Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Thefts tarnish airplane owner's dream


Alan Carberry 




CENTERVILLE, Ind. – The airplane parts strewn beside the Warm Glow factory don't look like much to some.

But Alan Carberry sees beauty. The beauty of the DC-3 as a shining whole. The beauty of the DC-3's history as an aviation staple. And the beauty of the DC-3 as it fits his dream.

That's why he struggles to understand why someone would break into the factory property and take metal parts for the airplane. But that's exactly what happened between 11:30 p.m. March 18 and 5 a.m. March 19, when a tank and pieces of the wings and tail were stolen.

"I never would have thought somebody would come and steal some parts," said Carberry, who's had the disassembled DC-3 for about five years. "It's just sad they would want parts just for scrap."

Ironically, Carberry bought the DC-3 that was built in 1939 and flown in World War II to save it from the scrap yard. And to fulfill a vision for the aviation buff, who was smitten with planes as a child.

Carberry's father, Walter, flew with the Army Air Corps during World War II, and he continued to receive aviation magazines when Carberry was a young boy in the 1950s.

"I enjoyed looking at the pictures," said Carberry, who also fondly remembers the family eating ice cream and watching planes land and take off at the local airport. "I've always loved airplanes. I think my dad leads me toward it because he always had magazines."

A young Carberry learned about Art Lacey and his Bomber gas station in Milwaukie, Oregon. In 1947, Lacey bought a B-17 Flying Fortress bomber and put it above his gas pumps.

"That always stuck with me," Carberry said. "I thought that would be so cool to do."

The dream took root in Carberry's imagination. Until recently, the plane above the pumps always was a B-17 bomber for Carberry, who years ago flew in a B-17 that was touring the Midwest.

Now, though, it's the DC-3 his friend pointed him toward five years ago on eBay; the one Carberry bought for $15,000, tore apart and hauled home from Allentown, Pa., in pieces over five weekends.

"It's not a B-17, but it's still World War II," said Carberry, who now has volumes of books about DC-3s. "I can't afford a B-17, but I thought I could do something with a DC-3."

Carberry has created his airport-inspired gas station in his mind. He sees airport runway lights leading vehicles along the driveways, which are painted with numbers like runways. He sees a convenience store looking like a hangar and filled with parts from airplanes. He sees a slanted canopy painted like a runway above his gas pumps, making the DC-3 look like it's coming in for a landing. He even sees a glider above the convenience store, with a tow rope connecting the glider to the DC-3.

The station would occupy the same Interstate 70 exit as Warm Glow and offer travelers one more reason to exit the interstate. However, "the dream may be shaboomed," Carberry said.

While the Carberrys — Alan and his wife, Jackie — commissioned a survey and report to see if the business could be profitable, the couple concentrated on Warm Glow's expansion first. Now, start-up costs exceeding $1 million and competition could keep the gas station from becoming a reality.

Carberry said land has been purchased for another gas station at the exit, meaning his would be the third in the area.

"I'm not 100 percent sure the idea of a gas station is killed," he said. "We have a dilemma: What exactly we're going to do with this thing."

He did explore donating the DC-3 to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. The museum, though, already has 11 DC-3s and declined his offer.

Turning the DC-3 into a museum piece still could happen. If he finds a museum that could use the DC-3 as a static display — returning it to flying condition would be cost prohibitive — he would donate it.

Carberry, though, just might display the plane off I-70, yet. It could be put back together and set out as an attraction. There's also a photo in one of his books that shows a DC-3 functioning as a very large weather vane at Whitehorse International Airport in Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada.

"That would be a possibility," he said.

Carberrys offer reward

Jackie and Alan Carberry are offering a reward for the return of DC-3 airplane parts stolen from the Warm Glow factory between 11:30 p.m. March 18 and 5 a.m. March 19. Anyone with information about the theft is asked to call (765) 855-5483.

In an advertisement of the reward, the Carberrys write, "Jackie and Alan Carberry own a WWII DC-3 plane that was used as a cargo plane during the war. In hopes to keep and restore this great piece of history, the plane has resided at the Warm Glow factory. It is with great disappointment that they have learned that someone has stolen pieces of this irreplaceable history."

Douglas DC-3

The DC-3, nicknamed the Gooney Bird, is a fixed-wing, propeller-driven airplane that was produced by the Douglas Air Company from 1935 until 1942. Military C-47 derivatives were built until the end of World War II in 1945.

The DC-3 revolutionized passenger air travel, said Alan Carberry, because its range and air speed made carrying passengers profitable.

During the war, C-47s served as troop and cargo transport planes, according to a fact sheet from National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. The planes also could tow gliders, drop paratroopers into enemy territory and evacuate sick or wounded personnel.

After the war, C-47s could be converted into DC-3s for use in carrying passengers. Some DC-3s continue in service, Carberry said.

Carberry said his DC-3 was manufactured in 1939 and served in World War II.

He found it for sale on eBay about five years ago. It was located in Allentown, Pa., after it was acquired to be restored and put into a museum. When backing for the museum fell through, the plane was offered on eBay. If it hadn't been sold, it would have been scrapped.

"I drove by it to see it, and it was beautiful," Carberry said. "I hated to see it go to a scrap yard."

Carberry bought it for $15,000 but was given just 30 days to transport the plane back to Centerville. On five weekends, he and friends dismantled the plane and hauled the pieces. To transport the fuselage, Carberry had to add 15 feet to his trailer and take the cap off the back of his pickup.

Bomber gas station

In 1947, Art Lacey created the inspiration for Alan Carberry's dream. That's when Lacey bought a surplus B-17 bomber and put it above the gas pumps at his gas station on South East McLoughlin Boulevard in Milwaukie, Ore.

