Monday, September 19, 2016

Island Air Expands and Promotes Leadership Team

Island Air has expanded its leadership team by adding a new senior vice president of operations and promoting two directors to vice presidents.

“As part of Island Air’s focus on growing our airline and improving operations at all levels, we are continuing to build a strong leadership team,” said David Uchiyama, president and CEO of Island Air.

“David Lindskoog, Dee Airman and George Nichols have extensive experience in the airline industry and they fully understand what it takes to ensure the efficient and safe operation of the airline on a daily basis, while also planning for future growth and expansion to meet customer needs and changing travel trends.”

David Lindskoog, Senior Vice President of Operations

David Lindskoog has 35 years of experience in airline operations, including 16 years of line flying and 19 years in airline management.

Throughout his career, he has served as a key member of the management teams for various airlines including Copa Airlines, North American Airlines and ATA Airlines, successfully effecting changes to streamline operations, improve standards and training, ensure regulatory compliance, foster better safety culture, improve labor relations and implement new systems and technologies.

He has been responsible for flight operations, including scheduling, flight training and standards for pilots, dispatchers and crew members.

In addition, Lindskoog has guided airlines through major transitions, including moving from a charter company to a major scheduled-service airline, as well as overseeing workforce growth and training relating to the introduction of new aircraft fleet.

He also served as senior director of safety at TransPac Aviation Academy.

William “Dee” Airman, Vice President of Administration, Safety and Security

William “Dee” Airman has more than 30 years of experience in aviation leadership and safety and security management.

For the past two years, Airman served as Island Air’s director of safety, security and quality assurance.

During that time, he led Island Air through the successful completion of its first International Air Transportation Association Operational Safety Audit, which is the global benchmark for operational safety management in the airline industry.

He also led the airline through its first successful codeshare safety review with United Airlines. Part of his new responsibilities will be to oversee human resources and elevate the airline’s training curriculum.

Airman has extensive experience in domestic and international flight operations, having held management and director-level positions in safety, security, regulatory compliance and systems operations for airlines including Northwestern Airlines, Porter Airlines, flydubai, Emirates and Champion Air.

A United States Air Force Academy graduate, Airman served as an Air Force commander, instructor and research pilot for 28 years.

George Nichols, Vice President of Information Technology

George Nichols has been promoted after serving as the airline’s IT director since May 2015.

He now oversees all aspects of the company’s IT systems, including preparing disaster and emergency recovery plans; creating IT security guidelines; managing and preparing the design, development and upgrading of systems and programs; and acquiring computer hardware, software and firmware.

Nichols, who has 26 years of experience in IT and project management, previously worked for American Airlines as a principal project manager responsible for technology and services operations, employee relations, financial management, business strategy and project management.

He has also held leadership and management positions at Cadbury Schweppes, Brink’s Incorporated, ElesticEdge, First Tennessee Mortgage, NationsBank/Bank of America and Computer Support Services, Inc.

Nichols also served in the U.S. Army Military Intelligence.

Island Air offers 238 flights each week between Oahu, Maui, Kauai and Hawaii Island.

Founded in 1980 as Princeville Airways, the company was renamed Island Air in 1992 and has been proudly serving the islands of Hawaii for more than 35 years.

Read more here:  http://bigislandnow.com

Piper PA-11, N4681M: Accident occurred September 19, 2016 in Grand Isle, Vermont

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4681M 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-65


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA495
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 19, 2016 in Grand Isle, VT
Aircraft: PIPER PA 11, registration: N4681M
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that about 450 feet above the ground, he reduced the power to idle to simulate an engine failure and forced landing. The pilot further reported that he "pushed the nose over" and made a "left tear drop turn" to land on the opposite direction of the takeoff direction. When the pilot had about 15 to 20 degrees remaining in the turn, and was about 15 to 20 feet above the ground, he reported that he increased "back stick pressure" and the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall. Subsequently, the left wing dropped and the airplane impacted terrain in a nose low left wing down attitude.

The left wing and fuselage sustained substantial damage. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/ Operator Aircraft Accident/ Incident Report that he misjudged the wind speed and did not realize he was completing the simulated training maneuver with a tailwind. The accident airport did not have an automated weather observing system or wind indicator. 



