Saturday, June 30, 2012

Old warbirds touch down for Canada Day

EDMONTON - A fleet of vintage aircraft touched down at Alberta’s Aviation Museum in Edmonton this weekend for Canada Day celebrations.

The F-86 Sabre, P-51 Mustang and Boeing Stearman were available for guests to admire and ride. All three planes belong to Vintage Wings, a Quebec-based non-profit organization dedicated to educating Canadians about aviation history.

“As Churchill succinctly said, ‘those that fail to learn history are doomed to repeat it,’” said Rob Fleck, president of Vintage Wings.

Each of Vintage Wings’ 18 planes tells a Canadian story.

The F-86 is dedicated to Fern Villeneuve, who was a military jet fighter pilot for 32 years and was inducted into the Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame in 2006.

The Stearman and the Mustang were both used in the Second World War.

Read more here:   http://www.edmontonjournal.com

Kirtland Air Force Base honors history-making pilot

ALBUQUERQUE (KRQE) - The oldest active pilot in the history of the U.S. Air Force is stationed at Kirtland Air Force Base and was honored by his colleagues Friday night. 

Lt. Col. James Routt is credited with training every Air Force pilot currently working special operations and combat search and rescue around the world at some point in their career.

Routt, 64, was also inducted into the British Guild of Air Pilots and Air Navigators as a "Master Air Pilot." He is only the third U.S. citizen so honored joining astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, and Capt. Sully Sullenberger, who landed an ailing passenger jet in the Hudson River.

Routt was honored by the KAFB colleagues for all of his accomplishments as he approaches his retirement in September.

He retired once before in 1996 but volunteered to return to the Air Force after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Since then he has been with the 58th Special Operations Wing at Kirtland where he is chief pilot of the 550th Special Operations Squadron.

Read more here:  http://www.kasa.com

Boca Raton, Florida - Man takes to the sky to help those in need

Name: Daniel Diamond 

Age: 28

Residence: Boca Raton

Family: Parents, one brother and one sister

Career: Aviation business, flight instructor and aircraft mechanic

Cause: Vital Flight, a South Florida-based nonprofit that coordinates air transportation for individuals with compassionate, humanitarian or medical needs. As part of the Air Care Alliance, pilots arrange to transport qualified patients throughout the United States at no charge. It is generally used when commercial air service is not available, is a health risk or is not affordable.

Q: Why do you volunteer?

A: Vital Flight combines my two favorite activities: flying and volunteering. The man next to me in the photo is a legally blind veteran. We flew him to Palm Beach from St. Petersburg to enter a rehabilitation hospital for the blind and learn how to function with his disability. Then we flew him home. Or it could be a child who is battling cancer who smiles at me, or helping a transplant patient with a lifesaving second chance get where they need to go. The words "Thank you so much, you've helped change my life" are powerful. There is nothing more satisfying.

Q: How did you choose this organization?

A: Two years ago, I heard of a new, local, nonprofit volunteer flight organization. I met with the people and found it to be a perfect fit.

Read more here:  http://www.sun-sentinel.com

LIVE: RAF Waddington International Air Show in Lincolnshire - UK

 The annual RAF Waddington International Air Show is taking place this weekend in Lincolnshire.

More than 100,000 visitors are expected to enjoy the spectacle of a seven-hour flying display above RAF Waddington airbase.

Around 50 aircraft will be taking part in the airborne displays, featuring the Lancaster, Hurricane and Spitfire from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight as well as modern aircraft such as the Typhoon from the Royal Air Force display team.

The gates open at 8am and the air displays start at 10:00am and finish at 5:30pm on both days.
The Red Arrows, which are based locally at RAF Scampton, are set to be one of the highlights of the day that has more than 20 different nations taking part.

Another local favourite, the Vulcan XH558 has sadly been forced to cancel its appearance after suffering a double engine failure and although engines No.1 and No.2 of the aircraft have been replaced, it is awaiting its first test flight and will not be included this weekend.

The air show also offers a chance for members of the public to get close to some of the most impressive military and civilian aircraft such as the C130H Hercules, with an extensive ground display in two exhibition hangers.

Visitors have the opportunity to get their photo taken in the cockpit of an F4 Phantom and a Lightening with helicopter pleasure flights running throughout the event.

Gates do not close until 7:30pm, allowing time to enjoy some of the extra attractions such as a funfair and classic cars, after the flying displays have ended.

Running since 1995, the Waddington International Air Show aims to raise public understanding and awareness of the Royal Air Force and its modern role with proceeds of the show going to the RAF and local charities.

To help spectators get the most from the show, organisers are encouraging people to download the official mobile app .

You can keep up-to-date with the show via this article with hourly updates and video and picture highlights throughout both days of the event..

Wings and Wheels AirShow Set For September 8 - Barnes County Municipal Airport (KBAC), Valley City, North Dakota

The Barnes County Municipal Airport, located one mile north of Valley City, will be the site for the Wings and Wheels AirShow with gates opening at 10 a.m. Sept. 8. 

Terry Gortmaker, who runs the “show and shine” portion of the AirShow, said Thursday performers have now been lined up for the event.

Those who’ve agreed to perform are Matt Younkin, Jim “Fang” Maroney, Warren Pietsch, Rex Hammarback, Toby McPherson and the Fargo Skydivers, Gortmaker said.

Air performances are scheduled to begin at 3 pm. The featured performer is Younkin, third-generation pilot and the son of Bobby Younkin, considered to be one the greatest air show performers of all time.

Younkin’s Beech 18 performance is likely one of the most unusual acts on the air show circuit today. The aircraft was never designed for aerobatic flight. The performance begins and ends to light-hearted music that capitalizes on an overly-obese airplane executing maneuvers its designers and air show audience members never conceived possible for a large transport plane. The performance will be two-fold with the last half, “Magic by Moonlight,” done after dark with the air show circuit’s largest, noisiest and smokiest airplane lit up like a Christmas tree.

Read more:  http://www.times-online.com

VIDEO: Blue Angels in Seacoast for Air Show - The Service Credit Union Boston-Portsmouth Air Show is this weekend.


 A crowd of several hundred spectactors were onhand at Portsmouth International Airport to them then demonstrate the performances they will present on Saturday and Sunday. Air Show Director Greg Osborn said Friday's turnout is nothing compared to the crowds he expects to see this weekend.

The weather will be 90 degrees and sunny Saturday and Sunday for the air show.

Osborn said his staff of 400 people and 1,500 volunteers who have worked so hard to get everything read expect as many as 60,000 people from all over New England and elsewhere will come to the air show.

Osborn said the Navy's Blue Angels are always a big draw, especially when this may be the last year in the foreseeable future they will be able to perform in Portsmouth.

Watch Video:   http://exeter.patch.com/articles/air-show-acts-fine-tune-shows-video-fa71d660#video-10490171

Test jump: Golden Knights get in practice before air show

PORTSMOUTH — Nine of the most experienced and precise parachute jumpers in the country leaped out of the black and yellow U.S. Army plane on Friday afternoon to practice their performance a final time before displaying the event to thousands of people this weekend during the Service Credit Union Boston-Portsmouth Air Show. 

The men tinkered with the vessel's body, rolled up their parachutes and slipped into their full body suits in preparation for the 6:00 p.m. take off.

As the hour approached the nine men filtered into the largely emptied plane, making final adjustments to their equipment. They sat on the gray metal seats that lined the interior of the plane, slapping each other, fist bumping and laughing as the engine started, a calm that only comes with repetition and confidence.

On the runway, clouds of exhaust blew into the two open doors, making it hard to see or breath. The hazy evening heat made the wait nearly unbearable, as the men perspired in their heavy, black body suits but looked unfazed by the conditions.

As the plane took off wind blew into the chamber, making the entire situation more comfortable.


Read more:  http://www.fosters.com

American Flyers Flight School to host open house and lunch July 7 at David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (KDWH), Houston, Texas

American Flyers Flight School will hold an open house and barbecue at noon on Saturday, July 7 at the David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport, 20803 Stuebner Airline Road, Spring.

This free event includes a facility tour and presentation by a certificated flight instructor after lunch.

Attendees can ask questions, check out training aircraft on display and experience a flight in one of the state-of-the-art simulators.

Lunch is served promptly at noon, so guests are encouraged to arrive 10 to 15 minutes early.

American Flyers has been training pilots since 1939 and operates seven FAA-accredited schools in six states and one in Mexico City.

Plainville, Connecticut - Robertson Airport (4B8) to host Wings & Wheels event to benefit charity

PLAINVILLE — On Sunday another local event will debut, bringing cars, airplanes, food and fun to town for a good cause. 

 Plainville Wings & Wheels will be held at Robertson Airport from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Plainville Food Pantry and the Petit Family Foundation.

Scott Saunders, Town Council vice chairman, came up with the idea.

“I was talking with two friends who I go camping with,” he said. “We started talking about it and decided to put it together.”

Saunders said the Bristol Auto Club has promised that “hundreds of cars” will be on display at the event. The Plainville Stadium Racers, who keep in touch at their annual reunion in Berlin, will display some of their vintage race cars. The Plainville Historical Center will also promote their exhibit on the stadium that is on display this summer.

Interstate Aviation will stage a fly-in at 10 a.m. There will also be static airplane and helicopter displays, airplane and helicopter rides and aviation related vendors. Scheduled to appear are Life Star, an antique 1946 J3 Cub Tailwheel and a light sport seaplane.

Food will also be available throughout the event. Saunders said the Plainville Fire Co. will sell hamburgers, hot dogs and fried dough, just as they do at the Balloon Festival

Other vendors will sell barbecue ribs and corn on the cob. J. Timothy’s Taverne will sell buffalo chicken sandwiches and World’s Best Sundae’s, based in Canton, will sell ice cream.

Scheduled entertainment for the youngsters includes a free bounce house, face painting and a clown.

There will also be a silent auction of donated items, include Stanley Tools, luggage, a golf package and something special from famous recording artist Michael Bolton. Saunders would not say what it is.

“There will be something for everybody,” he added. “It should be a lot of fun.”

Robertson Airport is located at 62 Johnson Ave. in Plainville.

Admission to Plainville Wings & Wheels is $2 for children ages 5 to12 and $5 for those over 12. Children under 5 are free. There will be free parking and free shuttle busses to the site from the middle school and Toffolon Elementary School on Northwest Drive.

Source:  http://www.newbritainherald.com

Friday, June 29, 2012

Blue Angels, Black Diamond Jets, and other aerial acts make practice runs for this weekend's Service Credit Union Boston-Portsmouth Air Show.

The Blue Angels, Black Diamond Jets and several other aerial acts that will perform in this weekend's Service Credit Union Boston-Portsmouth Air Show made their final practice runs on Friday. 

 A crowd of several hundred spectactors were onhand at Portsmouth International Airport to them then demonstrate the performances they will present on Saturday and Sunday. Air Show Director Greg Osborn said Friday's turnout is nothing compared to the crowds he expects to see this weekend.

Osborn said his staff of 400 people and 1,500 volunteers who have worked so hard to get everything read expect as many as 60,000 people from all over New England and elsewhere will come to the air show.

Osborn said the Navy's Blue Angels are always a big draw, especially when this may be the last year in the foreseeable future they will be able to perform in Portsmouth.

What follows is a video that shows a small sample of what air show goers can expect to see on Saturday and Sunday.

Watch Video:   http://portsmouth-nh.patch.com/articles/air-show-acts-fine-tune-shows-video#video-10490171 
 

Of Gabriel Nderitu: A little more work he could see his dreams take flight

 

This is a story of one man with a an unquenchable quest to fly. Gabriel Nderitu has fabricated a craft, which is almost hitting the skies. He finally ran some tests on a real airstrip. And as Rose Wangui reports, he is very optimistic. 

 

Residents of Kambirwa village in Murang’a east district were treated to a rare sight when an innovator sought to test his craft at the proposed Kambirwa airstrip. After three years spent building his own craft Gabriel Nderitu ferried it to Murang’a for a flight test….. While the craft did not get off the ground, Nderitu is confident that with a little more work he could see his dreams take flight.

Greenville, South Carolina: AeroCab expands aircraft

GREENVILLE, S.C. — AeroCab, LLC — based at the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport (KGSP) — continues to expand their aircraft charter services with the addition of a Learjet 35. The Learjet 35 is the second aircraft to be added to the AeroCab fleet in the past 30 days. 

With the addition of the Learjet 35, AeroCab’s private charter and aircraft management fleet now totals seven aircraft in the Upstate SC region, which includes: a Cirrus SR-22, Pilatus PC-12, Citation V, Citation Bravo, Beechjet 400, and a Hawker 800.

The Learjet 35 seats eight passengers and includes a full entertainment system with DVD/CD and Airshow in-flight information system, a forward refreshment galley, a full enclosed lavatory, and aft locker storage with cabin access.

In addition to aircraft charter services, AeroCab is pleased to announce the establishment of Aero Flight Solutions, a Domestic and International Flight Planning Services Company, co-located with AeroCab at the GSP airport. Aero Flight Solutions provides full 24-hour service to help clients with efficient and optimized flight plans, flight following, and concierge services.

Working collectively at the GSP airport, Aero Flight Solutions and AeroCab have expanded their employee base to 23 people.

AeroCab specializes in on-demand travel with charter coordinators and flight operations available 24/7/365. AeroCab’s experienced team of incredible pilots and crew members provide the highest level of service, both in the air and on the ground. AeroCab operates in strict accordance with FAA flight standards to ensure maximum safety and security.

To learn more about AeroCab or to book a charter reservation visit www.flyaerocab.com or call 864-416-0065.

To learn more about Aero Flight Solutions visit www.aeroflightsolutions.com or call 864-416-0041

Source:  http://data.greenvilleonline.com

Service Credit Union's Boston-Portsmouth Air Show: Seacoast traffic warning - Air show may cause weekend driving delays


PORTSMOUTH — Seacoast residents planning on traveling anywhere this weekend — both in and around town, as well as out of the state — will need to plan ahead and give themselves plenty of time because of the Service Credit Union's Boston-Portsmouth Air Show this weekend.

According to Bill Boynton of the N.H. Department of Transportation's Public Information Office, although no significant traffic measures have been established, planning and coordination with turnpike officials should help keep traffic moving as efficiently as possible. Boynton explained electronic messages such as 'DO NOT PULL OVER TO VIEW AIR SHOW' and 'REMAIN ON ROAD' typically send messages that motorists adhere to.

Although he couldn't speculate on how heavy the traffic or the amount of time expected for delays will be, Boynton did acknowledge there will be considerable traffic on both Saturday and Sunday.

"The Air Show is obviously going to generate a lot of traffic, people should realize this and give themselves extra time depending on where they need to go," said Boynton.

Read more here:  http://www.fosters.com

Bellanca 8GCBC Scout, Heads Up Advertising, N87020: Accident occurred August 02, 2011 in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey

http://registry.faa.gov/N87020 

NTSB Identification: ERA11LA437 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2011 in Egg Harbor Township, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
Aircraft: BELLANCA 8GCBC, registration: N87020
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After the airplane’s fourth unsuccessful attempt to pick up a banner, a witness reported that the airplane was flying about 100 feet above ground level and the wings were "wobbling." The airplane then descended, and spun before it impacted the ground. The pilot stated that he did not have any recollection of the accident or the events prior to the accident. No preimpact anomalies were noted with the airframe or engine during a postaccident examination.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering near the ground, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

On August 2, 2011, at 1500, eastern daylight time, a Bellanca 8GCBC, N87020, registered to an individual and operated by Heads Up Advertising, incurred substantial damage when it impacted terrain in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. The pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, banner towing flight. The flight originated from Woodbine Municipal Airport (OBI), Woodbine, New Jersey, about 1450.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector stated that the pilot fueled the airplane prior to flying towards the banner pick up area. The pilot attempted 3 banner pickups prior to the accident. He maneuvered the airplane for the fourth attempt but failed to pick up the banner. The banner ground handler looked away and started to prepare the banner for another attempt, when moments later he heard a loud impact noise and observed the airplane had crashed into the ground about half mile away from the pickup area, on the crosswind for the banner tow pattern.

According to a witness, the airplane was observed flying approximately 100 feet above ground level. She noted that the wings were "wobbling" and the airplane was not climbing although it was in a nose up attitude. Next, she saw the airplane begin to "nosedive" and start spinning but was unable to see the airplane impact the ground.

The pilot stated that he did not have any recollection of the accident or the events prior to the accident.

The airplane was manufactured in 1974 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series, 180-horsepower engine. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on February 3, 2011. At the time of the inspection, the reported aircraft time was 6698.0 total hours and the recorded tachometer was 2090.15 hours. The tachometer located in the wreckage 2236.91 hours.

The pilot, age 20, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued in May 2011. He reported 600 total hours of flight experience, of which, 65 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

A post accident examination of the wreckage by the FAA revealed that control continuity was verified to all flight control surfaces. Fuel samples were taken from each wing with no water or contaminants noted. Examination of the engine was performed and the top and bottom sparkplugs were removed and no issues were noted. The crankshaft was rotated by the propeller flange and compression was observed on all cylinders. In addition, spark was obtained from the spark plug leads during the rotation.




Jason Flood


FRANKLINVILLE, N.J. -   A FOX 29 investigation: a young New Jersey pilot survives a devastating crash only to learn that his employer does not hold the important insurance policy that is vital in getting him back on his feet.

Jeff Cole and FOX 29 Investigates have the story tonight of Jason Flood and his fight for what he believes he's owed.

A warning, some of the images in this report are hard to look at.

"...This is what it's made to do. Doing the aerobatics--flips, rolls, spins..." said Flood.

Jason Flood is happy when he's around his aerobatic plane. He feels pure joy when he's strapped in its seat, control in hand---defying gravity.

"Free. I'm at home. It's a place of enjoyment. It's freedom. It's what I love..." said Flood.

Flood is a 23-year-old pilot who flies out of a small airfield near his Franklinville, New Jersey home. However, every time he soars, he remembers the day that he came tumbling to earth.

"...August 2nd. was a very devastating, life changing event for me..." he said. "I can't talk. I am in a strange room trying to figure out where I am. I can't get up to go to the bathroom. My life changed that day."

August 2nd., 2011, He's is flying low trying to hook-on an advertising banner to pull above beach goers along the Jersey Shore. Suddenly, the engine quits and Flood spirals down.

Federal Investigators found that the 20-year-old pilot made an error.

Flood says he had just moments to lift the nose of the aircraft before it slapped the earth.

