Saturday, May 5, 2018

Otero County supports county-wide air ambulance membership



ALAMOGORDO – Otero County Commissioners agreed to write a letter of support to Air Methods Corp., a privately-owned helicopter operator which provides emergency medical services to 100,000 patients every year and serves 48 states, to start a membership program for Otero County residents at their April 12 regular Otero County Commission meeting.

The program being offered called Air Methods Advantage, provides individuals and families the security of being covered if there is a need for a loved one to be transported via air ambulance anywhere in its large service area.

The annual membership payment assures that covered family members enrolled in the program will not have to pay for anything over and above the amount paid by their health insurance providers for a medically necessary transport provided by Air Methods.

Native Air, which is the air ambulance service at Gerald Champion Regional Medical Center, is owned by Air Methods Corp. which is based out of Denver, Colorado.

Regional Business Development Manager for Native Air and flight paramedic Eric Palma said the more residents that sign up for the program, the cheaper it will be.

“Essentially, it’s a membership program that’s open to the public. We’re here to engage the county and County Commissioners to try and get an endorsement for this program and offer it on a large-scale basis for the entire county,” Palma said. “Communities like Timberon has elected to go together as a group to enroll in this program. We’ve done presentations for the County Fire Chief’s Association and PNM utilities, and they’ve all elected to go into smaller groups. The benefit of going in as a larger group is a discounted price.”

Palma said some counties across the U.S. have elected to enroll in the membership program as a whole county


Regional Business Development Manager for Native Air and flight paramedic Eric Palma answers questions about the Air Methods Advantage membership program during the April 12 regular Otero County Commission meeting. 


“Some counties have elected to go in as a whole county and the county chooses to pay for membership for all the residents of the county. It’s a big expense, there are about 65,000 residents in Otero County, those are the numbers I checked last time. So, that would bring the price per individual down to $2.50 a year,” Palma said. “The cost, if the county chooses to pay, would be about $160,000. I know that’s a huge unexpected expense.”

Palma said the membership does not have to be paid by the county, it could be paid by the residents if they choose to enroll.

“The program doesn’t have to be paid by the county, it could be paid by the individuals. Individuals or companies are choosing to sign up for the program,” Palma said. “We want to try and lower the costs to the individual. It’s no secret that it’s expensive to run an air medical helicopter. If anybody here or their family has been flown, the aftermath, the hospital bills, can be a huge headache on top of recovering from an injury or illness. Healthcare systems are limited in rural southern New Mexico.”

Commission Chairman Lori Bies said the community of Timberon was thankful for Air Methods’ service because it gives them peace of mind. She said they can be flown to the hospital in 15 minutes.

“The people of Timberon are incredibly thankful for your service, it’s hard to go up there,” Bies said. “It’s a difference between life and death.”

Palma said he hopes over 1,000 residents will sign up for the membership program so they can receive the benefits at a discounted rate.

Air Methods Advantage membership plans for individuals start at $40 per year, and family plans cost $75 annually for members with primary health insurance cpverage.

“Setting up a group will allow an agreement with Otero County that in the first year the price per individual or family is based on what that number is,” Palma said. “The more enrolled, the cheaper it is.”

For more information on Air Methods Advantage visit their website at www.airmethodsadvantage.com

Original article ➤ https://www.alamogordonews.com

Beech 35 Bonanza, N3187V: Accident occurred September 16, 2017 in Marathon, Monroe County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3187V



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Marathon, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA347
Date & Time: 09/16/2017, 0855 EDT
Registration: N3187V
Aircraft: BEECH 35
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 16, 2017, about 0855 eastern daylight time, a Beech 35, N3187V, was substantially damaged while ditching in the Gulf of Mexico, following a total loss of engine power about 10 miles west of Marathon, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The personal flight was operated by the private pilot and conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, about 0745.

The pilot reported that he and a business partner planned to survey damage to his business partner's home on No Name Key, Florida. They flew to the home, circled it at a low altitude, took photographs, and began a climb back to cruise altitude for the return to FXE. About 800 to 1,000 ft above mean sea level, the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power. The pilot prepared to ditch as the airplane would not glide far enough to reach land. He also attempted two engine restarts with no success, and reported the emergency to air traffic control. The pilot attempted two more engine restarts using the wobble fuel pump and electric fuel pump. He then attempted another restart using the electric fuel pump with no success. The pilot added that the propeller continued to windmill during the restart attempts. The pilot landed on the water with the landing gear and flaps retracted. The airplane came to rest upright and both occupants were rescued by law enforcement personnel.

