Sunday, July 16, 2017

Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion, N732FU, BIA Air LLC: Accident occurred February 16, 2016 in Bryan, Brazos County, Texas



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Kansas Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

BIA Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N732FU

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA107 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 16, 2016 in Bryan, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/06/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA P210N, registration: N732FU
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, 10 miles from the destination airport, the passengers heard a loud “clank” and smoke entered the cockpit. Shortly thereafter, the engine experienced a total loss of power and the propeller stopped turning. The pilot selected a field as a forced landing site, but the airplane impacted trees and terrain at the edge of the field. The pilot and passengers were able to extricate themselves through the right side passenger window.

A postaccident engine examination revealed a catastrophic failure of the engine crankshaft between the No. 2 main bearing journal and the No. 2 connecting rod journal. The damage displayed on the No. 2 bearing was consistent with the bearing having shifted and spun. Several of the bearing supports displayed fretting near the through-bolt holes. An accurate measurement of the preaccident through-bolt torques could not be determined due to the loads subjected upon the crankcase when the crankshaft failed. Review of maintenance records indicated that the through bolts were properly torqued during the remanufacturing process nearly 1,000 flight hours before the accident and that there was no record of major work performed on the engine since that time; however, the wear signatures displayed on the bearing supports indicated that the crankcase halves were shifting in a manner consistent with improper torque of the through bolts. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A failure of the crankshaft due to improper torque of the crankcase through bolts. 




On February 16, 2016, at 1130 central standard time, a Cessna P210N, N732FU, collided with trees and the terrain during a forced landing in Bryan, Texas, following a loss of engine power. The private pilot and one passenger received minor injuries. The second passenger was seriously injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to BIA Air LLC, and was being operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual flight rules (VFR) conditions prevailed for the flight which operated on a VFR flight plan. The flight originated from the Arlington Municipal Airport (GKY), Arlington, Texas, about 1030.

The pilot reported that they were 10 miles from the destination airport when the passengers reported hearing a loud "clank" and smoke entered the cockpit. He contacted air traffic control and requested information regarding a closer airport at which to land. He stated the engine quickly lost power and the propeller stopped turning. He declared an emergency with air traffic control stating that he was not going to be able to make it to the closest airport. The pilot chose a field in which to land. The airplane contacted trees just before landing. The airplane descended to impact with the terrain in a wooded area at the edge of the selected field. The pilot and passengers were able to extricate themselves through the right side passenger window.

A review of the engine logbook revealed the engine was factory remanufactured in September, 2005, and it was installed on the accident airplane on October 10, 2005. The last inspection was a 100-hour inspection conducted on January 6, 2016. The engine had accumulated 989 hours since being remanufactured. The records did not show any major work having been performed on the engine since it was installed.



A postaccident examination of the engine was conducted on under NTSB supervision on May 3, 2016, at the Continental Motors facility in Mobile, Alabama.

The engine was 310 horsepower, a six-cylinder, fuel injected, Continental Motors TSIO-520-P (7) engine, serial number 278936-R. Crankcase damage was observed just below one of the crankcase bolts above the #1 cylinder. The No. 4 stud on the No. 1 cylinder was loose and could be rotated with finger pressure. No torque putty was observed on this stud. A borescope inspection of the pistons revealed all of the pistons were in the down position.

The crankcase was cracked and a small portion of it was pushed out near the rear backbone bolts. Mechanical damage was visible on the No. 1 and No. 2 cylinder bays. The No. 1 bearing support displayed signatures consistent with minor movement of the bearing. The No. 2 main bearing support sustained damage consistent with a bearing shift and a spun bearing. The No. 1 and No. 2 main bearing supports were fretted near the through bolt holes.

The No. 1 main bearings displayed normal lubrication signatures. The bearing damage was consistent with minor bearing shift. There was fretting on the bearing supports near the through bolt holes.

The No. 2 main bearings were damaged consistent with a bearing shift event. Portions of the bearing were located in the oil sump. A portion of the right side of the bearing remained in the bearing saddle.

The No. 3 bearings remained intact and in their bearing supports. The bearings displayed signatures of heat distress due to lack of lubrication and the copper layer was exposed.

The No. 4 and No. 5 bearings were intact and displayed normal operating signatures.

The crankshaft was broken into two pieces. The fracture was located at the crankshaft cheek between the No. 2 main bearing journal and the No. 2 connecting rod journal. The lock slot on the No. 2 main bearing journal was worn and fretting was noted on several of the bearing supports near the through bolt holes indicating that the crankcase halves were moving. The No. 3 main journal displayed heat discoloration and scratches consistent with particle passage. The No. 2 connecting rod journal could not be observed as the connecting rod was impinged in place on the journal. The remaining connecting rod and main journals displayed normal operating and lubrication signatures.

