Thursday, June 8, 2017

Cirrus SR20, N320PG, Juliet Delta Mike Aviation LLC: Incident occurred June 07, 2017 at DuPage Airport (KDPA), West Chicago, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Plaines, Illinois

Juliet Delta Mike Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N320PG

Aircraft on landing, struck a runway light.

Date: 07-JUN-17
Time: 21:30:00Z
Regis#: N320PG
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DUPAGE
State: ILLINOIS

Piper PA-28-181, N924PA, Bird Acquisition LLC: Accident occurred June 07, 2017 at Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), incident occurred February 24, 2017 in Chandler, incident occurred August 08, 2016 at Phoenix-Deer Valley Airport (KDVL), Maricopa County, Arizona

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA328
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 07, 2017 in Phoenix, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-181, registration: N924PA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Bird Acquisition LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N924PA

Aircraft on takeoff, struck runway light.

Date: 07-JUN-17
Time: 18:40:00Z
Regis#: N924PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Aircraft damaged an approach light during landing.

Date: 24-FEB-17
Time: 16:40:00Z
Regis#: N924PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA-28A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CHANDLER
State: ARIZONA

N963WW Piper PA28 aircraft and N924PA Piper PA28 aircraft collided in the runup area. Both aircraft sustained minor damage.

Date: 08-AUG-16
Time: 18:08:00Z
Regis#: N924PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: PHOENIX
State: Arizona

Westwind Aviation Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N963WW

Date: 08-AUG-16
Time:  18:08:00Z
Regis#:  N963WW
Aircraft Make:  PIPER
Aircraft Model:  PA28R
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None 
Damage:  Minor
Flight Phase:  UNKNOWN (UNK)
City:  PHOENIX
State:  Arizona

Boeing Chief Says Overseas Plants Won’t Hit U.S. Jobs: CEO Muilenburg says the aerospace company is building a new facility with a Chinese partner

Boeing’s Dennis Muilenburg, shown in March, said that overseas facilities such as the new plant it is building with a Chinese partner near Shanghai aren’t directly harming U.S. jobs.


The Wall Street Journal
By Doug Cameron
June 8, 2017 5:30 a.m. ET

Boeing Co. is moving some work completing aircraft to China and other overseas markets but doesn’t expect this to affect its U.S. manufacturing workforce, said the chief executive of the world’s largest aerospace company.

Dennis Muilenburg is trying to reshape the company by boosting the profitability of its core commercial jetliner business and increasing defense exports while trimming costs with job cuts and more automation.

“My goal over time is to add manufacturing jobs, but these will be different kinds of jobs,” Mr. Muilenburg said in a recent interview.

Mr. Muilenburg and other manufacturing CEOs are under pressure to help deliver on President Donald Trump’s pledge to boost employment in the sector in return for tax and regulatory changes. However, potential changes to trade policies sit uneasily with some big exporters such as Boeing.

Boeing has been cutting its U.S. workforce through a mix of buyouts and involuntary layoffs, with the aim of revamping its factories through increased automation and use of new technologies it says can lower the cost of jet and defense systems’ production. Boeing’s employee roll fell to around 145,000 at the end of May, down 30,000 from 2012, though it hired 11,000 new workers last year.

But Mr. Muilenburg said that overseas facilities such as the new plant it is building with a Chinese partner near Shanghai aren’t directly harming U.S. jobs. He said the effort is an essential part of doing business in a China market that is expected to generate sales of 6,800 jets over the next 20 years.

Employees at the Chinese plant will paint jetliners destined for the Chinese market and equip them with seats and other interior fittings. Boeing is building the plant in partnership with state-owned Comac, which is spearheading China’s own efforts to develop a more advanced aerospace sector, recently flying for the first time its C919 jetliner, a competitor to the Chicago-based company’s own best-selling 737.

Comac also supplies Boeing with parts for its jets but has ambitions to produce a range of its own, recently inking a deal with a Russian aerospace company to develop a new widebody plane, the most profitable part of the industry.

Mr. Muilenburg said: “We know as we’re investing there we’re also creating a competitor.”



Other aerospace executives such as United Technologies Corp. CEO Greg Hayes have flagged the potential impact of China’s aerospace ambitions. “The Chinese will build aircraft someday, they will build engines someday, they will build aircraft systems someday and our goal is to continue to innovate to stay ahead of the curve such that we can capture those markets, and not them,” Mr. Hayes said at a recent investor conference.

Boeing is the largest U.S. exporter by dollar value, and while fast-growing customers such as China increasingly want to trade orders for more work in their own countries, Mr. Muilenburg said barters to secure cheaper labor costs wasn’t part of Boeing’s strategy.

“We’re not in the business of taking large operations in the U.S. and moving them overseas,” he said. Mr. Muilenburg credited the new administration with revising its own thinking on how global industry supply chains interact, recognizing how domestic jobs are tied to work carried out overseas.

Boeing recently secured a potential $50 billion in defense and commercial sales from Saudi Arabia. The Saudi sales include a pact to complete some Boeing Apache attack helicopters in the kingdom, and the company is also interested in assembling fighter jets in India to secure a deal that could involve more than 100 planes.

The Saudi agreements were sealed during the recent state visit by the president that included delegations led by Mr. Muilenburg and the CEOs of Lockheed Martin Corp. and Raytheon Co.

Boeing and Lockheed both supported the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal dumped by the Trump administration, but have retained close ties with the White House.

Mr. Muilenburg said the company has a “seat at the table” when it comes to trade policy, tax and regulatory reforms and the defense budget.