According to the president of a recovery company, the airplane was recovered 12 days later, on September 28, 2017. The airplane appeared to be intact and was resting on a sandy bottom. When the airplane was floated to the surface of the water, a fuel sheen was observed on the water surface. Following recovery, no fuel or water was noted in the left wing fuel tank and approximately 1 gallon of a fuel and water mixture was recovered from the right wing fuel tank. The president of the recovery company added that he was unable to rotate the propeller, possibly due to corrosion.

The pilot further stated that he used REC-90, a 90 octane, ethanol free gasoline in the airplane and stored the gasoline in his hangar. After every flight, he completely fueled the airplane from the gasoline storage to prevent condensation from accumulating in the fuel tanks. Prior to the accident flight, he last flew the airplane on September 11, 2017, for .6 hours and added 6 gallons of gasoline after he landed. He also inspected the fuel tanks during the preflight inspection for the accident flight, and both fuel tanks were full. He recalled being burned from fuel in the water and noted that a recovery diver made the same comment. The pilot subsequently provided a receipt indicating that he most recently purchased 30 gallons of REC-90 on September 5, 2017.

Initial examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the fuselage was buckled during the ditching. The inspector further examined the wreckage at a recovery facility and specifically examined the engine driven fuel pump as the pilot thought that the pump might have failed. The engine driven fuel pump drive shaft remained intact. The inspector was able to actuate the pump by hand and did not note any anomalies with the pump. Due to extensive corrosion damage, the inspector was unable to rotate the engine crankshaft.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number D-623, was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Continental E185, 185-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed, two-blade Hartzell propeller. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on April 27, 2017. At that time, the airframe had accumulated 3,768.4 hours of operation and the engine had accumulated 72 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had flown about 35 hours, from the time of the most recent annual inspection, until the accident. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/11/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  601 hours (Total, all aircraft), 421 hours (Total, this make and model), 509 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N3187V
Model/Series: 35 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: D-623
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/27/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2562 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 35 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3768 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: E-185-8
Registered Owner: RONIN AERO GROUP LLC
Rated Power: 185
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MTH, 5 ft msl
Observation Time: 0853 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 90°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1600 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 40°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fort Lauderdale, FL (FXE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fort Lauderdale, FL (FXE)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 0745 EDT
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  24.725556, -81.228889 (est)

Location: Marathon, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA347
Date & Time: 09/16/2017, 0855 EDT
Registration: N3187V
Aircraft: BEECH 35
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 16, 2017, about 0855 eastern daylight time, a Beech 35, N3187V, operated by the private pilot, was substantially damaged while ditching in the Gulf of Mexico, following a total loss of engine power about 10 miles west of Marathon, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, about 0745.

The pilot reported that he and a business partner planned to survey damage to his business partner's home on No Name Key, Florida. They flew to the home, circled it at a lower altitude, took photographs, and began a climb back to cruise altitude for the return to FXE. About 800 to 1,000 feet above mean sea level, the engine lost all power. The pilot prepared to ditch as the airplane would not glide far enough to reach land. He also attempted two engine restarts with no success, and reported the emergency to air traffic control. The pilot attempted two more engine restarts using the wobble fuel pump and electric fuel pump. He then attempted another restart using the electric fuel pump with no success. The pilot landed on the water with the landing gear and flaps retracted. The airplane came to rest upright and both occupants were rescued by law enforcement.

According to the president of a recovery company, the airplane was recovered 12 days later, on September 28, 2017. The airplane appeared to be intact and was resting on a sandy bottom. Following recovery, no fuel or water was noted in the left wing fuel tank and approximately 1 gallon of a fuel and water mixture was recovered from the right wing fuel tank.

Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that the fuselage was buckled during the ditching. The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Van's RV-6, N6GH: Accident occurred August 30, 2017 at Orange County Airport (KMGJ), Montgomery, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N6GH



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board


Location: Montgomery, NY
Accident Number: GAA17CA576
Date & Time: 08/30/2017, 1330 EDT
Registration: N6GH
Aircraft: HUNTER GEORGE RV 6
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

According to the pilot in the tailwheel equipped, experimental amateur-built airplane, during the takeoff roll on runway 3, there was a slight crosswind and he was unable to maintain directional control of the airplane, possibly due to "wind shear." The airplane exited the left side of the runway and impacted the visual approach slope indicator (VASI) lights.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the aft fuselage bulkhead and the vertical stabilizer.