Of course, it wasn't quite that easy.

According to a Feb. 18 article in the Statesman Journal in Salem, Ore., Lacey, spurred by a $5 bet he couldn't use a bomber as a canopy, bought a B-17 from a scrap yard. He took it for a test flight by himself although flying a B-17 was a two-person job. When he couldn't make the landing gear work, he crash-landed the plane, wrecking it and another B-17 on the runway.

The wrecked planes were written off as wind damage and Lacey chose another. This time he enlisted friends to help him fly it home.

Lacey's gas station eventually grew to 48 pumps, a restaurant and a small hotel. The gas pumps of the independent station closed in 1991.

The B-17 recently was taken from its post and is being restored to flying condition by the B-17 Alliance Group. The article says fewer than 15 B-17s remain able to fly.

Carberry said a B-17 in flying condition recently sold for more than $3 million.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.pal-item.com












SAREX: Navy, Coast Guard, Sentara conduct mock disaster training exercise



NORFOLK--It was a sight you just don't see every day. A Navy MH-53S Seahawk helicopter landing at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital, at the pad normally reserved for Nightingale.

It was all part of a "SAREX" - a search and rescue exercise conducted by the Navy, the Coast Guard and Sentara, with an objective of honing the skills of the air crew members, and improving communications between the various agencies.

The scenario in this case, was that there was a "victim" out in the Chesapeake Bay. It was drill participants' mission to go out and find him, and deliver him to the Norfolk General Emergency Room for trauma care.

In all, there were five helicopters involved, plus two E-2-C Hawkeye fixed wing aircraft.

"It's absolutely a fantastic opportunity, and it's not something we get to do a lot," said LT Kevin Chaney, aircraft commander for HSC-7. "This is the best hospital within several hundred miles of here, so it's nice to come here and work with them and land here."

And it's not just the military which benefits. So do the civilian first responders. "We have about 1,200 landings here at Norfolk General alone a year," said Nightingale Flight Nurse Denise Baylous. "And so this gives us a lot of opportunity to safely communicate back and forth with each other and safely land aircraft."

Story and video:  http://www.13newsnow.com

Inhofe advocates Pilots' Bill of Rights

Sen. James M. Inhofe



U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe this week promoted to the Senate the next steps needed for his Pilots' Bill of Rights legislation.

Inhofe is a member of the Senate General Aviation Caucus and certified flight instructor with more than 11,000 flight hours.

Inhofe and the cosponsors of Senate Bill 571 are working to simplify regulatory burdens on general aviation pilots while preserving the transparency of critical flight data, said Sen. John Thune, R-ND.

“I am expanding the original Pilot’s Bill of Rights to increase transparency for pilots and certificate holders so they have the information and resources to defend themselves against bureaucratic overreach and the inconsistent application of existing agency procedures,” Inhofe said.

The Pilot’s Bill of Rights of 2012 ensured that pilots receive fair and equitable treatment by the justice system, Inhofe said.

“The Pilot’s Bill of Rights 2 reforms FAA’s overly burdensome medical certification process by expanding an existing exemption for light sport pilots to include more qualified, trained pilots,” Inhofe said.

Expanding an exemption will not automatically decreases safety in the  bill, Inhofe said.

In 2004, FAA issued a medical exemption for pilots of light sport aircraft — these are planes that weigh less than 1,320 pounds and only have two seats, Inhofe said.

There are 9,500 of such planes in the U.S., Inhofe noted. In the 10 years since FAA issued this exemption, no light sport aircraft accidents has occurred because of medical deficiency, Inhofe said. Of the 46,976 aviation accidents that occurred from 2008 to 2012, only 99 had a medical cause as a factor, Inhofe continued.

“And of those 99, none would have been prevented by the current third class medical screening standards and the medical certification process,” he added. “Extending the medical exemption for light sport aircraft to include planes weighing up to 6,000 pounds with up to six total passengers, including the pilot, would add airman and aircraft to an existing FAA approved medical standard — without degrading or creating substandard safety.”

 A pilot would still have to meet current certification standards, according to the bill. All pilots must continue to pass the required practical tests and necessary check rides to fly their plane, Inhofe explained.

“This bill does create consistency for aviators across the country, where inconsistency and frustration are keenly felt,” Inhofe said.

The Pilot’s Bill of Rights 2 would extend due process rights in the original Pilot’s Bill of Rights to all FAA certificate holders, Inhofe said. Certificate holders’ rights to appeal a FAA decision would be protected through a new, merit-based trial in Federal Court, Inhofe said.

This legislation also expedites updates to the Notice to Airmen Improvement Program (NOTAM). Information is provided to pilots about airspace, runways, or flight conditions in order to avoid hazards, he said.

“My bill directs FAA to develop a rating system prioritizing NOTAMs by urgency and importance and incorporate prioritizing NOTAMs…” Inhofe said.

The FAA would be required to designate a sole source repository for NOTAMs. The FAA would certify the accuracy of this information, and it prevent enforcement action on a NOTAM for one not included in the database, Inhofe said.

Additionally, liability protection would be extended in the bill to aviation medical examiners, pilot examiners or designated air-worthiness representatives, according to the bill.

“This bill also includes a provision that essentially acts as a Good Samaritan Law for volunteer aviation pilots, protecting pilots from liability as long as they are following appropriate procedures,” Inhofe said.

