Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 717-200, N969AT: Incident occurred September 22, 2018 at Jackson–Medgar Wiley Evers International Airport (KJAN), Mississippi

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Flight number 935: Struck bird on short final, landed without further incident.

https://registry.faa.gov/N969AT

Date: 22-SEP-18
Time: 14:04:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 712
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 935
City: JACKSON
State: MISSISSIPPI

Beech 58 Baron, N4193S: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 at Henderson-Oxford Airport (KHNZ), Granville County, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Prop struck runway.

FlightGest Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N4193S

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N4193S
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: OXFORD
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Beech 58 Baron, N6662N: Incident occurred September 21, 2018 at Roberts Field Airport (KRDM), Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon 

Gear up landing.


Thomson Resources Inc https://registry.faa.gov/N6662N 


Date: 21-SEP-18
Time: 19:50:00Z
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: REDMOND
State: OREGON




REDMOND, Ore. - A twin-engine plane whose pilot was unable to lower the landing gear made a gear-up emergency landing at Redmond Municipal Airport early Friday afternoon. That prompted a halt to takeoffs and landings until the plane could be removed from the runway, delaying or diverting more than a dozen flights before it reopened three hours later.

Airport Director Zachary Bass said the pilot of the Beechcraft Baron plane told air traffic controllers shortly after noon that the landing gear would not come down. He circled the airport while the airport's ARFF (aircraft rescue fire fighting) units and others were positioned in place, should the need arise.

Fire crews on scene reported some light smoke as the aircraft slid down the runway on its belly after landing and came to a stop, and an ARFF unit deployed foam to prevent any fire, with the pilot getting out moments later.

Redmond fire officials said the plane's landing gear malfunctioned and made a successful gear-up landing with the pilot uninjured. Crews were making sure there were no hazards while the plane was removed.

An aircraft spokeswoman said the plane belly-landed on Runway 5, with no one hurt.

The airport does have two runways, but Bass said the plane blocked the primary runway. The airport’s second runway has been under reconstruction since May, a project expected to be completed in mid-October.

The airport's flight status page had showed several departures delayed through about 3 p.m., as well as several arrivals. At least seven arrivals and 10 departures were delayed due to the incident, with some of the incoming flights diverted elsewhere.

A crane was brought in and helped crews get the plane back onto its wheels so it could be towed off the runway around 2:30 p.m. Airport officials said flights resumed around 3 p.m., after crews washed the foam off the runway and prepared it for service.

Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane, owned by Thomson Resources Inc. of Bend (Tumalo), was built in 1979

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktvz.com

Piper PA-18-150, N8192D: Accident occurred September 20, 2018 in St. Mary's, Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N8192D

Location: St. Mary's, AK
Accident Number: GAA18CA567
Date & Time: 09/20/2018, 2000 AKD
Registration: N8192D
Aircraft: Piper PA18
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing at an off-airport dirt and grass landing area, the ground was very slippery. During the landing roll, the airplane struck a few holes and bumps and the airplane rocked side to side. The left wing struck the ground and "pushed up", which caused the right wing to strike and catch the ground. The airplane ground looped to the right and came to rest in a nose down attitude.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/27/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/17/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 350 hours (Total, all aircraft), 135 hours (Total, this make and model), 350 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 61 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N8192D
Model/Series: PA18 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1957
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18-6130
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/16/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3693 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-360-C4P
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PASM, 312 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 33 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0402 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 203°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 230°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: St. Mary's, AK (ksm)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: St. Mary's, AK
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1900 AKD
Type of Airspace:  Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  62.570000, -162.850000 (est)

Ayres S2R-G1 Thrush, N2245S: Accident occurred September 24, 2018 at Imperial County Airport (KIPL), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aircraft crashed while landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N2245S

Date: 24-SEP-18
Time: 18:10:00Z
Regis#: N2245S
Aircraft Make: AYRES
Aircraft Model: S2R G1
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 137
City: IMPERIAL
State: CALIFORNIA

Beech 58TC Turbo Baron, N283D: Incident occurred September 24, 2018 at Northern Colorado Regional Airport (KFNL), Fort Collins/Loveland, Larimer County, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Landed, taxied clear of runway then accidentally retracted the gear.