According to the METAR at the accident airport, about the time of the accident, the wind was variable at 3kts, the visibility was greater than 10 statute miles, and there were Few clouds at 3,800ft. The temperature was 72°F and the dew point was 57°F. Wind shear was not reported.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 90, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/19/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3048 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Total, this make and model), 3048 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: HUNTER GEORGE
Registration: N6GH
Model/Series: RV 6 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: AIRLANE III
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/01/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1700 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 200 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91  installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMGJ, 365 ft msl
Observation Time: 1654 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 199°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3800 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 14°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable, Variable
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Montgomery, NY (MGJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Montgomery, NY (MGJ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1330 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: ORANGE COUNTY (MGJ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 364 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 03
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5006 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  41.511944, -74.263611 (est)

Gulfstream American AA-5B Tiger, N28005: Accident occurred August 28, 2017 near Southern Illinois Airport (KMDH), Murphysboro, Jackson County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N28005



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Carbondale, IL
Accident Number: CEN17LA333
Date & Time: 08/28/2017, 0906 CDT
Registration: N28005
Aircraft: GULFSTREAM AMERICAN CORP AA 5B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Part(s) separation from AC
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 28, 2017, at 0906 central daylight time, a Gulfstream American Corporation AA-5B airplane, N28005, experienced a propeller separation in cruise flight and impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Carbondale, Illinois. The pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and the pilot was receiving visual flight rules flight following. The flight departed Louisville, Kentucky, at 0815 eastern daylight time, and was destined for Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

The pilot reported that about 1 1/2 hours after departure and about 6,700 ft mean sea level, he felt a "jolt" in the airplane as if the airplane struck an unknown object. The pilot realized the airplane propeller was missing, and the engine began to overspeed at a high RPM. The pilot reported an engine failure to air traffic control, initiated an emergency descent, and attempted to land at the Southern Illinois Airport (MDH), Carbondale, Illinois. The pilot was unable to glide the airplane to MDH and executed a forced landing to a field near Carbondale. During the forced landing, the airplane impacted trees and terrain, and came to rest upright. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and fuselage. The propeller, spinner, and spinner bulkhead were missing from the airplane wreckage.

Residential homeowners, located about 9 miles south of the accident site, found separated sections of an airplane propeller in their yards. The separated sections of the fixed-pitch propeller included both blades, the propeller hub, and other propeller installation components. The propeller sections were recovered by law enforcement and the Federal Aviation Administration. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 66, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/18/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1400 hours (Total, this make and model), 2000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 37 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: GULFSTREAM AMERICAN CORP
Registration: N28005
Model/Series: AA 5B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: AA5B0937
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/25/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:  33 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1506 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A4K
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

A review of the airplane records revealed the separated propeller sections matched the propeller model that was installed on the accident airplane. The most recent annual inspection was completed on January 25, 2017, at a tachometer time of 1,472.96. The tachometer time at the accident site was 1,506.71.

The McCauley model 1A170/FFA propeller was subject to repetitive inspections in accordance with Airworthiness Directive (AD) 82-27-01. The inspections are to be accomplished at intervals of 200 hours time in service (TIS). The inspections include removal of paint from the hub area followed by dye penetrant inspection of the attachment holes, center bore, and entire hub area. The last inspection per the AD was completed on March 20, 2015, at a tachometer time of 1,429.35 hours. According to the mechanic that performed the last recorded inspection, the shop did not use red dye penetrant, and inspections are performed with a fluorescent dye penetrant for higher sensitivity and easier clean-up.



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MDH
Observation Time: 0922 CDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 18°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 10°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Louisville, KY (LOU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Oklahoma City, OK (PWA)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0815 EDT
Type of Airspace: Unknown

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 37.673056, -89.259167 (est) 



Tests And Research

National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory Examination

The propeller with attached doubler, forward bulkhead, spacer, and attachment bolt pieces (propeller flange lugs) was examined by the NTSB Materials Laboratory.

Propeller

The propeller was fractured through the hub area with fractures adjacent to and partially intersecting bolt holes. Both fractures were on a relatively flat fracture planes with curving crack arrest marks, consistent with fatigue. The fatigue features on each fracture surface emanated from multiple origins located at the forward face. Fretting contact damage was observed near many of the attachment holes. Pink and red deposits were observed in the attachment and dowel holes for the propeller. No pink or red deposits were observed on the surfaces of the holes in the spacer.