This bill has strong bipartisan support and builds on the previous success of the Pilot’s Bill of Rights by focusing the new issues facing airman and the general aviation community, Inhofe said.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.edmondsun.com

Cessna 182Q Skylane, N735KF: Fatal accident occurred March 17, 2015 in El Paso, Texas

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA174 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 17, 2015 in El Paso, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/28/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N735KF
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was conducting a visual flight rules aerial observation flight and returning to his home base. Radar and weather data showed the airplane maneuvering in instrument flight rules conditions before radar contact was lost. Examination of the accident site indicated that the airplane impacted rocky, mountainous terrain in a slight left-wing-low attitude at high airspeed, consistent with controlled flight into terrain. It is likely that the mountainous terrain was obscured by clouds and low ceilings at the time of the accident, which prevented the pilot from seeing the terrain. Although the wreckage was significantly fragmented and damaged by fire, no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airframe or engine were noted that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to continue a visual flight rules flight into known instrument flight rules conditions, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT 

On March 17, 2015, about 1240 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane, N735KF, was destroyed after impacting mountainous terrain while maneuvering near El Paso, Texas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Brentco Aerial Patrols, Inc, Canton, Ohio. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation flight. The airplane departed from a private airstrip near Hobbs, New Mexico, at an unknown time, and was destined for the El Paso International Airport (ELP), El Paso, Texas.

According to company representatives, the airplane departed Snyder, Texas, approximately 0755, to perform a pipeline patrol aerial observation flight with a final destination of ELP. At 1056, the company dispatcher received a telephone call from the pilot who requested weather information for the southeast New Mexico and El Paso areas. The dispatcher informed the pilot that El Paso was reporting light rain. The pilot told the dispatcher he was going to depart, and "if he was going to make it, he had better get into the air."

Radar data showed the accident airplane about 30 miles northeast of ELP and traveling southwest at an altitude of approximately 6,000 feet mean sea level (msl). About 25 miles northeast of ELP at an altitude of 5,850 feet msl, the airplane was observed to make a left turn towards the south and then execute a right turn back toward the north. After maneuvering to the north for approximately 2 miles, the airplane made a left turn at an altitude of 6,150 feet msl toward the west and radar contact was lost. 

After company personnel determined the airplane had not arrived at ELP, a search ensued with local authorities. The airplane wreckage was located by local authorities in mountainous terrain near the last radar contact about 0900 on March 18, 2015.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 70, held a commercial pilot certificate, with airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument ratings. The pilot's most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued on February 4, 2015, with a time limitation of "Not valid for any class after 11/30/2015" and "Must have available glasses for near vision."

According to the company, the pilot had accumulated 13,274 total flight hours, and 4,800 hours in the accident airplane make and model. The pilot successfully completed a company flight review on November 7, 2014.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 1977 Cessna 182Q, serial number 18265479. The airplane was powered by a Continental O-470-U reciprocating engine and a McCauley controllable pitch propeller. The airplane was issued a standard airworthiness certificate on March 10, 1977.

According to the company, the airplane underwent its most recent annual inspection on December 2, 2014, at a total airframe time of 15,742 hours and a total engine time of 837 hours since major overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot did not receive an official weather briefing from Lockheed Martin Flight Service or any other official source. Prior to the flight, the pilot had a conversation about weather with the company dispatcher.

McGregor Range Base Camp (M63) was the closest official weather station to the accident site and had an automated weather observing system (AWOS) whose reports were not supplemented. M63 was located 11 miles west-northwest of the accident site at an elevation of 4,209 feet. 

M63 weather at 1230 was reported as wind from 010 degrees at 15 knots with gusts to 20 knots, 6 miles visibility, light rain, few clouds at 1,300 feet above ground level (agl), scattered clouds at 2,000 feet agl, a broken ceiling at 2,900 feet agl, broken skies at 3,700 feet agl, temperature of 13 degrees C, dew point temperature of 11 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury. 

M63 weather at 1256 was reported as wind from 010 degrees at 10 knots, 10 miles visibility, light rain, few clouds at 1,400 feet agl, a broken ceiling at 2,400 feet agl, broken skies at 2,900 feet agl, temperature of 13 degrees C, dew point temperature of 10 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury. 

El Paso International Airport (ELP) was located 4 miles northeast of El Paso, Texas, and had an automated surface observing system (ASOS), whose reports were supplemented by a human observer. ELP was located approximately 22 miles west-southwest of the accident site, at an elevation of 3,962 feet. 

ELP weather at 1151 was reported as wind from 140 degrees at 6 knots, 10 miles visibility, light rain, few clouds at 2,700 feet agl, broken ceiling at 4,000 feet agl, overcast skies at 5,500 feet agl, temperature of 16 degrees C, dew point temperature of 10 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury. Remarks: automated station with a precipitation discriminator, rain ended at 1114, rain began at 1147, sea level pressure 1015.8 hPa, occasional clouds topping mountains west through northwest, one-hourly precipitation of a trace, 6 hourly precipitation of 0.01 inches, temperature 16.1 degrees C, dew point temperature 10.0 degrees C, 6-hourly maximum temperature of 16.7 degrees C, 6-hourly minimum temperature of 15.6 degrees C, 3-hourly pressure increase of 0.3 hPa. 

ELP weather at 1251 reported the wind from 090 degrees at 12 knots, visibility 7 miles, light rain, few clouds at 2,700 feet agl, broken clouds at 3,000 feet agl, sky overcast at 3,800 feet agl, temperature 16 degrees C, dew point 12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury.

The observations from M63 and ELP indicated ceilings were likely between 6,000 and 8,000 feet msl around the time of the accident with light rain moving across the area and a gusty north to east surface wind. This was consistent with a cold front moving southward across the area at the accident time. In addition, the ELP observations indicated clouds topping and obscuring the mountainous terrain to the southwest through northwest of ELP. The mountains to the east of ELP were too far away to be included in the ELP observations, however, with clouds obscuring mountains and topping mountains to the west of ELP it was likely that the mountains and terrain near the accident site were also obscured due to clouds and precipitation at the accident time.

