrees before TDC. According to representatives from CMI, a 20-degree change in crankshaft angle corresponds to a circumferential change of 0.5 inches at the magneto flange, which equals about 16 degrees of angular rotation to the magneto.

The engine was installed in a test cell and an engine run was performed with the right magneto remaining in its as-found position of one degree after TDC. A replacement left magneto was attached and set to the same 1 degree after TDC position in an effort to gauge engine performance with two incorrectly timed magnetos. The engine started after two attempts and was run at 1,000 rpm for 5 minutes at which point the oil reached its standard operating temperature. The throttle was then advanced to a fully open position and the engine speed increased. The maximum speed that could be attained was 1,850 rpm at an indicated manifold pressure of 38.5 inHg; with the throttle in the full open position, the engine should have been able to reach a speed of at least 2,400 rpm. A magneto check was then performed in accordance with the Cessna P337H Pilots Operating Handbook (POH), and the engine speed was observed to drop 200 rpm for each magneto. According to the POH, the rpm drop should not exceed 150 rpm on either magneto, or 50 rpm differential between magnetos.

The left magneto was then set to the correct ignition timing of 20 degrees before TDC and another engine run was performed. The engine started immediately and responded smoothly to throttle inputs. A magneto check was performed at 1,800 rpm, and a drop of 20 rpm was observed when the left magneto was selected, and a drop of 240 rpm with the selection of the right magneto. The engine appeared to run normally and was capable of reaching maximum rpm.

A final series of engine runs were performed with both magnetos set to 20 degrees BTDC. The engine operated smoothly throughout its rpm range, and was able to achieve its maximum speed at a corresponding nominal manifold pressure.

A post engine test cylinder leakage test was performed in accordance with the latest revision of CMI Service Bulletin SB03-3 and normal pressure readings were attained.

The right magneto was subsequently removed and examined; the internal timing was correct, and no anomalies were noted that would have precluded normal operation. The original left magneto was installed on a test stand and operated at speeds varying between 500 and 2,100 rpm. All leads produced a spark in proper firing order and the impulse coupling triggered appropriately.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The airplane's POH documented the following emergency procedures for continuing a takeoff with an engine inoperative:

1. Throttles -- FULL FORWARD.
2. Propeller Controls -- FULL FORWARD.
3. Mixture Controls-- FULL FORWARD.
4. Inoperative Engine -- IDENTIFY from manifold pressure, RPM, fuel flow and EGT (if installed) indications....NOTE Verify inoperative engine by momentarily closing throttle and noting power response to throttle movement.
5. Windmilling Propeller-- FEATHER PROMPTLY.
6. Wing Flaps -- RETRACT slowly.
7. Airspeed-- 89 KIAS (80 KIAS with obstacles ahead).
8. Landing Gear -- RETRACT (after immediate obstacles are cleared).
9. Inoperative Engine -- SECURE.

Furthermore, a single engine rate of climb of 440 feet per minute would have been possible at sea level, with a temperature of 20 degrees C, under the following conditions:

-Weight 4,400 pounds
-Inoperative Propeller Feathered
-Flaps Up
-Gear Up
-2800 RPM
-37 Inches Hg
-Mixture Set at 140 PPH
-Cowl Flaps Open on Operating Engine
-Cowl Flaps Closed on Inoperative Engine

The sea level landing distance under similar conditions and utilizing the short field landing technique would have been about 810 feet.