https://registry.faa.gov/N283D

Date: 24-SEP-18
Time: 21:48:00Z
Regis#: N283D
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58TC
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: FORT COLLINS
State: COLORADO

Cessna 310D, N6749T: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 at Colorado Springs Airport (KCOS), El Paso County, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N6749T

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 16:36:00Z
Regis#: N6749T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310D
Event Type:
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: COLORADO SPRINGS
State: COLORADO

Cessna 172, N6950A: Incident occurred September 24, 2018 at Winter Haven Regional Airport (KGIF), Polk County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Ran off the runway on landing and struck a fence.

https://registry.faa.gov/N6950A

Date: 24-SEP-18
Time: 16:30:00Z
Regis#: N6950A
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WINTER HAVEN
State: FLORIDA

Bell OH-58A, N206WH: Incident occurred September 24, 2018 in Juana Díaz, Puerto Rico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Juan, Puerto Rico

Rotorcraft landed in a field.

https://registry.faa.gov/N206WH

Date: 24-SEP-18
Time: 21:49:00Z
Regis#: N206WH
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: OH 58A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: JUANA DIAZ
State: PUERTO RICO

Van's RV-14, N823HE: Accident occurred September 24, 2018 at Heber Valley Airport (KHCR), Wasatch County, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

https://registry.faa.gov/N823HE


NTSB Identification: GAA18CA566

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 24, 2018 in Heber City, UT
Aircraft: Vans RV-14, registration: N823HE

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Landed then hit lighting.

Date: 24-SEP-18

Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N823HE
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: RV14
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HEBER
State: UTAH

Cessna U206G Stationair 6, registered to Laughlin Acquisitions LLC and operated by Regal Air, N1738R: Fatal accident occurred September 24, 2018 in Rainy Pass, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Regal Air; Anchorage, Alaska 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N1738R

Location: Rainy Pass, AK
Accident Number: CEN18FA386
Date & Time: 09/24/2018, 1032 AKD
Registration: N1738R
Aircraft: CESSNA U206
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On September 24, 2018, at 1032 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna U206G airplane, N1738R, impacted mountainous terrain about 13 miles west of Rainy Pass Lodge Airport (6AK), Rainy Pass, Alaska. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Laughlin Acquisitions LLC and operated by Regal Air under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a visual flight rules on-demand cargo flight. Marginal visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed Lake Hood Seaplane Base (PALH), Anchorage, Alaska, and was destined for a private airstrip on the southwest side of the Alaska Range about 30 miles west of the accident site.

The operator reported that the purpose of the flight was to deliver about 400 lbs of lumber to the private airstrip, pick up two passengers and return to the PALH. The operator was tracking the pilot's flight path using Spidertracks (figure 1) and noticed the track stopped at 1031. An Alert Notice was issued for the missing airplane and the U.S. Air Force Alaska Rescue Coordination Center conducted an aerial search mission to locate the airplane. The wreckage was discovered near the end of a mountain valley on a steep mountain side about 3.5 miles southwest of the mouth of Goodman Pass.


Figure 1 – Spidertracks route

The Regal Air chief pilot was flying the same flight path in another company Cessna 206 and was about 20 minutes behind the accident pilot. He was in radio contact with the pilot throughout the flight and most of the communications were related to the current weather conditions and cloud coverage along the route of flight. The chief pilot inquired about how the pilot flew through certain areas along the route in order to stay clear of the clouds. The chief pilot also heard the accident pilot in radio communication with the owner of Rainy Pass Lodge, but he could only hear the pilot's side of the conversation. The pilot lost radio contact with the accident pilot about 1030 and assumed that he had proceeded into Rainy Pass and no longer had line of sight for radio contact. When the chief pilot reached Long Lake Hills he did not feel comfortable continuing the flight due to the low clouds so he turned around and proceeded back to PALH.