The crashed Piper PA-11 on the Savage Island runway 


The damaged plane after it was moved from the crash site to a barn on Savage Island.

The plane has been disassembled and placed in a barn on Savage Island until the owner can remove it. 



GRAND ISLE — The sheriff who mounted a large-scale emergency response to a plane crash on a Lake Champlain island said the air national guardsmen who did not immediately notify authorities should face consequences.

The accident occurred Sept. 19 around noon on Savage Island, according to Grand Isle Sheriff Ray Allen. However, the crash of the airman’s personal plane wasn’t reported to authorities until six hours later when another pilot, flying over the privately owned island, saw the crashed single-prop Piper PA-11, and radioed the flight tower at Burlington International Airport, Allen said.

Air traffic controllers called Vermont State Police, who called in Allen. Believing he was dealing with an active crash scene, Allen dispatched two boats and called on Milton’s volunteer fire department to join the marine response.

Allen requested assistance from a U.S. Customs and Border Protection helicopter out of Plattsburgh, New York, to help search the more than 200- acre island for the downed plane, but one of his deputies reached the scene in time to cancel that request.

The island’s caretaker, Wayne Fisher, told sheriffs that no one was injured and the pilot and his passenger were long gone, Allen said. Hours earlier, Fisher had ferried them back to Grand Isle, and drove them to the airport at Allenholm farm where their car was parked, the caretaker told Seven Days, which first reported the incident.

After an airplane accident that results in injury or “significant damage,” federal regulations require that the operator must “by the most expeditious means available, notify the nearest National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) office.”

It does not appear the two airmen involved did that, as the NTSB didn’t notify the Federal Aviation Administration workers at the Burlington airport.

“In my thinking, yeah, there ought to be some consequences,” Allen said. The response put his deputies and a group of volunteers at risk due to the lake’s low water level and because they left the island after dark, he said.

“If necessary agencies are informed ahead of time, we don’t have to treat this like it’s an active response situation,” Allen said.

Allen said failing to report an emergency happens frequently and is frustrating.

A few years ago, he said someone spotted light reflecting off the window of a car stuck in the ice on Lake Champlain. His department was called in, along with volunteers, who used specialized gear to trek out onto the ice, only to find the car was abandoned.

The car owner “was actually at home relaxing,” Allen said.

“If people are out there enjoying recreational activities, and something goes wrong, somebody else is going to see it and report it if they don’t,” Allen said, “It’s common sense.”

The FAA and NTSB are conducting a joint investigation of the accident. Scott Pratt, the FAA investigator handling the case, said depending on what his investigation finds, a suspension or revocation of the airmen’s private pilot license was possible.

The Piper PA-11 involved in the accident is registered to John Rahill. Rahill is a Lieutenant Colonel with the Vermont Air National Guard who flies F-16s and has deployed overseas a number of times, according to news reports unearthed by Seven Days.

VTANG spokesman Maj. Chris Gookin confirmed airmen were involved airmen, but declined to confirm the identity of the pilot or passenger, citing the ongoing investigation. Rahill did not return a call requesting comment.

George Moore, an aviation attorney who serves as an aviation legal expert for Plane & Pilot magazine, said the pilot should expect a letter from the FAA taking some type of action against their private pilot license.

“I think he’ll have to fight not to be suspended,” Moore said.

Moore noted that the standard for reporting an airplane accident with no injuries is “substantial damage,” and the pilot may argue on any appeal that he did believe that threshold was met.

However, a preliminary accident report on the FAA website lists the plane as “destroyed.” Moore said he believes there’s no doubt the NTSB should have been notified immediately. However, he said it’s understandable the pilot might not have felt any urgency to notify authorities.

““To be charitable, he might have thought ‘Why should I notify anyone?’” because there was no injuries, and the only people in the immediate area, the island’s caretaker, was aware of the situation.

“They’re not anticipating anyone getting all excited and notifying the FAA,” Moore added. “If you look at this from the pilot’s point of view it’s like ‘yeah I’ll take care of this later,’ I want to get back to my car.”

Moore said the FAA investigation may reveal that the pilot was not at fault for the accident or made efforts to minimize the damage. An investigation is underway.

Moore said it’s unlikely the incident will have any bearing on the pilot’s service as an airmen, noting that military pilots aren’t required to have civilian certifications.

