Sunday, November 24, 2019

Cessna 150H, N22931: Accident occurred November 24, 2019 near Shreveport Downtown Airport (KDTN), Caddo Parish, Louisiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances after takeoff into the river.


https://registry.faa.gov/N22931 


Date: 24-NOV-19
Time: 16:51:00Z
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: SHREVEPORT
State: LOUISIANA

Authorities responded to a report of an aircraft in the Red River late Sunday morning. Two men on board the plane escaped, apparently without major injuries.

The Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office reports that just before 11:00 a.m. Sunday, two men were practicing touch-and-go landings at the Shreveport Downtown Airport when the engine apparently failed in their Cessna 150H.

The plane went into the Red River near the end of the south runway, but the men were able to get out and swim to the Bossier City side of the river. The men did not appear to be injured but were taken to Ochsner LSU Health Shreveport as a precaution, authorities said.

A deputy said a pilot at the airport saw the plane take off, then heard its engine stop. He saw the plane drop below the tree line and called 911.

Bossier City police and fire departments and the Bossier Parish Sheriff’s Office, along with Shreveport Fire and the Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office responded to the scene.

Shortly after the incident, the airport returned to normal operations, however the plane had not been removed from the site of the crash as of Sunday afternoon.

The names of the two men involved were not immediately released.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.bossiernow.com

SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER CITY, Louisiana (KSLA) — Two men are safe following a plane crash in the Red River on Sunday morning.

According to Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Lt. Mike Gray, just before 11 a.m., two men were practicing touch-and-go landings at Shreveport Downtown Airport when the engine failed in their Cessna 150H.

The plane went into the Red River near the end of the airport’s south runway. Another pilot told CPSO that they saw the plane take off and heard its engine stop.

When he saw the plane drop below the tree line, he called 911, according to CPSO.

According to Bossier City Spokeswoman Traci Landry, two people were safely able to get out of the plane after crashing.

The pair were found near the Bossier City water plant, near Traffic Street and Berry Street. They were sent to a Shreveport hospital as a precaution.

Shreveport Fire Department responded to the scene as well as the Bossier City Police, Bossier City Fire Department and Bossier Parish Sheriff’s Office. Crews remain on scene to investigate.

Stacy Kuba, interim director of airports for the Shreveport Airport Authority, says the Downtown Airport has returned to normal operations.

The plane is expected to be removed at a later date.

Story and video ➤ https://www.ksla.com




SHREVEPORT, Louisiana - Law enforcement from both sides of the Red River responded to a plane crash in the river Sunday.

According to Caddo Parish Sheriff's Office, the two men inside the Cessna 150H, were practicing touch-and-go landings at the Shreveport Downtown Airport when their engine failed just before 11 a.m.. The plane went into the Red River near the end of the south runway.

Both men were able to get out and swim to the Bossier side of the river. They did not appear to be injured but were taken to Ochsner LSU Health as a precaution.   

According to deputies another pilot said he saw the plane take off, heard the engine stop, saw the plane drop below the tree line and called 911. 

Stacy Kuba, interim director of airports for the Shreveport Airport Authority, said the airport has returned to normal operations. The plane is expected to be removed at a later date.

No names of those involved have been released pending contact with their families.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktbs.com

Bushby Mustang II, N24GL: Fatal accident occurred November 24, 2019 at Peter Prince Field (2R4), Milton, Santa Rosa County, Florida

Lt. Col. Matthew Peter Platt
April 13, 1981 ~ November 24, 2019 (age 38)

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama 
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N24GL

Location: Milton, FL
Accident Number: ERA20FA043
Date & Time: 11/24/2019, 0940 CST
Registration: N24GL
Aircraft: Bushby BUSHBY MUSTANG M II
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On November 24, 2019, about 0940 central standard time, an experimental amateur-built Bushby Mustang II airplane, N24GL, sustained substantial damage on takeoff from the Peter Prince Airport (2R4), Milton, Florida. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was originating at the time of the accident.