The closest official weather observation station is located at 6AK. The weather observer for 6AK reported the following observations. At 0659 wind from 170° at 10 knots, visibility 7 statute miles (sm), light rain, overcast cloud later at 7,000 ft, temperature 6° C, dewpoint 6° C, and a barometric pressure of 29.58 inches of mercury. At 0848 wind from 160° at 12 knots gusting to 18 knots, visibility 7 sm, scattered clouds at 1,500 ft, overcast cloud layer at 4,000 ft, temperature 5° C, dewpoint 4° C, and a barometric pressure of 29.56 inches of mercury. At 1058 wind from 140° at 10 knots, visibility 7 sm, scattered clouds at 1,200 ft, broken clouds at 2,700 ft, temperature 6° C, dewpoint 5° C, and a barometric pressure of 29.53 inches of mercury.

The owner of Rainy Pass Lodge at 6AK stated that he saw the accident airplane fly over his lodge and he made radio contact with the pilot. He stated that he could see Long Lake Hills from 6AK, which is 8 miles southeast, and that the cloud coverage to the southeast was a lot more significant than it was to the northwest near Rainy Pass, which appeared to be dissipating.

On September 26, the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge and members of the investigative team traveled to the accident site via helicopter and documented the accident site and wreckage. The main wreckage was located about 4,400 ft mean sea level (msl) on the mountain side and was partially covered in snow. The initial impact point, identified by the propeller assembly and cockpit debris, and was located about 4,700 ft msl. Figure 2 is a photo taken from the same altitude and heading as the final Spidertracks point received from the airplane; the figure shows the initial impact area circled in red. The first responders reported that the rescue helicopter's rotor wash blew the wreckage off its perch and it slid down the face of the slope to its final resting point. A debris path of airplane wreckage was found along the slope leading to the main wreckage.

Figure 2 – Accident site, impact area circled in red

On September 28, the wreckage was recovered from the mountain side and transported to a secure facility for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N1738R
Model/Series: U206 G
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Regal Air
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPTI
Observation Time: AKD
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 20°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 6000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.61 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Anchorage, AK (LHD)
Destination: , AK

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  62.072778, -153.184722

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Dave Oberg, commercial pilot.


Dave Oberg has worked for Regal Air since 2002. 


An airplane crash in the Rainy Pass area on Monday took the life of veteran pilot, David Oberg, it has been reported by Alaska State Troopers on Tuesday.

The crash was reported to the Alaska State Troopers on Monday evening at 5:43 pm and the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center dispatched to the crash area, where they located the aircraft, a Cessna 206, and the pilot, the only occupant, deceased.

Oberg’s remains were transported to Joint Base Elmendorf-Fort Richardson where they were turned over to the State Medical Examiner’s office.

Oberg, 67, was flying for Regal Air, located on Lake Hood at the time of the incident. He had started flying in the skies over Alaska in his teens and had been a commercial pilot for over 40 years. He had been flying with the Regal Air team since 2002.

In his off-time, Oberg taught aviation science at a local high school.

Oberg’s death marks the second pilot fatality for Regal Air this year. 24-year-old Colt Richter died in a crash near Willow Lake on July 18th.

The National Transportation Safety Bureau is investigating the crash but has yet to release their preliminary report into the cause of the crash.

Oberg’s next of kin have been notified of his death.

Original article can be found here ➤https://alaska-native-news.com



ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - One man is dead after the small plane that he was piloting crashed in the area of Rainy Pass.

Carl David Oberg, 67, a pilot flying with Regal Air Services at Lake Hood, died after the Cessna 206 he was piloting crashed.

Alaska State Troopers confirmed the death in a dispatch report early Tuesday morning. They were notified of the crash itself at 5:43 p.m. Monday.

According to AST, the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center responded to the area of Rainy Pass and located the plane and Oberg, the sole occupant on board, deceased.

Oberg's body was transported back to JBER, where the State Medical Examiner took possession of his body.

So far there is no preliminary report from the National Transportation Safety Bureau into what caused the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktuu.com

Delta Air Lines, McDonnell Douglas MD-90, N960DN: Incident occurred September 21, 2018 at Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Pennsylvania and Incident occurred May 08, 2018 at Denver International Airport (KDEN), Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

September 21, 2018: Flight 967 bird strike while departing.