If VTANG officials determine the airmen acted recklessly by not notifying authorities, they may ask them to undergo further training.

Being taken off flight duty is unlikely, Moore said.

During a brief interview, Maj. Gookin repeatedly referred to the situation as a “civilian matter,” and would not comment on whether disciplinary action was possible.

Pratt, the FAA investigator, said he didn’t know when the investigation will be completed.

Source:   https://vtdigger.org




National Guard Pilot Crashed Plane, Left Local Police in the Dark

An off-duty Vermont National Guard airman crashed a small private plane on a Lake Champlain island around noon Monday and left the scene with his passenger — another airman — apparently without calling police.

Local authorities found out about the badly damaged Piper PA-11 on Savage Island only after the pilot of another small plane noticed the wreckage six hours later while flying over the 207-acre island, according to Grand Isle County Sheriff Ray Allen.

That pilot radioed the tower at Burlington International Airport to report it. The tower staff contacted Vermont State Police, who in turn patched in Allen around 6 p.m.

Allen mobilized a massive response to what he thought was an active crash scene.

“There are lots of fire chiefs upset, myself included, along with other agencies, that this was an incident six hours old with no injuries — and nobody there,” Allen told Seven Days. 

Had local authorities been alerted when the incident happened, an unnecessary large-scale response could have been prevented, Allen added. “This was a substantial amount of money and time wasted,” he said.

Federal regulations require a pilot involved in an accident to “immediately, and by the most expeditious means available, notify the nearest National Transportation Safety Board office.” The NTSB had a preliminary crash report on its website Thursday, but a spokesman could not say when the agency was notified.

Allen told Seven Days he contacted the FAA, along with the Milton Fire Department, and had six or seven boats from various agencies respond to the call. He even asked U.S. Customs and Border Protection to deploy a helicopter from its Plattsburgh, N.Y., base. 

After Allen arrived at the scene and realized there was no emergency, he called off the helicopter. The island caretaker, Wayne Fisher, told Allen that the crash had happened around noon. Allen learned that Fisher had ferried the airmen off the island by boat and drove them to the Allenholm Airport, the small South Hero airstrip from which the duo had originally taken off. 

Allen said the low water level exposed unseen obstacles that made it treacherous for the first responders to navigate the lake at night.

“By the time all resources were back in and my last boat came off the water, it was close to 8:30 p.m.,” Allen said.

Fisher told Seven Days that he had been in the basement of the island’s main house, then came upstairs and saw the damaged plane. It was on the grassy airstrip that runs through the private island, which is owned by members of the Riehle family.

The airmen were already out of the plane when Fisher reached it, according to the caretaker. They told him they were uninjured and that there hadn’t been any mechanical issues. Fisher said the pilot claimed to have landed and then tried a complicated takeoff maneuver that failed, resulting in the crash. 

“They did make several calls. I don’t know to whom and the nature of the calls but they made several calls,” Fisher said. “They never asked me to call cops. And I didn’t feel like it was my responsibility; it wasn’t my accident. I didn’t have anything to do with it.”

Pictures of the scene show the tiny plane nose-down in the field with a broken wing. The FAA describes the two-seat aircraft, built in 1947, as “destroyed.” 

The plane is registered to John Rahill, a lieutenant colonel in the Vermont Air National Guard. He did not respond to a phone call requesting comment. In April, he told NECN about flying an F-16 over Fenway Park for the Red Sox home opener in Boston. And in October 2015, he talked to WCAX after returning from a four-month stint in the Pacific. The deployment was his eighth overseas since joining the Vermont Air National Guard 15 years prior, Rahill told the station at the time.

The Guard issued a statement Tuesday confirming the crash involved airmen and said no further information would be released because of the FAA investigation.

“We appreciate the concern from the community and are happy that neither of our airmen were injured and are currently back at work,” the statement said.

Because no serious injury occurred, the NTSB will rely on information from the FAA “and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report,” the board says on its website.

The FAA did not come out to the scene, Fisher told Seven Days, but interviewed him by phone.

Source: http://www.sevendaysvt.com

SAVAGE ISLAND, Vermont  --   Grand Isle County Sheriff Ray Allen says he is waiting for a Federal Aviation Administration investigation to dictate whether federal investigators want the state of Vermont to press charges against two off-duty Air National Guardsmen.