The fatigue fracture region extended across most of the fracture surface. Near the origin, a portion of the fracture surface had a brown color, and an adjacent region with bluish gray tint. A periodic pattern of 17 crack arrest lines was observed between the bluish gray region and the fatigue boundary. No evidence of fluorescent dye was observed on the fracture surface.

Spacer

Fracture features in the spacer at the forward ends of a bolt hole and a dowel hole had a faceted appearance with the fracture on a plane perpendicular to the forward face, and features consistent with fatigue in the aluminum alloy. Fatigue features emanated from the hole corners at each location.

Doubler

Portions of the doubler fracture surfaces had flat fractures perpendicular to the surface with curving boundaries, features consistent with fatigue. The fatigue features were located at the edges of the attachment bolt contact faces. The fatigue propagated through the thickness of the doubler, initiating at the forward face in the fractures near 2 holes and initiated at the aft face near one hole.

The thickness of the doubler was measured in a flat area between the holes. The annular regions around the holes corresponding to the head contact area were recessed relative to the adjacent surfaces, and the surfaces were smeared in the circumferential direction consistent with sliding contact with the underside of the attachment bolt heads.

Forward Bulkhead

The forward bulkhead was fractured circumferentially outboard of the propeller attachment holes. Pieces were missing including the entire outer circumference and segments between 4 holes. Portions of the fracture surfaces had flat fractures perpendicular to the surface with curving boundaries, features consistent with fatigue. Fatigue regions were present outboard of each of the propeller attachment holes. The origins were located adjacent to the annular area associated with the attachment bolt heads, initiating at both the forward and aft sides of the bulkhead at each of the locations. The remaining fatigue regions had fracture features that generally propagated radially inboard or outboard and were located between attachment holes that corresponded to the propeller fracture locations.

Around each of the attachment holes, the forward bulkhead was deformed and was slightly dished with the concave side facing toward the forward direction.

Propeller Flange Lugs

Black deposits with silver flakes were observed in the threads and around the inner circumference of the lugs forward of the threads. A sample of the deposits were analyzed. The spectrum was consistent with carboxylic acid. A spectral library search was performed on the obtained material spectrum, and no strong matches were identified. However, there were some similarities to the spectra of several surfactants. Carboxylic acids are used in the production of several classes of surfactants. Carboxylic acids, as well as surfactants, can be found as components or additives to lubricants, greases, and fuels. According to the McCauley Propeller Systems Owner/Operator Information Manual, the torque specifications for propeller attachment bolts on fixed pitch propellers are for bolts installed dry.

Propeller Maintenance Instructions

The McCauley Propeller Systems Owner/Operator Information Manual refers to AD 82-27-01 and indicates the propeller should be inspected with fluorescent dye penetrant. In Section 15: Non-Destructive Procedures of the Information Manual, the inspection procedure for fluorescent dye penetrant inspection includes a note that states in part,

The use of visible dye penetrants (Type II) is not recommended for the inspection of the propeller and propeller hardware. While Type II visible dye penetrants do have limited crack detection capability, the constituents of visible dye penetrants are likely to deposit residue in crack voids. The residue can be extremely difficult to remove from cracks, regardless of the cleaning method employed. Cracks can become fully or partially masked by the remaining residue. Due to these characteristics, visible dye penetrants can make follow-on detection of existing cracks virtually impossible when using other NDI penetrant methods, specifically Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection (FPI).

The McCauley Propeller Systems Owner/Operator Information Manual also indicates fixed pitch propellers such as the accident model should be overhauled after 2,000 hour TIS or 72 calendar months, whichever occurs first (the time limits for overhaul listed in the owner's manual are not a requirement for airplanes such as the accident airplane operated under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91). The overhaul process includes removal and reapplication of paint to the propeller to facilitate dimensional and FPI inspections. According to a representative from McCauley Propeller Systems, the design logos on the accident propeller were discontinued from use at McCauley in 1998.

Flight Data Information

According to the flight log data provided by the pilot, the airplane accumulated 28 flight cycles and 89.9 hours TIS since the last propeller inspection per AD 82-27-01. No flight cycles were accumulated for more than 100 calendar days on several occasions.



