Monday, November 26, 2012

Air Pacific flights disrupted

International carrier Air Pacific has made several changes to its flights because of maintenance issues relating to one of its aircraft.

In a statement, the airline said it’s Flight 911 (Sydney – Nadi) was cancelled on Sunday night due to maintenance issues on one of its B747 jumbo aircraft.

Akosita Talei has the details.

"Air Pacific says its engineers in Sydney are still working on returning the aircraft to service and all affected passengers in Sydney have been provided with meals and accommodation.

They will travel to Nadi on supplementary services that Air Pacific will operate to from Sydney today.

As a result of Sunday’s B747 maintenance issue, most of Air Pacific’s passengers on the continuation Flight 810 from Nadi to Los Angeles, were delayed by 10 hours when they travelled to the United States on the airline’s leased Euro Atlantic B777-200ER aircraft or were flown to Los Angeles via Air Pacific’s Honolulu flight.

The airline says as a result of the new flight times, return Flight 811 from Los Angeles to Nadi today will experience a 4-hour delay.

Air Pacific has apologised to its customers for any inconvenience experienced as a result of this disruption, and thanked everyone for their understanding.

The airline says it’s Airport and Reservations staff will continue to keep affected customers updated on new flight times and any further flight delays once that information becomes available."

Source:   http://www.fbc.com.fj

Niagara Aerospace Museum finds new home at Niagara Falls International Airport (KIAG): Plans a relocation to terminal at airport

The Niagara Aerospace Museum is about to land a new home after being closed to the general public for more than a year.

A plan to relocate in an empty terminal at the Niagara Falls International Airport in Wheatfield will go before the museum’s board Wednesday, and museum officials hope to reopen in the new space in May 2013.

The new location will give the museum more room to display the region’s aviation and aerospace history than it had in its former locations in Buffalo and Niagara Falls.

“It will be larger,” said Paul Faltyn, museum curator, “with more square footage and the opportunity to have more artifacts on display, really showcasing the full spectrum of aviation history.”

Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority commissioners on Monday authorized a two-year lease for roughly half of the closed terminal at the airport on Niagara Falls Boulevard. The building has been empty since a new airport terminal opened in 2009.

“We think this is a great opportunity for visitors to the area,” said NFTA Executive Director Kimberly A. Minkel. “People waiting at the new terminal can wander over and take a look at the rich history that our region has to share.”

The NFTA estimates the annual rent for the museum’s 14,230 square feet of the terminal will be $32,017.

The aerospace museum, once housed in downtown Niagara Falls before losing its lease to Seneca Gaming Corp. offices, last displayed its collection at First Niagara Center until last year. Since then, it has stored its exhibits in the former Bell Aircraft Plant in Wheatfield, where it continues to maintain a research library and restoration facility. The museum staff, Faltyn said, has continued to collect, restore and preserve artifacts, but the museum has been closed except by appointment.

Among the museum’s collection are the second-oldest Bell helicopter known to exist, a restored 1917 Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny” single-engine biplane and a Bell X-22 – all aircraft that have ties to the region.

“Western New York, at one point, was really the center for aviation development,” Faltyn said.

The Virginia-based American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics last month designated the former Bell Aircraft Plant – which is adjacent to the Niagara Falls International Airport grounds – as a historic aerospace site. The plant produced a number of significant aircraft, including the first American jet, the first commercially certified helicopter and the experimental Bell X-1, which was the first aircraft to break the sound barrier.

Faltyn said the museum will also include exhibits on local companies that continue to contribute to aerospace engineering, including East Aurora-based Moog.

“Not only are we going to showcase the history,” Faltyn said, “but we’re also going to showcase that aviation is alive and well in Western New York.”

As the museum prepares for a new home, it continues to seek support from the public.

“We’re always looking for new artifacts, relative to military and local aviation,” Faltyn said, “and, of course, financial support.”

 http://www.buffalonews.com

 http://www.airnav.com/airport/kiag

Long Island Mac Arthur Airport (KISP), New York: Landing fee before Islip Town Board

 A resolution to impose a general aviation landing fee at Long Island MacArthur Airport is back in front of the Islip Town Board.

After tabling a vote in October that would have imposed a landing fee for general aviation and business aircraft, the board will pick up the issue again Tuesday. Deputy Airport Commissioner Terry Hennessey said the fee could raise $150,000 in revenue annually.

If approved, noncommercial transient aircraft -- meaning planes not based in hangars at MacArthur -- would pay $1.44 per 1,000 pounds of gross landing weight to touch down there, with a $10 minimum. Between 10 p.m. and 6:30 a.m., aircraft would pay a higher nighttime fee of $2.16 per 1,000 pounds.

Hennessey said in October that officials want to take advantage of all possible revenue streams and that Long Island MacArthur is the last Long Island airport with a control tower that doesn't charge a general aviation landing fee. Commercial carriers at MacArthur, which is in Ronkonkoma, have been paying the fee since 1991.

Hennessey has said 89 percent of the airport's landings last year were either for general aviation or air taxis.

A handful of local aviation industry representatives -- including air traffic controllers, flight school owners and aviation consultants -- criticized the resolution the last time it was on the town board's agenda. Town officials said then that they wanted to look at other landing fees across the state and might consider restructuring the fee, but didn't.

According to the resolution, the fee will be effective Dec. 1 and will increase annually by a minimum of 3 percent, not to exceed 9 percent.

The town board will also vote whether to enter into a contract with Vector Airport Systems Llc, which would provide aircraft tracking and landing fee management at MacArthur if the fee is instated, and to approve a bid for $88,728 for renovations to offices in historic Brookwood Hall.

The board will meet Tuesday at 2 p.m. at Islip Town Hall, 655 Main St.

McDaniel RV-6-CH, N424D: Fatal accident occurred November 26, 2012 in Scio, Oregon

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA056 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, November 26, 2012 in Scio, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/20/2015
Aircraft: MCDANIEL RV-6-CH, registration: N424D
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The purpose of the flight was for the pilot-rated passenger to show the owner/pilot how to perform rolls in the experimental kit-built airplane. A witness reported observing the airplane in level flight about 1,000 feet above ground level before it entered a steeply banked turn. The airplane was halfway through the turn when the right wing folded up over the fuselage. The wing departed the airframe, and the airplane rapidly descended to the ground. The right wing was located about 1,090 feet from the main wreckage. 

The owner/pilot was not the builder of the airplane, and he had no record of aerobatic flight experience. The pilot-rated passenger's logbook indicated that he had made a single 0.5-hour flight in another RV-6 that included performance of rolls and wing-overs. 

The operating limitations document for the airplane noted that aerobatic flight was prohibited unless such flights were satisfactorily accomplished and recorded in the aircraft logbook during its flight test period. No entries were found in the logbook that would satisfy this requirement. 