Sheriff Allen says 30 people, or more, were dispatched to Savage Island in Grand Isle County Monday after reports of a plane crash.

Allen says the response effort involved multiple marine vessels, volunteer firefighters and a U.S. Customs & Border Protection helicopter. The island is not accessible by any roadway.

“The volunteers, they're taking time away from their families, they're volunteering their time to go out,” said Sheriff Allen.

When they got there, they found a destroyed Piper PA-11. Nobody was with the plane.

“Rather surprised that nobody had reported the incident,” said Sheriff Allen. “It was probably about 6 hours prior when the crash actually occurred. The pilot or anybody, never reported it to the proper authorities as required to do so."

Sheriff Allen believes the plane crashed around noon Monday.

The Vermont Air National Guard confirmed earlier this week, two airmen were on board.

Sheriff Allen told Local 22/Local 44 News the pilot is John Rahill.

In an email Friday requesting information on Rahill’s rank, Guard spokesperson Capt. Tracy Morris responded: “We don't release information on members without their consent. It's for their own safety and operational security."

Sheriff Allen says the two Guardsmen were taken off the island by boat and brought back to the Burlington International Airport by the island’s caretaker.

As for the crash, pilots are required to immediately contact the National Transportation Safety Board following a crash.

NTSB Investigator Adam Gerhardt says the Board was notified about the incident but he is unsure of the timeline, saying “We are aware and we are investigating.”

“What is your reaction when you hear that they are Air National Guardsmen?” asked Local 22/Local44 News’ Staci DaSilva to Sheriff Ray Allen.

“A little surprised,” he responded. “I know the Guard, federal pilots, have very strict regulations and are up to date on all the requirements of the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board. I was stunned that they didn't ever notify anybody of the incident."

Sheriff Allen says the case, for now, is in the hands of the FAA.

“We're following the investigation out of the FAA and the NTSB and waiting to hear from them what they're going to do be doing or if they want to see any charges from the state of Vermont," he said.

Major Chris Gookin with the Vermont National Guard says the Guard has not been contacted, at this time, by the FAA.

In a statement sent Tuesday, Major Gookin wrote: “We appreciate the concern from the community and are happy that neither of our Airmen were injured and are currently back at work.

Due to the ongoing FAA investigation into this matter, we have no further details to release at this time.”

Source:   http://www.mychamplainvalley.com

Incident occurred September 19, 2016 at Midway International Airport (KMDW), Chicago, Illinois

No one was hurt in a small blaze on a airplane Monday afternoon at Midway International Airport.

The blaze was reported in the engine compartment of a plane near Gate 7 at 12:17 p.m., according to Fire Media Affairs.

The fire was put out with an extinguisher, according to Fire Media.

No passengers were on board the plane at the time, and no injuries were reported.

Source:  http://chicago.suntimes.com

Shiprock Airstrip receives $580K in Federal Aviation Administration grants: Funds will be used for a runway rehabilitation design and an aeronautical survey



FARMINGTON — A pair of grants from the Federal Aviation Administration will help renovate and improve the airstrip in Shiprock.

Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye signed documents last week to accept $580,000 in grants from the FAA, according to a press release from his office.


"This improvement to the Shiprock airport will support commercial developments being planned for the Shiprock area. This airstrip is in need of reconstruction," Begaye said in the release.


The airstrip is 4,840 feet long and is located six miles south of the community along U.S. Highway 491.


Michele Crank, a spokeswoman for Begaye's office, said today that the tribe has received the award, and the president signed the documents as part of the acceptance process.


Arlando Teller, acting deputy director for the Navajo Division of Transportation, confirmed the FAA awarded two grants to the tribe and said the funding for the airstrip has been a long time coming.


A grant for $180,000 will be used for a runway rehabilitation design, and the second grant for $400,000 will go toward an aeronautical survey.


The design aspect will take place during fiscal year 2017, and construction will start in fiscal year 2018, he said.


"This is the beginning of other potential improvements to the airport," Teller said.


Renovations include adding lighting to the runaway, which has been without lights due to vandalism and other factors, he said.


Also, both the runway and taxiway will receive new pavement, the president's office release states.