Cylinder/Piston/Connecting Rod No. 1
The cylinder was attached to the crankcase. The cylinder hold down bolt in the No. 4 position was loose and could be turned by hand. There was no torque putty on this nut. The remainder of the nuts were tight with torque putty in place. Impact damage was noted on the cylinder skirt. The valves, rocker arms, and push rods were normal.

The piston remained attached to its connecting rod and the piston skirt was damaged. The rear piston ring was broken and the forward 3 piston rings were intact. The piston displayed normal combustion signatures.

No anomalies were noted with the connecting rod and connecting rod bearing.

Cylinder/Piston/Connecting Rod No. 2
No anomalies noted with the cylinder, valves, rocker arms, and push rods.

The piston remained attached to its connecting rod and the piston skirt was damaged. The rear piston ring was damaged and the forward 3 piston rings were intact. The piston displayed normal combustion signatures.

The connecting rod remained attached to the journal. Some mechanical damage was visible. The connecting rod was impinged onto its journal by displaced crankshaft material at the crankshaft fracture. The bearing could not be observed due to the connecting rod impingement.

Cylinder/Piston/Connecting Rod Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 6
No anomalies were noted with the cylinder, valves, rocker arms, push rods, pistons, or connecting rods.

The camshaft was intact and no anomalies were noted. The No. 1 intake lifter was impinged and could not be removed. The remaining lifters displayed normal operating signatures.

The torque on the through bolts and cylinder hold-down studs was measured during the engine disassembly. The measurements varied between 626 and 1,137 inch-pounds to tighten, and between 697 and 1,087 inch-pounds to loosen. According to the remanufacture assembly specifications, the through bolts torque should have been either 625 or 800 inch pounds depending on the position of the bolt.

The left magneto did not produce any sparks when placed on a test bench. The magneto was opened and rust was noted inside the magneto. The vent hole in the pressure vent plug was blocked with debris. The right magneto produced a spark when placed on the test bench.

The oil pump was intact and remained attached to the engine. The pump housing contained scoring consistent with hard particle passage. The oil filter was opened and it contained metal particles. The oil sump contained several pieces of metal consistent with piston and bearing material. The oil pickup screen was clean.

No other anomalies were noted that would have resulted in a loss of engine power.

All of the Continental Motors engine component serial numbers, with the exception of the starter, matched the serial numbers of the components installed on the engine when it was remanufactured in 2005. The remanufacturing records indicated the through bolts and cylinder hold-down bolts were properly torqued during the build process.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA107
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 16, 2016 in Benchley, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA P210N, registration: N732FU
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 16, 2016, at 1130 central standard time, a Cessna P210N, N732FU, collided with trees and the terrain during a forced landing in Bryan, Texas, following a loss of engine power. The private pilot received minor injuries. One passenger received serious injuries and a second passenger was not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to BIA Air LLC, and was being operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual flight rules (VFR) conditions prevailed for the flight which operated on a VFR flight plan. The flight originated from the Arlington Municipal Airport (GKY), Arlington, Texas, about 1100.

Cessna R172 Hawk XP, N736NK, Maine Air Physician Services LLC: Accident occurred July 16, 2017 in Naples, Maine

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Maine Air Physician Services LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N736NK

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA252 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2017 in Naples, ME
Aircraft: CESSNA R172, registration: N736NK
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2017, about 1430 eastern daylight time, a Cessna R172K, N736NK, operated by Air Physicians, Inc., was substantially damaged during landing at Brandy Pond Seaplane Base (5ME), Naples, Maine. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Biddeford Municipal Airport (B19), Biddeford, Maine.

The pilot reported to local police that when the airplane landed it "bounced." In a statement provided to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot reported, "Upon water landing touchdown and after an otherwise normal circling approach the aircraft yaw and roll were uncontrollable. The aircraft rolled right and came to a stop with at least part of the right wing submerged."

The landing was recorded by a boater on Brandy Pond at the time of the accident and posted on a commercial website. Examination of the video revealed rapid, abrupt rolling of the wings at a very low altitude just prior to water contact. At touchdown, the airplane bounced and then rotated back and forth about the roll axis, alternately contacting the water with the left and right pontoons. The roll oscillations increased in magnitude until the right pontoon and right wing tip dragged the water, which brought the airplane to an abrupt stop with the right wingtip submerged.