Postaccident examination of the separated right wing determined that the upper and lower spar-caps had failed in buckle and overload. Although the airplane was registered with the Federal Aviation Administration by the builder as an RV-6-CH model, the design of its spar caps was found to be substantially different from the kit manufacturer's design for the RV-6 model airplane, a model which can be approved for aerobatic maneuvers. Rather the design was similar to the wing cap spar design for the older RV-3 model airplane, a design which was found to be susceptible to failure in buckle when exposed to aerobatic flight. Following a number of inflight wing failures in RV-3 airplanes during aerobatic flight, the kit manufacturer recommended that no aerobatic maneuvers be performed in RV-3 model airplanes until wing spar modifications that increase the spar's stiffness and resistance to buckling have been accomplished. Because the purpose of the flight was performance of an aerobatic maneuver (rolls) and because the airplane's wing spar cap design was not suitable for aerobatic flight, it is likely that at some point during the flight, an aerobatic maneuver was performed that weakened the wing, and the final steep turn was then sufficient to overload the wing.

Toxicology results showed that the owner/pilot had therapeutic levels of diphenhydramine, a sedating antihistamine, in his system; however, it could not be determined if he was flying at the time of the accident or if this impairment contributed to the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to perform aerobatics in an airplane that was prohibited from aerobatics as stated in its operating limitations document, which resulted in the failure of the right wing spar.

HISTORY OF THE FLIGHT

On November 26, 2012, at 1537 Pacific standard time, a McDaniel RV-6-CH, N424D, collided with terrain after its right wing departed the airplane 5 miles south of Scio, Oregon. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. The private pilot and the commercial pilot were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan had not been filed. The personal flight originated at the Lebanon State Airport, Lebanon, Oregon, at 1531.

A witness described observing the airplane at 1,000 feet above ground level (agl). When the airplane was halfway through a turn, one of the wings folded up. The airplane then rapidly descended to the ground. The Linn County Sheriff's office reported that the airplane's right wing was located on Highway 226, and the main airplane wreckage was located in a pasture 1,090 feet south of the wing.

The Fixed Base Operator (FBO) proprietor at Lebanon State Airport stated that the pilot and commercial pilot-rated passenger were acquaintances. The pilot arrived earlier that day at Lebanon State Airport and met up with his passenger. The passenger had a set of portable remote cameras that he was going to mount onto the foot step on the airplane to video record the flight. Additionally, the pilot-rated passenger intended to show the pilot how to perform rolls.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 46, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane, issued June 4, 2010. He additionally held a third-class medical certificate with the limitation that he wear corrective lenses, issued April 2, 2012. Examination of the pilot's logbook revealed that as of November 25, 2012, he had accumulated 1,005.0 total flight hours of which 48.5 hours were in the accident airplane. On June 8, 2012, he received a tail wheel endorsement, an endorsement to act as pilot-in-command in a Vans RV-6 or RV-7 series aircraft, and a flight review. No record of aerobatic instruction was found in his logbook.

The passenger, age 45, held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating issued June 26, 2012, and a second-class medical certificate with the limitation that he wear corrective lenses issued on May 22, 2005. Examination of his logbook revealed that he had accumulated 590 total flight hours as of November 23, 2012, and his most recent flight review was on February 8, 2012. The logbook showed a single entry dated November 5, 2012, for 0.5 hours in a RV-6A, and the comment line states, "Rolls & wing overs." No other entries were found that included experience in Vans RV model of airplanes or of aerobatic instruction.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

The two seat, low wing, fixed gear, tail-wheel configured airplane, serial number AC-3, was an experimental amateur-built airplane manufactured in 1996. The majority of the airframe was designed and built by an individual that was previously employed at Van's Aircraft. A second party bought the partially constructed airplane and completed the construction. The airplane was purchased by the pilot on May 29, 2012. The date of manufacture that is recorded on the FAA registration is 1996. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) letter defining N424D's Experimental Operating Limitations was dated May 17, 1996. Under Phase II of the Experimental Operating Limitations, subsection titled "The Following Limitations Apply Outside of Flight Test Area", line 4 states, "This aircraft is prohibited from acrobatic flight, unless such flight were satisfactorily accomplished and recorded in the aircraft logbook during the flight test period." Examination of the airplane's maintenance logbooks did not include any such entry that would satisfy this requirement.

The airplane was powered by a Continental IO-346-A, 165-horsepower engine, and equipped with a wooden fixed-pitch propeller. A review of copies of the airplane maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent conditional inspection was performed on May 25, 2012, at a total airframe time of 557 hours. 

Although the airplane was designated an RV-6-CH and closely resembled the Van's RV-6 model of airplane, there were numerous differences between the accident airplane and the kit design that Van's Aircraft produces. The wing span of the accident airplane, as measured after the accident, was 22 feet. In contrast, the Van's RV-3 wing span is 20 feet, and the Van's RV-6 is 23 feet. There were additional differences in the wing spar construction. The wing spar construction of the accident airplane utilized the same materials and general design as the Van's RV-3 series of designs and the wing appeared to be a modified and extended version of the RV-3 wing. The original Van's RV-3 wing spar design consists of a 0.040 aluminum channel web with a build-up of seven 0.125 by 1.25-inch bars riveted together on to form the upper and lower spar caps. The accident airplane's spar consisted of a build-up of 4 pieces of aluminum channel web with nine 0.125 by 1.5-inch aluminum bars for the upper and lower spar caps. In contrast, the Van's RV-6 uses 2 pieces of 0.040 2043-T3 aluminum channel web with a build-up of four 0.250 by 1.5-inch aluminum bars plus one 0.125 by 1.5-inch bar.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on November 11, 2012, by the Oregon State Medical Examiner, Clackamas, Oregon. The cause of death was listed as "blunt force injuries of head and chest."

The FAA Forensic Toxicology Research Team performed toxicology on specimens from the pilot with positive results for diphenhydramine detected in blood (0.604 ug/ml), and ethanol detected in muscle (20 mg/dl), no ethanol was detected in the brain. Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms and as a sleep aid. It is available over the counter under various trade names including Benadryl and Unisom. Diphenhydramine carries the following warning: may impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery). There was an insufficient specimen amount to test for carbon monoxide, and the test for cyanide was not performed.

An autopsy was performed on the pilot-rated passenger November 27, 2012, by the Oregon State Medical Examiner, Clackamas. The cause of death was listed as, "Craniocerebral and chest trauma." The FAA Forensic Toxicology Research Team performed toxicology on specimens from the passenger with negative results for carbon monoxide, screened drugs, or ethanol.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The right wing was located on a highway paved with asphalt. The wing root and 2-3 rib bays had been crushed longitudinally into the wing. The inboard portion of the main wing spar, in the vicinity of the longitudinal crushing, was buckled in the shape of a double-S. Located in the center of the highway there was an indentation in the asphalt that was consistent with wing impact, and in the adjacent area was the odor of aviation fuel and fuel stains were observed. The wing's aft spar doubler plate was not present on the spar. The upper and lower spar caps were bent aft and outward, pointing down the wing span towards the wing tip. The lower spar-cap of the rear spar, at the attach bolt-hole location, was missing a section of material originating at the bolt hole. The aileron and flap were present on the wing, the aileron control rod was connected to the aileron, and the control rod had separated at the wing root. The wing skin did not exhibit any wrinkling or buckling.