The Shiprock Airstrip is listed on the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems, which identifies 3,345 public-use airports in the country that are eligible to receive grants under the federal agency's Airport Improvement Program. 


Source: http://www.daily-times.com

Seawind 3000, N57TJ: Accident occurred September 18, 2016 in Renton, King County, Washington

http://registry.faa.gov/N57TJ

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Seattle FSDO-01


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA187
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Renton, WA
Aircraft: JURCAN Seawind 3000, registration: N57TJ
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 18, 2016, about 1500 Pacific daylight time, a Jurcan Seawind 3000 airplane, N57TJ, impacted a runway sign after landing with a landing gear malfunction at the Renton Municipal Airport (RNT), Renton, Washington. The pilot (sole occupant) sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a personal flight under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The airplane departed from Lampson Field Airport (1O2) Lakeport, California at 1040.

The pilot reported that after departing from 1O2 he observed that the landing gear indicator lights showed the right main landing gear extended with the nose and left main landing gear retracted. He proceeded to RNT where the control tower confirmed the airplane's abnormal configuration. The pilot attempted to extend the nose and left main landing gears, or retract the right main landing gear using both the regular and emergency systems, however, to no avail. The pilot landed the airplane onto the runway; the airplane slid to the left and exited the runway surface before it impacted a runway sign and came to rest. 

The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, Morgan Aviation LLC, N461SP: Incident occurred September 16, 2016 in Tooele County, Utah

MORGAN AVIATION LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N461SP

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING STRUCK THE PROPELLER, TOOELE VALLEY, UTAH

Date: 16-SEP-16
Time: 22:45:00Z
Regis#: N461SP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TOOELE VALLEY
State: Utah

De Havilland DH-115 Vampire T.55, CB Aviation Inc., N4861K: Accident occurred September 16, 2016 at at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

CB AVIATION INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N4861K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA181
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DH115 VAMPIRE, registration: N4861K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2016, about 1715 Pacific daylight time, a Dehavilland DH115 Vampire, N4861K, sustained substantial damage during an off airport landing near the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airplane was registered to CB Aviation Inc., Ogden, Utah, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local air race flight, which originated from RTS about 9 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that he was participating in a Jet Class Gold Race at the National Championship Air Races, which consisted of 6 laps around a closed race course. About 3.5 laps into the race, the pilot heard a loud bang followed by wind noise and wind within the cockpit. The pilot immediately aborted the race, pitched up, and began to slowly reduce power, trading airspeed for altitude. The pilot said he assessed all primary flight controls and trim, noting no anomalies, however, noticed a crack in the right side of the canopy. In addition, the pilot noted throughout the climb and orbit that all engine gauges displayed a normal indication as he set up for landing on runway 8. The pilot further stated that he attempted two separate engine restart procedures, with no success. The pilot said he was unable to reach runway 14 or runway 8, and elected to land in the open desert north of the airport. Subsequently, the pilot initiated a forced landing with the landing gear and flaps in the retracted position. As the airplane descended through about 80 feet above ground level, the pilot turned off the fuel and all switches in preparation of the off airport landing.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane came to rest up right about 7,741 feet north, northwest of the approach end of runway 8. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a heading of about 345 degrees and was about 756 feet in length. Portions of plexi glass from the airplane's canopy structure were located about 1.57 miles southwest of the accident site. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Cessna 172S, Christiansen Aviation Inc., N52265: Accident occurred September 18, 2016 near Spirit of St. Louis Airport (KSUS), Chesterfield, St. Louis County, Missouri

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

CHRISTIANSEN AVIATION INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N52265

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA St. Louis FSDO-62

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA379
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Chesterfield, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N52265
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On September 18, 2016, at 2006 central daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N52265, impacted terrain during a go-around from runway 26R at Spirit of St Louis Airport (SUS), Chesterfield, Missouri. The airplane descended after it entered into a right nose-down turn while turning downwind for runway 26R. The airplane was destroyed. The commercial pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to Christiansen Aviation Inc and operated by Air Associates of Missouri under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident for the flight that originated from SUS.


CHESTERFIELD, MO (KPLR) – A Chesterfield pilot is expected to recover after the single engine plane he was flying crashed near the Spirit of St. Louis Airport Sunday night.