Examination of the airplane by the FAA inspector revealed that the right wing was substantially damaged. Flight control continuity was confirmed to all flight control surfaces. Movement of the elevator was restricted due to impact damage.

The four seat, high wing, amphibious airplane, was powered by a Continental IO-360, 210 horsepower engine.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and airplane single-engine sea. He reported 650 hours of total flight experience on his most recent application for an FAA third-class medical certificate, which was issued on February 28, 2017.

The closest weather reporting facility was Auburn/Lewiston Municipal Airport (LEW), Auburn, Maine, about 14 miles east of the accident site. At 1956, weather included wind from 170° at 12 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; temperature, 28° C; dew point, 18° C; and an altimeter setting 29.91 inches of mercury.

The airplane was recovered and retained for further examination.






NAPLES, Maine—A pilot swam away uninjured from a seaplane crash landing Sunday afternoon.

Maine State Police said the small plane crashed into Brandy Pond in Sebago Lakes Region at approximately 3:15 p.m., and his Cessna plane sustained significant damage when it went down.

A viewer sent us a video of the seaplane crash landing in Naples Sunday afternoon.

Law enforcement officials said the pilot survived the crash landing and no one else was aboard. 

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the cause of the crash. 

http://www.wcsh6.com





NAPLES (WGME) -- Rescue crews and area boaters are responding to a seaplane crashing into Brandy Pond in Naples Saturday afternoon.

The accident happened shortly after 3 p.m. 

Dispatchers confirmed the small plane went down in the pond, with crews responding to the area of Moose Landing Trail near a marine.

The Cumberland County Sheriff's Office said a Cessna plane sustained significant damage in the crash. The pilot and a passenger were not injured, according to officials.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be the primary investigating agency.

http://wgme.com

Cessna 140, N3625V: Accident occurred February 13, 2016 at Independence State Airport (7S5), Polk County, Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Hillsboro, Oregon

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N3625V 

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA068
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 13, 2016 in Independence, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N3625V
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was landing the airplane on a dry, hard-surfaced runway. He stated that the approach and touchdown were normal. Just after touchdown, he felt “something similar to a bump,” and the airplane started to drift to the left. He thought that the airplane possibly had a flat tire and tried to compensate with rudder input, but the airplane continued drifting to the left, exited the left side of the runway, and ground looped, resulting in substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage.

An on-scene examination revealed that the left main landing gear axle had fractured, resulting in the separation of the wheel assembly. A detailed examination revealed that the axle was fractured near the inboard end, just outboard of the axle attachment flange. Portions of the fracture surface at the upper and lower sides of the axle had relatively smooth features oriented perpendicular to the outer surface, consistent with fatigue. The fatigue cracks initiated at a fillet corner at a change in the axle’s outer diameter. 

The manufacturer specified inspection intervals to check for cracks and corrosion of the main landing gear axle; however, the accident airplane’s maintenance logs were not located, and the airplane’s maintenance history could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the left main landing gear wheel axle due to a fatigue crack.

On February 13, 2016, about 0930 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 140G airplane, N3625V, sustained substantial damage when the left main landing gear axle broke during landing and the airplane ground looped at the Independence State Airport, Independence, Oregon. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was owned by the pilot and operated as a personal, cross-country flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, the pilot stated that the approach and touchdown were normal. Just after touchdown, he felt something similar to a bump, and the airplane started to drift to the left. He stated that he thought that he possibly had a flat tire and tried to compensate, but the airplane continued drifting to the left and exited the left side of the runway into the dirt and ground looped, sustaining substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage. 

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector from the Portland Flight Standards District Office was at the airport at the time of the accident and examined the airplane at the accident site. The examination revealed that the left main landing gear axle had fractured and the wheel assembly separated from the airplane. 

A detailed examination of the fractured axle by the NTSB materials laboratory revealed that the axle was fractured near the inboard end just outboard of the axle attachment flange. Portions of the fracture surface at the upper and lower sides of the axle had relatively smooth features oriented perpendicular to the outer surface, features consistent with fatigue. The fatigue cracks initiated at a fillet corner at a change in outer diameter for the axle. 

According to a representative for Cessna contacted by telephone, inspections of the main landing gear axle should be in accordance with Section 2A of the Maintenance Manual for the 100-series airplanes. The axles should be inspected for cracks and corrosion initially after 10 years or 4,000 hours and then at subsequent intervals of 3 years or 1,000 hours. The inspection consists of removing the wheel and completing a visual inspection. If any crack is suspected, an eddy current inspection is then required.

