Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Cessna 310R, N310LC: Accident occurred June 18, 2021 at Portland Municipal Airport (KPLD), Jay County, Indiana

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Location: Portland, IN
Accident Number: CEN21LA279
Date & Time: June 18, 2021, 20:30 Local
Registration: N310LC
Aircraft: Cessna 310R
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled

On June 18, 2021, about 2030 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 310R airplane, N310LC, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident at Portland Municipal Airport (PLD), Portland, Indiana. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The flight was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135on-demand air taxi flight.

The pilot reported that he diverted to PLD due to thunderstorms. During the landing flare, a deer ran onto the left side of the runway and collided with airplane; the left main landing gear separated. The airplane veered to the left and continued off the runway into a ditch. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer.

The airport does not have a perimeter fence for wildlife hazard mitigation.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N310LC
Model/Series: 310R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMIE,937 ft msl
Observation Time: 20:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C /19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 220°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.78 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Lake Geneva, WI (C02) 
Destination: Portland, IN

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.451543,-84.988608

Beechcraft 65 (U-8F) Queen Air, N62069: Accidents occurred June 17, 2021, July 09, 2019 and February 22, 2019

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Bemidji Aviation; Bemidji, Minnesota 

Bemidji Aviation Services Inc


Location: Goodland, KS 
Accident Number: CEN21LA274
Date & Time: June 16, 2021, 19:05 Local
Registration: N62069
Aircraft: Beech U-8F
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled

On June 16, 2021, at 1905 mountain daylight time, a Beech U-8F airplane, N62069, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at Goodland Municipal Airport (GLD), Goodland, Kansas. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 cargo flight.

The pilot stated that while starting the right engine he heard a loud bang and noticed flames coming out of the right wing. An airport surveillance video captured images of flames from the right wing for about 1 second. The pilot shut down the right engine with the mixture control and egressed the airplane.

Examination revealed damage to the outboard 12 ft of the right wing, with the forward spar deflected significantly aft and the right-wing leading edge curled aft. The outboard aft fuel bladder for the right wing was removed and observed to be in a degraded condition, with indications of fire damage. Wiring for the navigation light had a conductor exposed in two locations. The fuel bladder and right-wing wiring bundle were retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech 
Registration: N62069
Model/Series: U-8F 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code: BEMA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGLD,3656 ft msl
Observation Time: 18:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C /11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 190°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Goodland, KS
Destination: Denver, CO (DEN)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: On-ground
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 39.370627,-101.69898 (est)

Date: 17-JUN-21
Time: 01:05:00Z
Regis#: N62069
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: U-8F
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: CARGO
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
City: GOODLAND
State: KANSAS

July 09, 2019:  Explosion (Non-Impact); Sidney Municipal Airport (KSNY), Cheyenne County, Nebraska










Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Sidney, Nebraska 
Accident Number: CEN19LA215
Date & Time: July 9, 2019, 08:13 Local 
Registration: N62069
Aircraft: Beech 65
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Explosion (non-impact)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Positioning

Analysis

The pilot had topped off the outboard fuel tanks before departure. While taxiing for takeoff, the stall warning horn activated, and the pilot pulled the circuit breaker to disable the horn. During the takeoff roll, the pilot heard a loud bang, observed significant damage to the outboard left wing, and aborted the takeoff. While taxiing back to the ramp, the pilot noted smoke coming from the top of the left wing. The pilot taxied the airplane to the corner of the ramp, performed an abbreviated shutdown, grabbed a fire extinguisher, and evacuated. The pilot did not observe any additional smoke or fire and did not discharge the fire extinguisher.

Examination of the airplane revealed fire and thermal damage near the wing root area, including melted and burned wiring. Due to some loose installation screws, a fuel leak was found coming from the fuel sending unit, which had recently been replaced. In addition, a wiring harness was found pinched between a metal clamp and a wing rib. Metal-to-metal contact was noted between exposed wiring and
the wing rib. Based on the fuel leak in the left wing and the pinched wiring, it is likely fuel vapors ignited and caused an explosion of the outboard left wing.

A few months before the accident, the outboard left wing was replaced. The operator's director of maintenance stated that the electrical wiring in the wing was not inspected during the wing replacement.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The improper maintenance of the outboard left wing, which allowed electrical arcing and leaking of the fuel sending unit and subsequently resulted in ignition of fuel vapors and an explosion of the outboard left wing. 