According to a witness, she and her husband were driving on airport property when she first saw the accident airplane turning left base to final for runway 36. The airplane landed and did a touch and go. The next thing she saw was the airplane descending straight down to the ground from a height of about 100 ft just past the north end of the runway. She yelled out to her husband and they immediately drove to where the airplane impacted the ground and called 911. She did not hear the airplane's engine prior to impact because the windows of the car were rolled up.

The witness's husband said he saw the airplane do a touch and go on runway 36 but turned away to focus on driving. The next thing he saw was the airplane descending straight down to the ground from a height of about 50 to 100 ft just north of the runway. He did not hear the engine because he was inside his car with the windows rolled up. The witness said he and his wife rushed to the airplane. When he arrived, he did not see any leaking fuel, but assisted first responders by turning the fuel selector from the "on" position to the "off" position because there was a strong odor of fuel.

A flight instructor was standing on the western edge of taxiway alpha when he first saw the accident airplane parked behind his student in the run-up area near the departure end of runway 36. He said the accident airplane stayed in the run-up area for quite a while. The instructor said his student had departed and he was very focused on watching him as he flew in the traffic pattern. The next time the instructor observed the accident airplane it was departing, but he was not sure if this was his initial takeoff or not. He said the airplane used almost the entire length of the runway. When it rotated, the airplane was "pitching up fairly aggressively" and he could see the entire top of the airplane. The instructor said the airplane stalled and entered a spin. The airplane spun to the left a quarter of a rotation "where the plane was completely vertical upon impact with the ground." The instructor said he did not recall anything about the sound of the airplane's engine because he was more focused on his student.

The airplane came to rest on its nose in the grassy area located off the departure end of runway 36 on a magnetic heading of about 133°. The tail section of the airplane was straight up in the air and there was no post-impact fire. All major flight controls were accounted for at the scene and the single flap was fully retracted.

About 6 ft forward of where the airplane came to rest was an approximate 3-foot-wide wide impact crater. Embedded inside the crater were pieces of engine cowling. Extending to the right of the crater was an approximate 12-foot-long ground scar. A section of the right-wing tip and green navigational lens were found at the outermost end of the scar. The canopy was found separated from the airframe and was resting to the left of the airplane. The forward section of the empennage was deformed, and the tail section was bent to the right. The leading edge of the right and left wings exhibited leading-edge impact damage. The tail section appeared undamaged.

Flight control continuity was established for the ailerons and rudder by movement of the flight controls. The elevator did not move when the flight controls were moved. Further examination revealed that that the elevator control tube was still attached to the flight controls but was fractured on the forward and aft end where it connected to a bell crank mid-cabin from impact.

The engine was pushed aft into the main fuel tank and instrument panel. The main fuel tank, the fuel lines from the fuel selector to the tank, and the firewall fuel strainer bowl were breached. Each auxiliary fuel tank (located in the wing root of each wing) appeared intact. No fuel was found in the right auxiliary tank and about a half-gallon of 100LL aviation gas was drained from the left auxiliary tank. The fuel was absent of debris and water.

The two-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine. One blade was bent aft at mid-span and exhibited leading edge polishing and chordwise scratching along the entire span of the blade. The other blade appeared undamaged. The propeller and crankshaft flange were removed to facilitate rotation of the engine, which was accomplished via the vacuum pump port. Compression and valve train continuity were established on all four cylinders. A lighted borescope was used to examine each cylinder and no anomalies were noted to the pistons and valves. The oil filler neck was found cracked but the dip stick remained in place inside the filler neck. The oil suction screen was removed and absent of debris.

The carburetor separated from the oil sump and only the carburetor mating flange remained attached to the sump. The carburetor was disassembled and about a tablespoon of clear and rust-colored fluid was observed in the bowl and the accelerator pump chamber. The fluid was tested for water using a water finding paste, and all tests were positive for water. A milky white fluid was found in the fuel inlet screen port and it also tested positive for water. The fuel inlet screen was removed from the carburetor and was absent of debris. The firewall fuel filter bowl was breached during impact, but its screen was in the wreckage. The screen was corroded with a white powdery residue.