Authorities believe he may have been doing "touch and go” maneuvers when the plane stalled.  He was the only person on board.

The U.S. Air Force has credited the Missouri Civil Air Patrol with both a “find" and a "save", as in finding the plane and saving the pilot.

Their training and a search beacon led the way to the overturned plane and the injured pilot, Ranakrishna Vallurutalli, 70.

He was still trapped in the wreckage, hidden by the late night darkness and waist high soybeans.

“What we could see from the fence line when they actually found the airplane was just one of the wheels sticking up,” said Lt. Col. Keith Monteith of the MO Civil Air Patrol.

The plane went down not far Spirit Airport around 8:00 last night.

Helicopter searchers were picking up the plane’s emergency beacon, a steady radio tone activated by impact.  Still, they could not see the plane.  Their initial search focused on the Missouri River and Howell Island west of the airport.  But the handheld direction finder used by in civil air patrol’s ground search team locked onto the beacon and pointed them just north of the area where the helicopter searchers were looking.

“When we showed up with the direction finder, we got a bearing that said it was actually a lot close to the outlet mall, than Howell Island,” Monteith said.  “When the needle (of the direction finder) centers up then we just look straight ahead, that’s where the bearing should be to the airplane that we’re trying to find … so (we) directed the helicopter to relocate and search the soybean field that was just to north of the airport.  Within two passes he had lit up the crash site with his powered spotlight…we train for years to go out and find and hopefully rescue downed air crew before they are in too severe straits.  Many times you don’t find them in time.  It’s awesome if you find someone in time to make a difference.”

Shortly after 10:00, the search was over.  The FAA is investigating the incident but there is not yet any definitive word on what caused the crash.


Story and video:  http://kplr11.com

A pilot of a small single-engine airplane that crashed near Spirit of St. Louis Airport in Chesterfield on Sunday night reportedly suffered serious but non-life threatening injuries.

Chesterfield Sgt. Keith Rider identified the pilot as Ramakrishna Vallurupalli, 70, of Chesterfield. Vallurupalli was found conscious and alert inside the upside down plane about two hours after the crash, according to Monarch Fire Protection Agency officials.  He was extricated from the plane and hospitalized at a local hospital.

The investigation of the crash now is largely up to the Federal Aviation Administration [FAA], Rider said. Vallurupalli was the only person in the plane.

Roger Herin, a spokesperson for the Monarch Fire Protection District, said about 8:07 p.m. on Sunday night the control tower at Spirit reported the plane had gone down somewhere to the west of it.  Tower officials couldn’t immediately pinpoint the location of the plane,  A police helicopter found the plane after 10 p.m.

It was thought that the plane may be on the riverbank of the Missouri River in the Howell Island Conservation Area.  The plane turned out to have landed in an area near airport property, south of Rombachs Farm in the 18000 block of Olive Street Road that  shielded by high grass and  difficult to see, particularly with darkness setting in, Herin said.

The pilot actually was able to call his wife via cellphone to tell her to call 9-1-1 but the call was dropped before he could give a better location, Herin said.  Herin said another agency was in cellphone contact and responders were able to pinpoint his positions from the pilot’s cellphone signal.

Herin said the plane was upside down when responders came on the scene.  He said fire fighters had to literally cut the pilot out of the plane.  The pilot was then transferred to a local hospital.

Herin said plane crashes aren’t common.  “It does happen,” Herin said.

Source:  http://westnewsmagazine.com

Hawker 400A, Gulf Equipment LLC, N112WC: Incident occurred September 17, 2016 at Lakefront Airport (KNEW), New Orleans, Louisiana

GULF EQUIPMENT LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N112WC

AIRCRAFT ON TOUCHDOWN, RIGHT ENGINE INGESTED A BIRD, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, NEW ORLEANS LAKEFRONT AIRPORT, NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA.  

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baton Rouge FSDO-03

Date: 17-SEP-16
Time: 01:52:00Z
Regis#: N112WC
Aircraft Make: HAWKER
Aircraft Model: 400
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NEW ORLEANS
State: Louisiana

Mooney M20J 201, N37GD: Incident occurred September 17, 2016 Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N37GD

FAA Flight Standards District Office:   FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, TAMPA, FLORIDA.  

