Saturday, May 13, 2017

Cessna U206C Super Skywagon, N29137: Accident occurred June 09, 2014 in Chitina, Alaska

Additional Participating Entities:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Copper Valley Air Service; Glennallen, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N29137

NTSB Identification: ANC14LA040
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Monday, June 09, 2014 in Chitina, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA U206C, registration: N29137
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While in level cruise on the scheduled passenger flight, the airline transport pilot heard a loud “bang,” followed by a quieter “bang” and a total loss of engine power. He conducted a forced landing to a densely-wooded area, during which the airplane nosed over, resulting in substantial damage to the wings and horizontal stabilizer. A visual examination of the engine revealed a crack in the crankcase. A subsequent examination of the No. 1 piston assembly revealed fatigue fractures in both connecting rod retaining bolts. Additional internal damage to the engine was found to be consistent with damage caused by the release of the connecting rod from the crankcase.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the engine’s No. 1 piston connecting rod retaining bolts due to fatigue, which resulted in a total loss of engine power during cruise flight. 

On June 9, 2014, about 1305 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna U206C airplane, N29137, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power near Chitina, Alaska. The airplane was operated by Copper Valley Air Service, Glennallen, Alaska, as a visual flight rules (VFR) scheduled commuter flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135.The certificated airline transport pilot and sole passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Gulkana Airport, Glennallen, Alaska, at 1235 destined for McCarthy, Alaska.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on June 10, the pilot stated that he was in level cruise flight when he heard a loud "bang", followed by a quieter "bang", prior to a total loss of engine power. He made a forced landing to an area of densely populated black spruce trees. During the forced landing the airplane nosed over, sustaining substantial damage to wings and horizontal stabilizer.

The engine was removed from the airframe and sent to the facilities of Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) Mobile, Alabama, for further examination. The engine was examined on February 24, 2015, by representatives from CMI under the supervision of the NTSB IIC, along with another NTSB investigator. A visual inspection revealed that the right crankcase half was cracked, beginning at the number one cylinder mount continuing upward and slightly forward about 3 inches. 

The examination revealed that most of the engine's major internal damage was associated with the number one piston assembly. The number one piston was fractured at the piston bore, releasing the number one rod and piston pin assembly. The unsupported number one rod and piston pin assembly caused damage to the rear section of the crankcase and camshaft. The number one rod had released from the crankshaft, and exhibited extreme mechanical damage. There were no signs of lubrication distress.

A CMI metallurgist, with permission from the NTSB IIC, examined the number one connecting rod retaining bolts. The metallurgical examination revealed beach marks on the fractured surfaces of both connecting rod bolts consistent with fatigue fractures that initiated at the surface. 

The closest weather reporting facility was Gulkana Airport, about 58 miles northwest of the accident site. At 1253, a weather observation from Gulkana Airport was reporting, in part: wind from 160 degrees, at 9 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, 7,000 feet overcast, temperature, 57 degrees F; dew point 41 degrees F; altimeter, 29.91 inHG.

Search for Possible Downed Aircraft Near Redondo Beach Harbor Suspended: US Coast Guard

US Coast Guard officials have suspended a search for a possible downed aircraft two miles away from Redondo Beach Harbor after a four hour search on Saturday.

Coast Guard Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach authorities received an emergency notification from an aircraft's emergency locator transmitter beacon around 11:45 a.m., according to a Coast Guard press release. 

Several witnesses in the area told authorities they saw oil sheen on the surface of the water near the Redondo Beach Harbor entrance but no planes were reported missing, the Coast Guard said.

A MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew and 45-foot response boat were both launched to search for possible debris, and the Los Angeles County Fire Department assisted in the investigation.

The Coast Guard determined that there was no aircraft in distress and suspended the operation around 5 p.m.

Story and video:   http://ktla.com



Helicopters scoured the waters off Redondo Beach on Saturday for a downed aircraft, but it could have been a false alarm, said Petty Officer Andrea Anderson at the U.S. Coast Guard Station in Long Beach. 

Helicopters and boats with the Coast Guard as well as Los Angeles County Fire Department led by Baywatch Redondo searched the waters from El Segundo to Palos Verdes in a grid pattern for nearly two hours beginning around noon on Saturday.

Anderson said the Coast Guard received a notification at about 11:45 a.m. from an aircraft emergency response beacon, but has not confirmed yet whether a plane had actually entered the water. It was possibly a false alarm that led them to believe a plane had crashed into the ocean, she said. 

"We have not found any debris," she said. "We've been in touch with the Torrance Airport and, as of right now, it's just a preliminary investigation."

There were no eyewitnesses to a plane crash, although one person reported seeing an oil sheen on the water beyond the Redondo Beach Harbor in the vicinity where the emergency response beacon had indicated the downed plane, Anderson said. 

"Sometimes these response beacons can ping off the nearest tower and it can actually give a false location, especially if you're in the city and it goes off," said Anderson. "It can ping off several towers creating a false alarm."