Delta Air Lines Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N960DN


Date: 21-SEP-18
Time: 19:25:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Aircraft Model: MD90
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 967
City: PHILADELPHIA
State: PENNSYLVANIA

May 08, 2018 at Denver International Airport (KDEN), Colorado


May 08, 2018:  Flight 1854 reported smoke/fumes in the cabin.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Date: 09-MAY-18
Time: 00:36:00Z
Regis#: 960DN
Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Aircraft Model: MD 90
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 1854
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Sunday, September 23, 2018

Zenith STOL CH-750, operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N752VK: Accident occurred September 23, 2018 in DeLeon Springs, Volusia County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N752VK


Location: DeLeon Springs, FL
Accident Number: ERA18TA263
Date & Time: 09/23/2018, 1545 EDT
Registration: N752VK
Aircraft: ZENITH CH 750
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 23, 2018, about 1545 eastern daylight time, a Zenith Aircraft Company CH 750, N752VK, was substantially damaged following a forced landing near DeLeon Springs, Florida. The private pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated from DeLand Municipal Airport (DED), DeLand, Florida, about 1530.

The pilot/owner reported that while over the DeLeon Springs area, the engine started "skipping." The engine then lost all power and the propeller stopped. He set up for a forced landing to an open area. During the descent, he observed power lines and maneuvered to clear them. The airplane touched down at a steep descent angle. After touchdown, the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. He reported that the engine firewall, wings, and vertical stabilizer had structural damage. Further examination of the wreckage revealed that the airplane was equipped with two 12v motorcycle batteries, and both were discharged. One battery indicated 0.75 volts and the other indicated 7 volts. Both batteries were then charged by the inspector and a mechanic, who were then able to start the airplane's Viking 110 engine normally. The alternator was found to be charging normally with the engine running and the bus voltage was greater than 13.5 volts.

The key-actuated rotary (ignition) switch on the cockpit instrument panel controlled the airplane's alternator and started the airplane's engine was unlabeled. When the switch switch was placed in the unlabeled on position, the alternator field wire received power and the alternator charged normally. When placed to the unlabeled off position, power was removed from the alternator field wire, and the engine continued to run as long as one of the unlabeled battery toggle switches was turned on. The Viking 110 engine manual recommended an alternator warning light installation; however, the inspector noted that there was no light installed.

The pilot reported to the FAA inspector that he may have left the alternator switch in the unlabeled off position by mistake. The pilot also reported that he did not utilize a checklist when operating the airplane.

The Viking 110 engine manual reminds operators that the engine is controlled by an electronic control unit (ECU) versus mechanically operated magnetos and at least one battery must maintain its charge for the engine to operate.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 79, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/14/2011
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  237 hours (Total, all aircraft), 195 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ZENITH
Registration: N752VK
Model/Series: CH 750
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2012
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 75-8435
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/21/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1325 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 55 Hours
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 701 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Viking
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 110
Registered Owner: Aluminum Eagle LLC
Rated Power: 110 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDED, 79 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1915 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 145°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 90°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: DeLand, FL (DED)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: DeLand, FL (DED)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1530 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 29.139722, -81.343056 (est)






A single engine airplane flipped over in a field in DeLeon Springs Sunday afternoon while trying to make an emergency landing after an engine malfunction, officials said.

Volusia County Fire Services Battalion Chief Nick Castelli said two people were in the aircraft and only suffered minor injuries.

According to sheriff’s spokesman Andrew Gant, deputies were called to 5660 Johnson Lake Road around 3:27 p.m. reference an aircraft crash.

When deputies arrived on scene, they made contact with the pilot, Herbert Weems and his passenger, Kenneth Brownell.

Weens said that while in flight, an engine malfunction forced them to land the aircraft in a field on Johnson Lake Road. Weens said he misjudged the slope of the ground, causing the front tire to touch ground, damaging it on impact and flipping the airplane, Gant said.

Bystanders said the flight was a present for Brownell, who was celebrating his 89th birthday on Sunday.

Weems and Brownell suffered minor injuries and were transported by EVAC ambulance to Florida Hospital Deland. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were notified of the airplane accident, Gant said.

Original article ➤ http://www.news-journalonline.com






DELEON SPRINGS, Fla. —  A pilot and a passenger had to be pulled out of a plane in DeLeon Springs, officials said.