Date: 17-SEP-16
Time: 20:43:00Z
Regis#: N37GD
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TAMPA
State: Florida

Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer, Zatura Aero Inc., N3771F: Incident occurred September 16, 2016 in Port St. Lucie, St. Lucie County, Florida

ZATURA AERO INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3771F

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE GRASS STRIP AND THE GEAR COLLAPSED, PORT SAINT LUCIE, FLORIDA.  

Date: 16-SEP-16
Time: 23:19:00Z
Regis#: N3771F
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: 2T1A
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PORT SAINT LUCIE
State: Florida

Compass Airlines, Embraer ERJ-175, N208AN: Incident occurred September 13, 2016 at Denver International Airport (KDEN), Colorado

AMERICAN AIRLINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N208AN

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

COMPASS AIRLINES FLIGHT CPZ6006 EMBRAER E75L AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ON FINAL, SUSTAINED MINOR DAMAGE TO LEADING EDGE OF WING DUE TO A BIRDSTRIKE, NO INJURIES, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, DENVER, COLORADO.  

Date: 13-SEP-16
Time: 23:05:00Z
Regis#: CPZ6006
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: ERJ175
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Flight Number: CPZ6006
Aircraft Operator: CPZ-Compass Airlines
City: DENVER
State: Colorado

Rutan Long-EZ, N83NM: Incident occurred September 18, 2016 in Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N83NM

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE RUNWAY INTO THE GRASS, PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 19-SEP-16
Time: 02:00:00Z
Regis#: N83NM
Aircraft Make: RUTAN
Aircraft Model: LONGEZ
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PALO ALTO
State: California

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, Flying Vikings Inc., N7560D: Accident occurred September 18, 2016 in Auburn, Placer County, California

FLYING VIKINGS INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N7560D

AIRCRAFT LANDED AND NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, AUBURN, CALIFORNIA.  

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

Date: 18-SEP-16
Time: 18:50:00Z
Regis#: N7560D
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: AUBURN
State: California

Cessna 120, N76284: Accident occurred September 18, 2016 in Davis, Yolo County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N76284

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, GROUND LOOPED AND FLIPPED OVER, DAVIS, CALIFORNIA. 

Date: 18-SEP-16
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N76284
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 120
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Minor
Aircraft Missing:
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: DAVIS
State: California

Rockwell International 114A, Burro Canyon Enterprises Inc., N114GG: Incident occurred September 16, 2016 in La Verne, Los Angeles County, California

BURRO CANYON ENTERPRISES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N114GG

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK A SIGN, LA VERNE, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 18-SEP-16
Time: 20:40:00Z
Regis#: N114GG
Aircraft Make: ROCKWELL
Aircraft Model: 114
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LA VERNE
State: California

Cessna T210M Turbo Centurion, Forbes Enterprises, N12PF: Incident occurred September 16, 2016 in San Carlos, San Mateo County, California

FORBES ENTERPRISES: http://registry.faa.gov/N12PF

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, STRUCK A FENCE IN THE NON-MOVEMENT AREA, SAN CARLOS, CALIFORNIA.

Date: 16-SEP-16
Time: 17:57:00Z
Regis#: N12PF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: SAN CARLOS
State: California

Ryan Navion A, N4438K: Incident occurred September 17, 2016 in Chino, San Bernardino County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N4438K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Riverside FSDO-21

AIRCRAFT ON A REJECTED TAKEOFF, LANDED ON THE RUNWAY GEAR UP, CHINO, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 17-SEP-16
Time: 18:47:00Z
Regis#: N4438K
Aircraft Make: NAVION
Aircraft Model: NAVION
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: CHINO
State: California

Bellanca 7ECA Citabria, N5054B: Incident occurred September 16, 2016 in Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N5054B

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED OFF THE RUNWAY, 1 MILE FROM PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 16-SEP-16
Time: 21:41:00Z
Regis#: N5054B
Aircraft Make: CHAMPION
Aircraft Model: 7ECA
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PALO ALTO
State: California

Helio H-295, Bursiel Equipment Inc., N6464V: Accident occurred September 16, 2016 at Seekins Strip, Beaver Creek, Alaska