Findings
Personnel issues Installation - Maintenance personnel
Personnel issues Post maintenance inspection - Maintenance personnel
Aircraft Electrical pwr sys wiring - Damaged/degraded
Aircraft Fuel quantity sensor - Incorrect service/maintenance

Factual Information

On July 9, 2019, about 0813 mountain daylight time, a Beech 65 airplane, N62069, experienced a left wing explosion during takeoff roll from the Sidney Municipal Airport (SNY), Sidney, Nebraska. The airline transport pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was registered to and operated by Bemidji Aviation Services, Inc., as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 positioning flight. Day instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of
the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight was originating from SNY, and destined for Denver, Colorado.

According to the operator, the pilot had topped off the outboard fuel tanks prior to departure, and the airplane contained about 230 gallons. While taxiing and advancing the engine throttles, the stall warning horn sounded so he pulled the circuit breaker as a corrective action which stopped the stall warning horn. The pilot thought the stall warning horn was in error and no further action was taken before the takeoff. During the takeoff roll, the pilot heard a loud bang and observed significant damage to the outboard left wing. Initially he thought maybe the airplane struck an animal, or the airplane impacted a pothole on the runway. While taxiing back to the ramp, the pilot noted a small amount of smoke coming from the top of the left wing. The pilot taxied the airplane to the corner of the ramp, performed an abbreviated shutdown of the airplane, grabbed a fire extinguisher, and evacuated. The pilot did not
observe any additional smoke or fire and did not discharge the fire extinguisher.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector and personnel from the operator revealed fire and thermal damage near the wing root area to include melted and burned wiring. After the accident as a precaution, the airplane was defueled by the operator, and in order to determine if a fuel leak was present, fuel was added to the outboard left wing during the examination. After fueling with 15 to 25 gallons of fuel, fuel began leaking from the top of the left wing fuel sending unit. Safety wire on the fuel sending unit screws was removed, and the fuel sending unit screws were found loose. The screws were tightened and fuel stop leaking from the sending unit. A hole was cut in the wing skin to examine the melted and burned wiring. A wiring harness was found pinched between a metal clamp and a wing rib. The clamp was removed and metal to metal contact was noted between exposed wiring and the wing rib. Due to the thermal damage, the wiring harness could not be separated to determine if the stall warning system could be functionally tested.

On February 22, 2019, the airplane was involved in an accident that required the replacement of the outboard left wing. According to the operator's director of maintenance, the electrical wiring in the wing was not inspected during the wing replacement. In addition, during recent maintenance at an unknown time, the inboard left fuel sending unit was replaced. The most recent continuous airworthiness inspection was completed on June 26, 2019.

History of Flight

Takeoff Explosion (non-impact) (Defining event)
Takeoff Aircraft structural failure

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport; Commercial; Flight instructor
Age: 45, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: May 16, 2019
Flight Time: 7155 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2500 hours (Total, this make and model), 6301 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 150 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N62069
Model/Series: 65
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 62-3866
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle 
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: June 26, 2019 Continuous airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 8000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8933 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: IO-720-A1B
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 400 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: BEMA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 4313 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 07:53 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None /
Wind Direction: 300° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Sidney, NE (KSNY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Denver, CO (DEN) 
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 08:13 Local
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Sidney Municipal KSNY 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 4313 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6600 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-ground
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.101387,-102.985275(est)

February 22, 2019: System / Component Malfunction / Failure (non-power); near Colby Municipal Airport (KCBK), Thomas County, Kansas.




Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Colby, KS
Accident Number: CEN19LA086
Date & Time: 02/22/2019, 0945 CST
Registration: N62069
Aircraft: Beech 65
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning 

Analysis

Shortly after takeoff, the pilot noticed that the crew hatch door, located next to the left front seat, had unexpectedly opened. The pilot attempted to close the door without success. He indicated that, while trying to close the door, he "wasn't able to fully control the airplane normally (mainly [in] heading and pitch)," so he initiated a precautionary landing back to the departure airport. While maneuvering at a low altitude to stay in visual flight rules conditions (overcast ceiling at 300 ft), the airplane's airspeed decreased, the wing tips were dipping back and forth, and the airplane exhibited signs of nearing its critical angle of attack. The pilot retracted the landing gear and applied full engine power to try to gain airspeed. The pilot was unable to gain airspeed, and the airplane was losing altitude. Before impact, the pilot kept the wings level and the nose in a slight pitch-up attitude. The airplane then impacted the snowcovered terrain with the landing gear retracted, which resulted in substantial damage to the left wing and aileron. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed no preimpact malfunctions with the crew hatch door; thus, it is likely the door had not been properly secured before takeoff.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to properly secure the crew hatch door before takeoff, which resulted in his distraction and his failure to maintain airplane control and airspeed.