"On the scene you could hear in the police recordings they said this doesn't look good," Flood said.

Jason Flood was knocked-out. Rescue workers found him bent-over and bloodied in the cockpit. Pictures show his crumpled body in the yellow tee-shirt. Flood had suffered massive injuries including broken bones, organ damage and internal bleeding.

Flood was eventually rushed to Camden's Cooper Hospital where, after 3 weeks in a coma and multiple surgeries, he emerged with rods and pins holding his broken body together.

"...How did you survive?" asked FOX 29's Jeff Cole.

"By the grace of God..." he replied.

Jason Flood's rehab was painful and long. Furthermore, he says it was made more difficult when he learned the family friend who'd hired him to fly banner planes failed to carry state-required insurance that would have gone a long way to help him get back on his feet."

That man is Herbert Degan of Woodbine, New Jersey. He can be seen behind the wheel of the Lexis recording FOX 29's Jeff Cole and his crew with his cell phone.

You can see Degan in happier times with Jason Flood in a photo posted on a web site which documents aerobatic air shows. They're also side by side in a video of a fund raiser held for Flood.

According to a State of New Jersey Workers Compensation Order, Degan's banner business Heads Up Advertising, LLC, which is under his and his wife's names, was uninsured. It did not carry state-mandated workers' compensation insurance.

While the Degan's did pay Flood his weekly wages of about 200 bucks for half a year in 2012, Flood's won a 190,000 dollar workers' compensation judgment against Heads Up Advertising and the Degan's, but he has not collected.

And there's something else you should know about Herbert Degan. He's an air traffic controller at the Atlantic City Airport. He's directed aircraft to depart and land safely for 22 years. In fact, he's listed as the "safety rep." at the Atlantic City air traffic control Tower for the National Air Traffic Controllers Union.

Jeff Cole tried to talk to Herbert Degan, but as he approached his SUV, he noticed his young son in the back seat, so he asked Degan to take his card so they could talk later.

Degan would not talk. His bankruptcy attorney, in an e-mailed statement to FOX 29, accused Jason Flood and his parents of spreading "venomous lies" about the Degan's.

He wrote that the Degan's would like "nothing more than to respond" but are unable to because the "Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Case is still pending."

Herbert Degan and his wife filed the Chapter 7 bankruptcy in November of 2013 claiming that they owe between One-million and 10-million dollars.

Listed as creditors: Jason Flood for his 190,000 dollar workers' comp. judgment and the State of New Jersey for almost 1.2-milion dollars, most of it for Flood's medical bills. Those bills have now been cut to $400,000 and paid by a special state fund.

In a recording of the December bankruptcy hearing, Herbert Degan admits his banner business had no workers' compensation insurance at the time of Flood's devastating crash, but claimed it was an accountant's fault.

"He failed to obtain workers compensation insurance for us without us knowing," Degan said.

In the meantime, Jason Flood is back fighting gravity and battling for what he believes he's owed.

"I'm left in the dust, left at the bottom, trampled on again--even after the plane crash," said Flood.

FOX 29 called New Jersey accountant Michael Shumski who's listed on the Degans' bankruptcy filing. He said he did work for Degan's Heads Up Advertising but does not recall Degan asking him to arrange workers' comp insurance. He says he forwards such requests to insurance brokers. The Degan's Attorney calls the crash a "tragic event" which has forever altered the lives of the Floods and the Degans.

Degan's attorney says they will also not respond at this time due to an "open criminal charge" against Jason Flood's father. Flood's father was charged with harassment after he accused the Degan's of lying on their bankruptcy filing after that December hearing. Flood says he'll fight the charge.

Story, video, photo gallery:  http://www.myfoxphilly.com

 





 


Published on Mar 17, 2013
PLEASE READ THE DESCRIPTION
WARNING: Graphic material. Viewer discretion is advised.

This is a video montage of photos that were acquired by Jason Flood, an aerobatic pilot based in Southern New Jersey. On August 2, 2011, Jason was flying a Bellanca 8GCBC Scout on a routine banner tow flight when, in the process of picking up a banner, the engine seized on the airplane and he and the aircraft crashed in Egg Harbor Township.

As a result of the accident, Jason sustained the following injuries: crushed left calcaneus heel, right ankle explosion, broken right tibia and right femur, an assortment of broken ribs, lumbar spine explosion, the total loss of his left kidney and spleen, and lastly a ruptured aorta. Jason underwent numerous surgeries to fix his heel, ankle, and tibia with rods and screws as well as the insertion of plates and screws in his body, including rods and screws in his back.

Amazingly, Jason made a full recovery. He took his first airplane flight a mere two months after the accident and flew the family's Piper Cub shortly afterwards. Ten months after the accident, in late June 2012, Jason competed in the Widlwood Acroblast competition in Cape May County, NJ, placing second in the intermediate category out of nine competitors. Not even two months after that Jason flew his first airshow performance since the accident - the airshow taking place at the New Garden Flying Field in Toughkenamon, PA.

Jason would like to thank the Egg Harbor Township Police Department, the Scullville Fire Company, the Cardiff Fire Department, and their respective EMS personnel for assisting in his rescue as well as the EMTs and pilots for the New Jersey State Police's SouthStar Medevac unit, along with staff at AtlantiCare Regional Medicare Center and Cooper University Medical Center in Camden for going above and beyond to ensure Jason got the best medical care possible. He would also like to thank his family and friends for always being by his side during that time, and of course throughout the entire recovery phase and beyond.

You can visit Jason's website at http://www.jasonfloodairshows.com 


Video of Jason's performances at the 2012 New Garden Airshow can be found at http://www.zingeraviation.com .



 

Published on Mar 17, 2013
PLEASE READ THE DESCRIPTION
WARNING: Graphic material. Viewer discretion is advised.

This is a video montage of photos that were acquired by Jason Flood, an aerobatic pilot based in Southern New Jersey. On August 2, 2011, Jason was flying a Bellanca 8GCBC Scout on a routine banner tow flight when, in the process of picking up a banner, the engine seized on the airplane and he and the aircraft crashed in Egg Harbor Township.

As a result of the accident, Jason sustained the following injuries: crushed left calcaneus heel, right ankle explosion, broken right tibia and right femur, an assortment of broken ribs, lumbar spine explosion, the total loss of his left kidney and spleen, and lastly a ruptured aorta. Jason underwent numerous surgeries to fix his heel, ankle, and tibia with rods and screws as well as the insertion of plates and screws in his body, including rods and screws in his back.