Airmen's Meteorological Information (AIRMETs) Sierra and Zulu were issued at 0845, with an update to AIRMET Sierra at 1215, and valid at the accident time for the accident site for below 15,000 feet msl. They forecasted mountains obscured by clouds and precipitation, ceiling below 1,000 feet agl with visibility below 3 miles in precipitation and mist, moderate icing between 12,000 feet and flight level 260, and moderate icing between 10,000 feet and flight level 210.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane wreckage was located in rocky, mountainous terrain at a measured elevation of about 6,195 feet msl. The airplane was fragmented and debris was scattered in a diameter of about 300 feet. The main wreckage consisted of the empennage, aft fuselage, left wing and engine. A postaccident fire consumed a majority of the fuselage, left and right wings, and empennage. Several small trees and vegetation displayed cut limbs in a pattern consistent with the airplane impacting in a slightly left wing low attitude.

The left wing, destroyed by thermal and impact damage, was separated from the fuselage. The flap and aileron were destroyed and remained partially attached to the wing. The right wing was separated from the fuselage and found fragmented and embedded within large rocks in the mountainous terrain. The flap and aileron were destroyed and remained partially attached to the wing.

The forward fuselage was fragmented and located within the debris field and displayed multiple areas of thermal damage. The cockpit and instrument panel were destroyed. The tachometer faceplate displayed a tachometer reading of 0711.0 hours, and the RPM indicating needle was captured at 2,400 RPM, which was at the end of the green arc and red line. The left and right cabin doors were separated and crushed with their respective locking pins engaged. One seat frame was located in the debris field and displayed thermal damage to the frame and seat cushion material. The three landing gear assemblies and tires were separated and located in the debris field.

The empennage remained attached to the aft fuselage. The left and right horizontal stabilizers were crushed and displayed thermal damage. The elevators remained attached to their respective horizontal stabilizers. The vertical stabilizer remained attached to the empennage and displayed minor crush damage. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer. 

Flight control continuity was partially established to all flight control surfaces. Several of the flight control system components were destroyed by thermal and impact damage. The flap position could not be determined due to thermal damage. 

The engine came to rest near the main wreckage. The number 1, 3, and 5 cylinders were separated from the engine. The number 6 cylinder head was separated from the remaining cylinder. The forward portion of the crankcase was fragmented. Both magnetos were separated from the engine and located within the debris field. The carburetor was separated from the engine, and the mixture, throttle, and fuel lines remained attached. The engine and its accessories displayed thermal and impact damage.

The propeller separated from the engine crankshaft at the propeller flange. The propeller flange was bent, twisted, and thermally damaged. The propeller hub was fragmented and portions of the hub were located within the debris field. Both propeller blades were separated from the hub. One propeller blade was bent, twisted, and the outboard 8 inches of the blade tip was missing. One propeller blade outboard section was located within the debris field. The inboard portion of the blade and blade hub were not located. The outboard portion of the propeller blade was bent, twisted, and contained leading edge gouges.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Medical Examiner of El Paso, Texas. The listed cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries as a result of a single airplane accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on the pilot. The tests were negative for all screened drugs and alcohol.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA174
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 17, 2015 in El Paso, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N735KF
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 17, 2015, about 1240 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane, N735KF, was destroyed after impacting mountainous terrain while maneuvering near El Paso, Texas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Brentco Aerial Patrols, Inc, Canton, Ohio. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation flight. The airplane departed from a private airstrip near Hobbs, New Mexico, and was destined for the El Paso International Airport (ELP), El Paso, Texas.

According to company representatives, the airplane departed Snyder, Texas, approximately 0855 central daylight time, to perform a pipeline patrol aerial observation flight with a final destination of ELP. At 1156 central daylight time, the company dispatcher received a telephone call from the pilot who requested weather information for the southeast New Mexico and El Paso areas. The dispatcher informed the pilot that El Paso was reporting light rain. The pilot told the dispatcher he was going to depart, and "if he was going to make it, he had better get into the air."

Preliminary radar data showed the accident airplane about 30 miles northeast of ELP and traveling southwest at an altitude of approximately 6,000 feet mean sea level. Approximately 25 miles northeast of ELP, the airplane was observed to make a left turn towards the south and then execute a right turn back toward the north. After heading north for approximately 2 miles, the airplane made a left turn toward the west and radar contact was lost. 

After company personnel determined the airplane had not arrived at ELP, a search ensued with local authorities. The airplane wreckage was located by local authorities in mountainous terrain near the last radar contact location approximately 0900 on March 18, 2015.

At 1251, the ELP automated surface observing system, located approximately 22 miles southwest of the accident site, reported the wind from 090 degrees at 12 knots, visibility 7 miles, light rain, few clouds at 2,700 feet, broken clouds at 3,000 feet, sky overcast at 3,800 feet, temperature 16 degrees C, dew point 12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury.

BRENTCO AERIAL PATROLS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N735KF


From 2009 War Eagles Museum newsletter: The Museum’s latest acquisition is a 1942 Stinson L-5 Sentinel, one of the most important observation aircraft of World War II and the Korean War. El Pasoan “Doc” Nelson (left) was its former owner and restorer.  Waldo Cavender (r.) delivered it to the Museum from El Paso International Airport.



EL PASO, Texas -

A source in the aviation community and law enforcement tells ABC-7 the name of the pilot killed in a plane crash March 18 near Hueco Tanks is Waldo Emerson Cavender of El Paso.

Cavender was piloting the Cessna 182 that is registered to Brentco Aerial Patrols in Durango, Colorado.

The cause of the crash has not been determined. 