The airplane was manufactured in 1948. The owner/operator reported that the last annual inspection was completed about 7 months prior to the accident at a total airframe time of 6,314.5 hours. No airframe logbooks were located during the investigation, therefore it was not determined when the last inspection of the main landing gear axle occurred.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA068 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 13, 2016 in Independence, OR
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N3625V
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 13, 2016, about 1100 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 140G airplane, N3625V, sustained substantial damage when the left main landing gear axle broke during landing and the airplane ground looped at the Independence State Airport, Independence, Oregon. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was owned by the pilot and operated as a personal, cross-country flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, the pilot stated that the approach and touchdown were normal. Just after touchdown, he felt something similar to a bump, and the airplane started to drift to the left. He stated that he thought that he possibly had a flat tire and tried to compensate, but the airplane continued drifting to the left and exited the left side of the runway into the dirt and ground looped, sustaining substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage. 

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector from the Portland Flight Standards District Office was at the airport at the time of the accident and examined the airplane at the accident site. The examination revealed that the left main landing gear axle had fractured and the wheel assembly separated from the airplane. A detailed examination of the fractured axle by the NTSB materials laboratory is pending.

Accident occurred July 16, 2017 in Eastford, Windham County, Connecticut

EASTFORD — One person was transported after a plane crash this afternoon in Eastford, according to fire officials.

At approximately 12:05 p.m., the Eastford Independent Fire Co.#1 Inc., along with Ashford Ambulance, were dispatched by Quinebaug Valley Emergency Communications for a report of an injured person from an ultralight aircraft crash.

When units arrived, they were directed by witnesses to a wooded area approximately 500 feet past the end of the runway, according to the Eastford fire department.

Emergency workers entered the wooded area and found the aircraft with a single occupant inside. Crews from the department, with assistance from the Bungay Fire Brigade, extricated the patient who was transported to a medical helicopter. The unidentified patient was flown to Hartford Hospital for treatment.

Crews cleared the scene at 1:15 p.m. and Connecticut state police are investigating the crash.

http://www.norwichbulletin.com

Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair, N562H: Accident occurred February 08, 2016 at Billings Logan International Airport (KBIL), Yellowstone County, Montana



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N562H 

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA073 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, February 08, 2016 in Billings, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/23/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA T206H, registration: N562H
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, just after landing, the airplane began to veer left and exited the side of the runway. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the nose landing gear fork and the right main landing gear strut were fractured in a manner consistent with overload. Examination of the damage to the airplane revealed that the main landing gear attachment points sustained upward crushing and the tail was bent downward; damage consistent with a hard landing.  Control continuity was established, and no anomalies were revealed that would have precluded normal operation. 

Recorded wind information for the time of the accident indicated a 50- to 60-degree crosswind at 8 knots with gusts to 19 knots for the selected runway. Shortly before the airplane landed, a general wind shear warning was broadcast on the airport’s tower control frequency. Wind shear was present in the area at altitudes below 2,000 ft above ground level (agl), and review of weather information valid at the time of the accident indicated several areas of clear air turbulence extending from the surface through 14,000 ft agl. Given the damage to the airplane, the surface wind profile, and upper level winds over the terrain, the accident flight likely encountered gusting wind conditions and low-level wind shear while landing. The airplane landed hard, damaging the landing gear, which resulted in the pilot’s subsequent inability to maintain directional control. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to attain a proper flare during landing in gusting wind conditions and low-level wind shear, which resulted in a hard landing and a subsequent loss of directional control. 

On February 8, 2016, about 1131 mountain standard time, a Cessna T206H, N562H, veered off of the runway after landing at Billings Logan International Airport (BIL), Billings, Montana. The pilot, sole occupant, sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Red Reflect Ranch Airport (WY00), Ten Sleep, Wyoming at 1030.

The pilot reported that the airplane touched down very smoothly. Shortly thereafter, it started to veer to the left with no lateral control. The airplane veered 90 degrees and went off the side of the runway. 

Postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector revealed heavy damage to the airplane. The windscreen was partially separated. The fuselage at the main landing gear attachment points sustained upward crushing, and the nose wheel fork was fractured. The right wheel strut was fracture separated about three inches from the wheel assembly and the wheel separated from the airplane. The fracture surface was visually inspected and was consistent with overload. The outboard about four feet of the right wing was bent upward, and the fuselage just aft of the rear window was bent downward. Overall, there were no anomalies noted with the airplane that would have precluded normal operations.