Findings

Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Pilot
Personnel issues Attention - Pilot
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Airspeed - Not attained/maintained
Aircraft Altitude - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

On February 22, 2019, about 0945 central standard time, a Beech 65 airplane, N62069, impacted terrain near Colby, Kansas, while maneuvering for a precautionary landing. The commercial pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by Bemidji Aviation Services, Inc., as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 positioning flight. Day instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight was originating from Shalz Field Airport (CBK), Colby, Kansas, and destined for Denver, Colorado.

According to the pilot, shortly after takeoff, he noticed the crew hatch door, located next to the left front seat, had unexpectedly opened. The pilot attempted to close the door, without success. While focusing on trying to close the door, the pilot "wasn't able to fully control the airplane normally (mainly in heading and pitch)," so he initiated a precautionary landing back to CBK. While maneuvering at a low altitude to stay in visual flight rules conditions (overcast ceiling at 300 ft), the airplane's airspeed decreased, and the wing tips were dipping back and forth. The pilot retracted the landing gear and applied full engine power to try and gain airspeed. The pilot was unable to gain airspeed, the airplane was losing altitude, and he knew the airplane was going to impact terrain. Prior to the impact, the pilot kept the wings level, and the nose in a slightly pitch up attitude. The airplane then impacted the snow-covered terrain with the landing gear retracted.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by the operator revealed the left wing and left aileron were bent. No evidence was noted that the crew hatch door malfunctioned during the flight.

History of Flight

Takeoff Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power) (Defining event)
Emergency descent Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 27, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/28/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/18/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2550 hours (Total, all aircraft), 34 hours (Total, this make and model), 2444 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N62069
Model/Series: 65
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 62-3866
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/29/2019, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 8000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8877 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IA-720-A1B
Registered Owner: Bemidji Aviation Services Inc
Rated Power: 400 hp
Operator: Bemidji Aviation Services Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CBK, 3187 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0955 CST
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  1.25 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 200 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 130°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Drizzle
Departure Point: Colby, KS (CBK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Denver, CO (DEN)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0945 CST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Shalz Field Airport (CBK)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 3187 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Precautionary Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.427222, -101.052778 (est)

Cessna A185F Skywagon, N735GE: Incident occurred June 18, 2021 at Portland International Jetport (KPWM), Cumberland County, Maine

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft porpoised on landing and veered off the runway. 

Cianchette Family 3 LLC


Date: 18-JUN-21
Time: 14:43:00Z
Regis#: N735GE
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 185
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PORTLAND
State: MAINE

Ayres S2R-G10 Thrush, N2250P: Incident occurred June 17, 2021 in Browerville, Todd County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aircraft made contact with the ground during aerial application and landed hard in a field. 


Date: 17-JUN-21
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N2250P
Aircraft Make: AYRES
Aircraft Model: S2R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 137
City: BROWERVILLE
State: MINNESOTA

Mooney M-20J, N5765N: Accident occurred June 20, 2021at Ryan Field Airport (2MT1), West Glacier, Flathead County, Montana

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Integrative Aerospace Corp 


Location: West Glacier, MT
Accident Number: WPR21LA239
Date & Time: June 20, 2021, 15:00 Local 
Registration: N5765N
Aircraft: Mooney M20J 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N5765N
Model/Series: M20J
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGPI,2973 ft msl
Observation Time: 14:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C /8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 350°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 7500 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Unknown
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 48.48,-113.96 

Cirrus SR22, N2275T: Incident occurred June 20, 2021 at Teterboro Airport (KTEB), Bergen County, New Jersey

Additional information and photographs are available upon request. 

Incident report provided by: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aircraft blew a tire on takeoff and veered off runway. 

Alexander Wolf Corporation 


Date: 20-JUN-21
Time: 14:48:00Z
Regis#: N2275T
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: TETERBORO
State: NEW JERSEY

Van's RV-7, N505RV: Incident occurred June 19, 2021 at Double Eagle II Airport (KAEG), Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aircraft landed and veered off runway into the grass damaging the propeller. 


Date: 19-JUN-21
Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: N505RV
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV7
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ALBUQUERQUE
State: NEW MEXICO

Bombardier Global 5000, N40TE: Incident occurred June 19, 2021 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aircraft landed and incurred damage to left wing.  