The NTSB and FAA are investigating the crash.

Story and photo:  http://www.kvia.com
NTSB Identification: CEN15FA174
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 17, 2015 in El Paso, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N735KF
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 17, 2015, about 1240 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane, N735KF, was destroyed after impacting mountainous terrain while maneuvering near El Paso, Texas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Brentco Aerial Patrols, Inc, Canton, Ohio. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and a company visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation flight. The airplane departed from a private airstrip near Hobbs, New Mexico, and was destined for the El Paso International Airport (ELP), El Paso, Texas.

According to company representatives, the airplane departed Snyder, Texas, approximately 0855 central daylight time, to perform a pipeline patrol aerial observation flight with a final destination of ELP. At 1156 central daylight time, the company dispatcher received a telephone call from the pilot who requested weather information for the southeast New Mexico and El Paso areas. The dispatcher informed the pilot that El Paso was reporting light rain. The pilot told the dispatcher he was going to depart, and "if he was going to make it, he had better get into the air."

Preliminary radar data showed the accident airplane about 30 miles northeast of ELP and traveling southwest at an altitude of approximately 6,000 feet mean sea level. Approximately 25 miles northeast of ELP, the airplane was observed to make a left turn towards the south and then execute a right turn back toward the north. After heading north for approximately 2 miles, the airplane made a left turn toward the west and radar contact was lost. 

After company personnel determined the airplane had not arrived at ELP, a search ensued with local authorities. The airplane wreckage was located by local authorities in mountainous terrain near the last radar contact location approximately 0900 on March 18, 2015.

At 1251, the ELP automated surface observing system, located approximately 22 miles southwest of the accident site, reported the wind from 090 degrees at 12 knots, visibility 7 miles, light rain, few clouds at 2,700 feet, broken clouds at 3,000 feet, sky overcast at 3,800 feet, temperature 16 degrees C, dew point 12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury.

BRENTCO AERIAL PATROLS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N735KF

EL PASO, Texas - The National Transportation Safety Board released a report about the deadly plane crash that happened near Hueco Tanks State Park on March 17. 

NTSB officials said the pilot was the sole occupant on board the Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane. 

The pilot died from his injuries after crashing into the Hueco Mountains.

The plane left Hobbs, New Mexico, and was headed for the El Paso International Airport when it crashed on a mountaintop 25 to 30 miles east of El Paso near Hueco Tanks State Park.

The preliminary report on the crash indicates that the plane is registered to and operated by Brentco Aerial Patrols Inc., a company based out of Canton, Ohio.

According to company representatives, the airplane departed Snyder, Texas, around 8:55 a.m.Central Daylight Time, to perform a pipeline patrol aerial observation flight and with a final destination of El Paso. 

Around noon, the company dispatcher received a telephone call from the pilot who requested weather information for the southeast New Mexico and El Paso areas. 

The dispatcher informed the pilot that El Paso was reporting light rain. The pilot told the dispatcher he was going to depart, saying if he was going to make it, he had better get into the air.

The NTSB said 25 miles northeast of El Paso, the plane made several turns before radar contact was lost.

The company reported the plane missing when the airplane had not arrived at the El Paso International Airport.

The airplane wreckage was located by local authorities in mountainous terrain near the last radar contact location approximately on March 18 at 9 a.m.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.kfoxtv.com



From 2009 War Eagles Museum newsletter: The Museum’s latest acquisition is a 1942 Stinson L-5 Sentinel, one of the most important observation aircraft of World War II and the Korean War. El Pasoan “Doc” Nelson (left) was its former owner and restorer.  Waldo Cavender (r.) delivered it to the Museum from El Paso International Airport.



EL PASO, Texas -

A source in the aviation community and law enforcement tells ABC-7 the name of the pilot killed in a plane crash March 18 near Hueco Tanks is Waldo Emerson Cavender of El Paso.

Cavender was piloting the Cessna 182 that is registered to Brentco Aerial Patrols in Durango, Colorado.

Story and photo:  http://www.kvia.com

Court grants plea deal extension to ‘Money Jet’ pilot

Embattled Guyanese pilot, Khamraj Lall, who was arrested after more than US$600,000 was discovered on his private jet during a stopover last November in Puerto Rico, has been granted another month to finalize a plea deal.

According to applications filed in Puerto Rico courts, Lall, who has a limousine service and Kaylee’s Gas Station at Coverden, East Bank Demerara, will have until April 21 to update the judge.

According to court documents filed by Lall’s defense lawyer, Rafael Castro Lang, this week, plea negotiations are still ongoing.

“The defendant is presently obtaining the evidence to establish the legitimate source of the cash seized by the government which has become an issue during plea negotiations. The government has requested a counter offer from defendant which will be made as soon as it notifies the evidence requested by the government.”

Lall, earlier this year, opted out of trial and signaled his intentions for a plea deal.

Lall’s case has generated much attention in Guyana, Puerto Rico and mainland US, because of the amount of cash that he was found with.

In February, the US Government filed applications in the District Court of Puerto Rico to seize the jet which was reportedly used in the illegal transport of the cash.

Assistant United States Attorney, Maritza Gonzalez, said that the forfeiture of the plane is in keeping with the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure.

The plane in question is a 1988 fixed wing, multi-engine Israel aircraft bearing FAA registration N822QL.

It is one of the aircraft that Lall had been using to fly to Guyana. Also to be seized are the related aircraft maintenance log books and other records.

Lall was arrested by airport authorities in Puerto Rico in November after his jet made a stop to refuel, on its way to Guyana.

Stashed in different parts of the plane was more than US$600,000 that prosecutors say was not declared by Lall. He reportedly took responsibility for the cash at the time of arrest. On board were his father and another person.