NTSB Identification: CEN17LA333
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 28, 2017 in Carbondale, IL
Aircraft: GULFSTREAM AMERICAN CORP AA 5B, registration: N28005
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 28, 2017, at 0906 central daylight time, a Gulfstream American Corporation AA-5B airplane, N28005, experienced an in-flight propeller separation in cruise flight and impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Carbondale, Illinois. The pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a visual flight rules flight following flight plan was filed. The flight departed Louisville, Kentucky, at an unknown time, and was destined for Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector who responded to the accident site, the airplane was in cruise flight when the pilot reported an engine failure to air traffic control. The pilot initiated an emergency descent and attempted to land at the Southern Illinois Airport (MDH), Carbondale, Illinois. The pilot was unable to land at MDH and executed a forced landing to a field near Carbondale. During the forced landing, the airplane impacted trees and terrain, and came to rest upright. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and fuselage. The propeller, spinner, and spinner bulkhead were missing from the airplane wreckage.

A home owner, located about 9 miles south of the accident site, found a separated section of an airplane propeller in the residence's yard. The separated section of the fixed-pitch propeller included one blade and about 1/2 of the propeller hub. The propeller section was recovered by law enforcement and returned to the accident site. A review of the airplane records, which were located in the airplane, revealed the separated propeller section matched the propeller model installed on the accident airplane.

The airplane and propeller section were recovered for further examination.

Just Aircraft / Easy Raider, N6862K: Accident occurred August 14, 2017 near Fulton County Airport (KRCR), Rochester, Indiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N6862K




Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Rochester, IN
Accident Number: CEN17LA318
Date & Time: 08/14/2017, 1920 EDT
Registration: N6862K
Aircraft: Knapp Easy Raider
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 14, 2017, at 1920 eastern daylight time, an amateur built Knapp Easy Raider airplane, N6862K, collided with a steel handrail during a forced landing in Rochester, Indiana, following a partial loss of engine power. The student pilot received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual flight rules conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight was departing from the Fulton County Airport, (RCR), Rochester, Indiana, at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that the engine had recently been rebuilt and that he installed it in the airplane himself. The engine had a "couple" of hours of ground run-up time on it and the accident occurred on the first flight. The pilot was "crow-hopping" the airplane on the runway when he decided to takeoff. The pilot reported that upon reaching an altitude about 500 ft above the ground, the engine stopped responding to throttle control movements and the propeller continued to turn. Unable to maintain altitude, the pilot landed the airplane in a factory parking lot where it hit a steel handrail.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector did not reveal any reason for the loss of engine response.

The temperature and dewpoint recorded at the Fort Wayne International Airport (FWA), Fort Wayne, Indiana, at 1954, was 79°C and 62.9°C respectively. According to the Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) CE-09-35 "Carburetor Icing Prevention" chart, the conditions were conducive for serious carburetor icing at glide power.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: Knapp
Registration: N6862K
Model/Series: Easy Raider
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: ER012
Landing Gear Type:
Seats: 
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: 582
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RCR, 789 ft msl
Observation Time: 1915 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 250°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:  ROCHESTER, IN (RCR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: ROCHESTER, IN (RCR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1920 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: FULTON COUNTY (RCR)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 789 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 29
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5001 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  41.067500, -86.194167 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA318
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 14, 2017 in Rochester, IN
Aircraft: Knapp Easy Raider, registration: N6862K
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 17, 2017, at 1920 eastern daylight time, an amateur built Knapp Easy Raider, N6862K, collided with a steel handrail during a forced landing in Rochester, Indiana, following a loss of engine power. The student pilot received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual flight rules conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight was departing from the Fulton County Airport, (RCR), Rochester, Indiana, at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that the engine had recently been rebuilt and that he installed it in the airplane himself. The engine had a "couple" of hours of ground run-up time on it and the accident occurred on the first flight. He reported the engine stopped responding to throttle control movements shortly after becoming airborne.

The pilot landed the airplane in a factory parking lot where it hit a steel handrail.

Grob G102 Club Astir IIIB, N102BK, owned by the Central Ohio Soaring Association Inc and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred August 05, 2017 at Marion Municipal Airport (KMNN), Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N102BK



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Marion, OH
Accident Number: CEN17LA305
Date & Time: 08/05/2017, 1350 EDT
Registration: N102BK
Aircraft: BURKHART GROB FLUGZEUGBAU G102 CLUB ASTIR IIIB
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Glider tow event
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 5, 2017, about 1350 eastern daylight time, a Burkhart Grob Flugzeugbau G-102 Club Astir IIIB glider, N102BK, collided with a tree and terrain after releasing from the tow airplane at the Marion Municipal Airport (MNN), Marion, Ohio. The pilot received serious injuries, and the glider sustained substantial damage. The glider was owned by the Central Ohio Soaring Association, Inc., and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight was departing MNN on a local flight.