Review of the Billings Air Traffic Control Tower recordings revealed that shortly before the pilot landed a general wind shear warning was broadcasted on the frequency. 

BIL was the closest official weather station. At 1153 the automated surface observing system (ASOS) reported wind from 220 degrees at 8 knots with gusts to 19 knots, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 8,500 feet agl, scattered clouds at 20,000 feet agl, temperature 9 degrees C, dew point -6 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.38 inches of mercury. The one-minute BIL ASOS surface data was provided by the National Weather Surface. At 1131, BIL reported the two-minute average wind from 222 degrees at 12 knots and a five-second maximum average wind from 233 Degrees at 17 knots. In addition, the complete Rawinsonde Observation program reported low-level wind shear in the lowest 2,000 feet agl. Several layers of possible clear-air turbulence were identified from the surface through 14,000 feet.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA073
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, February 08, 2016 in Billings, MT
Aircraft: CESSNA T206H, registration: N562H
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 8, 2016, about 1130 mountain standard time, a Cessna T206H, N562H, veered off of the runway after landing at Billings Logan International Airport (BIL), Billings, Montana. The pilot, sole occupant, sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Red Reflet Ranch Airport (WY00), Ten Sleep, Wyoming at about 1030.

The pilot reported that shortly after landing, the airplane suddenly veered sharply to the left. During the turn, the airplane's right landing gear strut fracture separated, and the wheel assembly departed the airplane. The airplane exited the left side of the runway surface and came to rest on the grass adjacent to the runway.

The airplane was moved to a secure location for further examination.

Aeronca 15AC, N1370H: Fatal accident occurred July 15, 2017 in Big Lake, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Lycoming

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
http://registry.faa.gov/N1370H 

Location:BIG LAKE, AK 
Accident Number: ANC17FA035
Date & Time: 07/15/2017, 0925 AKD
Registration: N1370H
Aircraft: AERONCA 15AC
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 15, 2017, about 0925 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Aeronca 15AC airplane, N1370H, sustained substantial damage following a collision with a tree and impact with terrain about 20 miles west of Big Lake, Alaska. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed a remote lake near Big Lake about 0905 destined for Sand Lake, Anchorage, Alaska.

According to a family friend, the purpose of the flight was to shuttle several friends from Sand Lake to the pilot's remote recreational cabin. The pilot dropped off the first group of friends and was returning to Sand Lake when the accident occurred. When the airplane failed to arrive at Sand Lake to shuttle the second group of friends, the family friend initiated an aerial search and ultimately found the accident site. The family friend also stated that the pilot liked to fly at a low level over the Yetna River to look for eagle's nests when returning from his recreational cabin.

Another family friend said that it was common for the pilot, when returning from his recreational cabin, to fly between 300 and 500 ft above ground level (agl) over the Yetna River to the confluence of the Yetna and Big Susitna Rivers. He would then climb to about 1,100 feet agl for the remainder of the trip to Sand Lake.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 75, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and sea and instrument airplane. On May 24, 2017, the pilot applied for "BasicMed,"an alternative to third-class medical certification to fly certain small aircraft, including the accident airplane.

Some personal flight records were located for the pilot; however, they were not complete. On his most recent application for a medical certificate, dated June 7, 2013, he indicated that his total aeronautical experience was about 5,892 hours of which 38 hours were in the previous 6 months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 1949. A review of the maintenance records revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed on September 9, 2016, when the airframe had accumulated 4,659.6 hours total time in service.

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 engine rated at 180 horsepower at 2,700 rpm. The engine was last overhauled on June 28, 2005 and had accumulated 874.6 hours since overhaul at the most recent annual inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather observation station to the accident site was Wasilla Airport, Wasilla, Alaska, located about 31 miles east of the accident site. At 0856, Wasilla was reporting, in part, wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, clouds and ceiling 4,600 ft broken, 6,000 ft overcast, temperature 60°F, dewpoint 51°F, and altimeter 30.01 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in an area of brush- and tundra-covered terrain with scattered trees at an elevation of about 50 ft. The initial impact point was marked by a broken tree top, atop an estimated 45-foot-tall cottonwood tree, located about 150 ft from the west bank of the Yetna River. Broken tree branches and paint fragments that matched the color of the airplane were located below the initial impact point. The main wreckage was located northeast along a magnetic heading of about 072° about 450 ft from the initial impact point. The fuselage came to rest inverted. All of the airplane's major components, with the exception of the left wing, were found at the main wreckage site.