The Volusia County Sheriff’s Office said a small plane landed near Johnson Lake Road and flipped over.

Authorities said the pilot, Herbert Weems, experienced an engine problem and tried to put the plane down. Weems said he misjudged the slope which damaged the landing gear and caused the plane to flip, officials said.

According to witnesses, the pilot was hanging upside down and they had to cut him out while Kenneth Brownell, his passenger, was crawling out the door. Witnesses said Brownell told witnesses it was his 89 birthday and the ride on the plane was his present.

The men were taken to a hospital as a precaution. The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane is a Stol CH 750 light sport utility aircraft. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wesh.com

Federal Aviation Administration Bill Leaves Out Change Fee Oversight: Airlines had lobbied against proposed regulation

The Wall Street Journal
By Andrew Tangel and Andy Pasztor
Updated September 22, 2018 5:25 p.m. ET

Congressional lawmakers have left a proposal to regulate airline “change fees” out of a bill authorizing the Federal Aviation Administration’s operations.

A version of the FAA bill released on Saturday doesn’t include a provision that would have given the Department of Transportation oversight of the fees airlines charge passengers to change their reservations, according to a summary of the legislation and to spokesmen for the House and Senate transportation committees.

An earlier draft version of the bill approved by a Senate committee had included the change-fee provision.

The latest version of the bill was negotiated by House and Senate lawmakers who aim to hold a vote in both chambers ahead of a Sept. 30 deadline to reauthorize the FAA’s operating authority.

Excluding the change-fee provision is a victory for U.S. airlines and their trade group, Airlines for America. U.S. airlines took in nearly $3 billion from change and cancellation fees last year, federal data show. They pushed hard for Congress not to regulate that revenue stream, arguing it would upend their business model.

The bill does include a provision directing the FAA to set minimums for leg room and the width and length of commercial airline seats.

The airline group said the FAA bill “will provide long-term certainty for the millions of passengers and countless businesses that rely on access to safe, affordable travel and shipping options every day.”

Sen. Edward J. Markey (D., Mass.), who had pushed for the change-fee provision, blamed airlines for its defeat. “Congress had the opportunity to return fairness to change and cancellation fees,” he said in a statement. “Instead, through an opaque negotiating process, the airlines have managed to kill this important consumer protection provision. No one should have to pay a $200 change fee on a ticket that costs nearly that much.”

The compromise legislation, which could reach the House floor as early as next week, also includes several provisions pushed by industry groups related to expanding uses of commercial drones and promoting a return of civil supersonic aircraft to the U.S.

Prodded by advocates of such planes, lawmakers called on the FAA to develop criteria authorizing certification of future models producing reduced sonic booms. To start with, prospective manufactures want the agency to establish noise standards during takeoffs and landings at conventional speeds. But eventually, companies and industry groups will seek approval for civilian supersonic flights over the U.S. that are now prohibited.

In addition, the legislation endorses accelerated and expanded operations of unmanned aircraft, flown for both commercial and governmental purposes. House and Senate members agreed, among other things, that the FAA should rely on consensus industry standards when approving certain drone designs. The bill also envisions that within a year, FAA leaders will spell out plans to broaden existing rules to accommodate regular flights of package-delivery drones. The agency has repeatedly missed similar legislative deadlines over the years, largely due to technical and legal challenges. FAA efforts to allow more widespread drone flights also continue to be impeded by security and law-enforcement concerns over hazards posed by rogue operators or terrorists. Until those issues are resolved, the FAA will remain stymied in implementing many of the goals highlighted in the bill.

However, in a big win for Amazon.com Inc. and many other companies pushing to deliver packages to consumers using relatively small, highly automated unmanned aerial systems, the bill specifically calls for consideration of drones weighing more than 55 pounds including cargo.

By late 2019, the FAA also will be required to provide congress a plan for implementing an air-traffic control network focused on drone operations. And lawmakers want reports from industry and government experts laying out finding proposals for regulating the fast-growing commercial drone industry.