Original article can be found here:   http://tbrnews.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N3976K: Incident occurred May 13, 2017 near Davis Field Airport (KMKO), Muskogee County, Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N3976K


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA186
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 13, 2017 in Muskogee, OK
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N3976K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 13, 2017, about 1500 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140 single-engine airplane, N3976K, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power during cruise flight near Muskogee, Oklahoma. The private pilot was not injured and his passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight that departed Davis Field Airport (MKO), Muskogee, Oklahoma, about 1440.

The pilot reported that he had flown from Robert S. Kerr Airport (RKR), Poteau, Oklahoma, to MKO earlier in the day. The pilot stated that before departing RKR he observed the fuel level was below the filler tab in each wing tank, and estimated that each wing fuel tank contained 10 to 12 gallons of fuel. He recalled that the cross-country flight from RKR to MKO was uneventful and that he switched fuel tanks (from right to left) about halfway through the 45 minute flight. After landing at MKO, the pilot met a friend and two of her children, to whom he provided two short flights. The first flight was about 10 minutes and remained in the airport traffic pattern. The second flight was over the city of Muskogee, Oklahoma. The pilot reported that about 20 minutes into the second flight, the airplane experienced a partial loss of engine power at 3,000 ft mean sea level over downtown Muskogee. The pilot stated that he applied carburetor heat, switched fuel tanks (from left to right), activated the electric fuel pump, and verified magneto operation; however, despite his corrective actions, the engine continued to operate at 500 rpm. He decided to make a forced landing on the southbound lanes of US Highway 64. The pilot reported that shortly before the landing flare, the left wing struck a road sign and the airplane swerved left into the grass median. The nose landing gear fork then separated from the strut and the airplane came to rest in a nose-down attitude.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness inspector examined the airplane after it had been recovered from the accident site to MKO. The inspector observed substantial damage to the main wing spar, immediately outboard of the left wing tank. The inspector stated that the he found the fuel selector positioned to draw fuel from the right fuel tank, and that the right wing tank contained about 10 gallons of fuel. The inspector observed the fuel level was about 1.5 inch below the right tank filler tab. The left wing tank did not contain any usable fuel; less than 1 quart of fuel was drained from the left tank. The fuel recovered from the left wing tank was blue in color and did not contain any water or particulate. A visual inspection of the left wing tank established that it was intact with no apparent damage. Additionally, there was no evidence of any fuel leaks from either wing tank. The fuel supply line located between the engine driven fuel pump and the carburetor did not contain any fuel. The carburetor bowl contained residual fuel. The inspector stated that when he turned-on the electric fuel pump, with the fuel selector on the left fuel tank, the pump cavitated and discharged minimal fuel. The inspector then switched to the right fuel tank and the pump cavitated for a few seconds before it established a typical fuel flow. The fuel discharged from the electric fuel pump was blue in color and did not contain any water or particulate.







MUSKOGEE, Okla. — A plane crashed Saturday afternoon after making an emergency landing on a highway in Muskogee.

The pilot told KOCO 5 First Alert Storm Chaser Chase Rutledge, who responded to the crash while flying for the National Guard, that he was over Oklahoma from out of state when his plane lost power and experienced engine failure. He contacted several people and tried to fly to the Muskogee Airfield.

When the pilot realized the plane wouldn't make it to the airfield, he decided to attempt an emergency landing on Highway 64 in Muskogee. As he made an emergency landing on the highway, a wing hit a road sign, causing the plane to crash.

The pilot and a female passenger are OK, Rutledge said.

Original article can be found here:  www.koco.com

Video: http://www.fox23.com







Yakovlev YAK-55M, N176FD: Fatal accident occurred June 01, 2014 at Stevens Point Municipal Airport (KSTE), Portage County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin
International Council of Airshows (ICAS); Leesburg, Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Bill Cowden poses with his aerobatics plane on Sunday morning June 01, 2014 at the Stevens Point Air Show, a few hours before the plane crashed.

http://registry.faa.gov/N176FD


NTSB Identification: CEN14FA266
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 01, 2014 in Stevens Point, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2017
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK-55M, registration: N176FD
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was performing an aerobatic flight at an airshow event when the accident occurred. The flight team manager witnessed the accident and reported that the airplane entered an intentional inverted flat spin at the apex of an inside loop maneuver. The airplane completed more than 3 rotations in the inverted flat spin before recovering into a dive. The team manager then saw the airplane pitch up and enter an "aggressive" left turn. A review of ground-based video footage confirmed the sequence of events reported by the team manager and showed that, after the pitch up and left roll, the airplane entered a nose-low, descending left spiral that continued to ground impact. The observed flight path was consistent with an accelerated aerodynamic stall after the pilot had recovered from the inverted spin at a low altitude. The airplane cockpit was equipped with an aft-facing video camera that captured the pilot and his flight control movements. A review of the available cockpit footage confirmed that the pilot remained conscious throughout the accident flight and that the ailerons, elevator, and engine had responded to his control inputs. Although the rudder was obstructed from view in the video by the pilot's helmeted head, his observed leg movements were consistent with expected rudder inputs throughout the flight. Further, a postaccident examination of the airplane did not reveal any mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control during the aerobatic flight, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and entering an accelerated stall at a low altitude.
Bill Cowden

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 1, 2014, about 1222 central daylight time, a Yakovlev YAK-55M airplane, N176FD, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during an aerobatic flight over the Stevens Point Municipal Airport (STE), Stevens Point, Wisconsin. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local airshow demonstration flight that departed about 1220.

The flight team manager, who provided the public announcement during the aerobatic flight, reported that the flight began with the airplane rolling inverted shortly after liftoff on runway 21 and making a shallow inverted climb past show center. The airplane then rolled upright before entering a 90° turn away from show center and the crowd. The airplane continued to climb as it turned to a heading opposite that of the takeoff runway, turned back to the runway heading, and reentered the aerobatic box. The airplane rolled inverted before it entered a 45° dive toward show center. The airplane then completed several descending aileron rolls before it rolled wings level and entered a near vertical climb. At the apex of the climb/loop, the airplane entered an inverted flat spin. The flight team manager stated that the pilot normally entered the inverted flat spin at 3,000 ft above ground level (agl) and completed three rotations before recovering in a vertical dive with a 4-5 g pullup at show center; however, on the accident flight, the pilot appeared to enter the inverted spin about 500 ft lower than normal and complete more than 3 rotations before recovering into a dive. According to the the flight team manager, the airplane then pitched up and entered an "aggressive" left turn that resulted in an accelerated aerodynamic stall.

A review of ground-based video footage showed that the airplane had completed 3-1/2 rotations in the inverted flat spin before it entered a near-vertical dive. The airplane pitched up momentarily before it developed a rapid left roll. The airplane subsequently entered a nose-low, descending left spiral that continued to ground impact.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the 47-year-old pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with single engine land and sea, multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. The pilot was type-rated for the Airbus A320, Boeing 757, Boeing 767, McDonnell Douglas DC-9, and Douglas DC-3 transport category airplanes. He also held a glider rating. The single engine land and sea airplane ratings were limited to commercial privileges. The glider rating was limited to private privileges. The pilot's last aviation medical examination was completed on March 24, 2014, when he was issued a first-class medical certificate with no restrictions or limitations. On September 16, 2013, the pilot completed an evaluation flight and was issued a Statement of Aerobatic Competency. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. His last flight review, as required by 14 CFR Part 61.56, was completed on May 12, 2014.

The pilot's flight history was established using his pilot logbook. His most recent logbook entry was completed on May 28, 2014, at which time he had accumulated 8,266.1 hours total flight time, of which 3,628.5 hours were listed as pilot-in-command. According to the logbook, the pilot had accumulated 3,608.8 hours in single-engine airplanes, 4,649.7 hours in multi-engine airplanes, and 4.7 hours in gliders. The pilot had flown 184.2 hours during the 90 days before the accident, 36 hours in the month before the accident, and 0.8 hours during the 24-hour period before the accident. The pilot had accumulated 107.6 hours in the accident airplane make/model. According to available documentation, the pilot had completed one aerobatic training flight in his authorized aerobatic practice box during the 8-month period before the accident. The single aerobatic training flight was completed on May 28, 2014, in the accident airplane.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a 1993 Yakovlev YAK-55M, serial number 930810. It was an aerobatic single-place, single-engine airplane with a fixed conventional landing gear. The airplane was powered by a 360-horsepower, 9-cylinder Vendeneyev M14P radial engine, serial number KR0312035. The engine provided thrust through a constant-speed, three-blade, MT-Propeller MTV-9-B-C propeller, serial number 110600. The airplane had a maximum allowable takeoff weight of 2,150 pounds. The pilot purchased the airplane on October 17, 2010. The airplane was issued an FAA experimental category airworthiness certificate for the purpose of exhibition and associated operating limitations on December 7, 2010.

According to the airplane maintenance records, the most recent condition inspection was completed on September 29, 2013. At the time of that inspection, the airframe and engine had accumulated 214.5 hours total time. The propeller had accumulated 51.4 hours total time. The last recorded maintenance was an engine oil change that was completed on May 22, 2014. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues. The recording hour (Hobbs) meter was damaged during the accident, and a definitive reading could not be obtained.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1215, an automated surface weather observation station located at STE reported: wind 200° at 14 knots, gusting 21 knots; broken cloud ceilings at 2,900 ft agl and 3,600 ft agl; 10 miles surface visibility; temperature 26° Celsius; dew point 19° Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 29.90 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Stevens Point Municipal Airport, located about 3 miles northeast of Stevens Point, Wisconsin, was served by two asphalt runways, runway 3/21 (6,028 ft by 120 ft) and runway 12/30 (3,635 ft by 75 ft). The airport elevation was 1,110 ft mean sea level.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located alongside a dirt road in a wooded area about 260 yards northeast of the runway 30 threshold. The elevation of the accident site was 1,095 ft. The main wreckage consisted of the entire airplane, which was orientated on a northwest heading. The wreckage was found in an upright position, and there was no appreciable wreckage debris path. The observed tree damage and the lack of a lateral debris path were consistent with a near vertical impact. All observed structural component failures were consistent with overstress separation, and there was no evidence of an inflight or postimpact fire. Flight control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. The engine was found in a 2.5 ft deep impact crater and remained partially attached to the firewall. Three engine cylinders had partially separated from the crankcase, which prevented the engine from being rotated. After removing several cylinders, an internal examination did not reveal any mechanical discontinuities within the engine drivetrain. The No. 1 magneto exhibited impact damage that prevented a functional test. The No. 2 magneto provided a spark on all leads when rotated. All three propeller blades were fragmented, consistent with the engine producing power at the time of impact. The postaccident examination of the airplane did not reveal any mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

At the request of the Portage County Coroner, an autopsy was performed on the pilot at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, located in Madison, Wisconsin. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident. The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during the autopsy. The toxicological test results were negative for ethanol and all drugs and medications.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

A Garmin GPSMAP 396, serial number 67014609, was recovered from the wreckage and examined at the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. The non-volatile data was recovered through a memory-chip recovery process. The final dataset was recorded on May 31, 2014, and was associated with a 0.8-hour flight from Menomonie Municipal Airport (LUM) to STE. The Garmin GPSMAP 396 device did not contain any data associated with the accident flight.

A GoPro Hero 3+ digital video camera, serial number 30C3CDE, was recovered from the wreckage and examined at the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. A forensic recovery of the memory card revealed eight video files. Seven of the eight video files were not associated with the accident flight. The remaining video file contained 4 minutes 37 seconds of video footage from the accident flight.

A review of the available video footage established that the camera was mounted on the glare shield facing aft toward the pilot. The pilot's helmeted head, torso, hips, upper legs, and knees were in the field-of-view. Also visible were the pilot control stick, the inboard portions of both ailerons, the outboard portions of both horizontal stabilizers, and both elevator horns/counterbalances. The vertical stabilizer and rudder were obscured by the pilot's helmeted head. The video camera also recorded audio that detected changes in wind and engine noise during the accident flight.

A review of the video footage established that the flight controls were moving in conjunction with the pilot's control inputs and that he closed and locked the canopy before takeoff. The pilot initiated the takeoff by advancing the engine power lever gradually with his left hand. The airplane became airborne in a level attitude while over the runway 21 centerline. About 8 seconds after liftoff, the pilot activated the smoke system with his right thumb on the control stick, and the airplane briefly entered a slight climb before it rolled to the right into an inverted attitude. The inverted airplane was slightly left of the runway 21 centerline. The pilot then pushed the control stick forward to initiate an inverted climb. During the inverted climb, the pilot turned the airplane away from the showline and eventually rolled the airplane upright and continued in a climbing left turn onto a downwind for runway 21. While on the downwind, the pilot made a radio call and activated the airplane's smoke system several times. The airplane continued to climb on the left crosswind and eventually turned upwind for runway 21.

At 03:53 (mm:ss) into the recording, the pilot made a radio call, activated the smoke system, and rolled the airplane inverted. After rolling inverted, the airplane continued to fly level briefly before the pilot applied aft control stick with both hands to establish a descending flight path of about 45°. The airplane then completed 2-1/2 right aileron rolls while descending, and smoke was observed trailing the airplane's flight path. By 04:06, the airplane was upright and wings level. The airplane then entered an inside loop maneuver. While the airplane was ascending, the two intersecting runways were visible outside the airplane's canopy. The longitudinal axis of the airplane appeared to be about 20° offset to the runway 3/21 centerline. At 04:17, the pilot reduced engine throttle, and the recorded audio track was consistent with a partial reduction in engine power. About 1 second later, the unrestrained portion of the pilot's shoulder harness straps (strap ends) fell toward the top of the airplane's canopy indicating the airplane had entered a negative-g environment. The pilot applied slight forward control stick with his right hand. By 04:19, the pilot further reduced the engine throttle and applied additional forward control stick input. The airplane's heading remained offset about 20° from the runway 3/21 centerline. The elevator horns/counterbalances showed that the elevator was near maximum deflection as the control stick approached the full forward position. The pilot then applied a left rudder input while holding the control stick in the full forward position. The observed smoke trail was consistent with the airplane yawing. By 04:27, the airplane was established in an inverted spin and had completed one rotation. The pilot was still holding full forward stick with some right aileron input. The airplane completed several rotations while in the inverted spin before the pilot began to move the control stick forward and applied right rudder. The airplane's rotation rate began to slow, and by 04:31, the control stick was being held in a neutral pitch position. The elevator was observed in a neutral position when compared to the horizontal stabilizer. The pilot then moved the control stick to the right, and both ailerons were observed to move in conjunction with the control stick position. The shoulder harness straps were still floating, consistent with the airplane still in a negative-g environment. The pilot was holding the control stick with a clenched right hand. At 04:32, the pilot applied a rapid left aileron and left rudder control input. The ailerons were observed to respond to the control stick movement. The shoulder harness straps were no longer floating, consistent with the airplane in a positive-g environment. The airplane rotation stopped, and there was an increase in engine noise.

About a second after the rotation had stopped, the pilot quickly centered the control stick before moving the control stick aft. The elevator was observed to move in conjunction with the control stick movement. The ailerons appeared to be in a neutral position as the airplane pitched up from a nose-low descent toward level flight. Within the next 2 seconds, the horizon became visible behind the airplane. The upright airplane was banked slightly to the right as the airplane neared a level flight attitude. At 04:34, the pilot moved his head to look over his right shoulder. The airplane continued to pitch up and subsequently entered a level climb. The pilot then turned his head back toward the center of the cockpit, his right hand was still firmly griping the control stick, and his left hand was on the engine throttle. Runway 3/21 was observed directly behind the airplane and perpendicular to the airplane's flight path. The airplane then entered an abrupt left roll with a positive pitch angle. The pilot had not commanded the left roll with aileron or rudder control input. The control stick position was consistent with an aft pitch and a neutral roll input. The observed positions of the ailerons and elevator were consistent with the control stick position.

The video footage was analyzed frame-by-frame, and the left roll rate appeared to increase rapidly between frames. The pilot was still griping the control stick with his right hand while his left hand remained on the engine throttle. As the left roll developed, the pilot moved the control stick to the right and partially reduced the aft pitch. The airplane continued to roll left, and the runway 30 threshold markings became visible below the airplane. During the left roll, the pilot added additional right roll control and further reduced the aft pitch input. The ailerons and elevator responded to the control stick movement. Throughout the left roll, the pilot was looking forward, and his right hand remained on the control stick and his left hand on the engine throttle. At 04:37, the video footage ended with the airplane still airborne and rolling to the left. The airplane had rolled beyond 90° to the horizon and the runway 30 threshold markings were still visible under the airplane. The final impact sequence was not recorded by the video camera. However, during the final seconds of recorded video, the pilot's body positioning, active head movements, and flight control movements were consistent with him being conscious. Additionally, the review of the available video footage confirmed that the pilot had remained conscious throughout the aerobatic flight.




NTSB Identification: CEN14FA266
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 01, 2014 in Stevens Point, WI
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK-55M, registration: N176FD
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 1, 2014, about 1222 central daylight time, a Yakovlev model YAK-55M airplane, N176FD, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during an aerobatic flight over the Stevens Point Municipal Airport (STE), Stevens Point, Wisconsin. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local airshow demonstration flight that departed about 1220.

The flight team manager, who also provided the public-announcement during the accident flight, reported that the accident flight began with the airplane rolling inverted shortly after liftoff, followed by a shallow inverted climb past show-center. The airplane then rolled upright before entering a 90-degree turn away from show-center and the crowd. The airplane continued to climb, while on the opposite heading used for the takeoff, before it turned back to the runway heading and reentered the aerobatic box. The airplane then rolled inverted before it entered a 45-degree dive toward show-center. The airplane then completed several descending aileron rolls before it rolled wings level and entered a near vertical climb. At the apex of the climb/loop, the airplane entered an inverted flat spin.

Ground-based video footage showed that the airplane completed 3-1/2 rotations in the inverted flat spin before it entered a near vertical dive. The video footage then showed a momentary increase in airplane pitch, achieving a positive deck angle of about 20-degrees, before the airplane entered a rapid left roll. The airplane then entered a nose-down left descending spiral into terrain.

A postaccident examination established that the airplane impacted terrain in a near vertical attitude. Flight control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. The engine was located in a 2-1/2 feet deep impact crater and remained partially connected to the firewall. Three engine cylinders had partially separated from the crankcase, which prevented the engine from being rotated. After removing several cylinders, an internal examination did not reveal any mechanical discontinuities within the engine drivetrain. The No. 1 magneto exhibited impact damage that prevented a functional test. The No. 2 magneto provided a spark on all leads when rotated. All three propeller blades exhibited damage consistent with the engine producing power at the time of impact. The postaccident examination of the airplane did not reveal any mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal operation. A handheld GPS and GoPro video camera were recovered from the wreckage and were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for readout.

AS+ LTD AC 4, N358R: Fatal accident occurred May 13, 2017 at Blair Municipal Airport (KBTA), Washington County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Michael D. Boska: http://registry.faa.gov/N358R

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA181
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 13, 2017 in Blair, NE
Aircraft: AS+ LTD AC 4, registration: N358R
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 13, 2017, about 1520 central daylight time, an experimental racing AS+ LTD AC 4 glider, N358R, impacted terrain after the canopy had opened during takeoff at Blair Municipal Airport, Blair, Nebraska. The glider sustained substantial damage. The private pilot received fatal injuries. The glider was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Dr. Michael Boska 



BLAIR, Neb. — A Saturday glider plane crash took the life of a Glenwood man and respected UNMC scientist.

Blair police say Dr. Michael Boska, 59, died after his personal sailplane crashed during take-off just after 3 p.m.

Members of the Omaha Soaring Club released a statement Monday that indicates the plane's canopy opened unexpectedly during the towed takeoff, causing Boska to somehow lose control.

"The glider subsequently went airborne followed by a rapid descent and crash while still attached by rope to the tow plane," the release said.

Glider planes, or sailplanes, do not have engines, and need assistance to take off. Once they are in the air, they rely on columns of rising air, or thermals, to maintain elevation.

Boska's wife, Margaret Boska, says her husband was somebody who played as hard as he worked. Boska had been employed at UNMC for 17 years as a radiology professor and vice chairman of radiology research, contributing to breakthroughs on Parkinson's disease.

Boska was a loving father to two children, grandfather, brother, and husband. But Margaret says nothing appealed to him more than being in the sky.

"Always wanted to fly, from the time he was a kid," Margaret said.

Margaret says her husband's passion for flying started with hang-gliders years ago, while he was a college student at the University of California, Berkeley.

"He loved the feeling of it, he just loved that freedom," Margaret said.

That love evolved into flying glider planes, which, like hang gliders, rely on Mother Nature rather than engines to soar.

"There's no sound of an engine," Margaret explained, "you just hear the air coming over the wings."

Boska was ready to enjoy that freedom Saturday when something went wrong.

"This is just a very unexpected event that occurred, and everybody's devastated," Robert Craig of the Omaha Soaring Club said.

Craig says Boska was a treasured member of several years, and a skilled pilot.

"Those are the times that I'll remember the most, the enjoyable flying times with him," Craig said.

Margaret says she'll remember his sense of adventure, wit and heart.

He always like to see the world from above, Margaret said, and that hasn't changed.

"He died doing what he absolutely loved the most, and I feel that he's just flying a little higher now," Margaret said.

Omaha Soaring members say this is the first time in 30 years that the club has seen an accident this serious.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Omaha Soaring Club's full statement:

The members of the Omaha Soaring Club are deeply saddened at the tragic loss of a fellow member in a glider accident that occurred at the Blair Municipal Airport on the afternoon of Saturday, May 13th. Our prayers and support go out to his family. His loss is of great concern to each of us as fellow Club members and glider pilots.

As previously reported by witnesses to the accident, it occurred during a takeoff sequence when the glider’s canopy unexpectedly opened during the takeoff roll. The glider subsequently went airborne followed by a rapid descent and crash while still attached by rope to the tow plane. The resulting impact caused immediate fatal injuries to the pilot.

The Club owns two gliders and some members own their own gliders. The accident glider was one of those personally owned by the pilot. By FAA rules, he was current and qualified to fly this glider. The designated glider operations area on the field, maintained by the Airport Authority, was in excellent condition.

We want the community to know that the Omaha Soaring Club has operated for over 30 years without an accident of this magnitude. It has continually fostered and encouraged a culture of safety that has included recurring FAA safety seminars and consultations with local FAA Air Traffic Control operations to enhance safety in all respects possible. The Club has also worked closely with the City of Blair’s Airport Authority’s leadership to ensure the safest possible operations at the Blair Municipal Airport. This support is respected and valued by all Club members. In this situation, no conflict with airport operations contributed to this accident and future operations should remain unaffected.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will conduct an investigation to determine the cause of this accident. All members of the Omaha Soaring Club stand ready to support this effort in any manner requested.


Story and video:  http://www.ketv.com









BLAIR, Neb. — We have learned the name of the man killed after a glider crashed at the Blair Airport Saturday. Authorities said the victim is Michael Boska, 59, of Glenwood, Iowa. He was a member of an area glider club.

One witness said it appeared windy conditions may have contributed to the crash during take-off.

Authorities have not released any additional information. The cause of the crash is currently under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.ketv.com

BLAIR, Neb. — A Glenwood man who died in a glider accident Saturday has been identified by authorities as Michael Boska.

Boska, 59, was a member of the Omaha Soaring Club according to Bob Craig, club president.

In a statement, Craig said Boska crashed about 3:30 p.m. He was the only occupant inside the glider, and was pronounced dead at the scene.

“The members of the Omaha Soaring Club are deeply saddened at the tragic loss of a fellow member in a glider accident that occurred at the Blair Municipal Airport,” Craig said. “Our prayers and support go out to his family. His loss is of great concern to each of us as fellow Club members and glider pilots.”

Craig said witnesses saw the crash occur during a takeoff sequence when the glider’s canopy unexpectedly opened during a takeoff roll.

The glider went airborne, then descended rapidly and crashed while still attached by the rope of the tow plane, Craig said.

“In the process of the gentleman reaching for the canopy, he lost control of the plane and crashed,” according to accounts provided to Craig.

The glider was Boska’s personal craft, Craig said. Boska was currently qualified to fly a glider.

“The designated glider operations area on the field, maintained by the Airport Authority, was in excellent condition,” Craig elaborated.

It is the first accident of this magnitude in 30 years of history with the club, Craig said.

“In this situation, no conflict with airport operations contributed to this accident and future operations should remain unaffected,” he said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.nonpareilonline.com

One person is confirmed dead in a glider accident at the Blair Airport just before 3:30 p.m. Saturday.

Representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board arrived at the scene at approximately 6:30 p.m. The agencies will be investigating the cause of the crash and reporting their findings in an accident report.

The victim, a 59-year-old male, is from Glenwood, Iowa. The man's name has not yet been released to the public.

"As far as the mechanics of the crash, it was in the process of taking off at the time," Lt. Aaron Barrow of the Blair Police Department said. "It's still in the process of being investigated."

Both Blair police and the Washington County Sheriff's Office both responded to the call. Bob Craig, the Omaha Soaring Club's president, confirmed that the deceased was a member of the club.

"I wasn't there, but it was a takeoff accident," Craig said. "His canopy opened up, and in the process of reaching for the canopy to shut it, he lost control of the plane, essentially. He was on tow, just got off the ground, and lost control of the plane, which came back down and hit hard. That's what happened."

The victim was the sole occupant of the glider, which Barrow said is in numerous pieces near the accident location. Police vehicles parked in a row to block the view of the crash site. It is unclear whether the wind was a factor in the crash.

County Attorney Scott Vander Schaaf has ordered an autopsy to be performed on the deceased to determine the exact cause of death. It was reported that he was already dead at the police's initial arrival.

Barrow said there is not a clear timeframe of when the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will report their findings.


Original article can be found here: http://www.enterprisepub.com

BLAIR, Neb. (WOWT)-- The Washington County Sheriff's Department has identified the man from Glenwood, Iowa who died after a small aircraft crashed near the Blair Airport.

That person is Michael Boska, His family has been notified of the crash.

The Blair Police Department is handling the investigation. They tell us only one person was on board at the time of the crash. They also said the plane was taking off when it crashed.

Officials tell WOWT 6 News the FAA and the NTSB are on location to help in the investigation.

Story and video:  http://www.wowt.com

Cessna 182 Skylane, N97038: Accident occurred May 24, 2014 in Arvin, Kern County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N97038


NTSB Identification: WPR14LA207 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 24, 2014 in Arvin, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N97038
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 24, 2014, at 1211 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182Q, N97038, experienced a total loss of engine power and force landed in a field one mile south of Arvin, California. During the off airport landing the airplane nosed over, substantially damaging the tail and left lift strut. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the commercial pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91, as a personal flight. Both the pilot and his single passenger received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed during the flight, and a visual flight plan was not filed. The flight originated at Corona Municipal Airport, Corona, California.

The pilot stated that an hour into the flight, while over the Tehachapi Mountains, he noticed that the engine oil pressure had dropped, but the oil temperature and cylinder temperatures were normal. He declared an emergency to Bakersfield Approach and was initially given vectors to Bakersfield Municipal Airport. About 2-3 minutes later he started hearing rattling noises coming from the engine and then the cockpit filled with black smoke. He identified an open field on his left and maneuvered to make that field but didn't realize it had crop furrows. The airplane hit the first berm hard, bounced 3-4 times hitting berms along the way, then the nose wheel hit a berm and flipped the airplane over onto its back. On scene photos showed that the belly of the airplane was coated with engine oil aft of the engine fire wall.

An examination of the airplane and engine by the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge (IIC) and a technical representative from Continental Motors Incorporated was performed on September 30, 2014. The engine time indicated on the tachometer was 2,861.6 (hours). Investigators found the air-oil separator return line disconnected from the oil return port located on the rocker cover of the engine's number 1 cylinder. Oil staining was evident on the lower engine cowling below the number 1 cylinder. It was noted that the engine oil filter was located behind the air-oil separator return line. The left engine case half, upper section above the No 4 cylinder, exhibited a 6 x 4 inch hole just aft of the oil filler neck. The cylinders were removed and the case was separated into its halves. The crankshaft main bearings exhibited normal wear with no heat discoloration. The number 3 crankshaft throw bearing was shiny & polished showing very little heat discoloration. The number 4 crankshaft throw was dark black with a few gouges and exhibited extreme heat distress. The number 5 crankshaft throw was black and exhibited extreme heat distress. The number 6 connecting rod attached to the crankshaft throw was discolored dark gray, consistent with heat distress. The internal section of the engine case in line with the number 3 & 4 crankshaft throws exhibited internal repeated impact marks, metal removal, and damage to the oil galleries on both sides of the engine case.

Examination of the engine logbook revealed that the most recent annual inspection was performed on April 10, 2013, 2,828.2 hours total time, and 309.5 hours since major overhaul (SMOH). The last entry in the logbook was dated April 18, 2014, where the pilot/owner had performed an oil change, 2,857.3 hours total time.

Wings Over Pittsburgh airshow returns to thrill onlookers



Thousands of people packed the 911th Airlift Wing in Coraopolis for Wings Over Pittsburgh Saturday, after a six-year hiatus.

The event, free to the public, offered ground exhibits, including vintage and current military aircraft and thrilling aerial exhibitions by stunt pilots.

Spectators lined up to see the inside of a KC-135 Stratotanker, a FedEx cargo plane or to peek into the cockpit of a P-51 Mustang that was flown by the famous Tuskegee airmen. Others gathered on the grass next to the runway to see air demonstrations by the United States Air Force Thunderbirds, aerobatic pilot Sean Tucker with Team Oracle, GEICO Skytypers Airshow Team or a demonstration by Air Combat Command F-22 Demonstration Team.

For Cole Draskovich, 7, of Cranberry, the louder aircraft, the better.

“We've seen tons of cool stuff like skydivers, and planes that make big circles in the sky but I really liked the big, loud jets,” said Draskovich. 

Story and photo gallery: http://triblive.com

Beechcraft 400A Beechjet, N412GJ, MLW La Paloma Inc: Incident occurred May 13, 2014 at Sugar Land Regional Airport (KSGR), Fort Bend County, Texas

Aviation Incident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Incident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident. 