The engine was equipped with dual electronic magnetos and eight automotive spark plugs. Both magnetos were secured to the engine with some minor impact damage. The No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 top spark plugs exhibited some impact damage. All spark plugs were removed and appeared new with no damaged electrodes. The magnetos were retained for further examination.

According to an airframe and powerplant mechanic, the pilot had reported a larger than normal RPM drop on the left magneto during an engine run just days before the accident. The mechanic said he removed, cleaned and rotated all eight sparkplugs. The pilot re-tested the engine and a larger than normal RPM drop was observed on the right magneto. The mechanic said that he and the pilot agreed there was an issue with the spark plugs, so the pilot went to a local automotive shop and purchased a new set of automotive spark plugs. The mechanic installed the new plugs the day before the accident, and the pilot performed another test run of the engine. According to the mechanic, the pilot said both magnetos tested normally, and he planned to take the airplane up for a test flight but would perform a long test-run of the engine before he departed. The mechanic did not know if the pilot did an engine test run that day but knew that the pilot did not fly due to a low overcast.

The pilot, who was an active duty flight officer in the United States Air Force, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine, as well as instrument airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical was issued on September 10, 2015. A review of his logbook revealed he had logged a total of 91.4 civilian hours; of which, 26.8 hours were in the accident airplane. Of these 26.8 total hours in the accident airplane, about 8.5 hours were as pilot-in-command.

Weather reported at Whiting Naval Air Station South (NDZ), Milton, Florida, about 4 miles north of the accident site, at 0956, was reported as wind from 340° at 10 knots, visibility 10 miles and clear skies. The temperature was 12° C and a dewpoint of 6° C, with a barometric pressure setting of 30.04 inches of Hg.

The airplane was equipped with an electronic flight instrument system (EFIS) and engine information system (EIS). These units were retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bushby
Registration: N24GL
Model/Series: BUSHBY MUSTANG M II No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: NDZ, 177 ft msl
Observation Time: 0956 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 340°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Milton, FL (2R4)
Destination: Milton, FL (2R4)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 30.637500, -86.993611 (est) 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Honor Mission
Matthew Peter Platt, Active Duty
USAF 
Morrisville, North Carolina
11-29-19

ABOUT THE MISSION:
Patriots we have once again been call upon to Honor and escort a hero home. As LTC Matthew Peter Platt stood for us it will be our honor to stand and escort him and his family home.

PRIMARY STAGING DETAILS: 11-29-19
Staging Time: 4:00 PM

Sheetz
1600 Aviation Parkway
Morrisville, North Carolina 27560
Ride Captain:
Charles Bullock
(919) 906-3641
Asst: Steve Haven, (919) 793-7296

Special Instructions:
Stage : 4:00 pm
Briefing: 4:30 pm
Move to RDU and prepare for flag line and escort to Miller-Boles Funeral Home, 1150 Fire Tower Rd, Sanford NC 27330.
Flags will be provided.  If you have large bike flags, please bring them.
Water will be provided.

https://www.patriotguard.org



SANTA ROSA COUNTY, Florida (WEAR) — The Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office has released the name of the pilot killed in a plane crash early Sunday morning.

Matthew P. Platt, 38, was killed in a crash at Peter Prince Field in Milton. The sheriff's office says Platt was a former resident of Navarre.

The cause of Sunday's deadly plane crash at Peter Prince Field in Milton is still under investigation.

Channel 3 spoke to an eyewitness of the crash. Darin Southard lives right down the road from the airport.

"I'm used to seeing planes take off all the time," Southard said. "The moment I saw it, I knew that it did not look natural."

Southard says he saw the plane take a straight ascent, then make a violent turn to the right.