In another closely watched portion of the bill, for the first time in more than two decades the legislation mandates longer rest periods for flight attendants between duty days.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Robinson R44 Raven, Workpress Aviation, OK-BAJ: Fatal accident occurred September 05, 2018 in Plzen, Czech Republic

NTSB Identification: CEN18WA376
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 05, 2018 in Domažlická 1059, Plzen - Skvrnany, Czech Republic
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration:
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On September 5, 2018, at 1533 Coordinated Universal Time, a Robinson R44, I-CCNI, impacted terrain while maneuvering at low altitude, Plzen-Skvmany, Czech Republic. The pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries.


The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Czech Republic government. Further information may be obtained from:


Air Accidents Investigation Institute (AAII)

Beranových 130
Prague, Czech Republic
19900
Phone: +420 266199231
Fax: +420 266199234
E-mail: info@uzpln.cz
Webpage: http://www.uzpln.cz/en/

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the Air Accidents Investigation Institute (AAII) of the Czech Republic.








Hasiči odvezli vrak vrtulníku z haly v průmyslové zóně v Plzni, který se zřítil ve středu odpoledne a zahynuli v něm čtyři lidé. Stroj vytáhli vraty, nejdřív museli zpevnit konstrukci objektu.

Kriminalisté spolu s pracovníky Ústavu pro odborné zjišťování příčin leteckých nehod  (ÚZPLN) jsou na místě a zjišťují veškeré okolnosti nehody. Vyslýchají svědky, vyhodnocují zajištěné stopy a jsou nařízené znalecké posudky,“ uvedla před devátou ráno policejní mluvčí Martina Korandová.


Doplnila, že jsou nařízeny soudní pitvy u všech čtyř lidí, kteří zemřeli. „Jedná se o dvaatřicetiletého muže a tři cizince. Těmi jsou pětačtyřicetiletá žena a dva muži ve věku 57 a 45 let,“ dodala Korandová.


Trosky vrtulníku byly částečně v konstrukci, jeho zadní část propadla a opřela se o zem v hale.


Připravujeme nejdříve pažení na zajištění stability budovy. Pak budeme odřezávat trámy v konstrukci střechy, aby bylo možné vrak vyzvednout a nedošlo k jeho poškození, aby ho mohli dál zkoumat odborníci na zjišťování příčin leteckých nehod,“ popsal ráno vyprošťovací akci mluvčí hasičů Petr Poncar.


Hasiči doufali, že se jim podaří stroj vyprostit a dostat ven vnitřkem haly vstupními vraty, která jsou dostatečně široká. To se jim také podařilo. Trosky stroje vyváželi na vysokozdvižném vozíku.


Hala, na kterou vrtulník spadl po 17. hodině, není velká. Na výšku má podle Poncara kolem pěti metrů. V době pádu vrtulníku v ní nebyli žádní lidé ani pracovní technologie. Objekt je opuštěný.


Inspektor z ÚZPLN a zkušený pilot dohlížejí na hasiče, kteří vrak vyprošťují. „Kontrolují, aby nebyl vrtulník při vyprošťování dále poškozen, například aby se z něj něco neulomilo, což by mohlo komplikovat vyšetřování,“ řekl pro ČTK ředitel ÚZPLN Pavel Štrůbl s tím, že do konce roku by chtěli určit příčinu nehody.


Hasiči vrak převezli do hangáru ÚZPLN, kde bude podroben zkoumání od motoru po trup, po všechny prvky. Inspektoři budou zjišťovat, zda nehodu zavinil technický stav stroje nebo chyba pilota. 


Podle svědků měl vrtulník potíže už ve vzduchu, kdy se podivně kymácel a poté se náhle zřítil.  


Záchranáři dva pasažéry oživovali. „Bohužel neúspěšně, lékařka musela konstatovat smrt. Další dva lidé utrpěli zranění neslučitelná se životem,“ uvedl mluvčí záchranné služby Martin Brejcha.


Zřícený vrtulník patřil firmě Workpress Aviation (WPA), která sídlí právě na Borských polích. Jednalo se o černý Robinson R44-Raven.


Podle zjištění MF DNES stroj pilotoval generální ředitel podniku WPA. K neštěstí se ale nikdo z firmy nechce vyjádřit. 



https://plzen.idnes.cz