MLW La Paloma Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N412GJ

NTSB Identification: ENG14IA013
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Incident occurred Tuesday, May 13, 2014 in Sugar Land, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/27/2017
Aircraft: RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT COMPANY 400A, registration: N412GJ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft incident report.

The No. 2 engine sustained a yellow-crowned night-heron birdstrike during takeoff roll from Sugar Land Regional Airport (SGR)- Sugar Land, Texas. The impact from the birdstrike resulted in contact between the fan and inlet case that separated all nineteen (19) fan blades. The released blade fragments penetrated the engine case and cowl and caused an engine fire. A blade fragment impacted the right wing and punctured the fuel tank resulting in fuel spillage onto the wing surface and runway. Materials analysis on recovered fan blade fragments determined that all separated blades failed due to overload and no evidence of fatigue was identified. A series of modal tests including: tap hammer, high energy shaker, and computer model simulation were conducted at the system and component level. The tests identified a four nodal diameter coincidence at about 72% N1 speed. When sufficient energy is imparted to the engine fan during a foreign object ingestion event like a birdstrike, it may result in a rub induced excitation and subsequent fan blade separation and catastrophic engine failure.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this incident as follows:
The probable cause of the uncontained No. 2 engine failure on the Raytheon Beechjet 400A was a yellow-crowned night-heron birdstrike that resulted in fan blade contact with the inlet case and rub induced excitation of a previously unidentified natural frequency (resonance) within the engine operating range.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 13, 2014, at about 1511 central daylight time, a Raytheon Beechjet 400A, N412GJ, equipped with two Pratt & Whitney Canada (PWC) JT15D-5 engines, experienced a No. 2 engine fire following a bird strike during takeoff roll at Sugar Land Regional Airport (SGR), Sugar Land, Texas. The crew successfully aborted the takeoff and came to a full stop on the runway. Both fire bottles were discharged and the fire was extinguished. During a survey of the aircraft, fuel was found leaking from the No. 2 engine cowling and from a puncture in the right wing fuel tank at the wing fence between the wing and fuselage. The No. 2 engine fan blades were all fractured near the root and there was evidence of blade fragments impacting the inlet cowl forward of the fan. The flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 to reposition the airplane.

INJURIES

No injuries were reported to passengers or crew.

DAMAGE TO AIRPLANE

An on scene examination of the airplane and No. 2 engine cowling was conducted by representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Houston Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) and Textron Aviation. The No 2 engine core cowl had multiple breaches and bulges around the engine consistent with radial release of engine fragments. The core cowl also exhibited thermal distress including paint bubbling and deformation, most concentrated on the top half. Paint blistering was observed on the No. 2 engine strut. The right wing had multiple small impact marks forward of the engine inlet. One of the impacts at the wing fence penetrated the right fuel tank resulting in a fuel leak.The inner barrel of the inlet cowl exhibited extensive circumferential tearing in line with the fan plane of rotation and gouging and impact damage along the length of the cowl. The inlet cowl damage partially separated the inlet cowl from the engine.

TEST AND RESEARCH

Engine Examination

The No. 2 engine was shipped to the PWC facility in Bridgeport, West Virginia for examination and teardown. All 19 fan blades were fractured and separated near the blade platform. Seventeen (17) of the 19 separated blade airfoils were recovered in the engine or on the runway. The engine inlet case was ovalized and the outer diameter of the case exhibited impact damage. The inlet case also had a 360 degree circumferential fracture that allowed the forward section of the case to separate from the engine and was found hanging loosely. The intermediate case was pulled away from the inlet case where the attaching bolts failed between the 7 and 1 o'clock positions and had a series of circumferential and axial cracks.

Metallurgy

Nineteen (19) fan blade platforms and seventeen (17) fan blade airfoils that were recovered were submitted to the PWC Materials Lab in Longueuil, Quebec, Canada for examination. All blades had transverse factures near the blade platform. Binocular and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination determined that all fracture surfaces were consistent with ductile overload and no indications of fatigue were observed.

Bird Species Identification

A sample of bird feathers and remains (snarge) were sent to the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC for species identification. The remains were positively identified to be a yellow-crowned night-heron. The average mass of this species is 683g (1.51lbs). The analysis could not determine if more than one bird was ingested.

Modal Testing

PWC completed a series of tests to determine the root cause of the dynamic response between the fan and inlet case following the birdstrike event. Modal testing was done at both the component and engine level with tap hammers and high energy shakers. Tests were also conducted to measure the sensitivity of the engine to varying levels of stiffness at the engine to inlet case attachment. Finally, tap hammer testing was performed on a JT15D-5 engine installed on a Beechjet 400A representative of the incident airplane. The testing identified a four nodal diameter coincidence between the fan and inlet case at an N1 speed of about 72%. Both the fan and inlet case share a natural frequency at about 72% N1 speed and when energy is imparted to the components by an event like a birdstrike, it can result in a rub induced excitation and catastrophic engine failure. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Corrective Actions

In response to these findings, PWC is evaluating inlet case damping options to attenuate the identified natural frequency and plans to complete the design change and introduce the modification to the fleet in 2017.