The pilot stated that he made a mistake during his before takeoff checks and forgot to latch the canopy. He stated that after climbing a "few hundred feet" the canopy came open. While he was trying to close the canopy, he lost sight of the Cessna 150 tow airplane, so he released the tow line and made a turn to the right. He attempted to land in a bean field, but the glider struck a tree and impacted the field.

A witness who observed the glider during the accident flight reported that the glider's left and right-wing spoilers were extended during the flight and were visible from the ground. He stated that the glider and tow airplane were unable to climb normally with the spoilers extended. He reported that the glider released from the tow airplane around 150 to 200 feet above ground level (agl) and tried to make a 180-degree turn back to the runway with the spoilers still extended. The glider's wing clipped a tree and crashed in a bean field.

The tow airplane pilot reported that shortly after takeoff, he felt the tow airplane being "jerked around" by the glider. He saw the glider in a high nose-up position, and then the tow line released about 150 feet agl. The tow airplane continued climbing straight ahead and then returned to MNN and landed. The tow pilot inspected the tow line after landing. The towline and tow ring were undamaged and attached to the tow airplane.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the examination of the glider at the accident site revealed that the spoilers were found in the open or deployed position. Maple leaves were found in the bottom of the spoiler wells. The right wing exhibited impact damage about mid-span. The flight controls were damaged consistent with impact forces. The canopy attachment pins and the surrounding composite material were torn from the fuselage at impact. The canopy attachment handle and bayonet pins showed proper operation. The damage to the canopy was consistent with it being in the latched position at impact.

In an interview with a FAA inspector, the pilot stated that he heard air noise in the cabin during takeoff and thought his canopy had become unlatched. He attempted to check the canopy handle during takeoff and climb out while still under tow.

In his report to the National Transportation Safety Board, the pilot stated, "We should not have let the need for a rapid departure overlook the need to make sure that the checklists are completed. And most important, fly the airplane." The pilot indicated that the glider had no mechanical malfunctions or failures.

At 1353, the surface weather observation at MNN was wind from 280 degrees at 9 knots; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 24 degrees C; dew point 12 degrees C; and altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury. 


Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Engineer
Age: 77, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Glider; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/12/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  24000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model), 19000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BURKHART GROB FLUGZEUGBAU
Registration: N102BK
Model/Series: G102 CLUB ASTIR IIIB
Aircraft Category: Glider
Year of Manufacture: 1985
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 5622CB
Landing Gear Type: Ski/wheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/17/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 992 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 0
Airframe Total Time:  1336.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 
Registered Owner: CENTRAL OHIO SOARING ASSOC INC
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MNN, 993 ft msl
Observation Time: 1353 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 12°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 280°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Marion, OH (MNN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Marion, OH (MNN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1413 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Marion Municipal (MNN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 993 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3498 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 40.626111, -83.109444


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA305
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 05, 2017 in Marion, OH
Aircraft: BURKHART GROB FLUGZEUGBAU G102 CLUB ASTIR IIIB, registration: N102BK
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 5, 2017, about 1413 eastern daylight time, a Burkhart Grob Flugzeugbau G-102 Club Astir IIIB glider, N102BK, collided with a tree and terrain after releasing from the tow airplane at the Marion Municipal Airport (MNN), Marion, Ohio. The pilot received serious injuries, and the glider sustained substantial damage. The glider was owned by the Central Ohio Soaring Association, Inc., and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight was departing MNN on a local flight. 

A witness who observed the glider during the accident flight reported that the glider's left and right-wing spoilers were visible from the ground, and that they were not locked down into the stowed position. He stated that the glider and tow airplane, a Cessna 150, were unable to climb normally with the spoilers extended. He reported that the pilot released from the tow airplane around 150 to 200 feet above the ground, and tried to make a 180-degree turn back to the runway with the spoilers still extended. The glider's wing clipped a tree and crashed in a bean field. 

At 1353, the surface weather observation at MNN was wind from 280 degrees at 9 knots; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 24 degrees C; dew point 12 degrees C; and altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury.