Thursday, March 07, 2019

Rockwell S-2R Thrush Commander, N4913X; accident occurred August 01, 2017 in Brawley, Imperial County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California
Farm Aviation Incorporated; Brawley, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N5022X 



Location: Calipatria, CA
Accident Number: ANC17FA047
Date & Time: 08/22/2017, 1100 PDT
Registration: N5022X
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL S 2R
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Unknown or undetermined
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

Analysis 

The commercial pilot was performing an aerial application flight in the airplane. A witness reported that after a slight right turn, the airplane rolled wings level, about 150 to 200 ft above ground level. Then, the nose dropped, and the airplane impacted a field in a near vertical attitude. A postimpact fire ensued, which consumed most of the airplane's fuselage, left wing, and empennage. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed no evidence of mechanical failures or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. However, the extent of thermal damage to the airplane prevented confirmation of control continuity. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A loss of control for reasons that could not be determined because of the extensive thermal damage from the postcrash fire.

Findings

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering-low-alt flying
Unknown or undetermined (Defining event)


On August 22, 2017, about 1100 Pacific daylight time, a Rockwell International S2R agricultural airplane, N5022X, was destroyed by a collision with terrain and postcrash fire about 8.5 miles east of Calipatria, California. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the Bank of Utah and was being operated by Farm Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the aerial application flight. The local flight originated about 1050 from an unimproved dirt airstrip about 4 miles from the accident location.

The accident flight was the pilot's second chemical load flight of the day. The first flight originated from Brawley Municipal Airport (KBWC), Brawley, California, about 1020.

According to a witness located about 100 yards from the accident location, the airplane completed an agricultural spray pass from west to east. As the airplane approached the witness's position, it began a turn to reverse course and re-enter the spray area. Following a slight right turn, the airplane rolled wings level, and the witness anticipated that it would enter a left turn back to the field. When the wings were rolled level, at an estimated altitude of between 150 ft above ground level (agl) and 200 ft agl, the nose dropped, and the airplane impacted the field in near vertical attitude. A postimpact fire ensued, which consumed most of the airplane's fuselage, left wing, and empennage.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 

The pilot, age 40, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single- and multi-engine land and instrument ratings. The pilot also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine and instrument ratings. The pilot was issued a second-class airman medical certificate on April 26, 2017, without any limitations. On the application for this medical certificate, the pilot reported that he had accumulated 2,210 total hours of flight experience of which 280 hours were in the last 6 months.

The pilot was involved in an aviation accident (WPR17LA174) in a different agricultural airplane on August 1, 2017; this accident is still under investigation. According to the preliminary report on the earlier accident, the pilot reported that shortly after takeoff, while conducting a low-altitude reconnaissance of a field, the engine started to lose power. The pilot subsequently initiated a forced landing to the field. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and the pilot was not injured.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL
Registration: N5022X
Model/Series: S 2R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 5054R
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R1340
Registered Owner: BANK OF UTAH TRUSTEE
Rated Power:
Operator: FARM AVIATION INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: FAYG 

The single-seat, low-wing airplane, serial number 5054R, was manufactured in 1975. It was powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-1340-59 reciprocating radial engine, serial number E-142. The overhauled engine was installed on February 24, 2017. According to the operator, the engine had accumulated about 75 hours at the time of the accident.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIPL, -58 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1053 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 213°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 37°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Calipatria, CA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Calipatria, CA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1050 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

The closest weather reporting facility to the accident site was at Imperial County Airport (KIPL), Imperial, California, about 20 miles southeast of the accident site. At 1053, KIPL reported wind calm, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 98°F; dew point 60°F, and altimeter setting 29.90 inches of mercury.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.114444, -115.365278 

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board examined the wreckage at the accident scene on August 23, 2017. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was the engine, which was separated from the airframe and lying flat on the ground oriented propeller side down. A linear ground impact scar extended from both sides of the engine; the two ground scars contained yellow paint fragments and were consistent with wing leading edge imprints. The main wreckage was located about 20 ft north of the FIPC; the fuselage was inverted and oriented on a 263° magnetic heading.

Most of the empennage fabric was consumed by fire. The vertical stabilizer remained relatively free of impact damage. Elevator trim tab control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the trim tab. Rudder control continuity was established from the rudder to the fuselage. The left rudder cable remained intact to the pedal, and the right cable was detached at the bellcrank. Elevator control continuity could not be determined on scene due to impact damage.

The outboard and inboard connecting rods on the left aileron remained attached to the left wing. The middle control rods were detached from the aileron. Left aileron control continuity could not be determined due to thermal damage. The right aileron remained relatively free of impact damage and exhibited signatures consistent with thermal damage. Control continuity was established from the right aileron to the fuselage. Right aileron control continuity from the fuselage to the cockpit could not be established due to thermal damage.

All three propeller blades remained intact and attached to the propeller hub and was buried about 1ft under dirt and grass. Blades 1 and 2 (numbers arbitrarily assigned) exhibited torsional twisting and aft bending, consistent with engine operation at the time of impact. Blade 3 was relatively free of impact damage.

Investigators conducted further examination of the wreckage at Air Transport, Phoenix, Arizona, on October 4 and 5, 2017. The last 4 ft of elevator control tube continuity was established through fractured segments. The fractures were consistent with impact damage.

The propeller rotated freely by hand. The forward spark plugs from the Nos. 1, 8, and 9 cylinders were damaged by impact. The forward spark plugs were removed from all cylinders and exhibited a normal wear signature; coloration could not be determined due to oil saturation. Thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. The carburetor exhibited impact damage. The throttle valve could be moved from stop to stop with difficulty due to the presence of debris from impact. The carburetor case was opened, and no anomalies were observed with the floats and accelerator pump. The fuel filter was removed, and no anomalies were observed. The fuel pump fuel adjustment cover safety wire was separated, and the cap was loose. The fuel pump was disassembled with no debris or anomalies observed; all splines appeared without defect. Testing of the magnetos was not possible due to severe impact damage.

The electric flap motor drive screw measured about 1 1/4 inches and about 9 threads were visible. The jackscrew assembly was not located; therefore, the flap setting could not be determined.

Medical And Pathological Information

The Imperial County Coroner's Office, El Centro, California, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was attributed to "multiple traumatic injuries."

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. The testing was negative for ethanol and drugs.

NTSB Identification: ANC17FA047
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 22, 2017 in Calipatria, CA
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL S 2R, registration: N5022X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 22, 2017, about 1100 Pacific daylight time, a Rockwell International S2R agricultural airplane, N5022X, was destroyed when it collided with terrain following a loss of control while maneuvering, about 8.5 miles east of Calipatria, California. The airplane was registered to the Bank of Utah and was being operated by Farm Aviation Inc. as a visual flight rules (VFR) aerial application flight, under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137, when the accident occurred. The certificated commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated at an unimproved dirt strip, about 4 miles from the accident location, at about 1050 and was a local flight for aerial application.

According to the owner of Farm Aviation Inc., this was the pilot's second chemical load flight of the day. The first flight originated from Brawley Municipal Airport (KBWC), Brawley, California, about 1020.

According to a witness located about 100 yards from the accident location, the accident airplane completed an agricultural spray pass from west to east. As the airplane approached his position, the airplane began a right turn to turn around and re-enter the spray area. Following a slight right turn, the airplane rolled wings level before what would typically be a left turn back to the field. When the wings were rolled level, at an estimated altitude of between 150 ft above ground level (agl) and 200 ft agl, the nose dropped and the airplane impacted the field in near vertical attitude. A postimpact fire ensued, which incinerated a majority of the airplane's fuselage, left wing, and empennage. 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), along with another NTSB investigator reached the accident site on the afternoon of August 23. The wreckage was in an alfalfa field at an elevation of about 20 ft below sea level. 

Following the initial impact, the fuselage separated from the engine and came to rest about 20 ft north of the engine. The airplane impacted the terrain in a nose-down, near vertical attitude. All of the airplane's major components were located at the wreckage site. 

The closest weather reporting facility was the Imperial County Airport (KIPL), about 20 miles southeast of the accident site. At 1053, a METAR from KIPL was reporting, in part: Wind, calm; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, clear; temperature, 98°F; dew point, 60°F; altimeter, 29.90 inches of mercury.

The airplane was equipped with a Pratt & Whitney R-1340 series engine. A detailed examination is pending.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N4913X


Location: Brawley, CA

Accident Number: WPR17LA174
Date & Time: 08/01/2017, 0655 PDT
Registration: N4913X
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL S 2R
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On August 1, 2017, about 0655 Pacific daylight time, a Rockwell International S-2R airplane, N4913X, was substantially damaged following a partial loss of engine power and subsequent off-airport landing near Brawley, California. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Farm Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from a private airstrip in Brawley at 0645.


The pilot reported that he departed westbound from the private airstrip with about 180 gallons of chemical and 70 gallons of fuel on board. After climbout, he made a right turn to the east to conduct a low-level reconnaissance of the field he intended to spray. As he began to set up for the eastbound pass on the north side of the field, the engine started to lose power. The pilot leveled the wings, the engine momentarily regained some power, but started to lose power again shortly after. The pilot subsequently initiated an emergency landing to an open field. During the landing roll, the propeller struck the ground and the landing gear was torn off. Both wings, the engine mounts, and the bottom of the fuselage sustained substantial damage.


On October 3, 2017, the Pratt & Whitney R1340 radial engine was examined by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors. The inspectors reported that the engine was partially disassembled before their arrival. The inspectors reported that one of the supercharger drive gear teeth was separated and found in the engine oil sump. Further disassembly of the supercharger drive section revealed that two additional gear teeth were separated from the supercharger drive. Slight rubbing marks were observed on the supercharger impeller. The thrust bearing exhibited damage consistent after a propeller strike. The oil filter revealed signs of high carbon content and some debris with very little metallic content. Surface rust was noted on internal oil transfer tubes, the camshaft drive gear, and the supercharger drive gear. The spark plugs exhibited normal wear signatures. The inspectors further reported that the carburetor was visually inspected, and no foreign objects were observed in the venturi. The magnetos were externally examined before the gears were rotated by hand. No anomalies were found


The separated supercharger gear teeth were examined at the National Transportation Safety Board Materials (NTSB) laboratory, Washington, DC. The fracture surfaces were examined using a stereomicroscope at moderate magnifications. The fractures exhibited features and topographies consistent with bending overstress separations. Contact patterns and pitting were noted on the pressure faces of the remaining intact gear teeth indicative of heavy loading. No indication of preexisting cracking was apparent.


During a conversation with a representative from an engine overhaul facility, who commonly overhauls Pratt & Whitney R1340 radial engines, he reported that from his experience, the gear teeth most often break off due to either a sudden engine stoppage or due to fatigue or stress cracking. The fatigue or stress cracking can often be the result of a propeller strike and, if left unchecked, can result in the eventual separation of the affected gear teeth. He reported that it is possible for an engine to continue a relatively normal operation with only one gear tooth missing, however multiple broken teeth would result in a decrease in power of the supercharger section.


The pilot reported that the engine had accumulated about 783 hours since overhaul, and 74 hours since the last annual inspection on November 16, 2016. No maintenance records were made available for review to determine if there was a report of a previous propeller strike or sudden engine stoppage.


Pilot Information


Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial

Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/26/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/20/2017
Flight Time:  2400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 500 hours (Total, this make and model), 2280 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 60 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL

Registration: N4913X
Model/Series: S 2R UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 2104R
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/16/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6615 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: R-1340- AN1
Registered Owner: Ironwood Equipment Leasing Inc
Rated Power: 600 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site:

Visual Conditions:  
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIPL, -58 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1353 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 208°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 50°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.78 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Brawley, CA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Brawley, CA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0645 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.033611, -115.453056 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA174

14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 01, 2017 in Brawley, CA
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL S 2R, registration: N4913X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On August 1, 2017, about 0655 Pacific daylight time, a Rockwell International S2R, N4913X, sustained substantial damage following a partial loss of engine power and subsequent emergency landing near Fresno, California. The airplane was registered to and operated by Farm Aviation Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 137 as an aerial application flight. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a flight plan. The local flight departed from a private airstrip at 0645.