Demiron LLC


Date: 19-JUN-21
Time: 21:59:00Z
Regis#: N40TE
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: BD700
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ALBUQUERQUE
State: NEW MEXICO

Fuel Exhaustion: Piper PA-22-160, N9227D; fatal accident occurred January 13, 2019 in Kingman, Mohave County, Arizona

Heidi Sue Dowland 


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Kingman, Arizona 
Accident Number: WPR19LA063
Date & Time: January 13, 2019, 10:45 Local
Registration: N9227D
Aircraft: Piper PA22 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion 
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The student pilot was conducting a cross-country flight with one passenger onboard. According to the passenger’s sister, at 1001, her sister sent her a text, which stated that she and the pilot had taken off and were heading to an airport about 50 miles to the south to obtain fuel. The investigation was unable to determine whether the pilot obtained fuel at this airport. At 1038, while at the second airport, the passenger telephoned a relative and stated that they would take off shortly for the destination airport. Although the actual departure time from the second airport could not be determined, the sister stated that she expected the airplane to arrive at the destination airport about 1130. By 1215, the sister called the local Sheriff’s Office and search and rescue to locate the airplane because it was overdue. First responders found the airplane, which had impacted trees and came to rest inverted in a ravine in a park about 10 miles south of the second airport. The pilot was seriously injured, and the passenger was fatally injured. The pilot reported to the first responders that the airplane experienced an electrical failure and he tried to turn around, however the engine lost power.

Almost all the airplane components remained attached to the wreckage. The propeller damage signatures were consistent with a complete lack of engine power at impact. Examination of the airframe, engine, and propeller revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

First responders did not note the presence of any fuel on scene. The airplane was equipped with two separate fuel tanks, one in each wing. Each tank had a dedicated filler neck with a removable cap. Neither fuel cap was found at the accident site or in the recovered wreckage. There was no evidence of the caps being installed at impact.

The wreckage evidence was consistent with a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. The absence of the fuel caps likely resulted in the fuel being siphoned overboard during flight. Aside from the absence of fuel caps and fuel, no evidence was found of any other preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. It is likely that, when the pilot stopped at the second airport to obtain fuel, he did not put the fuel caps back on the airplane; whether he actually obtained fuel or not could not be determined because it was likely all siphoned out during the flight.

The pilot was hospitalized for several days, and a review the pilot’s postaccident hospital records revealed that he had diabetes and used an insulin pump, which was corroborated by a review of his previous medical records. However, insufficient evidence was found to determine whether the pilot was impaired due to diabetic complications at the time of the accident. Thus, whether the pilot's diabetes or some other medical factor contributed to the accident could not be determined. Several attempts were made to obtain a statement from the pilot however he refused to provide any information to the investigation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's failure to secure the fuel caps, which led to the fuel being siphoned overboard, fuel exhaustion, and the total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft Fuel - Fluid level
Personnel issues Forgotten action/omission - Student/instructed pilot
Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Student/instructed pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Prior to flight Aircraft servicing event
Enroute Fuel exhaustion (Defining event)
Unknown Off-field or emergency landing

On January 13, 2019, about 1100 mountain standard time, a Piper PA22-160 airplane, N9227D, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Hualapai, Arizona. The pilot sustained serious injuries, and the passenger was fatally injured. The airplane was being operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

On the morning of the accident, the airplane departed Pearce Ferry Airport (L25), Meadview, Arizona, and at 1001, the passenger sent her sister a text stating that they were airborne. The sister reported that, at 1038, the passenger telephoned a relative while on the ground at Kingman Airport (IGM), Kingman, Arizona and told him that they either got fuel or attempted to get fuel and planned to depart IGM and fly to Glendale Municipal Airport (GEU) Glendale, Arizona, about 132 miles southeast of IGM. The actual time that the flight departed IGM could not be determined, but the sister expected the airplane to arrive at GEU about 1130. About 1215, the sister called the Mohave County Sheriff’s Office and search and rescue to report the airplane was overdue.

According to a first responders' report, the pilot had crawled from the wreckage location to the road, and then flagged down a passerby, who in turn called 911. The pilot reported to the first responders that the airplane experienced an electrical failure and that he tried to turn around, however the engine lost power. The airplane subsequently impacted the bottom of a ravine about 10 miles south-southeast of IGM. Several attempts were made to obtain a statement from the pilot however he refused to provide any information to the investigation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 43, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: January 8, 2014
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 2 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Passenger Information

Certificate: Age:
Airplane Rating(s): 
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the pilot was issued a combined medical and student pilot certificate in January 2014. FAA regulations prohibit student pilots from carrying passengers. The pilot provided no training or flight experience information to investigators.

The pilot reported no medical conditions or use of medications on his third-class medical certificate application. However, a review of his medical records noted that he had diabetes and used fast-acting insulin and an insulin pump. A family member of the passenger corroborated these findings.