The severed left wing was located about 160 ft from the initial impact point. A large elliptical impact area was found on the leading edge, about 3 ft outboard of the wing root, with multiple smaller elliptical impact areas outboard to the tip. The left aileron remained attached to its respective attach points and was relatively undamaged.

The right wing separated about 3 inches inboard of its rear attach point but remained attached to the fuselage at its forward attach point. Multiple elliptical impact areas were found on the leading edge. The wing's lift strut remained attached at both the fuselage and wing attach points. The right aileron remained attached to its respective attach points but sustained impact damage.

The cockpit area was extensively damaged. The engine, firewall, and instrument panel were displaced upward and aft. The throttle control was found in the near full-forward position, and the carburetor heat was in the off position. The horizontal and vertical stabilizer, elevators, and rudder remained attached to the empennage and were relatively free of impact damage.

All the primary flight control surfaces were identified at the accident site, and flight control continuity was verified from the cockpit to the elevators and rudder. Aileron control continuity was established from the control column to the overhead aileron bell crank, in the aileron control cables to the wing aileron bell cranks, and in the aileron push-pull tubes. A fracture was observed in the left aileron bell crank; multiple fractures were observed in the overhead aileron bell crank; all fractures were consistent with overload.

The engine was examined on August 16, 2017. The engine sustained impact damage to the front, top and underside. No anomalies, contamination, or evidence of malfunction was found in any of the engine accessories. The cylinders, pistons, valve train, crankshaft, and other internal components were all without evidence of anomaly or malfunction. Both magnetos were removed from the engine. When the magneto couplings were rotated, blue sparks were observed at the distributor in rotational order.

The propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft by its attach bolts. Both propeller blades exhibited slight torsional "S" twisting and aft bending.

The examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Alaska State Medical Examiner, Anchorage, Alaska conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death for the pilot was attributed to multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot, which were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. The toxicology testing revealed 0.039 ug/ml of morphine in the pilot's urine.

Morphine is a prescription narcotic used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. The cutoff for federal workplace testing of urine is 2.000 ug/ml. The level of morphine detected in the pilot's urine was well below this level, and the medication was not detected in his blood. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: BasicMed Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/24/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 5892 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERONCA
Registration: N1370H
Model/Series: 15AC
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1949
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 15AC-419
Landing Gear Type: Float;
Seats: 
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/09/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4659.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAWS
Observation Time: 1656 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 31 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: BIG LAKE, AK
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Anchorage, AK
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal

Latitude, Longitude:  61.606389, -150.506667 (est)

NTSB Identification: ANC17FA035
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 15, 2017 in BIG LAKE, AK
Aircraft: AERONCA 15AC, registration: N1370H
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 15, 2017, about 0925 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Aeronca 15AC airplane, N1370H, sustained substantial damage following a collision with a tree, and a subsequent loss of control and impact with terrain, about 20 miles west of Big Lake, Alaska. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed a remote lake near Big Lake, Alaska about 0905 destined for Sand Lake, Anchorage, Alaska.

According to a family friend, the purpose of the flight was to shuttle a group of friends to a remote recreational cabin and the accident occurred during the return trip to Sand Lake. When the airplane failed to arrive at Sand Lake to shuttle the second group of friends, another family friend initiated an aerial search, and ultimately found the accident site. 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) along with another NTSB investigator and an Alaska State Trooper reached the accident site in the afternoon of July 16. The accident site was in an area of tall brush and tundra covered terrain with sparsely populated trees at an elevation of about 50 ft msl. An area believed to be the initial impact point was marked by a broken tree top, atop about a 45-foot-tall cottonwood tree, situated near the banks of the Yentna River. Broken tree branches and paint fragments that matched the color of the airplane were located at the base of the cottonwood tree. After the initial impact, the airplane's wreckage traveled northeast along a magnetic heading of about 072° for about 450 ft before coming to rest inverted. 

The airplane's severed left wing was located about 160 ft from the 45-foot-tall cottonwood tree, initial impact point. A large elliptical impact area was found on the leading edge, about 3 ft outboard of the wing root, with multiple smaller elliptical impact areas outboard to the tip. 

All the primary flight control surfaces were identified at the accident site, and flight control continuity was verified from the cockpit to the elevators and rudder. Aileron control continuity was established from the control column in the aileron control cables to the fuselage aileron bell crank, in the aileron control cables to the wing aileron bell cranks and in the aileron push-pull tubes. A fracture was observed in the left aileron bell crank and multiple fractures were observed in the fuselage aileron bell crank, but all fractures were consistent with overload. A detailed wreckage examination is pending following recovery of the airplane. 