NTSB Identification: ANC15LA070
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, September 13, 2015 in Delta Junction, AK
Aircraft: HELIO H 295, registration: N6464V
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 13, 2015, about 0840 Alaska daylight time, a tundra tire-equipped Helio Courier H-295 airplane, N6464V, sustained substantial damage during takeoff following a runway excursion from a remote unimproved airstrip near Delta Junction, AK. The airplane was being operated by Wright Air Service Fairbanks, Alaska, as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand charter flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135.The certificated airline transport pilot and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a VFR flight plan had been filed. The flight departed a remote unimproved airstrip near Delta Junction, Alaska, at about 0840 destined for Fairbanks, AK.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on September 14, the pilot stated that he was departing from a remote unimproved airstrip estimated to be about 850 feet long, with 800 feet usable. He stated that the airplane seemed to accelerate normally, but failed to become airborne at the departure end of the runway, and impacted brush and trees, sustaining substantial damage to the right wing.

In the recommendation section of the NTSB Accident/Incident Reporting Form 6120.1, the pilot went on to state that following the accident he departed the airstrip in the same make and model airplane with a similar load and the airplane lifted off in about 600 feet. In addition, he stated that it was possible that the engine was not producing full power even though the RPM was at redline, and there were no sounds associated with missing or a power reduction. 

A Helio Courier training manual dated October 1968 provided a Takeoff Distance vs Density Altitude chart for hard surfaced runways, which included a ground run correction factor for wet grass and soft turf. At a density altitude of about 928 feet and a gross weight of about 3,340 pounds, the takeoff ground run with the wet grass correction factor was about 480 feet. 

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming GO-480-G1D6 engine, the pressure carburetor was replaced with a Bendix fuel injection system, under the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) field approval process. 

On October 2, the engine, while still mounted on the accident airplane's airframe, was operated under the direction of the IIC, along with the rest of the investigative team. The engine ran without any observed anomalies, and produced full factory specified rpm. A drop of about 25 RPM was noted for the left and right magnetos. A series of power adjustments from idle to full power were conducted with no hesitation in engine operation noted.

An aviation safety inspector from the Flight Standards Division, System Safety and Analysis Branch inspected the accident airplane following the engine run, and noted that the scat tube that joins the air box assembly to the air filter assembly was not secured to the filter assembly with the hose clamp as depicted in the Helio Courier parts manual. 

The closest weather reporting facility was Allen Army Airfield, about 35 miles northeast of the accident site. At 0853, a weather observation from Allen Army Airfield was reporting, in part: wind calm; visibility, 10 statute miles; few clouds 1,000 feet, few clouds 13,000 feet, scattered clouds 17,000 feet, scattered clouds 20,000 feet; temperature, 28 degrees F; dew point 27 degrees F; altimeter, 30.14 inHG.

BURSIEL EQUIPMENT INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6464V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fairbanks FSDO-01


NTSB Identification: ANC16LA067
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2016 in Fairbanks, AK
Aircraft: HELIO H 295, registration: N6464V
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 16, 2016, about 0815 Alaska daylight time, a tundra tire-equipped Helio Courier H-295 airplane, N6464V, sustained substantial damage following a loss of control and subsequent runway excursion during takeoff from a remote, unimproved airstrip near Fairbanks, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by Wright Air Service, Fairbanks, Alaska, as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand commercial flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135. The certificated airline transport pilot and one passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a VFR flight plan had been filed. 

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge on September 20, the pilot stated that as he initiated the takeoff everything seemed normal. About 300 feet into the takeoff roll the airplane veered sharply to the left, exited the airstrip and impacted brush and trees, resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage and left horizontal stabilator.

The initial examination of the airplane, reported by the pilot, revealed that the tailwheel separated from its attach point and folded underneath the empennage. A trench was visible in the airstrip's surface that began about 300 feet from the point where the takeoff roll was initiated and continued to where the airplane impacted the brush and trees. 

The closest weather reporting facility was Fairbanks International Airport, Fairbanks, Alaska, about 42 miles south of the accident site. At 0753, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from Fairbanks Airport, was reporting in part: wind from 050 degrees at 4 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; sky condition, broken clouds 5,500 feet, broken clouds 7,500 feet, broken clouds 15,000 feet; temperature, 39 degrees F; dew point 37 degrees F; altimeter, 29.36 inHG.

A detailed examination of the tailwheel assembly is pending.