Amazingly, Jason made a full recovery. He took his first airplane flight a mere two months after the accident and flew the family's Piper Cub shortly afterwards. Ten months after the accident, in late June 2012, Jason competed in the Widlwood Acroblast competition in Cape May County, NJ, placing second in the intermediate category out of nine competitors. Not even two months after that Jason flew his first airshow performance since the accident - the airshow taking place at the New Garden Flying Field in Toughkenamon, PA.

Jason would like to thank the Egg Harbor Township Police Department, the Scullville Fire Company, the Cardiff Fire Department, and their respective EMS personnel for assisting in his rescue as well as the EMTs and pilots for the New Jersey State Police's SouthStar Medevac unit, along with staff at AtlantiCare Regional Medicare Center and Cooper University Medical Center in Camden for going above and beyond to ensure Jason got the best medical care possible. He would also like to thank his family and friends for always being by his side during that time, and of course throughout the entire recovery phase and beyond.

Music by Matchbox Twenty - How Far We've Come.

You can visit Jason's website at http://www.jasonfloodairshows.com .
Video of Jason's performances at the 2012 New Garden Airshow can be found at http://www.zingeraviation.com .



 

Until last August, the only thing miraculous about Jason Flood was his youth — the young pilot flew alongside men more than twice his age.

But after a banner plane crash left him critically injured in a medically-induced coma, no one imagined he would be here, competing at the Wildwoods AcroBlast Competition that begins today.

But today Flood, 21, will go through his usual pre-flight routines this morning. He will walk around the plane, checking the aelerons and the propeller. He will walk through his routine — the dips and rolls and inverses — on the ground before taking off from Cape May County Airport.

Jason Flood was trying to pick up a banner from a grassy airfield when his single-engine airplane crashed into an area of dense brush in Egg Harbor Township. Responders spent 40 minutes freeing the bloodied pilot from the wreckage. Eventually, he was flown to Cooper Medical Center, where a series of surgeries mended his broken bones and a torn aorta, and ultimately saved his life.

While family and friends remained hopeful the aerobat would return to the skies, Jason’s recovery was a dim hope in the weeks and months that followed.

“What if I never fly again?” Flood asked his father after he awoke and the tracheostomy tube had been removed.

Read more here:  http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com

Taking the message sky high


You’re stuck in traffic. Or lying on the beach gazing up at a blue sky. Perhaps you’re hiking on Table Mountain or hanging out at a pavement cafĂ© in Parkhurst. A small plane flies overhead, quite low in the sky. It’s pulling a massive banner. You crane your neck to read what it says…

And that’s the rub: did you get the message? Did it stay with you? Did the company paying for advertising on a sky-high banner get what it was looking for?

Thomas Kritzer, from Sky Messaging, believes this particular out of home advertising media delivers major impact – and he can prove it. “Results hinge entirely on the message that clients choose to fly. We can positively demonstrate the recall rate that banners have achieved in the past, which is a result of the brand itself and/or of the message that is being displayed, that has been proven to be around 27% over 50 flight hours and as high as 48% over 100 flight hours. In one instance we even had 89% of all sampled respondents recall a banner that flew for only 10 hours!” he says.

Read more here:   http://themediaonline.co.za/2012/06/taking-the-message-sky-high/

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Port of Walla Walla to consider airline rent, fee reductions

WALLA WALLA -- Port of Walla Walla commissioners will consider reducing Alaska Airlines' rents and fees during a 2 p.m. Friday meeting at the port's office, 310 A St., in Walla Walla.

The port is trying to keep commercial air service at the Walla Walla Regional Airport, said Jim Kuntz, the port's executive director. Currently, Alaska Airlines provides two daily flights between Walla Walla and Seattle, and said it operates the market at a loss.

Reducing the rent is part of the port's solution to the Walla Walla market losing money, Kuntz said.

The port also may postpone negotiations with Northwest Grain Growers until after wheat harvest is complete.
 

Foreign pilots' body seeks Director General of Civil Aviation intervention to end IPG strike

Striking Air India pilots got backing from a global pilots' body which extended them support and sought intervention of Director General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) to end the deadlock that entered the 52nd day on Thursday. 

In a letter to DGCA chief EK Bharat Bhushan, International Federation of Air Line Pilots' Association (IFALPA) said, "It is our view that DGCA, as the responsible regulator, is in a unique position and can make a very positive contribution towards ending this dispute.

"We would ask you to use your good offices to bring both sides back to the negotiating table so that the differing views can be resolved," IFALPA President Capt Don Wykoff said in the letter. IFALPA claims to represent over 100,000 professional pilots in more than 90 countries worldwide.

Read more here:   http://www.dnaindia.com

Boeing 737 chartered for one asylum seeker

An empty 737 plane chartered by the Federal Government was used to transfer a single asylum seeker from Christmas Island to Perth at the weekend. 

Fewer than five passengers are understood to have been on the aircraft - which usually seats 130 - including the injured asylum seeker and an accompanying Serco guard and immigration officer.

A spokesman for the Department of Immigration confirmed the Saturday morning flight and said the decision was made to use the jet to move the man because it was already sitting on standby at Christmas Island's airport.

He said it was the "quickest and best" way to get him to Perth for treatment.

The plane left for the 3-hour journey just hours before the scheduled Virgin flight to Perth departed Christmas Island that evening.

The West Australian understands the man, who was on the asylum seeker boat that sank last week, was being treated for two severed fingers.

Read more:  http://au.news.yahoo.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Mac’s Seaplane Service: Seaplane Dream Takes Flight On The Ohio River in Rising Sun, Indiana

 

(Rising Sun, Ind.) – When he accepted early retirement from Comair as a commercial pilot a few years ago, Troy MacVey didn’t want to quit doing what he loved. 

The Milan resident and 30-year flight veteran began his own airline, only its planes don’t use a concrete runway. They use the Ohio River.

MacVey is the proprietor of Mac’s Seaplane Service offering aerial tours of the region and a unique experience -landing and taking off from the river in Rising Sun. His 1946 Cessna 140 two-seater uses floats where the landing gear would be to land and take off from water runways.