The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff, while conducting a low-level altitude reconnaissance of the field, the engine started to lose power. The pilot subsequently initiated a forced landing to the field. During the landing, both wings and the engine firewall sustained substantial damage.

Rutan Long-EZ, N56EZ: Accident occurred March 06, 2019 in Phoenix, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Nose gear collapsed, aircraft slid down the runway.

https://registry.faa.gov/N56EZ

Date: 06-MAR-19
Time: 19:47:00Z
Regis#: N56EZ
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: RUTAN LONG EZ
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Privateer amphibious amateur-built, N327JM: Incident occurred March 06, 2019 at Melbourne International Airport (KMLB), Brevard County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Gear collapsed and aircraft veered into the grass.

https://registry.faa.gov/N327JM

Date: 06-MAR-19
Time: 20:34:00Z
Regis#: N327JM
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: AMPHIBIAN
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MELBOURNE
State: FLORIDA

Eurocopter AS 350 B3, N353E: Incident occurred March 05, 2019 in Sun Valley, Blaine County, Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Main rotor blade struck snowbank.

Reeder Flying Service Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N353E

Date: 05-MAR-19
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N353E
Aircraft Make: AMERICAN EUROCOPTER
Aircraft Model: AS350B3
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SUN VALLEY
State: IDAHO

Cessna 150F, registered to a private individual, ferry flight conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91, N6917F: Accident occurred March 06, 2019 near Bob Sylvester Airpark (2G5), Granite Shoals, Burnet County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N6917F

Location: Granite Shoals, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA101
Date & Time: 03/06/2019, 1300 CST
Registration: N6917F
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry 

On March 6, 2019, about 1300 central standard time, a Cessna 150F, N6917F, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage during a loss of engine power after takeoff from the Granite Shoals/Bob Sylvester Airpark (2G5), Granite Shoals, Texas. The private pilot and one child passenger were not injured and another child passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The ferry flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. The flight's intended destination was the San Marcus Regional Airport (HYI), San Marcus, Texas.

The pilot reported that the flight's purpose was to reposition the aircraft to HYI to conduct an annual inspection. A local A&P mechanic had provided the pilot documentation for the ferry permit that was issued by the FAA.

The pilot recalls that he last refueled the airplane in October of 2018 with about 8 gallons. Prior to the flight, the pilot conducted a preflight and sumped both wing fuel tanks. The left fuel tank had a little sediment initially, but then became clear. The right fuel tank sump ran clear. After engine start, the left fuel tank gauge indicated near empty, and right fuel tank gauge indicated about 1/4 full. The fuel selector was in the "on" position. In the Cessna 150F airplane, the fuel selector has an "on" and "off" positions. The fuel supply drains from both wing tanks collectively to a "Y" fitting, then to a airframe fuel filter, then to the fuel selector valve, and then to the carburetor and engine.

The pilot stated that he started a right turn after takeoff, and about 600 feet from the ground, the engine sputtered and lost power. The pilot then attempted to turn back to the airport but realized that he was too low. He then executed a forced landing to a field, vegetated with small trees. Upon landing, the left wing struck a small mesquite tree and spun 180-degrees, resulting in structural damage to the left wing. The pilot and two children passengers (6 and 4 years old) exited the airplane. The airplane was not equipped with child safety seating. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N6917F
Model/Series: 150 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AUS, 541 ft msl
Observation Time: 1255 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 55 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.7 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Granite Shoals, TX (2G5)
Destination: San Marcus, TX (HYI) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  30.589444, -98.370278 (est)



Two men, who were on their way to Llano, survived an emergency landing into an empty lot in Granite Shoals. 

The incident happened about 1:15 Wednesday, March 6 at the intersection of Hilldale and Baker Street, a few blocks from the community's air strip. 

Police reported the Granite Shoals men in the single-engine aircraft said shortly after take off they heard what seemed to be engine problems. 

The men refused treatment at the scene.

Other than the aircraft, there was no damage to nearby property. 

The FAA will conduct an investigation.

Original article ➤ https://www.highlandernews.com




Three passengers in a small aircraft walked away from a crash landing in Granite Shoals on March 5.