The pilot had flown President Donald Ramotar on occasions on the private jet. His company, Exec Jet Club, has a private hangar at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport. There were swirling questions over the operations of the hangar and its accessibility.

Government had denied that it granted the company any special privileges and said that the operations were in keeping with regulations. Exec Jet has reportedly also closed its Gainesville, Florida Office because of the troubles.

In addition to charges related to bulk cash smuggling, Lall is in deep trouble with the US authorities who by law can seize properties that are linked to illegal transactions.

As Puerto Rico is a territory of the US, the country’s tax body, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), had stepped into the matter, going after 14 bank accounts, a Lexus car, and two planes, including the jet that Lall used on that fateful flight.

Two weeks after he was arrested in Puerto Rico, US tax authorities, on December 8, filed a civil case in New Jersey. They were able to seize US$442,743.59 from accounts controlled by Lall and his companies. This is in addition to the US$600,000 that was found on the jet in Puerto Rico, and which is subject to seizure too.

Investigators, apparently working on information, started tracking Lall’s deposits to accounts held at Wells Fargo, Citibank and JP Morgan and found startling evidence that between April 2011 and September 2014, the pilot and family members deposited an astounding US$6,324,411.41 (G$1.3B). There were over a thousand transactions.

The IRS believes that a scheme was devised where Lall and others deliberately deposited less than US$10,000 each time in attempts not to trigger suspicion by banks which are mandated to report transactions above that amount. Lall’s wife, Nadinee and mother Joyce, were named in the transactions.

Investigators tracking the money said that Lall and his family had properties in New Jersey, Florida and New York.

The US Government said that it is not yet requesting seizures of properties that the Lalls control in three states but intends to do so, as proceeds of the deposits were used to renovate or pay mortgages.

According to the US Government, when domestic financial institutions, including banks and money service businesses, are involved in a transaction for the payment, receipt, or transfer of United States currency in an amount greater than $10,000, the institution is required to file a currency transaction report (“CTR”) for each cash transaction, such as, by way of example, a deposit, withdrawal, exchange of currency, or other payment or transfer by, through, or to a financial institution.

“Many individuals involved in illegal activities, such as tax evasion, money laundering, and narcotics trafficking, are aware of the reporting requirements and take active steps to cause financial institutions to fail to file CTRs in order to avoid detection of the movement of large amounts of cash.”

The court documents said that Lall and his family and others “structured” their payments deposit below US$10,000.

Lall, who was ordered to relinquish his pilot’s licences, was said to own and operate Exec Jet Club (“EJC”) and Exec Jet Sales (“EJS”), which were operated from a hanger located at Gainesville Regional Airport, Florida.

Joyce Lall, his mother, was said to have controlled Kaylee’s Investments (“Kaylees”) and Shannon Investments (“Shannon”), which appear to be real estate and investment holding companies. These structured funds were used, in part, to purchase and improve the Lalls’ properties, aircraft, and Lexus.

Story and photos:  http://www.kaieteurnewsonline.com

Pilot ready to provide source of $620K


Khamraj Lall, the pilot caught with $620k in his private jet while flying through Puerto Rico en route to Guyana, says he is willing to provide evidence of where the funds came from as part of a plea deal.

According to court filings from Monday asking for another 30 days to finalize plea negotiations, his lawyer Rafael Castro Lang states:

“The parties are still engaged in plea negotiations. Defendant is presently obtaining the evidence to establish the legitimate source of the cash seized by the government which has become an issue during plea negotiations. The government has requested a counter offer from defendant which will be made as soon as it notifies the evidence requested by the government.

2- Defendant is not going to trial in the present case.

3- Defendant requests that the Court grant an extension of 30 days to finalize
plea negotiations.

WHEREFORE it is respectfully requested from this Hon. Court that it extend the
time period to finalize plea negotiations another 30 days.”

Lall is also embroiled in a civil matter where he stands to lose his jet and other assets based on money laundering charges based on activity over several years, whereby he made multiple deposits amounting to US$6.4M. The source of those funds are yet to be established. Lall owns a gas station in Guyana as well as a private jet service with a private hangar at CJIA.

Story and photo:  http://gtmosquito.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N822QL


 
Kemraj Lall, CEO, Head of Operations of Exec Jet Club





Colyaer Freedom S100, N787Z: Accident occurred March 02, 2015 in Boynton Beach, Florida

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA141
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, March 02, 2015 in Boynton Beach, FL
Aircraft: COLYAER SL FREEDOM, registration: N787Z
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 2, 2015, about 1252 eastern standard time, a Colyaer Freedom S100, N787Z, was destroyed after it impacted terrain and a postcrash fire ensued near Boynton Beach, Florida. The airline transport pilot and student pilot were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, that departed from Palm Beach County Park Airport (LNA), West Palm Beach, Florida at 1218.

Preliminary radar data indicated that the airplane had been operating over a wildlife refuge area for approximately 25 minutes prior to the accident. According to witnesses who were fishing about a half mile from the accident site, they also observed the airplane flying over the wildlife refuge, and then heard the airplane engine make a sound that resembled a cylinder misfire, similar to what they had heard their boat motor do. The engine then "revved up" almost instantaneously, which was followed by a loud boom about thirty seconds later. The witnesses then rushed to the accident site, and observed smoke coming from the wreckage. About a minute later a postcrash fire ensued.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane had come to rest upright in a swamp on a southeasterly heading about 40 feet from a berm. All major components of the airplane were accounted for. The wings had remained attached to the fuselage and exhibited some fire damage. Both wing flaps and a portion of the left wing aileron were destroyed by fire. A portion of the right wing tip, that measured about 70 inches in length, was impact separated. The fuselage, with the exception of the cockpit hull, and the empennage, were completely destroyed by fire. The elevator had separated from the tail section and was located several feet behind the main wreckage. All three composite propeller blades were fracture separated from the propeller hub. A section of propeller blade that measured about 15 inches in length was co-located with the main wreckage. The other two propeller blades were not recovered. Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed that the airplane was not rotating around the vertical axis at impact.