“It’s been busy so far. We gave 20 rides last week,” said MacVey.

The water runway on the river stretches 10,000 feet, just as long as the runways at the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport, MacVey said. In fact, the river runway is the only river runway between Minnesota and Florida.

Currently, the new business which opened June 7 does not have an office. That could change as he works with the City of Rising Sun to build a hangar near the new boat ramp.


Dozens of people have come to the Rising Sun riverfront to witness the takeoffs and landings, according to Mayor Branden Roeder.

Read more here:  http://www.eaglecountryonline.com

Media Advisory - Media invited to see Bombardier Q400

WestJet to display the turboprop aircraft selected for its new regional airline 

CALGARY, June 27, 2012 /CNW/ - Media are invited to see the Bombardier Q400 turboprop aircraft in WestJet's Calgary hangar at 11:30 a.m. tomorrow, Thursday, June 28, 2012

In January of this year, WestJet announced it was considering launching a regional airline. In February, it revealed that 91 per cent of WestJetters who voted in a company poll supported the move. In April, WestJet selected the Canadian-made Bombardier Q400 aircraft for the new airline, expected to launch in the second half of 2013. 

On Thursday, media will have the opportunity to see and tour a Bombardier Q400 aircraft, and to interview Bombardier and WestJet representatives. 

What: WestJet unveils Bombardier Q400 aircraft

When: Tomorrow, Thursday, June 28, 2012, at 11:30 a.m.

Where: WestJet's Calgary campus, 22 Aerial Place NE
 
Media note: Please report to the front desk of the Campus building to sign in and receive a visitor's pass. From there, you will be escorted to the hangar.
 
About WestJet
 
WestJet is Canada's preferred airline, offering scheduled service throughout its 76-city North American and Caribbean network. Inducted into Canada's Most Admired Corporate Cultures Hall of Fame and named one of Canada's best employers, WestJet pioneered low-cost flying in Canada. Named a J.D. Power 2011 Customer Service Champion, WestJet offers increased legroom and leather seats on its modern fleet of 98 Boeing Next-Generation 737 aircraft. With future confirmed deliveries for an additional 37 aircraft through 2018, WestJet strives to be one of the five most successful international airlines in the world. 

Connect with WestJet on Facebook at www.facebook.com/westjet
Follow WestJet on Twitter at www.twitter.com/westjet
Subscribe to WestJet on YouTube at www.youtube.com/westjet

Pontiac, Illinois: Planes to ‘buzz square’ Saturday

Pontiac, Ill. — Antique airplanes will “buzz the square”“ Saturday as part of the city of Pontiac's 175th birthday celebration this weekend. The city of Pontiac and Pontiac-Oakland Automobile Museum will be hosting events devoted to the history of transportation prior to World War II. Cars, bicycles, motorcycles, trucks, trains, and planes of the past will be a part of the occasion. 

“I think it’s going to be interesting,” said Tim Dye, curator of the new Pontiac-Oakland Automobile Museum and Resource Center and organizer of the Pre-War Festival. “We go to a lot of car shows, and I think sometimes, car people just get bored with the standard sit there, people judge your car and you get a trophy. I think vintage car owners will be more inclined to participate because there are things to do other than bring a car and sit. ”

Dye and his wife attended a similar event in Greenfield Village at the Henry Ford museum. That event was called the Old Car Festival, so Dye said when he brought the idea back to Pontiac, he wanted to tweak things a bit and include anything from 1942 and earlier.

“Of course we will have cars,” said Dye. “But we are also going to have some of those big-wheeled bicycles, which always draw a lot of attention and we have invited some motorcycles. We just feel like with the beautiful 1800s courthouse as a backdrop, this would be a unique setting to have a nice event. We do have some antique airplanes that are going to do a flyover and then we are going to have a barbershop quartet in the afternoon that will be strolling around the courthouse. It adds atmosphere to the people who will be dressing in period clothing. So, I think it will be very interesting.”

Flight rally to take place Saturday - Harbor Springs Airport (KMGN), Michigan

HARBOR SPRINGS -- Area young people will have a chance to take to the skies on Saturday, June 30. 

For youth age 8-17, the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 1087 will host a Young Eagles Flight Rally at Harbor Springs Airport.

The rally is part of the association's Young Eagle's Program, created to interest young people in aviation. Since the program was launched in 1992, volunteer pilots in the association have flown more than 1.4 million young people who reside in more than 90 countries.

"Free airplane rides are just one part of the flight rally," said Bill Meyer, spokesman for the event. "We hope to build one-to-one relationships between pilots and young people, giving a new generation a chance to learn more about the possibilities that exist in the world of aviation."

Pilots at the event will also explain more about their airplanes allowing young people to discover how airplanes work and how pilots ensure safety is the prime concern before every flight.

Read more here:   http://www.petoskeynews.com

Southwest Freedom Over Texas’ Sky Stage To Feature Vintage Aircrafts


Brand new to Houston’s official Fourth of July celebration is the Sky Stage hosted by Southwest Airlines featuring vintage aircrafts from the Lonestar Flight Museum. You’ll see a B-17 Bomber, B-25 Bomber, a B-25 and two A-26 Invaders making fly-over’s throughout this year’s Southwest Freedom Over Texas.

The Lone Star Flight Museum is home to one of the finest collections of restored aircraft and aviation exhibits in the nation. Over 40 restored aircraft are displayed and most are in working condition. The collection includes WWII Fighters, Bombers, Liaison Trainers, and Executive Planes.

If planes aren’t your thing and you’re into fitness and sports, you can be an athlete at the Family Fitness Challenge Area. Activities will be provided by all five Houston professional sports teams including the Houston Aeros, Houston Astros, Houston Dynamo, Houston Rockets and Houston Texans.

Reliant is offering non-Reliant customers 2 half-price tickets for the event. All you have to do to take advantage of this special offer, visit www.FreedomOverTexas.org by midnight July 3rd to get your tickets.

 Date: Wed, July 4th – 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Where: Eleanor Tinsley Park on Buffalo Bayou

Prices: $8 per person/free children 5 and younger.

Click here for parking and street closure information.

Be sure to listen to the live simulcast on our sister station, 100.3 KILT, during the fireworks show!

For more information from CBS Local about this year’s Southwest Freedom Over Texas, click here.

Read more: 

http://houston.cbslocal.com

http://www.houstontx.gov/july4/

http://abclocal.go.com  

AeroCamp offers look at world of aviation - Mint Air at Greenville Downtown Airport (KGMU), Greenville, South Carolina

AeroCamp, a summer program designed to give kids a chance to explore the world of aviation and aerospace, will be held in Greenville July 16-20.

The camp, presented in conjunction with Mint Air flight school and the Flight School Association of America, is targeted to sixth through 12th grades.

Students will learn what makes an aircraft fly, how pilots use instruments, basic radio communication skills, and info about weather, rockettry, airport traffic patterns, basics of aeronautical charts.

The program will include one to two hours of actual flight time, which can count toward future pilot training.

AeroCamp will be held at the Greenville Downtown Airport from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, and 10 students can participate, although more sessions may be added.

For information, visit www.flymintair.com.

Plainville Wings & Wheels - Fly-In & Car Show - Robertson Field Airport (4B8), Plainville, Connecticut

http://www.plainvillewingsandwheels.com

WE ARE EXTREMELY GRATEFUL TO THE PLAINVILLE FIRE CO. FOR SUPPLYING OUR COOKING FACILITIES AND VOLUNTEERS TO COOK! THANK YOU!

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

World Champion aerobatic pilots practice at Kokomo Municipal Airport (KOKK)

Two champion aerobatic pilots are practicing their high-speed maneuvers of aerial loops, twists and turn over the skies of the Kokomo Municipal Airport this week. 

Several times a day, through Thursday, pilots Bill Stein and Rob Holland will be taking flight to practice for upcoming Midwest air shows in which they will be participating.

Rob Holland flies the most advanced aerobatic aircraft in the air show industry today, and his practices in Kokomo will include a high energy mixture of both high and low altitude maneuvers. Rob is the current International Free Style World Champion.

Since 1995 Bill Stein has performed at air shows all across the United States and has entertained millions of air show fans. Bill trains every day so that his skills stay razor sharp, and to maintain the all-out energy and excitement he puts into his air show sequence.

Read more here:  http://kokomoperspective.com

KMOX Fair St. Louis VIP Air Show Day

KMOX is proud to present the First Fair St. Louis VIP Air Show Day at the St. Louis, Tuesday, July 3rd from 9am – 3pm at the St. Louis Downtown Airport sponsored by BBQ ASAP.

This event, perfect for aeronautical enthusiasts and families of all ages, will get KMOX listeners up-close to the Fair St. Louis Air Show a day before the full performance. Listeners attending the event will get to see the full air-show, as pilots practice their flight runs above the St. Louis Skyline with the Arch as the backdrop. They will also get to interact with pilots and climb in and around aircraft including a B-17, Harrier Jets, and Aeroshell Stunt Plans and have a chance to win flights in stunt planes and the B-17, along with other prizes from Fair St. Louis.

Free lunch will be provided by BBQ ASAP from Ballwin.

NOTE: This event is closed to the general public. For your chance to attend, listen to Total Information AM and The Mark Reardon Show. Listeners will have chances to win on Total Information AM and the Mark Reardon Show, each day between Wednesday, June 27th and Friday, June 29th.

The Fair Saint Louis Air Show will return skies above the Mississippi River on Wednesday, July 4 at 12 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Among the acts are the AeroShell Aerobatic Team, the U.S. Army Golden Knights, and Barnstormer John Mohr. Read more below! Acts and performances are subject to changes and additions.

Fly-in/drive-in at Macomb Municipal Airport (KMQB) still draws big crowd

Macomb, Ill. — A Sunday morning thunderstorm didn’t keep over 1,000 from visiting the Macomb Municipal Airport’s 30th annual Heritage Days fly-in/drive-in and enjoying a pancake breakfast served by the Macomb and Colchester Lions Clubs. 

Bill Butcher, vice chair of the municipal airport board, said most of the pilots who flew in to the event arrived before the mid-morning thunderstorm arrived. Awards were given for the oldest pilot, oldest antique airplane, best spot landing and pilot that traveled the longest distance.

“We’ve had about 20 planes and two helicopters,” Butcher said. “The farthest came in from Bolingbrook, Illinois.”

One local pilot, Joe Runyan, of rural Bushnell, arrived in a 1940 Waco UPF-7 and took home two honors: one for oldest antique airplane and one for third place in the spot landing contest.

“Both of my parents were pilots,” said Runyan, 32. “If I’m not working I go every year. It’s just nice to see local pilots from the area and talk to people.”

Read more here:   http://www.mcdonoughvoice.com

Flying to their rescue: Pet project Pilots N Paws volunteers help shuttle animals to new homes

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — At Midwest National Air Center, in Mosley, Mo., a white Piper Cherokee drifts to earth like a paper airplane in the bright twilight, the buzz of its single engine only slightly louder than the chirp of grasshoppers in the surrounding farmland. 

On the ground, the plane noses down deserted runways and taxiways toward the padlocked terminal building. The propeller coughs to a stop, and the pilot unfolds his body backward through the passenger-side door.

Standing on the wing he asks his passenger, “Honey Bee, do you want to get out?”

Honey Bee, a 2-year-old bluetick coonhound, raises her head and cocks her floppy velvet ears. But she remains rooted to the backseat where she has slept most of the two hours since the gentle-voiced stranger picked her up at Spirit of St. Louis Airport and loaded her into this strange vehicle that vibrates like a pickup but is much louder.

The pilot strokes Honey Bee under the chin, then leans in and scoops up the 50-pound hound, no easy feat while trying to keep your footing on a convex aircraft wing.

Even cradling a coonhound, Sam Taylor has the squared shoulders and stick-straight posture of military servicemen. Taylor is a retired Navy helicopter pilot who flew search-and-rescue missions during the Vietnam War. Now he flies animal rescue missions in his plane for a nationwide network called Pilots N Paws.

On average, Taylor goes on one to three rescue flights a week. Most flights are in a 150-mile range, but he has flown much farther.

In September 2010, Taylor was part of a mission that rescued 171 dogs from Louisiana after the Gulf oil spill.

Taylor would go more often if he could afford it. Pilots N Paws pilots pay for their own gas, which averages $48 per hour.

Last year, Taylor spent $3,255 on gas for rescue flights. This year he's up to $2,400 already.

Baneasa airport in Bucharest to host aviation air show in July

The National Bucharest Airports Company will organize its Aviation Air Show and Exhibition this year between July 21 and 22, on the International Airport Bucharest Baneasa. 

The organizers promise this will be the largest air show in Romania. Two teams of elite air acrobats, Freccia Tricolori and Turkish Stars announced their presence, alongside some of the best professionals in civil and military aviation in Romania.

This year’s air show will celebrate 100 years of aviation history. The Baneasa airport, which is no longer used for daily flights, will also host an exhibition of general aviation in Romania. Several aircraft, from ultralight aircraft to business jets will be on display.

Read more here:  http://www.romania-insider.com

Crossroads pilots win Air Race Classic

After an incredible journey spanning four days, eight states and 2,862 miles, Diana Stanger and Victoria Holt are flying back to the Crossroads with new nicknames: "The Racing Aces." 

The two pilots placed first in the 36th annual Women's Air Race Classic against 56 other teams from across the U.S.

The race dates back to the 1920s and has seen competition from some of aviation's most notable women pilots.

"You feel like Amelia Earhart is patting you on the back," Stanger said.

Stanger, of Port Lavaca, and Holt, of Belton, took off from Calhoun County Airport Thursday in a Cirrus SR-22 toward their starting point in Lake Havasu, Ariz., and reached their final destination, Batavia, Ohio, by Friday.

Stanger said landing was a great feeling.

Read more here:  http://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/2012/jun/25/mc_flight_winner_062612_180490/

Pilots reach new heights: Pair take to skies in 2,400-mile race


NEW CASTLE — In a small, single-engine plane that is slower than a speeding car, Cynthia Lee and Nancy Rohr found themselves caught in a thunderstorm somewhere over Newberry, Mich. 

 But the two pilots, tucked together their Diamond DA-40, weren’t worried. They were excited.

Last week, the duo competed in the 35th annual Air Race Classic, a 2,400-mile competition from Lake Havasu City, Ariz., to Batavia, Ohio, for female aviators.

The race is composed of various timed legs and challenges where pilots compete in events including high-speed flybys, following designated routes and flying clean legs that stay within parameters. Each aircraft is handicapped for speed and engine power, with the goal of having the actual ground speed as far over the handicapped speed as possible.

“It’s a huge tradition that’s been going on for [decades],” said Lee, 57, of Avondale, Pa. “It’s beyond my wildest dreams that I would fly and be in one of these races. [It] was fantastic [and] it was the first race for both of us.”

Lee, a relatively new flyer, and her co-pilot, 57-year-old Newark resident and experienced aviator Rohr, paired up after learning about the race during a Christmas party for the Mid-Atlantic Ninety-Nines, an international organization of female pilots that began with Amelia Earhart. They wanted to carry on the tradition of other Wilmington-area pilots who competed in the event in years past.

Read more here:  http://www.delawareonline.com/article/20120626/NEWS/306260040/Pilots-reach-new-heights?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|Home&nclick_check=1

Young pilot has high hopes for record

By CLARE MELLOR 

 It’s not an average summer trip to the East Coast but Matthew Gougeon is not your average teenager.

The 16-year-old Ontario resident is hoping to set a record as the youngest pilot ever to fly a plane solo from Canada’s West Coast to the East Coast.

“I’m looking forward to it, ” says Gougeon, without a hint of nervousness about the upcoming adventure.

He will leave Tofino, B.C., around July 13 and land in Halifax around the 19th. He will be piloting his dad’s amphibious Cessna 182 airplane.

“At the start and end of the trip I’m going to try and land in each ocean, just as kind of a cool thing.”

“It’s a float plane but it is amphibious, which means the floats have wheels that come out of them, so I can land on runways, too.”

Gougeon lives in Collingwood, where he has just finished Grade 11 at Pretty River Academy, but spends his summers in Sudbury.

During his long solo flight, he expects to fly about six to nine hours a day, and will make overnight and refuelling stops in various cities across the country. His schedule is weather dependent.

“If there is weather or rain or anything like that, I can be grounded pretty easily,” he said.

Read more here:  http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/110996-young-pilot-has-high-hopes-for-record

Monday, June 25, 2012

Hendricks County Aviation: Adventuress Leslie Bailey flies an airplane - Hendricks County Airport-Gordon Graham Field (2R2), Indianapolis, Indiana


Written by Leslie Bailey, Star correspondent 

Over the hum of the plane engine, I can hear Richard Stevens' voice through my headset loud and clear: "We've gone through the checklist, and you're ready for takeoff."

Stevens, 65, Indianapolis, is my instructor for my first flight school lesson at Hendricks County Aviation.

I sit motionless for a moment before realizing that Stevens is telling me that the plane is ready to fly and I'm the one who will be responsible for getting it into the air.

Less than an hour earlier, I didn't know the difference between a flap and an aileron, and now this man wants me to lift a 2,500-pound Cessna 172 SP off the ground?

Read more here: http://www.indystar.com

Plane spotting, the new fad among Japanese women

Years after women Japanese train spotters were given the nickname “Tetsuko,” which loosely translates as rail girl, officials of Narita airport and nearby Narita city recently coined the word “Sorami” — air girl — to describe members of Japan’s growing band of women plane spotters.
 
Just as a Tetsuko would crisscross the nation to photograph different trains, so a Sorami such as Ayumi Fukuda, a 34-year-old public servant from Takaishi, Osaka Prefecture, travels from Hokkaido in the north to Okinawa in the south to capture images of airplanes.

In May she was one of 27 participants in an event organized for Sorami in Narita, Chiba Prefecture.

“I don’t understand why airplanes can fly, and that’s why I’m attracted to them,” said Fukuda, a plane spotter of five years. The event was organized by “Narita Kuentai,” a group consisting of employees of the Narita municipal government and of Narita airport that works for the development of the local community.

After gathering at a hotel in the city, the participants, mostly in their 20s and 30s, were given a tour of a park close to the airport and taken to a Japan Airlines hangar to photograph planes.

“It’s huge!” “Beautiful!” the assembled Sorami exclaimed as they entered the hangar and set eyes on JAL’s Boeing 787, the state-of-the-art passenger jet nicknamed Dreamliner. Some lay on the ground to photograph the plane from a certain angle, while others posed in front of the jet for photos with mechanics, who were acting as tour guides.