The three Granite Shoals residents were flying in a 1966 Cessna 150 aircraft on their way to Llano from the Bob Sylvester Airpark in Granite Shoals.

A witness contacted the Granite Shoals Police Department between about 12:30 p.m. and 12:40 p.m. to say a plane had grazed treetops on the corner of Barker and Hilldale drives. It spun then came to a stop in the brush and cactuses at the corner of the two streets.

Police officers were on the scene throughout the afternoon.

“They had trouble with the plane and were over (Lake LBJ) and circled back to land and just landed in a field,” City Manager Jeff Looney said.

Police Chief Gary Boshears said this is only the second such crash in Granite Shoals in 13 years.

“The pilot turned back around when he started having mechanical issues and put it down here,” he said.

Passengers were “shaken up but in good spirits,” Boshears said. “They were thanking the Lord everybody was OK.”

Because it is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration, city officials declined to release the names of the passengers.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailytrib.com

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee B, owned by private individuals and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan, N7369W: Fatal accident occurred March 05, 2019 in Summersville, Texas County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Ann, Missouri
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N7369W

Location: Summersville, MO
Accident Number: CEN19FA093
Date & Time: 03/05/2019, 2204 CST
Registration: N7369W
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 5, 2019, about 2204 central standard time, a Piper PA 28-180 airplane, N7369W, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain 4 miles northwest of Summersville, Missouri. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was owned and piloted by private individuals and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The cross-country flight departed New River Valley Airport (PSK), Dublin, Virginia, at an unknown time and was en route to Downtown Airport (3DW), Springfield, Missouri.

According to the owner of the airplane, the pilot traveled to Virginia on commercial airline flights the morning of the accident to fly the airplane back to 3DW. A receipt found by investigators indicated that the pilot stopped at London-Corbin Airport Magee Field (LOZ) and purchased 26 gallons on fuel at a self-service pump. He departed about 1800.

The pilot of the airplane did not receive services, nor was he required to receive, services from air traffic control. A preliminary review of radar data illustrated the flight west-bound at an altitude of 5,000 ft msl. The airplane initiated a turn back towards the east before the radar track was lost. The wreckage was located the next morning by the driver of a vehicle on a nearby road.

The accident site was characterized by deciduous walnut trees and hilly terrain vegetated in short grass. The wreckage came to rest on a measured heading of 99° at an elevation of about 1,330 ft.

The initial impact point was located at the top of a 45 ft tree, characterized by broken branches. The main wreckage came to rest about 76 ft east of the initial impact point. A section of the right wing, broken branches, and paint chips were scattered on the ground between the initial impact point and a second tree. The second tree was about 45 ft high and exhibited broken branches near the top of the tree and witness marks consistent with impact with the airplane. Additional branches, plexiglass, paint chips, torn metal from the wing, torn fiberglass, the baggage door, and a fragmented red lens cover were scattered over 45 ft between the second tree and the main wreckage.

The main wreckage included the fuselage, empennage, left wing, and engine and propeller assembly. The right wing came to rest about 14 ft north of the main wreckage. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N7369W
Model/Series: PA28 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KUNO, 1228 ft msl
Observation Time: 2153 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 40 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.43 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Dublin, VA (PSK)
Destination: Springfield, MO (3DW)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 37.179167, -91.661944 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Robert "Bob" Franklin Torp

At the Greene County courthouse this past week, conversations between hearings or on elevator rides have often focused on attorney Robert Torp.

Torp, 64, was known in legal circles as a kind, eccentric man with a passion for flying.

Officials say Torp died Tuesday night when a single-engine airplane he was flying crashed in a field in Texas County.

"He was probably one of the nicest guys you'll ever meet," said attorney Stuart Huffman, Torp's longtime colleague. "Very genuine."

Huffman said he was shocked when he got the news Wednesday that Torp had died.

In the days since, Huffman said he has been reminiscing about Torp's passion for legal research and his various quirks — like wearing sneakers and a suit to work.

"He would always go that little extra mile," Huffman said. "When he felt something was right, he defended it until the absolute end."

Huffman said Torp had recently gotten married, and the website for Torp's law practice says he leaves behind three children and eight grandchildren.