"It went straight down," Southard said. "I told my wife, I think we just saw a plane crash."

A Florida Air Recovery team was on scene Monday afternoon removing the plane from the crash site.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are still investigating the cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://weartv.com



The pilot of the aircraft that crashed on November 24th at Peter Prince Airport has been identified as Matthew P. Platt of Navarre, Florida.

At this time, the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are conducting an investigation into the cause of the crash.

ORIGINAL STORY--------

MILTON, Florida (WALA) -- The Federal Aviation Administration responded to the scene of a plane crash that occurred in Milton on November 24th.

According to Santa Rosa County Sheriff's officials, a Bushby Mustang II plane crashed at Peter Prince Airport near Milton.  

The crash happened around 10:15 a.m. Sunday.  

There was one fatality.  

The pilot, who was the only person in the plane, was pronounced dead at the scene.  

The pilot has not been identified.

Sheriff's officials said the National Transportation Safety Board will be assisting the Federal Aviation Administration in their investigation of this crash

Story and video ➤ https://www.fox10tv.com



The Santa Rosa County Sheriff's Office has identified the pilot who died in a crash at an airport in Milton on Sunday.

Matthew P. Platt, 38, formerly of Navarre, died around 10 a.m. Sunday when the small, single-engine aircraft that he piloted crashed at Peter Prince Field, according to SRSO spokesman Sgt. Rich Aloy.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were conducting an investigation into the cause of the crash as of Monday afternoon. 

SRSO deputies were dispatched to Peter Prince Field, a public airport about three miles east of Milton on U.S. 90. at about 10:15 a.m. Sunday, and authorities determined the aircraft crashed on airport property, according to the SRSO. 

Platt was the sole occupant on the aircraft.

Story and video ➤ https://www.pnj.com

Ground Collision: Piper PA-28-150 Cherokee B, N5776W; accident occurred November 23, 2019 at Simsbury Airport (4B9), Hartford County, Connecticut

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N5776W

Location: Simsbury, CT
Accident Number: GAA20CA094
Date & Time: 11/23/2019, 0845 EST
Registration: N5776W
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The flight instructor reported that, while the student pilot was landing, a car did not stop at the hold short line and drove onto the runway. The car struck the left wing, the airplane nosed over and came to rest on the runway.

The driver of the vehicle reported that, he stopped at the entrance of the runway and checked left and right to make sure it was clear. While crossing the runway he heard glass shatter and a heavy impact. At no time did he see the airplane, until after the collision.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the fuselage and empennage.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/25/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 50 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model), 5 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 23, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/19/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/01/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 450 hours (Total, all aircraft), 45 hours (Total, this make and model), 389 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 163 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 56 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration:N5776W 
Model/Series: PA28 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1964
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate:Normal 
Serial Number: 28-1611
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/02/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1733 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2A
Registered Owner: Future Flyers Of Connecticut Llc
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: Future Flyers Of Connecticut Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBDL, 175 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1351 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 73°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 250°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Plainville, CT (4B8)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Simsbury, CT (4B9)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0820 EST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Simsbury (4B9)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 195 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 03
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2205 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Stop and Go; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.916111, -72.776944 (est)



SIMSBURY – A small plane landing at Simsbury airport collided with a car that was crossing the runway this morning.

Airport officials say it happened about 8:40 a.m. when a Piper PA-28-150 Cherokee B was attempting to land. For as yet unknown reasons, a Honda Accord was crossing the runway. The plane, traveling at an estimated 40 mph, struck the car, flipped and landed on its back. Luckily the two people in the plane were shook up, but reported no serious injuries.

The driver of the car was also uninjured. No word yet if they will face any charges.

The airport was closed while emergency crews secured the scene and removed the plane, but reopened just before noon.

Airport Manager Brad Griswold said the Federal Aviation Administration is sending a representative to investigate the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://fox61.com





A plane landing at Simsbury Airport crashed into a vehicle crossing the runway on Saturday morning, according to fire officials.

The impact caused the Piper PA-28-150 Cherokee B to flip over.

Emergency crews were called to the scene around 8:40 a.m.

A flight instructor and a student pilot were in the plane. No one was injured, Fire Capt. Steve Hess said.

Vehicles aren't allowed on the runway, so it wasn't clear why the driver was attempting to cross the landing strip, Capt. Hess said.

The airport was expected to be closed for several hours.

Police said they are investigating the incident.

Original article ➤ https://www.nbcconnecticut.com

Grumman AA5B Tiger, N310PD: Fatal accident occurred November 22, 2019 near Jackpot Airport/Hayden Field (06U), Elko County, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N310PD

Location: Jackpot, NV
Accident Number: WPR20FA031
Date & Time: 11/22/2019, 1834 PST
Registration: N310PD
Aircraft: Grumman AA5
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 22, 2019, about 1834 Pacific standard time, a Grumman AA-5B Tiger airplane, N310PD, impacted terrain near Jackpot, Nevada. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed for the cross-country flight, which originated at 1834 and was destined for Rexburg, Idaho.

According to a witness, who was located at a residence adjacent to the airport, he observed the airplane lift off from the runway and begin an immediate turn to the left. In his experience watching airplanes depart from this airport, the airplane was at an unusually low altitude when it began the turn. The witness then looked away while the airplane was turning and immediately heard a loud explosion. He immediately looked back in the direction of the airport and observed a fire.

The airplane came to rest inverted in a level hay field about one quarter nautical mile east of the departure end of runway 15 on a heading of about 095° magnetic. All major components were found at the accident site. The initial impact point was marked by an 18 inch-long by 36 inch-wide ground scar at the beginning of the debris path, which was 276 ft long and oriented on a heading of 212° magnetic. The wreckage was fragmented and numerous components were distributed along the energy path, which terminated at the main wreckage and was consumed by postcrash fire.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Grumman
Registration: N310PD
Model/Series: AA5 B
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTWF
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Departure Point: Jackpot, NV (KPT)
Destination: Rexburg, ID (RXE)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.967778, -114.646111 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 



Robin Lee (Hauck) Quinn
June 9, 1960 ~ November 22, 2019 (age 59)

Robin Lee Quinn, 59, of Ririe, along with her husband, Mike, passed away November 22, 2019, in Jackpot, Nevada, from injuries sustained in an airplane accident.

Robin was born June 9, 1960, in Bismarck, North Dakota, to Leo Hauck and Arlena Sayler Hauck. She grew up on a dairy farm and attended school at Wishek Public School, graduating from Wishek High School. She went on to college in Rapid City, South Dakota. 

In November 1980, she married Anthony B Schlenker at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Idaho Falls. They were blessed with two daughters, Justene and Kelsey. They made their home in Idaho Falls, Idaho, where Robin worked as a server at several restaurants in town. Following her time in Idaho Falls, she worked for The Bank of Commerce in Ririe, Idaho. Anthony passed away on March 7, 2001.

In May 2003, Robin married Mike Quinn at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Idaho Falls. Robin and Mike made their home in Ririe, Idaho. Robin managed many aspects of Heise over the years, most recently operating the Pizza Parlor with the same dedication and passion for leading that she showed in all aspects of her life. 

She was a member of St. John’s Lutheran Church. She enjoyed meeting with her girlfriends and playing cards once a month, working out at Orangetheory Fitness, and had recently taken up tennis lessons with Mike. She also loved traveling with her husband, sewing, gardening, and spending time with her children and grandchildren. She loved nothing more than being with family and was always the instigator of laughs and fun times at any family gathering.   