Donald Wayne Frantz passed away on July 15, 2017, along the Yentna River, Alaska. He died from heart failure while flying his beloved Aeronca Sedan. Don was born on Oct. 26, 1941, in Pueblo, Colo., to Roy Osee and Ethel May. The Frantz family owned the local feed store in Pueblo, where Don and his two brothers worked. After graduating from Central High School in Pueblo in 1959, he attended Colorado State College, Greeley. While studying, he competed for the men's gymnastics program and was nationally ranked. During the summers he traveled to Alaska, to work for Anchorage Natural Gas. He graduated from Colorado State College, Greeley in 1967, with a master's degree in biology. He met Georgette Thomas in 1965. Their love flourished quickly and they were married on July 1, 1966. After three years of marriage, they had their son, Dowell. They were happily married for 51 years.

In August 1966, Don and Georgette drove to Alaska to teach. Don worked at A.J. Dimond High School from 1966 to 1969. He taught Biology and Physical Education. In addition to teaching, he coached wrestling. In 1969, he left teaching to begin his career in the insurance industry. He bought his first airplane, an Aeronca Sedan, in 1975. The next year he began guiding for big game. His love for guiding continued until the mid '80s. He established Tax Deferral Associates in 1986, and continued working in this area until retirement.

In 1988, Don made his first trip to Kansas, to hunt pheasants with family and friends. This was the beginning of his biannual trips to Hoxie, Kan., for spring turkey hunting and fall pheasant hunting. His last successful Kansas hunt was in April of this year, when he bagged a long-bearded turkey. In 1974, his son started playing hockey, which began Don's second great love of watching Dowell and grandkids, Kody and Estee, play hockey for the next 43 years. Don maintained an almost perfect attendance record, even when the hockey games were played outside of Alaska. When he wasn't watching hockey, he volunteered for many years on the board of the Alaska Hockey Association. He was also a beloved member on the board of directors for Credit Union 1. When Don retired from the Credit Union 1 board, he began traveling back and forth from Anchorage to Colorado Springs with his wife and dog, Ravyn.

In 2010, Don took up another project. He started to build his second airplane at the Legend Cub Factory in Sulphur Springs, Texas. It took him six months to finish the plane. After the completion of his airplane, he flew it up to Alaska with his cousin, Murray Sloan. The journey home took them eight days.

Don was a loving father, husband, friend and a cherished grandfather. His contagious smile will be dearly missed. He is survived by his wife, Georgette; son and daughter-in-law, Dowell and Stephanie; grandchildren, Kody and Estee; brother, Bob and family; and brother-in-law, Jim Thomas and family.
A celebration of life will be held at the Alaska Aviation Heritage Museum, 4721 Aircraft Drive, on Thursday, July 20, 2017, from 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. All are welcome to attend.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Pheasants Forever, Smoky Valley Chapter 349, Hoxie, KS 67740; or Friends of Pets, P.O. Box 240981, Anchorage, AK 99524-0981.

=========

A 75-year-old Anchorage man died Saturday after his plane crashed near the mouth of the Yentna River in the Mat-Su Valley, the Alaska State Troopers and federal aviation officials said.

Pilot Donald Wayne Frantz had flown  passengers in his Aeronca 15AC Sedan to a remote cabin on the river, in Alaska's Mat-Su Valley, around 9:30 or 10 a.m., said Clint Johnson with the National Transportation Safety Board.

He had just taken off alone on a flight back to Anchorage to pick up a second load of passengers when the plane crashed in wooded terrain "very close to the mouth of the Yentna River," and not far from the cabin.

When Frantz didn't return from his flight on time, people at the cabin began searching for him and discovered the wreckage, Johnson said.

Around 1 p.m., members of the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center were called to the site of the crash and found Frantz dead, according to an Alaska State Troopers dispatch Sunday. Troopers and Talkeetna Fire and Rescue also went to the scene, and helped transport Frantz's body to Anchorage, troopers said.

The Aeronca is a single engine plane, said Johnson. FAA records show the Aeronca owned by Frantz was manufactured in 1949. It was on floats, Johnson said.

Two federal investigators were at the site of the crash Sunday working to determine why the plane crashed, Johnson said.

Rotor Flight Dynamics Dominator Tandem, N41852: Fatal accident February 01, 2016 near Centralia Municipal Airport (KENL), Illinois

Raymond Z. Brown 
April 18, 1952 - February 1, 2016
Raymond served in the United States Army during Vietnam.