A debris field extended from the right wing to the main wreckage and mostly consisted of Plexiglas fragments, and small cockpit items. The reported remote video camera that may have been mounted to the foot step was not located. Blister packs of Nicorette (4mg/piece) and Benadryl Allergy (25mg Diphenhydramin HCl liquid-gels) were identified in the debris.

The main wreckage was located about 1,090 feet to the south of the right wing, in a grass pasture, resting on its right side. It was oriented from tail to nose on a bearing of 138 degrees magnetic. The wreckage consisted of the left wing, fuselage, cockpit, tail, engine, and propeller. Flight control continuity was established on-scene by manually moving the aileron and elevator control surfaces and observing movement of the control stick in the cockpit area. Control continuity from the rudder to the cockpit was established by tracing the rudder cables from the rudder control surface attachment point to the rudder pedal cable anchors on the rudder pedals. The left horizontal stabilizer and vertical stabilizer appeared undamaged; the right horizontal stabilizer and elevator exhibited crush damage from ground impact. The left wing laid on top of and in line with the fuselage. The left wing main spar was continuous through the cabin and extended 14 inches into the right wing spar where it was fractured completely at the upper and lower spar caps. In the region of the fracture surfaces the spar ends were bent aft. The upper and lower spar caps were a buildup of 9, 0.125 thick aluminum bars and bolted together with through-bolts positioned every 1.25 inches. The fracture surface of each bar appeared bright and angular, with shear lips. The aft spar of the left wing remained attached to the carry through. The right side of the aft wing spar carry though contained the right wing aft-spar doubler plate and spar attach-bolt.

The cockpit cabin had been completely compromised, and the right side of the engine had imbedded about 2 feet into the ground. The right underside of the engine's case and oil pan had been broken and torn laterally. The right case-half contained a crack at the no. 3 cylinder location. The two magnetos had been displaced from their mounting pads. The right magneto produced spark at three terminals when rotated by hand; the left magneto was seized and could not be rotated by hand. The upper spark plugs were removed. The spark plugs were dark gray in color, all gaps were similar, and no mechanical damaged was observed. The engine was seized and could not be rotated by hand. The fuel distribution valve was intact, no debris was observed in the filter screen, and fuel was observed in the valve. The wood propeller was attached to the propeller hub. One blade was fractured at the hub, the other blade extended out 20 inches from the hub. A majority of wood blade-fragments were recovered with the engine.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The right-wing spar was sectioned out of the wing, and the wing carry through spar was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's Materials Laboratory for a detailed examination. The entire Materials Laboratory Factual Report is contained in the official docket for this investigation.

The right wing separated approximately 1 foot from the centerline of the center section. The left wing remained attached to the center section. The wing structure was disassembled on-site from the fuselage to facilitate shipping, handling, and examination. The wing section contained a forward and aft spar. The forward spar at the fracture location contained a total of four reinforcement pieces for the web; nine reinforcement strips (1.5 inch by 0.125 inch) for the upper spar cap; and nine reinforcement strips (1.50 inch by 0.125 inch) for the lower spar cap. Examination of the forward spar revealed that the fracture faces of the lower spar cap at the inboard side contained less mechanical damage compared to those on the upper spar cap pieces.

The aft spar contained an attachment plate with two holes (about 0.75-inch diameter, each). When intact, the attachment plate extended between the aft spar of the center section and the aft spar of the right wing. The attachment plate is designed to be attached by rivets to the upper and lower brackets of the aft spar for the right wing. The inboard end of the plate is designed to be attached by two bolts and corresponding nuts to the aft spar of the center section. Examination of the attachment plate revealed the attachment rivets between the center section and right wing fractured at the shank. The fracture faces of the rivets exhibited metal flow consistent with ductile separation in shear mode. The outboard end of the attachment plate was deformed up and aft relative to the aft spar of the center section. The upper and lower brackets remained attached to the aft spar of the right wing.

Microscope examination of the fracture faces on the forward and aft spar sections of the wing structure and those on the center section showed gray-granular rough features on a slant plane consistent with overstress separation with no evidence of fatigue cracking.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

RV-3 History

Van's Aircraft Service Bulletin SB-96-3-1, dated March 25, 1996, states in the synopsis, "After a number of in flight wing failures in RV-3 and RV-3A aircraft. Studies were initiated to identify any possible design deficiencies. These studies resulted in a recommendation by Van's Aircraft and the FAA to limit aerobatic flight of affected aircraft until main wing spar modifications have been accomplished."

The RV-3 wing spar design utilized a spar-cap stack up of 0.125-inch bar stock. This design was found to be susceptible to failure in buckle when exposed to aerobatic flight or high g-loading. An extensive discussion regarding this issue was addressed in Van's Aircraft RV-3 Safety Alert, dated March 25, 1996.

The Van's RV-6 wing spar design resolves the RV-3's spar failure issue by increasing the spar stiffness and resistance to buckling by increasing bar stock thickness from 0.125 to 0.25-inch bar stock in the wing spar stack up and construction.


 http://registry.faa.gov/N424D

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA056 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, November 26, 2012 in Scio, OR
Aircraft: MCDANIEL RV-6-CH, registration: N424D
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 26, 2012, at 1537 Pacific standard time, a McDaniel RV-6-CH, N424D, collided with terrain after its right wing departed the airplane 5 miles south of Scio, Oregon. The airplane was operated by the owner under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and the commercial pilot were both fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated at the Lebanon State Airport, Lebanon, Oregon, at 1531.

A witness described the airplane as being halfway through a turn at 1,000 feet above ground level (agl) when one of the wings folded up on the airplane. The airplane then rapidly descended to the ground. The Linn County Sheriff’s office reported that the airplane's right wing was located on Highway 226, and the main airplane wreckage was located in a pasture 1,000 feet south of the wing.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 424D        Make/Model: EXP       Description: RV6
  Date: 11/26/2012     Time: 2330

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: SCIO   State: OR   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD WERE 
  FATALLY INJURED, 5 MILES FROM SCIO, OR

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   2
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   2     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: PORTLAND, OR  (NM09)                  Entry date: 11/27/2012 


 
Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board arrived Tuesday at the scene of a small plane crash that killed two men Monday afternoon.

Investigators from the FAA and NTSB examine the remains of a RV6 two-seat airplane Tuesday morning Nov. 27, 2012, that crashed into a field near Crabtree, Ore., after apparently losing a wing inflight Monday afternoon. The wing was found on highway 226 several thousand feet from the crash site. Commericial pilot Jeff Earl "Tebo" Kropf of Halsey, Ore., and aicraft owner Timothy Dean Carter of Portland, Ore., were killed in the crash. 
(AP Photo/Albany Democrat-Herald, Mark Ylen)

 
 Jeff Kropf
 Jeff Earl Kropf, 45, of Halsey and Timothy Dean Carter, 46, of Portland died in the crash 



















PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The crash of a two-seater experimental airplane this week in the Willamette Valley has shocked people who build their own aircraft from kits or plans. 

 They consider the plane designed by an Aurora company, Van's Aircraft, one of the most popular experimental aircraft in the U.S., saying it's fast, versatile, fuel-efficient and relatively easy to build and fly.

"The performance is great in terms of being able to go both reasonably slow and reasonably fast and to land and take off reasonably short," said Skip Lawson, former president of the Experimental Aircraft Association chapter in Eugene. "They're also known as being over-engineered — they're very strong airplanes."

Witnesses reported that the plane, known by its model number, RV-6, lost a wing when it plowed into a field south of Scio on Monday afternoon, said Linn County Undersheriff Bruce Riley.

The plane's owner, Timothy Dean Carter, 46, of Portland, and his passenger, Jeff Earl "Tebo" Kropf, 45, of Halsey, died.

"I've never heard of a wing coming off an RV aircraft," Dick Knapinski, spokesman for the Wisconsin-based Experimental Aircraft Association, told The Oregonian.

Carter's plane had passed its air worthiness test and was registered with the Federal Aviation Administration, records show. Carter purchased it fairly recently, perhaps in the past year or two, said his oldest daughter, Valerie Tillia. It's not clear whom Carter bought the plane from.

"The nice thing about experimental aircraft is you can modify and change them pretty much at will," said Bob Duncan, a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association chapter in Hillsboro. "But if you buy an airplane from someone else, you need to do the due diligence."

Gus Funnell of Van's Aircraft said the crashed plane appeared to be highly modified and built from plans with custom components, not from a company kit, citing differences in fuselage, cowling and canopy. He said the motor was not the one the plane was designed for.

"We've never had a structural failure in an RV-6," he toldthe Albany Democrat-Herald. "This plane is an RV-6 in name only."

It's easier to use a kit, but people can save money getting their own raw materials, and builders get the satisfaction of creating something themselves, he said.

There are about 33,000 homebuilt planes registered under the Federal Aviation Administration's experimental category. Van's designs account for about 20 percent of the amateur market, with the RV-6 its most popular model. About 6,000 plans and kits for the plane were sold until 2001, when the next model came out.

The accident rate for amateur-built aircraft is up to three times higher than for lightweight manufactured planes, said Loren Groff, safety analyst for the National Transportation Safety Board. The fatality rate is four times higher.

The agency said 86 people have died in RV-6s in the past two decades. Carter and Kropf were the first this year.


Story, video and photos:  http://www.kval.com


By Lynne Terry, The Oregonian on November 28, 2012 at 7:00 PM, updated November 29, 2012 at 6:29 AM  

The two-seat airplane that crashed near Scio on Monday, killing the two men onboard, is one of the most popular experimental aircraft in the United States.

Designed by Van's Aircraft in Aurora, the RV6 is considered something of a hot rod in the air. It's fast, versatile, fuel-efficient and relatively easy to build and pilot, making it a hit when it first came out in 1986.

The company sold  kits and plans of the plane to amateurs to build themselves.

"The performance is great in terms of being able to go both reasonably slow and reasonably fast and to land and take off reasonably short," said Skip Lawson,  former president of the Experimental Aircraft Association chapter in Eugene. "They're also known as being over-engineered -- they're very strong airplanes."

Witnesses reported that the RV6 was banking left and had lost a wing when it plowed into a field south of Scio Monday afternoon, said Linn County Undersheriff Bruce Riley. The plane's owner Timothy Dean Carter, 46, of Portland, and his passenger, Jeff Earl "Tebo" Kropf,  45, of Halsey, died on impact.

» The Linn County crash victims loved flying


Federal aviation officials cleared the accident site on Tuesday. It could take months for officials to determine what happened.

The accident rate for amateur-built aircraft is up to three times higher than for lightweight manufactured planes, said Loren Groff,  safety analyst for the National Transportation Safety Board. The fatality rate is four times higher.

The NTSB said 86 people have died in RV6s in the past two decades. Carter and Kropf were the first this year.

The accident appears to be unique.

"I've never heard of a wing coming off an RV aircraft," said Dick Knapinski,  spokesman for the Experimental Aircraft Association, headquartered in Wisconsin. "It's a very good aircraft."

The accident has shocked experimental airplane enthusiasts, who often spend several years poring over plans, drilling holes and driving in rivets to construct the planes.

There are about 33,000 homebuilt planes registered under the Federal Aviation Administration's experimental category. Van's designs account for about 20 percent of the amateur market, with the RV6 its most popular model. About 6,000 plans and kits for the plane were sold until 2001, when the next model came out.

"It's a fun airplane to fly," said Knapinski. "It's efficient, has good flying characteristics and is very responsive to what the pilot wants to do."

They're even used for aerobatics.

The airplane, 21 feet long with a wingspan of 23 feet, can fly 180 mph. Made mostly out of aluminum, the plane is engineered withstand a stress load -- or gravitational load -- nine times its weight.

That's much more than a human body can withstand without a flight suit. 


 Like all experimental aircraft in the skies, Carter's RV6 had passed its air worthiness test and was registered with the FAA, records show. Carter purchased the plane fairly recently, perhaps in the past year or two, according to his oldest daughter, Valerie Tillia, 26.

It's not clear who Carter bought the plane from. FAA records show it was first registered in 1996 by builders in Amity. David McDaniel confirmed that he made the plane with his father but declined to comment further, saying the plane was sold a long time ago.

Van's Aircraft has no record of selling an RV6 kit or plans to the McDaniels, said Gus Funnell,  a technical expert for the company.

The plane is designed for a Lycoming motor, but Carter's RV6 was equipped with a Continental. Using different engines is not uncommon in the kit airplane world, enthusiasts say.

"The nice thing about experimental aircraft is you can modify and change them pretty much at will," said Bob Duncan, a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association chapter in Hillsboro. "But if you buy an airplane from someone else, you need to do the due diligence."

Tillia believes this was her father's first homebuilt plane.

Carter flew the craft to the Lebanon Municipal Airport on Monday to fill up with fuel and go out on a pleasure ride with Kropf, who worked at the airport and was like a son to the facility's operator, Larry Knox.

"He flew down here and asked (Knopf) to go up with him to do some rolls," Knox said.

Knopf, who earned his commercial pilot's license this spring, had more experience than Carter, Knox said.

Knox said Knopf mounted a camera on the plane before it took off a little before 3:30 p.m. in crisp, sunny weather. The plane crashed about 10 minutes later. A large chunk of the wing landed on Highway 226, nearly 2,000 feet from the fuselage.

It's not clear who was piloting. The RV6 has dual controls.

Though the accident jolted amateur airplane fans, it's not likely to dampen their enthusiasm.

"When you get in a car there's a risk" said Bruce Rose, president of the Hillsboro EAA chapter. "When you cross the street there's a risk and when you get in an airplane there's a risk. Accidents happen." 

http://www.oregonlive.com

 
Well known Linn County commercial pilot Jeff "Tebo" Kropf was killed when the plane he was riding in crashed near Crabtree on Monday afternoon. Kropf, also known as Tim Corban, had flown hundreds of first-time flyers out of the Lebanon airport in the Young Eagles flight program. 


Firefighters mark wreckage debris east of Brester Road after a plane crash east of Crabtree. 



 
A piece of plane wreckage sits on the side of Highway 226 near Brewster Road east of Crabtree. 


 
Witnesses say the plane was missing a wing when it crashed

 A two-seater RV6 experimental airplane tumbled from the sky Monday afternoon, crashing near Crabtree and killing the two men aboard.

The victims have been identified as Jeff Earl “Tebo” Kropf, 45, of Halsey and Timothy Dean Carter, 46, of Portland.

Carter, the pilot, was the owner of the aircraft and had a private pilot license.  Kropf, the passenger, had a commercial pilot license.

Both  Kropf and Carter died upon impact, Linn County Undersheriff Bruce Riley said in a statement.

Their bodies were taken to Fisher Funeral Home in Albany.

Investigators believe the 16-year-old silver aircraft departed the Lebanon Municipal Airport shortly before 3:30 pm on a pleasure flight.

Witnesses reported seeing the plane eastbound, crossing Brewster Road, banking to the left over Highway 226. While turning to the left, part of the wing became separated from the plane and fell onto Highway 226 north of Brewster Road, Riley said.

The plane came to rest several thousand feet south of the intersection in a field.
Jenissa Currey, 17, said she was driving home from Scio High School, where she is a junior, when she noticed something falling from the sky out of the corner of her eye. It ended up in the middle of a cow pasture about 400 yards from the road.

“It took me a few seconds to realize what it was,” Currey said. “In the back of my mind, I knew it was a plane because what else could it be, but it had only one wing on the plane, and it wasn’t fully put together.”
Currey said it looked as though the plane had broken up somehow while still in flight.

“There were no wings, or if there were they were wrapped around it. It was just a big ball,” said Tom Bishop of Lacomb, who came on the scene on his way to work in Albany minutes after the crash. “All you could see was the tail fin on it, to basically tell you it was a plane.”

The intersection of Highway 226 and Brewster Road was closed for four hours during the investigation.

‘He loved to fly’

Friends and family of Kropf, known to most people in the mid-valley as Tebo, are clear about one thing: he never wanted to stop flying.

Kropf, known as Tim Corban at one point, was the office manager at LebanAir Aviation and the coordinator for Chapter 1524 of the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Young Eagles flight program; the guy who put more than 200 youngsters in the air last year and was well on his way to topping that record.

 “He loved the Lord, he loved his family and he loved to fly,” brother-in-law Alvie Shrock of Brownsville said late Monday.

His first flight was a ride at age 9, in a float plane off a lake near Florence. He had his first lesson at age 16 at Daniels Field in Harrisburg. He became a private pilot in 1996.

His dream was to share the experience, particularly with children who may not see flying as a realistic goal. He also gave a free flight this past January to Paul Miller of Sweet Home, age 101.

“Tebo was such a Renaissance guy. He did photography and flew airplanes and played music and just was an amazing person,” flight instructor Jerry Wilken of Albany said. “Tebo was doing what he loved to do.”

Wilken also flies a RV6. The planes are strong and good at handling both fast and slow speeds, making them one of the most popular small aircraft designs around, he said.

“I don’t know what could have happened,” Wilken said. “Wings shouldn’t fall off of them. They’re built just amazingly strong. ... The way it’s put together, it’s hard for me to believe a wing would just fall off.”


Linn County Undersheriff Bruce Riley reports deputies have learned that two people died as a result of a plane crash that occurred earlier today.
 
The victims have been identified as Timothy Dean Carter, 46 years old of Portland and Jeff Earl Kropf, 45 years old of Halsey.  Carter was the owner of the aircraft and had a Private Pilot License.  Kropf had a Commercial Pilot License. Both Carter and Kropf died upon impact. Their bodies were taken to Fisher Funeral Home in Albany.

Witnesses reported seeing the plane eastbound, crossing Brewster Road, banking to the left over Highway 226. While turning to the left, part of the wing became separated from the plane and fell onto Highway 226 north of Brewster Road. The plane came to rest several thousand feet south of the intersection in a cow pasture.

The aircraft was a two seat experimental RV6 that was completed in 1996.  Investigators believe the aircraft departed the Lebanon Municipal Airport shortly before 3:30 pm on a pleasure flight.

The Linn County Sheriff's Office is coordinating the ongoing investigation with the FAA and NTSB. The Scio Rural Fire District assisted on scene with extrication. LCSO was further assisted on scene by members of the Multi Agency Investigation Team with representatives from the Oregon State Police, Linn County Sheriff's Search and Rescue, the Albany Police Department and the Lebanon Police Department.

The intersection of Highway 226 and Brewster Road was closed by representatives of ODOT and the Linn County Road Department for approximately four hours during the investigation.


SCIO, Ore. - Debris from a small plane crash closed Oregon Highway 226 on Monday.

No word yet on the condition of the pilot and whether there were any passengers aboard the plane.

The crash was reported to 911 at 3:37 p.m. Monday.

Initial reports indicate the plane crashed in a field near a rural residential area near Hwy 226 and Brewster Road.

Firefighters from Lebanon and Scio responded to the scene.

As of 4:45 p.m., neither the Linn County Sheriff's Office nor the fire crews who responded were certain how many people were on board the plane or what exact type of aircraft crashed.

'The status of those on board is also unknown at this time," firefighters said in a press release.

The Oregon Department of Transportation said Hwy 226 (the Albany-Lyons Highway) is closed 6 miles south of Scio.

Motorists should plan an alternate route, ODOT said.

The crash did not occur on the highway but debris from the crash has landed on the highway and will likely not be cleared until an investigation is completed, ODOT said.


LEBANON, OR (KPTV) -  Emergency crews responded to a plane crash in Linn County Monday.

The call came in to authorities around 3:30 p.m. It involves a small, private plane that crashed in a field near Highway 226 and Brewster Road about nine miles east of Albany, according to authorities.

Firefighters and deputies were called out to the scene, but there is not yet any word about possible injuries.

The Oregon Department of Transportation said Highway 226 was closed about six miles south of Scio. The crash did not happen on the highway, but ODOT said debris from the plane crash went on the roadway and it likely wouldn't be cleared until the investigation was completed.

The Linn County Sheriff's Office is handling the investigation. 


SCIO, Ore. -- A small plane has crashed south of Scio, in Linn County, according to witness reports.

The Oregon Department of Transportation has issued a warning for drivers that there is some debris from the plane crash on OR 226, also known as the Albany-Lyons Highway, about six miles south of Scio.

Motorists were warned to avoid the area and a detour was also being set up.

ODOT officials said the crash did not occur on the highway but debris landed on the highway and will likely not be cleared until an investigation is completed.

  
ALBANY, Ore. – Sheriff’s deputies in Linn County are investigating a small plane crash near Albany.

The plane crashed in a field near Brewster Road and Highway 226 at around 3:30 p.m., deputies said.

The rural area is located about nine miles east of Albany.

It’s unclear how many people were on the plane or what caused the crash.

Debris from the crash closed Highway 226 south of Scio. Deputies said the debris will likely not be removed until the investigation is completed.

A small plane has crashed into a field east of Albany and its debris has closed Oregon 226 Monday, authorities said.

The crash was reported about 3:30 p.m. near Brewster Road and Oregon 226, said Lebanon Fire District. Details on how the crash occurred and if there are any injuries has not been released.

The Oregon Department of Transportation said the plane did not crash on the roadway and the debris will not be cleared until an investigation is finished.

The Linn County Sheriff's Office and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash.


 Officials with the Linn County Sheriff’s Office are investigating a plane crash that occurred in a field approximately nine miles east of Albany Monday afternoon.

The plane crashed in a field near a rural residential area near Brewster Road and Highway 226. It is unknown at this time how many people were aboard the aircraft or if anyone on the plane or the ground was injured. The aircraft was confirmed to be a small plane, although the specific model or its use is unknown at this time.

Debris from the crash has closed Highway 226 six miles south of Scio in Linn County. Officials said the debris will likely not be cleared until the investigation of the crash has been completed.

CRABTREE — Firefighters and law enforcement officials were called to the scene of a plane crash late Monday afternoon near Crabtree.

A small plane left a trail of debris before it came to rest in a field just west of Brewster Road off of Highway 226. It was unknown how many people were in the plane when it went down or if there were any survivors.

About 14 vehicles from various city, county and state agencies were deployed to the scene. As the sun was setting around 5 p.m., firefighters were trying to mark where debris was spotted.

The plane left at least one large piece on the north shoulder of Highway 226. Additional wreckage was scattered on both sides of Brewster Road.

Traffic was being diverted on Highway 226 about a half-mile away from the scene in both directions and also northbound on Brewster Road.
 

Linn County sheriff's deputies are investigating a small plane crash east of Albany, Ore., that scattered enough debris to temporarily close a nearby state highway. There was no immediate word on the status of those aboard the plane.

Undersheriff Bruce Riley said in a statement that the plane crash was reported at about 3:30 p.m. Monday. He said his office did not immediately know the extent of any injuries nor the identity of those aboard.

The plane reportedly crashed in a field in a rural residential area about nine miles east of Albany in the Willamette Valley.

The Oregon Transportation Department says debris from the crash closed state Highway 226 about six miles south of Scio.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified.


ALBANY, Ore. (KMTR) -- Linn County Undersheriff Bruce Riley reports that deputies are currently investigating a report of a plane crash. Today at approximately 3:37 PM the sheriff's office received a 911 call reporting that a small plane had crashed in the area of Brewster Road and Highway 226. This rural residential area is located approximately nine miles east of Albany. 

Initial reports indicate the plane crashed in a field. At the time of this release the Sheriff's Office has not confirmed the cause of the crash, identity of occupants or extent of injuries. As with all plane crashes, the FAA has been notified.

180th to conduct night training flights

Starting today, the 180th Fighter Wing of the Ohio Air National Guard will conduct night training flights.
 

The training is expected to be done each Monday through Thursday, through Dec. 13. Training should end at 9 p.m.

Area residents might see or hear the F-16 fighter jets take off and land, base officials said.

Training is usually done during the day, but F-16 pilots and maintenance personnel are required to conduct night operations as part of their readiness training.

The 180th is at 2660 South Eber Rd., near Swanton.


http://www.toledoblade.com

Opinion: Twin Cities flight paths, it seems, are very personal

Article by: MARGARET MCRAITH 

Updated: November 26, 2012 - 7:40 PM 

 It makes me sad (if not necessarily surprised) to see the selfishness and mean-spiritedness of people toward each other over airplane noise. 

I live on the west side of Lake Nokomis -- virtually under a flight path. My husband talked me into moving into this house in 1989. He loved the house. The study to determine whether the airport would be moved to a location with more land and fewer people was just getting underway. I reluctantly agreed, saying: "I can't believe they'll destroy the quality of life in this beautiful city by leaving the airport in the middle of it."

So, I was wrong back then about how decisions are made, and about who wins. And I am even more surprised and disappointed by the latest antics to keep the noise "anywhere but here."

Judging from the results of the latest outcry ("Homeowner ire deflects plane noise: Commissioners compromise on plan for major shift in MSP flight paths," Nov. 20), if people had united back then, during the airport location deliberations, there would have been a different outcome. But people were divided by their selfish interests then, too.

My relatives who live in the western suburbs just said: "Move -- you're crazy to live there." I have never thought that it was right to have my conveniences and leave other poor suckers to suffer. It was clear that there would be more flights as the population increased and as people traveled more frequently for work and pleasure.

Now, my relatives say we should never have left the airport in the middle of the city with no place to expand except over densely populated areas.

In the intervening years, those who were not affected did not even pay attention to the gradual rolling back of the restrictions we worked so hard to get put in place -- restrictions on hours, noise levels, etc. I'm guessing people in Edina and the areas of south Minneapolis who were scheduled to have a little bit more airport noise under the proposed plan like the convenience of having the airport nearby rather than in Dakota County or Anoka.

The amazing thing is that, by the time the airport study was over, I couldn't hear the planes anymore. I love the neighborhood, the lake, the parkway, and easy access to the freeway and both cities. Of course I like peace and quiet as much as the next person, but I know that every place has its tradeoffs. In Edina, it's the leaf-blowers. At the lake, it's the jet skis and snowmobiles.

As the world becomes more global -- and science is proving that we all affect and are affected by one another -- I naively thought that we would understand that there is no free lunch. There are no actions without consequences. Truly, we are all affected by the decisions that most directly impact the few.
 
Who wins? The airlines. 

The argument didn't become: How can we work together to come up with a solution that provides the lowest impact for all, with a little give and take, and places the pressure on the noisemakers to find ways to mitigate it -- like using quieter planes.

It makes me sad (if not necessarily surprised) to see the selfishness and mean-spiritedness of people toward each other. When are we as a culture going to learn that we can't have what we want when we want it all the time? Not yet, I guess.

If we don't learn to work together as people and communities, it is going to get uglier and uglier. I suppose the people in Edina (or wherever NIMBY is this week) can make themselves feel better by volunteering for the "poor," but they fail to see how poor in spirit they are.

* * *
Margaret McRaith, of Minneapolis is a holistic physical therapist.

http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries

Parkland foundation names Frasca entrepreneur of the year


URBANA — Rudy Frasca has been chosen as the 2013 Entrepreneur of the Year by the Parkland College Foundation. 

 Frasca is the founder and former president of Frasca International, the Urbana-based flight-simulator manufacturer that sells products internationally.

Frasca is slated to receive the V. Dale Cozad Entrepreneur of the Year Award on June 12, 2013, at a banquet at the I Hotel and Conference Center in Champaign.

The banquet is a fund-raiser for the Parkland College Entrepreneurial Program, which provides scholarships to students demonstrating potential as managers, leaders and innovators.

The suggested donation per ticket is $50. Tickets can be reserved by contacting Susan Goldenstein at the Parkland College Foundation, 351-2464. Corporate sponsorships for the event can also be arranged.

Frasca, 81, of Champaign will be the fourth recipient of the award. Winners in previous years were Clint Atkins of The Atkins Group, Rick Stephens of Horizon Hobby and McDonald's franchisee Dwight Miller.

Discussing the selection, Carl Meyer, executive director of the Parkland College Foundation, cited Frasca's innovation and professional growth.

"We're fortunate to have someone who has grown as much as he has in our own backyard," Meyer said.

Frasca International, based at 906 Airport Road, U, employs 208 people.

In a statement released by his daughter, Peggy Prichard, Frasca said he was honored to have been chosen.

"Parkland College is a great asset to our community, both for students and employees," he said. "We have hired many graduates of Parkland for careers at Frasca International."

Born In Melrose Park, Frasca began taking flying lessons at age 14. In 1949, he joined the Navy and worked at Glenview Naval Air Station as an instructor, teaching pilots on the early Link trainers.

After the Korean War, he left the Navy to attend the University of Illinois, where he conducted research in aviation psychology and became more interested in flight simulation.

In 1958, Frasca built his first flight simulator in his garage and founded Frasca Aviation, now called Frasca International.

Today, the company makes flight training equipment for airlines, flight schools and military organizations worldwide.

Over the last 54 years, the company has delivered more than 2,500 flight training devices to more than 70 countries.

Frasca has received many aviation-related awards, including the University Aviation Association President's Award for lifelong commitment to collegiate aviation.

He was inducted into the National Association of Flight Instructors Hall of Fame in 2012, and is also a member of the Chanute Air Force Base Hall of Fame.

Frasca has been active in the Warbirds of America organization, the Experimental Aircraft Association and the Sport Aviation Association.

He was named to the Illinois Aviation Honor Roll in 1993 and was appointed to the Governor's Board of Aeronautical Advisors in 2000.


 http://www.news-gazette.com

Aerospatiale AS 355F1, Bahamian registration C6-APV, registered to Pioneer Caribbean Logistics Ltd.

NTSB Identification: ERA13WA066 
 14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Thursday, November 22, 2012 in Great Guana Cay, Bahamas
Aircraft: AEROSPATIALE AS-355F1, registration: C6-APV
Injuries: 1 Fatal,4 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On November 22, 2012, about 1310 eastern standard time, an Aerospatiale AS 355F1, Bahamian registration C6-APV, registered to Pioneer Caribbean Logistics Ltd., impacted terrain while attempting to land at Baker's Bay Resort, Great Guana Cay, Bahamas. The pilot and three passengers were seriously injured, while a fourth passenger was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed Marsh Harbour, Bahamas, destined for Baker's Bay Resort.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of the Bahamas. Any further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Manager of Flight Standards Inspectorate, Bahamas
P.O. Box AP 59244
Nassau, N.P. Bahamas
Phone: (242) 377-3445/3448
Facsimile: (242) 377-6060

This report is for information purposes only, and contains only information released by or obtained for the Bahamian Government.




The Bahamas Ministry of Transportation and Aviation has completed its preliminary report on the Abaco helicopter crash that killed a New York businessman last week.

The report, which was completed through the Civil Aviation Department’s Air Accident Investigation and Prevention Unit, found that control of the helicopter was lost while attempting to land at the Baker’s Bay Golf and Ocean Club on Abaco’s Great Guana Cay.

Florida-based real estate developer Jeffrey Soffer, whose company owns the Fontainebleau resort in Miami Beach, was among the crash’s survivors.

The helicopter first departed from Marsh Harbour International Airport at 1:10 PM EST on Thursday, Nov. 22, with five passengers on board.

“While attempting to land, control was lost, resulting in the helicopter crash-landing at Baker’s Bay Golf and Ocean Club, Great Guana Cay, Abaco,” the report said.

The crash killed one passenger and left four others with “injuries of varying severity.”

“The surviving passengers were rescued and stabilized prior to being transported to Marsh Harbour for further evaluations prior to being airlifted to South Florida [three persons] and Nassau [1 person],” the report said.

A three-member team from the Bahamas Civil Aviation Department began the investigation on Friday, and members of the Baker’s Bay Golf and Ocean Club and the Royal Bahamas Police Force provided a “detailed briefing” to them.

The Air Accident Investigation Prevention Unit completed its on-site investigations, recovered the wreckage and relocated it to a “secure location.”

According to International Civil Aviation Organization and Bahamas Civli Aviation Safety regulations, the manufacturers of the airframe, engine and propeller and the State of Design have been notified of the accident.

The unit is currently coordinating plans for additional analysis and testing to determine the cause and contributing factors of the accident, it said.

The Ministry said it was expected that “further analyses and testing will take place” to determine the cause and contributing factors of the crash.

“The Ministry of Transport and Aviation extends its sincere condolences to the family of the deceased and its best wishes for the speedy recovery of the survivors of the crash,” it said in a statement. 


http://www.caribjournal.com

Bar Mitzvah Celebrated at Monmouth Executive Airport (KBLM), Belmar/Farmingdale, New Jersey

 

PHOTOS 

VIDEO

With dad a commercial pilot and son in flight-school, what more appropriate place to celebrate the boy’s Bar Mitzvah than in an airport.

Family and friends gathered at the Monmouth Executive Airport Sunday evening to celebrate the Bar Mitzvah of Jakee D. (Yoel Yaakov) of Long Branch, NJ, who is an aspiring pilot and currently taking flying lessons.

The Bar Mitzvah guests were treated with a 5-10 minute flight in either a 4-seater Cessna or Piper plane, before sitting down to an elegant meal inside the airport’s Hangar – the first such event ever at the airport.

During the Bar Mitzvah, a T-shirt invitation for the Bar Mitzvah boy’s Israel celebration, was handed out to all the guests. 


 Read more:  http://www.thelakewoodscoop.com


http://www.airnav.com/airport/KBLM

Airbus Ads Jab Boeing With Pinocchio Nose

The Airbus SAS ad asserts that Boeing is “stretching the truth” in its own campaign to promote its aircraft.
 Source: Airbus SAS via Bloomberg

Airbus SAS accused Boeing Co. of making misleading claims about its planes’ performance and ridiculed its competitor with an advertising campaign showing a Boeing jet nose grotesquely elongated to resemble Pinocchio’s. 

 The ad, which appears this week in trade publications including Aviation Week and Flight, asserts that Boeing is “stretching the truth” in its own campaign to promote its aircraft. Boeing said it stands by its performance claims.

“They crossed a line when they started running specific numbers,” Airbus’s sales chief, John Leahy, said yesterday in an interview. “They’ve blatantly misrepresented the facts.”

The bickering highlights the stakes in the $70 billion global civil aviation industry as the companies fight to trump each other in orders. Airbus is set to lose its delivery lead this year for the first time in almost a decade, after Boeing overcame production delays and began shipping its new 787 Dreamliner to customers.

Airbus and Boeing are both drawing comparisons with each other’s narrow-body aircraft, the industry’s workhorses, and their four-engine A380 and 747-8 jumbo jets. Leahy said Airbus was driven to act only after Chicago-based Boeing ran ads with specific claims about the alleged superiority of its 737 Max over the A320Neo, and its 747-8 over Airbus’s A380.


Cost Claims

The 737 Max ad claims the plane’s costs on a per-seat basis are 8 percent less than an A320neo’s. Toulouse, France-based Airbus wrote to Boeing’s general counsel complaining the numbers are “wildly out of line,” and placed ads targeting airlines only after the U.S. company failed to respond, Leahy said.

“We received the letter and responded weeks ago that we are fully confident in the accuracy of the statements made in our advertisements,” Marc Birtel, a spokesman at Boeing’s commercial headquarters in Seattle, said in an e-mail yesterday.

The two planemakers combined have delivered more than 12,000 narrow-body planes since Boeing 737s reached their first customers in 1967. In its ad, Airbus said it is now dominant in the market for very large aircraft with its A380 double-decker, a niche where Boeing has struggled to match the popularity of previous iterations of its iconic 747 jumbo.

Airbus and Boeing have sparred in public before. Some 15 years ago, Airbus took out ads touting the now-canceled four- engine A340 as safer than a twin-engine Boeing model. Boeing took umbrage that its rival had breached an unwritten understanding not to use safety issues to market its planes.


Different Numbers

The manufacturers have promoted competing planes with different sets of numbers for decades, each choosing parameters that would give its own model an edge with buyers. Both the upgraded 737 and the A320 will boast new engines, the main contributing factor to improved efficiency.

“The truth about these claims is that neither side knows,” said Richard Aboulafia, vice president of consultant Teal Group in Fairfax, Virginia. “These are engine-driven aircraft,” and until they have been fully developed and start tests, it’s impossible to know what they can offer, he said.

Airbus’s A320neo is scheduled to make its commercial debut in late 2015, while the Max is due to enter service in 2017, according to timetables outlined by the planemakers.

Boeing said Nov. 15 that the 737 Max has reached “firm concept” in the development process, with larger engines, a redesigned tail cone and winglets. The company also announced some systems changes, including the addition of large cockpit displays, similar to those for the Dreamliner.


Milestone Ahead

Boeing doesn’t expect to reach the “firm configuration” milestone for the Max until next year and won’t begin building the first test plane until 2015.

“We’re confident in our performance claims based on our historical and projected performance for the airplane,” Boeing’s Birtel said.

Airbus has won 1,515 orders for the A320neo, the fastest- selling model in civil aviation history, after a head start of about six months over the Max, which has 969 orders. Boeing has delivered about 7,400 737s since 1967, making the jet the world’s most widely flown airliner.

Airbus was concerned that some “less sophisticated airlines” might be swayed by Boeing’s claims and be less inclined to talk to Airbus, Leahy said. The sales chief said he didn’t know what Airbus will do if Boeing ignores its ads.

“We’ll take one step at a time,” he said. 


http://www.businessweek.com

Airbus, Boeing launch airliner ad war as rivalry heats up

* Planemakers make competing claims on jet performance

* Airbus ad depicts Boeing aircraft as Pinocchio

* Boeing stands by performance claims

* Clash reflects rising competition for market share


By Tim Hepher

PARIS, Nov 26 (Reuters) - Airbus and Boeing have clashed over the performance of their latest revamped models as the aerospace companies battle for market share by offering fuel savings to cash-starved airlines.

The dispute is being splashed across the columns of specialist industry magazines in a series of negative ads as the world's dominant aircraft makers battle to maintain their share of the $100 billion a year commercial airliner market.

In the latest exchange, Airbus ran an advertisement in Aviation Week on Monday accusing its rival of "exaggerating the capabilities" of both the 737 and the latest 747 models.

The ad featured a Boeing aircraft with an elongated nose in the style of Pinocchio under the headline: "Why is our competitor stretching the truth?"

Airbus sales chief John Leahy said the European aircraft maker had chosen the Pinocchio theme in response to recent Boeing advertisements claiming a massive advantage for Boeing aircraft.

"They are blatantly misrepresenting the truth by orders of magnitude," Leahy told Reuters. "What is going on is just over the top."

Boeing defended its advertising.

"We believe in - and history has shown - the superior performance of our products and services. We stand behind our performance claims," said Boeing Commercial Airplanes spokesman Marc Birtel.

"Ultimately, our customers will decide based on their experience and analysis relative to their needs."

The exchange is the latest evidence of tensions that have escalated steadily since both companies took a gamble by tweaking their most popular models to offer fuel savings.

The decisions triggered an avalanche of orders, first for the revamped Airbus A320neo and then the Boeing 737 MAX. But industry sources say that has not prevented prices from coming under pressure as each side fights for market share.

With oil prices representing about 40 percent of airline operating costs, every litre of fuel saved represents potentially valuable business for aircraft and engine makers.

"This is an industry that thrives on producing incremental products, where just a couple of percentage points in performance can make a dramatic difference," said aerospace analyst Richard Aboulafia of Virginia-based Teal Group.

"There is no prize for being second."

CONTRADICTORY CLAIMS


The Boeing 737 is the U.S. company's most popular aircraft and competes with the Airbus A320 in the largest segment of the aircraft market, estimated at $2 trillion over 20 years.

Both planemakers are bringing out revamped versions of these roughly 150-seat jets from around the middle of the decade.

Boeing says its 737 MAX 8 will cost 8 percent less to operate per seat than the revamped A320neo. Airbus says the Airbus aircraft has a 3.3 percent cost advantage per seat.

Much of that discrepancy is due to a basic disagreement over the relative merits of the existing generation of aircraft.

Boeing says its 737 is already 8 percent more efficient per seat than the current A320. Airbus says the roughly 50/50 market split in recent years indicates the aircraft are comparable.

"I will claim an extra couple of percent better for mine and they should be claiming a couple of percent better for theirs, and if you talk to most airlines, they say they come out about equal," Leahy said in a telephone interview.

Such contradictory claims are also being made for some of their largest aircraft.

Boeing's 747-8 is a stretched 467-seat version of its legendary jumbo jet and is designed to compete with the 525-seat Airbus A380 superjumbo, the world's largest airliner.

In ads, Boeing says the total trip costs of the 747-8 are 26 percent less than an A380. Airbus says the 747-8 has 10 percent lower trip costs, but that the A380 is 30 percent bigger, allowing airlines to gain by filling up the extra seats.

Rivalry between Airbus and Boeing comes as no surprise, but rhetoric has sharpened as Boeing looks set to recover the top spot in the industry by out selling Airbus this year. Airbus says its rival is merely catching up after a record European year in 2011.

Industry analysts and executives say competition has also intensified since Ray Conner stepped up from being Boeing sales chief to become president of the commercial division in June.

Rivalries in aerospace are fierce and Leahy has himself been accused by Boeing executives of overstepping boundaries at airshow appearances, but detailed attacks are rare.

Monday's Airbus advertisement is not Pinocchio's first appearance in the take no-prisoners world of aviation.

At the Farnborough Airshow in 1994, the head of Boeing's jetliner unit compared an Airbus executive to Pinocchio in a spat over market share, according to Flight International.

In 2010, Ryanair Holdings Plc Chief Executive Michael O'Leary apologised and paid damages to top European rival Stelios Haji-Iouannou for depicting the easyJet Plc founder as Pinocchio and suggesting he was lying about on-time performance.


http://www.reuters.com