The website says Torp is a Michigan native with a background in the Army National Guard.

Authorities say the official cause of Tuesday night's plane crash is still under investigation.

Jennifer Rodi, senior air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, said Torp was traveling from Virginia to Springfield when the 1963 Piper Cherokee 180 he was flying crashed into a field near Summersville at about 10 p.m.

The scene was discovered by a passing neighbor the next morning, according to Rodi.

As of Friday, Rodi said the plane was still in the field where it crashed, but federal investigators would recover the aircraft in the next couple of days.

"It's a muddy mess out there," Rodi said.

Rodi said the preliminary report on the crash could be completed by the middle of the next week, but the entire investigation will take upwards of a year.

Back in Springfield, Torp's friend and fellow attorney Stacie Bilyeu said Torp's death is a big loss for the local legal community.

"My favorite kind of person is a person who marches to their drum," Bilyeu said. "He was his own person. There was no one else like him."

Torp practiced civil and criminal law in the Springfield area and liked taking cases in the outlying areas so he had an excuse to fly.

Bilyeu said she will remember Torp as a genuinely nice person who had a good sense of humor and was dogged in his pursuit of justice. She said she will miss running into Torp at the courthouse or in social settings.

"People have been talking all over the courthouse since his accident," Bilyeu said. "Everybody says the same thing about him, he was just such a nice guy."


Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.news-leader.com


Robert F. Torp     
August 23, 1954  -  March 6, 2019   


Robert "Bob" Franklin Torp was born August 23, 1954, in South Haven, Michigan and passed away on March 6th, 2019, from injuries he sustained during complications while landing a plane he was transporting.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Franklin B. Torp and Geraldine E. Torp; and brother, Donald Torp.

Robert is survived by his fiancĂ©, Lucy Fernandez; sister, Nancy Christensen; brother, Thomas Christiansen; three children Lori McDaniel and husband Steven, Judy Torp, Charles Torp and wife Cassie; eight grandchildren, Dominic, Caleb, Ajay, Nellie, Andru, Sema’j, JJ, and Joshua.

Robert was a Michigan native who moved to Missouri nearly twenty years ago, after graduating from law school. Bob's service to his country include both his service in this National Guard where he drove tanks and he was also in the Civil Air Patrol of Missouri to assist in search and rescue missions. Robert was a man of many talents and interests, and he had a love of learning. He was always looking for the next big adventure, whether it was another hobby, job or place to travel to. He enjoyed spending time with his fiancĂ© and his family, and his passion for flying kept his head above the clouds. He could hold a conversation with anyone about anything and had the ability to connect with others. He touched many lives and always wanted to help others. He will be truly missed and loved by those who were closest to him. 

Visitation will be held from 1-2 PM, Tuesday, March 12, 2019, in the Chapel at Elfindale Manor, 1701 S Fort Ave, with funeral services following at 2 PM.


http://www.midwestfuneralservices.com


Robert F. Torp






A Springfield lawyer has died after a single-engine airplane crashed in Texas County.

At approximately 7:16 a.m. Wednesday, Texas County Emergency Services received a report of a plane crash in a field on Bethel Drive in the Summersville area, according to a press release from Sheriff Scott Lindsey.

Robert Torp, 64, was declared dead at the scene, said Marie Lasater, Texas County Coroner. Torp was the only person in the aircraft.

The plane was identified as a 1963 Piper Cherokee 180, according to Lindsey. The aircraft is registered to a different subject from Newport, Virginia.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, Torp held a private pilot license. He had it renewed in August 2018.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will conduct an investigation of the crash, according to Lindsey.

Torp, an attorney, specialized in personal injury, immigration law, civil settlements and criminal defense in the Springfield area, according to torplaw.com. 

Under the "About" section on his website, it says Torp was from Michigan and moved to Springfield nearly 20 years ago after graduating from Western Michigan University and law school at University of Southern Illinois. He also graduated from the Trial Lawyers College. 

Torp drove tanks for the Army National Guard and served in the Civil Air Patrol of Missouri, where he assisted in search and rescue missions, according to his website.

Torp had three children and eight grandchildren, the website says.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.news-leader.com