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Raymond Z. Brown: http://registry.faa.gov/N41852




NTSB Identification: CEN16LA096
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, February 01, 2016 in Centralia, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/23/2017
Aircraft: RAYMOND Z BROWN CONDOR, registration: N41852
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A witness observed the sport pilot departing in his experimental, amateur-built gyroplane when, about 300 ft above ground level, the gyroplane turned right and the rotor blades began to slow. The gyroplane then made a sharp left turn, descended, and abruptly pitched up before impacting a field. A postaccident examination of the gyroplane found that the belt driving the prerotator had broken and had become entangled in the engine timing belt, which would have resulted in a loss of engine power. No other anomalies were detected with the airframe and engine. An autopsy did not reveal any medical concerns with the pilot.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the prerotator belt, which impeded the engine's timing belt and resulted in a loss of engine power at low altitude.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On February 1, 2016, about 1435 central standard time, an amateur-built Condor gyroplane, N41852, impacted terrain near Centralia, Illinois. The sport pilot was fatally injured and the gyroplane was substantially damaged. The gyroplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Centralia Municipal Airport (KENL), Centralia, Illinois at an unknown time.

According to information obtained by the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors, an instructor pilot rated eyewitness watched the gyroplane as it departed runway 36. Upon reaching 300 ft above ground level, the gyroplane began a right turn. During the climb, the gyroplane rotor blades began to slow down. Another witness reported that the engine lost power. The gyroplane made a "tight" left turn towards the airport. It then rolled wings level and began descending in a flat attitude. Prior to impact, the gyroplane pitched up abruptly and impact the ground. The accident occurred about 1 mile from the airport.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 63, held a sport pilot certificate issued on August 24, 2012. His log book was not located during the course of the investigation, and his flight experience could not be determined. He used a valid driver's license to exercise sport pilot privileges rather than possessing an FAA medical certificate.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single-engine, two tandem seat gryoplane was manufactured in 2012 by the accident pilot. It was powered by a Subaru EJ22 engine driving a four-bladed composite Warp Drive propeller and equipped with Dragon Wings rotor blades. It was issued a Special Airworthiness Certificate as an experimental amateur build on December 22, 2012. The builder listed the gyroplane as a Condor and it followed the design of a Rotor Flight Dynamics Twin Dominator.

The gyroplane restraint system consisted of a single lap belt.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1435, an automated weather reporting station located at ENL reported a wind from 040 at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, a clear sky, temperature 54° F, dew point 32° F, and a barometric pressure of 29.99 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The gyroplane came in rest on its left side in an open field. All major components were located at the accident site. There was an impact crater located next to where the wreckage had come to rest. The fuselage was slightly twisted and the main rotor blades were bent, but remained attached to the rotor mast.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

As of the writing of this report, an autopsy did not reveal any medical concerns with the pilot. The manner of death resides with the Marion County Coroner and is still undetermined.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. Results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and drugs.

SURVIVAL ASPECTS

The pilot was wearing a helmet similar to a Comtronics Aircraft Helmet. However, its make and model could not be verified.

TESTS AND RESEARCH


The gyroplane was recovered to a hanger and examined by the FAA inspector. They found that the belt driving the prerotator had broken and had become entangled in the timing belt. No other anomalies were detected with the airframe and engine. The gyroplane's prerotator had a freewheeling mechanism which would allow for free rotation of the rotor system. In addition, the prerotator would not have been engage during the accident.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA096
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, February 01, 2016 in Centralia, IL
Aircraft: RAYMOND Z BROWN CONDOR, registration: N41852
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 1, 2016, about 1435 central standard time, an amateur-built Condor gyroplane, N41852, impacted terrain near Centralia, Illinois. The sport pilot was fatally injured and the gyroplane was substantially damaged. The gyroplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The local flight was departing from the Centralia Municipal Airport (KENL), Centralia, Illinois at the time of the accident.

According to information obtained by the responding Federal Aviation Administration inspectors, an eyewitness watched the gyroplane as it departed runway 36. During the climb out, the gyroplane began a right turn during which the witness perceived that the rotor blades began to slow. The gyroplane then made a sharp left turn and began descending. After the gyroplane did a quick flare, it descended out of view and rolled over. The witness ran to the accident site and called for assistance. The accident occurred about 1 mile from the airport.

The gyroplane was retained for further examination.

At 1435, an automated weather reporting station located at ENL reported a wind from 040 at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, a clear sky, temperature 54° F, dew point 32° F, and an altimeter setting of 29.99 inches of mercury.