Postaccident examination of the airframe was conducted After recovery from the accident site. Continuity of the elevator flex control cable was confirmed from the elevator to the elevator flight controls. Both left and right aileron flex cables were attached to the aileron and displayed continuity to the center bell crank. The wing flap control system was not recovered. The airplane was equipped with three fuel tanks; a left wing tank, a right wing tank, and a fuselage tank. Both wing tanks were destroyed by fire. The fuselage tank remained intact; however, the fuel lines were burned and the fuel vent was impact damaged. The gascolator filter was free of debris and the gascolator bowl was void of contamination. The right and left occupants' rudder pedals moved synchronously, which actuated the center bell crank assembly and push rods. There was approximately six inches of push rod, which extended from the rudder into the vertical stabilizer. The rudder control tubes that connected to the push rod at the vertical stabilizer were not recovered. The throttle and choke controls were confirmed from the throttle/choke quadrant to the carburetors.

The pilot held a FAA airline transport pilot license with a rating for airplane multi-engine land. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued on February 4, 2015. At that time, he reported 19,400 hours of total flight experience of; of which, about 149 hours were in the airplane make and model.

A handheld Garmin 496 global positioning system receiver was recovered from the cockpit and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC, for download.

http://registry.faa.gov/N787Z



A preliminary report is out on a deadly plane crash that happened west of Boynton Beach on March 2. 

The National Transportation Safety Board has confirmed the small aircraft caught fire right after the plane went down in the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge.

The impact destroyed the Colyaer Freedom S100, the NTSB says.

The airline transport pilot and student pilot were killed.

The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office identified the victims as David Whitney, 64, of  Lake Worth and William Mahn, 66, of Jupiter.

Federal investigators also confirmed the pilot didn't file a flight plan.

Nearby fishermen say they heard the plane engine make an odd sound shortly before it crashed. They said the sound  resembled a cylinder misfire, similar to what they had heard their boat motor do.

The NTSB's final report will be issued at a later date.

Story, video and photo:  http://www.wptv.com

Murfreesboro Municipal Airport (KMBT) runway project starts in April

Murfreesboro Airport manager Chad Gehrk




MURFREESBORO – Pilots and MTSU aviation majors should be able to land at an extended runway completed by around Aug. 18, Murfreesboro Airport Manager Chad Gehrke said.

“We are going to start this April,” Gehrke told the Murfreesboro City Council last week. “Our goal is to get this (finished) by the time MTSU gets into the (fall) semester.”

The seven-member council responded to Gehrke’s recommendation by hiring LoJac Enterprises to extend the Murfreesboro Airport runway by 852 feet for a new total of 4,750.

“We will also be taking up the old asphalt on the existing runway and repaving that, as well,” Gehrke said during a Monday phone interview.

LoJac had the lowest bid at $4.5 million to beat out two other competing firms: HMA Contractors, which bid nearly $5.5 million; and Baron Construction, which bid about $5.6 million.

About 20 days after the construction is completed, LoJac will come back and stripe the runway, Gehrke said.

The airport, which is behind the new Walmart on Memorial, will be closed for three weeks during the 135-day project while final paving takes place, Gehrke told the council.

Gehrke said he and his staff will send out notices to pilots and other airports about the city airport being closed. Two large letter “X’s” will be placed on the grounds to remind approaching pilots not to land there, the airport manager added.

“We will be working at night for about 35 days,” said Gehrke, who noted that LoJac has done a lot of airport work.

During part of the project, the airport will use a temporary runway that stretches 3,300 feet, but the existing tenants should be able to continue, including Middle Tennessee State University’s largest aircraft, a King Air, Gehrke said.

In addition to the longer runway, the airport will replace its lighting with LED bulbs.

“The efficiency of the LED will help us tremendously,” Gehrke said. “It should stand out a little bit brighter.”

In addition to the council hiring LoJac, the elected officials approved an amended grant the airport pursued with the assistance of consulting firm ATKINS and the Tennessee Aeronautics Division to fund the runway extension and lighting project for a new total of nearly $5.1 million.

The original grant was more than $3.1 million, but the amendment adds more than $1.9 million to the total.

The total grant includes more than $4.4 million from the state, $328,000 from the federal government and $295,090 from airport debt and interest payments covered by airport revenues from fuel sales and leases.

The amended grant will address the following improvements:

•the addition of concrete drainage ditches to meet Federal Aviation Administration standards for managing storm water run-off rates

•the addition of LED lights and all wiring installed in a conduit, to cut utility bills and make maintenance easier

•more work on three of the four taxiway runway connectors, bringing them up to the latest required federal airport design standards and construction of Taxiway “E” to serve newest tenant, Air Methods, and for future airfield development as outlined in the Airport Layout Plan.

Story and photo:  http://www.dnj.com

If flight training keeps you awake, call the Navy

LETTER: Stop grumbling among yourselves and complain to the Navy at 855-628-9247.

I am writing concerning the aircraft noise in the Wallops area. Many people are aware of and affected by the flight training going on at Wallops Flight Facility. The planes fly day and night, hours on end, until midnight — and on one occasion until 2:15 a.m.

They currently use the east/west runway. The use of this runway affects hundreds of working men and women who have to get up and go to work each day, and also hundreds of school age children who would perform better in class if they had a good night sleep.