Robin is survived by her loving daughters, Justene Lee Schlenker and Kelsey Pauline Schlenker, both of Idaho Falls; step-daughters, Cathi (Dave) Quinn-Minami of Maui, HI, and Kate (Josh) Schroeder of Heise, ID; step-son, Robi (Lori) Quinn of Heise, ID; father, Leo Hauck of Wishek, ND; brothers, Randy (Daphne) Hauck of Bismarck, ND, Ritchie (Terrie) Hauck of Richlands, NC, Dennis (Stephan Michaud) Hauck of Minneapolis, MN; sister, Rachel (B.J.) Johnson of Chesapeake, VA; 1 grandchild, Jaydon Anthony Putnam of Idaho Falls; 8 step-grandchildren, Eric (Marisa) Quinn, Ashlee, Abbey and Annie Quinn, Kati Kai (Ryan) Engle, Cali Minami, Kaia and Finley Schroeder; and one great grandchild, Hazel Elaine Quinn. She was preceded in death by her mother, Arlena Hauck, and her first husband, Anthony B Schlenker.

Funeral services will be held at 11:00 a.m. Saturday, December 7, 2019, at the Idaho Falls Civic Auditorium (501 S. Holmes). The family will visit with friends on Friday, December 6, 2019, from 6-8 p.m. at Wood Funeral Home East Side (963 S. Ammon Road). Burial will be held immediately after the services in the Ririe-Shelton Cemetery.

Michael (Mike) Merrill Quinn
February 12, 1941 ~ November 22, 2019 (age 78)

Michael Merrill Quinn, 78, of Ririe, along with his wife, Robin, passed away November 22, 2019, in Jackpot, Nevada, from injuries sustained in an airplane accident.

Mike was born February 12, 1941, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to Robert Merrill Quinn and Elsie Frey Quinn. He grew up at Heise and attended schools in Ririe and Hollister, California. He graduated from Ririe High School and attended Ricks College. 

In 1962, he married Elaine Ashment. They were blessed with four children: Robi, Cathi, Chris, and Kate. Elaine passed away on August 15, 2001. In 2003, Mike married Robin Schlenker. Mike and Robin made their home at Heise Hot Springs. While owning and operating Heise consumed the majority of his life, Mike knew how to play better than most. He enjoyed motorbikes, guns, traveling, water/snow sports, fishing, reading, learning...too many interests to count. He particularly loved to fly, but above all, enjoyed being in the company of his good friends. His biggest accomplishment was the legacy of  Heise Hot Springs and all that it provided for the community.

Mike is survived by his eldest son, Robi (Lori) Quinn of Heise, ID; daughter, Cathi (Dave) Quinn-Minami of Maui, HI; daughter, Kate (Josh) Schroeder of Heise, ID; step-daughters, Justene and Kelsey Schlenker, both of Idaho Falls, ID; brother, Joel (Hoa) Quinn of West Jordan, UT; sister, Susan (Harold) Sermon of Heise, ID; 9 grandchildren, Eric (Marisa) Quinn, Ashlee, Abbey, and Annie Quinn, Kati Kai (Ryan) Engle, Cali Minami, Kaia and Finley Schroeder, and Jaydon Putnam; and great-granddaughter, Hazel Elaine Quinn.

He was preceded in death by his first wife, Elaine Ashment Quinn; son, Chris Quinn; parents, Elsie and Robert Quinn; sister, Carolyn Helm; brother, Robert D. Quinn; and sister, Mary Crowther.

Included among his loved ones are James (Janean) Osmond, of Idaho Falls, ID, and Brennan (Angela) Reed, along with their sons, Channing and Diesel, of Ririe, ID. Mike was very much family to them all. The Reeds spent the past 14 years helping him run things at Heise, and James is Mike’s nephew, who had the unique privilege of being--for lack of a better word--his indentured servant at Heise longer than anyone else. 


Funeral services will be held at 11:00 a.m. Saturday, December 7, 2019, at the Idaho Falls Civic Auditorium (501 S. Holmes). The family will visit with friends on Friday, December 6, 2019, from 6-8 p.m. at Wood Funeral Home East Side (963 S. Ammon Road). Burial for immediate family will be in the Heise Cemetery, following the interment for Robin at the Ririe-Shelton Cemetery.


Robin and Mike Quinn


HEISE – An eastern Idaho couple died in a plane crash Friday afternoon near Elko, Nevada.


Friends and relatives say the victims are Mike and Robin Quinn, owners of Heise Hot Springs.


“Friday evening, Heise Hot Springs experienced a tragic loss. Mike and Robin Quinn have been confirmed deceased by members of the Heise family,” a family member says in a statement to EastIdahoNews.com. “Their private plane crashed shortly after takeoff in Jackpot, Nevada. No other details are available at this time. The family thanks you for your support.”


Mike had been a pilot for 40 years, and the couple frequently flew into Jackpot for a night of dinner and entertainment, family members say.


Sgt. Nick Czegledi with Elko County, Nevada Sheriff’s Office says the couple took off from the Jackpot airport in a Grumman AA5B Tiger around 5:40 p.m. Friday on their way back to Idaho. Shortly after takeoff, Mike made a left turn to the east, lost altitude and crashed.


The plane burst into flames when it landed. The cause of the crash has still not been determined. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are on their way to conduct an investigation.


Czegeldi says crashes like this are a common occurrence at the airport and his heart goes out to the family.


“This gentleman flies in and out of there frequently with his wife,” Czegeldi says. “My heart goes out to the family.”


Kelsey Schlenker, Mike and Robin’s daughter, paid tribute to her parents in a Facebook post Saturday morning.


“My parents have always been outgoing and doing random things spur of the moment. Mike has been flying since he was 29. They randomly took trips to Jackpot to have dinner and some entertainment for the evening. They decided to this yesterday,” she wrote. “I lost both of my parents last night. I will be forever grateful for his kindness and love he had toward me. Mike wasn’t my biological father, but he sure treated me like I was his own blood, for that I will be forever thankful. My mom Robin was the most selfless person I have ever met. She would do anything for anyone whenever possible. I hope to someday be just like her.”


The family is grateful for the community’s support, but asks that you respect their privacy during this time of mourning.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.eastidahonews.com


JACKPOT, Nevada (KOLO)-- Two people died Friday when a Grumman AA5B Tiger crashed in a field near the Jackpot, Neada, airport in northeast Elko County just after takeoff, authorities said.

The man and the woman were from Idaho and the Elko County Sheriff’s Office will not release other identifying information until their identities are confirm, Sgt. Nick Czegledi said.

The airport appears to have taken off to the south, then banked to the east and crashed at about 5:39 p.m., Czegledi said. The two were the only people on the airplane and they died on impact, Czegledi said.

The cause of the crash was not known.

It appears the airplane was heading to Idaho.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Jackpot is on U.S. 93 at the Idaho-Nevada border, about 67 miles north of Wells.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kolotv.com

JACKPOT (AP) — Authorities say two people were killed when a light plane crashed and burned after taking off from a small northeastern Nevada airport near the border with Idaho.

Elko County sheriff’s Sgt. Nick Czegledi said the identities of those killed in the crash late Friday near Jackpot weren’t being released pending confirmation through autopsies.

However, the Idaho State Journal reported that the victims were Mike and Robin Quinn of Heise, owners of the Heise Hot Springs in Ririe.

The newspaper reported that a Facebook post from the couple's daughter identified the victims. The resort has been in the Quinn family since 1942, according to the Post Register archives.

Czegledi said a witness said the plane took off to the south and then banked hard to the east before losing altitude before crashing.

He said National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration officials were expected to arrive in the area to investigate the crash.

Jackpot is on U.S. 93 and 41 miles south of Twin Falls, Idaho.

A month ago, a Twin Falls pilot was forced to make an emergency landing after taking off from the airport due to a snowstorm.

Pilot Darrell Schmidt told authorities he was forced to land because of the sudden change in the weather.

That incident on October 19th was initially reported as a plane crash.

Friday’s crash was the first plane fatality in Elko County since January 2018, when a 26-year-old pilot from Mississippi crashed into the Ruby Mountains while traveling from California to Utah.

The pilot had reported ice on the aircraft. It took authorities 10 days to reach the remote location near Pearl Peak.

Prior to that incident, four people were killed in November 2016 when an American Medflight plane crashed into an Elko parking lot after taking off with a patient on a planned flight to Salt Lake City.

The cause of that crash was officially undetermined, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, but an investigation revealed that there were three issues involving the left engine over six weeks prior to the crash.

Beechcraft E35 Bonanza, N3315C: Accident occurred November 23, 2019 near Okeechobee County Airport (KOBE), Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3315C


Location: Okeechobee, FL
Accident Number: ERA20LA044
Date & Time: 11/23/2019, 1244 EST
Registration: N3315C
Aircraft: Beech E35
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On November 23, 2019 about 1244 eastern standard time, a Beech E35, N3315C, operated by Spaceport Aviation, impacted a field shortly after takeoff from Okeechobee County Airport (OBE), Okeechobee, Florida. The private pilot sustained serious injuries, and the two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was destroyed by a postcrash fire and was being operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and flight plan information was unknown for the flight that was originating at the time of the accident, and was destined for Marathon, Florida.

The pilot's wife advised law enforcement personnel that during takeoff about 100 ft above ground level, the engine "started to cut out." Her husband attempted to turn for an emergency landing but the engine quit. The airplane started to "nosedive", impacting into a field.

An Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office deputy who was responding to work witnessed smoke from the wreckage and responded to the scene. He rescued the pilot and also assisted the passengers away from the burning wreckage. The occupants were transported for medical treatment.

The wreckage was recovered for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information
Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N3315C
Model/Series: E35 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Spaceport Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OBE, 33 ft msl
Observation Time: 1235 EST
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3700 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Departure Point: Okeechobee, FL (OBE)
Destination: Marathon, FL (MTH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 27.260556, -80.847500




OKEECHOBEE, Florida — Saturday afternoon, the Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office responded to a small plane crash at Okeechobee Airport.

Deputy Richard Varnadore was the first to arrive on scene and found the Beechcraft E35 Bonanza engulfed in flames.

While two passengers managed to escape the burning plane on their own, Varnadore rescued the pilot.

All three people who were onboard the plane were airlifted to an area hospital after being transported to Raulerson Hospital. Their injuries are currently unknown.

According to a report, the plane appeared to have lost power before crash landing at the south side of the Okeechobee Airport in the industrial park.

The Federal Aviation Administration as well as the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating this crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wpbf.com

OKEECHOBEE, Florida (WSVN) — Rescue crews have taken three people to the hospital after, officials said, a small plane crash landed at Okeechobee County Airport.

According to the Okeechobee County Sheriff’s Office, they received a phone call about the crash at around 12:45 p.m., Saturday.

Deputies arrived at the scene to find the Beechcraft E35 Bonanza engulfed in flames.

Authorities said the aircraft appears to have lost power before it went down in an industrial park on the south side of the airport.

Federal Aviation Administration officials said the pilot had reported engine trouble before the crash landing.

Paramedics transported the pilot and two passengers to a nearby hospital, then airlifted to another hospital. Their conditions are unknown.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://wsvn.com

Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office

A call was received at approximately 12:45 pm in reference to a plane crash. Deputy Richard Varnadore was first on scene and found the plane in flames. Two occupants were able to escape. Deputy Varnadore was able to rescue the pilot still in the burning Beechcraft E35 Bonanza. It appears that the plane lost power and made a crash landing at the south side of the Okeechobee airport in the industrial park. All three occupants were transported to Raulerson Hospital and subsequently airlifted to an area hospital, with unknown injuries. This case will be investigated by the FAA and NTSB. No further information to release at this time.

Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office