According to 14 CFR 67.313(a), diabetes is disqualifying for a third-class medical certificate if it requires treatment with insulin or other blood-glucose-lowering medication and that a person may not act as pilot-in-command while that person knows or has any reason to know of a disqualifying medical condition or is taking a disqualifying medication. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N9227D
Model/Series: PA22 160 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1958
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal Serial Number: 22-6287
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner:
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

On October 30, 2018, the passenger purchased the airplane. An FAA "deregistration" letter dated December 31, 2018, that was addressed to the passenger stated that the registration was suspended because it had not been renewed following the October 2018 transfer/sale to her.

Each fuel tank had a total capacity of 18 gallons and was equipped with a dedicated filler port with a removable cap. Each cap installed into its respective filler neck by aligning the two cap tabs with the two slots in the filler neck, and then pushing down and rotating the cap to lock it in place.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 3448 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 10:51 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 342°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: Unknown / Unknown
Wind Direction: 10° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: Unknown / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Kingman, AZ (IGM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Glendale, AZ (GEU) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace: Unknown

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 35.101943,-113.886108(est)

The airplane came to rest inverted at the bottom of a ravine in Hualapai Mountain Park, Hualapai, Arizona. The accident site was about 9.8 nautical miles from IGM on a true bearing of 165°. The site elevation was about 6,500 ft mean sea level.

Almost all of airplane components remained attached to the wreckage. The right wing and empennage were severely crushed and deformed. The fuselage and left wing were moderately crushed or deformed.

The engine remained attached to the airframe, and the propeller remained attached to the engine. No fuel was recovered from the airplane.

Flight control continuity was confirmed for the ailerons, flaps, elevator, elevator trim, and rudder.

However, proper routing could not be confirmed due to impact and recovery damage. The flaps were found in the fully retracted position.

The instrument panel was partially deformed, but all avionics and instruments remained mounted in the panel. The cockpit throttle control was set to idle, and the mixture was set to full rich; both were immobilized by impact damage. The primer knob was in and locked. The carburetor heat knob was set to off. The magneto switch was set to both. The fuel selector valve assembly was found in its normal location in the left lower forward cabin wall. The handle was found positioned near the detent for the left tank. The valve was removed and tested for blockage; no blockage was noted in either the left or right tank detent. Some impedance was noted when the selector was positioned to the as-found setting, and an examination of the valve port revealed that the port was about 40% occluded at this setting. The valve handle was difficult to move. The fuel lines were found securely attached to the valve. No fuel was noted in the fuel selector or adjacent lines, and no evidence of any fuel leaks was found.

Neither fuel tank cap was found. When a donor fuel cap was installed on the two filler necks, it rotated smoothly and locked into place.

The engine remained attached to the airframe by the engine mount and had been pushed aft, deforming the firewall. The engine sustained impact damage at the forward bottom area, which separated the airbox and carburetor bowl from the carburetor.

All the spark plugs displayed normal operating signatures. The crankshaft rotated easily by hand. The complete valve train operated in proper sequence, no mechanical malfunctions were observed, and "thumb" compressions were obtained in proper sequence on all cylinders. Clean, uncontaminated oil was observed at all four rocker box areas, and mechanical continuity was established throughout the rotating group, valve train, and accessory section during hand rotation of the crankshaft.

Both magneto drives were intact and undamaged. During hand rotation, both magnetos produced sparks at their spark plug leads. Borescope inspection of the combustion chambers and valves revealed that they were mechanically undamaged with no evidence of foreign object ingestion or detonation. The combustion signatures observed at the spark plugs, combustion chambers, and exhaust system components displayed coloration consistent with normal operation with no oil residue was observed.

The exhaust system and mufflers were found unobstructed.

The propeller remained mounted to the crankshaft. The spinner remained attached to the propeller backing plate and was crushed aft, with no circumferential scoring. The backing plate/engine mounting flange was fractured. One propeller blade was straight, with no chordwise scraping or leading-edge damage. The other propeller blade was bent slightly aft, displayed no obvious leading-edge damage, and showed a series of spanwise scrapes.

Examination revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Medical and Pathological Information

A review of the pilot's hospital records revealed that his initial postaccident laboratory testing detected blood glucose levels that were greater than twice the normal maximum and that he used an insulin pump. The hospital records indicated that a blood test was negative for ethanol; this result was published about 2.5 hours after the accident and did not indicate the time that the sample was collected. A urine drug screen was negative for all other screened drugs.

Christopher Adam Anderson and Heidi Sue Dowland