What most people don’t know is that there is a north/south runway. If the Navy used this runway the noise effect would be much less than the current arrangement.

But an environmental impact study was conducted prior to this program and birds and geese won out over humans.

Through a number of channels, I have obtained the phone number which you can call to voice your complaints. This number is by no means a secret, it’s posted on Facebook.

If you or your loved ones have been affected by aircraft noise at Wallops Flight Facility, call the Navy at 855-628-9247 and voice your complaint.

Stop grumbling among yourselves and call the number.

William Wessells

Wallops Island

Opinion: http://www.delmarvanow.com/opinion

Runway project: Federal Aviation Administration priority but ‘not a sure thing’ • Idaho County Airport (KGIC), Grangeville, Idaho

Riedesel project engineer John Watson (right) talks with meeting participant Bob Fogarty at last Tuesday’s March 17 public information event at the Idaho County Commission meeting room.



GRANGEVILLE – Final design plans on the proposed $8 million Idaho County Airport runway reconstruction project await Federal Aviation Administration approval, likely within the week. And then there’s just securing the funding.

“The FAA says this is a top priority, but it’s not a sure thing,” said John Watson, project engineer with Riedesel Engineering. The FAA normally doesn’t provide such funding to airports of this size, and Idaho County will be competing with similar projects across the nation for funding. As well, funding will depend on appropriations made available by Congress.

“They are supportive of the project, and we feel it will be funded,” Watson said.

Federal funds will pay for 90 percent of the work, with the remainder to be met by the county and state. The project is estimated to take approximately four months, tentatively starting July 6 and running through October, during which the runway will be closed to fixed-wing aircraft. Helicopters would continue to use the airport; and public agencies are relocating equipment to other fields, such as the Forest Service that plans to disburse firefighting aircraft to Cottonwood and Lewiston.

A federal funding award is expected in June or July; however, if this is made much later, the project would be moved forward to 2016 due to the seasonably dependent construction window.

Watson, along with Idaho County Airport manager Mike Cook and Idaho County Commission Chair Jim Chmelik, spoke to a light attendance of five attendees at an information meeting last Tuesday, March 17, at the Idaho County Courthouse. As proposed, the project calls for reconstructing the 5,100-foot-long runway north and east of its present location to provide sufficient spacing, as per FAA regulations, from the taxiway as well as adjacent Day Road. An estimated 13,000 feet of drainage pipe will also be installed to address runway breakup issues due to freeze-thaw cycles in the underlying clay.

“It’s definitely been an issue with low-slung air attack aircraft,” said Cook, referring to loose asphalt chunks along the airport runway. Employees patrol the runway to clear debris, especially during the busy summer season, and they apply cement patches. But it’s reached a point, he continued, where the runway has approximately 180 cracks: 100 of these go clear across the runway with some being four to six inches wide.

Watson said old asphalt will be pulverized and placed on the runway shoulders to provide for easier maintenance and improve light visibility.

Among the other proposed changes include installation of new medium-intensity lighting, and also a reduction of connectors from the taxiway to runway. On this last, those connectors will be offset and so not provide a direct shot from the apron, according to Watson, due to FAA concerns for aircraft safety.

“We know it won’t be popular,” he said, “but it is what it is.”

Cook added plans are for follow-up taxiway work in 2016 that, if approved by the FAA, would be handled in phases to keep traffic open for fixed-wing aircraft.

Meeting attendee Gary Lazenby of Harpster asked, with the amount of back country air traffic in the region, would the airport be considering a designated grass strip for traffic. Watson said such a strip would not be recognized by FAA due to insufficient spacing and an inadequate amount of available land to designate for such a strip.

Another question regarding whether there would be discretion in accepting project bids or if officials were locked to accept the lowest offer? Watson said if the low bid met project specifications they would be hard-pressed not to select it, unless there were a justifiable reason to do so.

“This is the only asset the county has, and it does make the county money,” said Commissioner Chmelik, who complimented cook and former Commissioner James Rockwell on their vision to revitalize the facility. Private enterprise efforts, such as expansion by Anderson Aeromotive, could be complemented with other aviation-related manufacturing businesses locating to the facility. He hopes to see improvements to the airport within the next 10 years to generate revenue as well as jobs for Grangeville and the county.

Jurisdictions to see impacts of airport project

A side note to the airport project, Watson said a portable hot mix asphalt plant would be brought into the area for the duration that public jurisdictions such as the City of Grangeville and Grangeville Highway District, and Idaho Forest Group could utilize as well. Interviewed last week, representatives for these entities commented they would be doing some minor projects that would welcome having close plant access.

“We’re always glad to have a hot plant local,” said Jeff McFrederick, Grangeville public works director. “It saves us about 30 percent in costs because we don’t have to haul it,” and this will help his department prepare for an upcoming chip seal project.

For the Grangeville Highway District, it will utilize the plant for some asphalt maintenance and repair projects, but the uncertainty of federal SRS (Secure Rural Schools) funding means it will not be planning on needed work, such as renovation of Mountain View Road.

“We’ve been trying to redo that road for the last couple of years,” said district foreman Matt Holman. “We’d be looking at that now if SRS funding hadn’t fallen through,” as the district doesn’t have the $200,000 “on the low end” to do the work.

For the district, which is responsible for approximately 120 miles of road, its perspective on the airport project is how work to improve the runway may negatively impact its roadways.

“If the airport project goes through, our biggest concern is how will are our roads going to hold up?” Holman said. With his estimates, around 80,000 tons of material will be hauled in for the project, a significant amount of heavy truck traffic going across district roads. The district’s concern it will be monitoring is, “if our roads start to fail, how much is it going to cost us to rebuild our roads?”

Story and photo:  http://www.idahocountyfreepress.com