The executive, who enters his third year in charge as CEO in July, has been outspoken in calling the U.S. business climate uncompetitive, even after securing a record backlog of 5,700 jetliners and plans to boost monthly output of its workhorse 737 planes to 57 by the end of the decade from 42 at present. That would boost Boeing’s annual deliveries to more than 900 by the end of the decade from an estimated 750 this year.

New orders for Boeing and rival Airbus SE have been scarce this year, but while the U.S. company is considering an all-new plane that would sit between the 737 and the 787 Dreamliner that was plagued by delays, Mr. Muilenburg said the biggest benefits may come from changing the way it makes planes, rather than designing them.

“The opportunity ahead of us in terms of transforming how we design and build how we manufacture is even greater than some of the product innovation that we’re going to bring to the table,” he said.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.wsj.com

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Cessna 180D, N6479X: Accident occurred May 03, 2016 at Naknek Airport (5NK), Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA024 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 03, 2016 in Naknek, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/26/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N6479X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot stated that, during the landing rollout in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, the left wheel axle fractured and separated from the airplane with the wheel attached. The left landing gear leg then dug into the runway surface, the airplane made a sudden left turn, and the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer struck the runway. 
An examination of the fractured left axle revealed features consistent with a bending overstress fracture. High magnification optical examination of the fracture also revealed several small fatigue cracks within the crack origin area. Although several fatigue initiation sites were present along the fracture origin area, none of them were large enough to have led to the failure or to have significantly lowered the ultimate strength of the axle enough for a bending overstress failure to occur under normal loading conditions. Therefore, it is likely the landing gear axle failed as a result of bending overstress due to a hard landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The overstress fracture and subsequent separation of the left main landing gear axle due to a hard landing, which resulted in the pilot’s inability to maintain directional control of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N6479X

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA024 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 03, 2016 in Naknek, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N6479X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 3, 2016, about 1230 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped Cessna 180 airplane, N6479X, sustained substantial damage following a separation of the left main wheel and axle from the landing gear strut during the landing rollout at the Naknek airport, Naknek, Alaska. The commercial pilot and sole occupant were not injured. The airplane was registered to Skol-Alaska, LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed and activated.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on May 3, 2016, the pilot stated that during the landing roll out, the left wheel axle fractured and separated from the airplane with the wheel attached. As the left landing gear leg dug into the runway surface, the airplane made a sudden left turn, and the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer struck the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer. 

The fractured wheel axle was sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, D.C. for further examination. The fracture surface showed several areas of post-fracture damage. The undamaged portions of the fracture surface were optically, matte grey and highly textured consistent with a bending overstress fracture. Radial lines visible on the fracture indicated a wide area initiation at the outer diameter surface near the inboard end of the axle. High magnification optical examination of the fracture also revealed several small fatigue cracks within the crack origin area.

A Materials Laboratory Factual Report is located in the public docket for this accident.

The closest weather reporting facility is King Salmon Airport, King Salmon, Alaska, about 12 miles east of the accident site. At 1154, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the King Salmon Airport was reporting in part: wind from 080 degrees at 4 knots; sky condition, scattered at 2,700 feet AGL, broken at 5,000 feet AGL, broken at 7,500 feet AGL, broken at 20,000 AGL; visibility, 10 statute miles; temperature 52° F; dewpoint 36° F; barometric pressure 29.70 inHG.

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA024

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 03, 2016 in Naknek, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N6479X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 3, 2016, about 1230 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped Cessna 180 airplane, N6479X, sustained substantial damage following a separation of the left main wheel and axle from the landing gear strut during the landing rollout at the Naknek Airport, Naknek, Alaska. The commercial pilot and sole occupant was not injured. The airplane was registered to Skol-Alaska, LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed and activated.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on May 3, 2016, the pilot stated that during the landing roll out, the left wheel axle fractured and separated from the airplane with the wheel attached. As the left landing gear leg dug into the runway surface, the airplane made a sudden left turn, and the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer struck the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and left horizontal stabilizer. 

The closest weather reporting facility is King Salmon Airport, King Salmon, Alaska, about 12 miles east of the accident site. At 1154, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the King Salmon Airport was reporting in part: wind from 080 degrees at 4 knots; sky condition scattered at 2,700 feet agl, broken at 5,000 feet agl, broken at 7,500 feet agl, broken at 20,000 agl; visibility 10 statute miles; temperature 52 degrees F; dew point 36 degrees F; barometric pressure 29.70 inHg.

Homeland Security Developing New Airport Security Standards: Foreign airports that meet them wouldn’t be hit by electronics ban, official says

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly testifies before a Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee hearing in Washington, D.C. Tuesday. 



The Wall Street Journal 
By Susan Carey
June 7, 2017 7:54 p.m. ET


An expanded ban of carry-on laptops on international flights could extend to flights headed to the U.S. from 71 airports around the world, a top security official told lawmakers on Wednesday.

But Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly also said that the agency is trying to develop security standards that airports could meet to avoid the ban on laptops, tablets and other electronic devices.

The secretary, who spoke at a House Homeland Security Committee hearing, said foreign terrorists “are trying every day to knock down one of our airplanes coming over here from—right now—Europe and the Middle East.” He called the threat “very serious “and “constant.”

The latest comments on the proposal under consideration by the Trump administration come after the agency previously hinted a ban may be expanded to all inbound flights to the U.S. from Europe. Recently, Mr. Kelly suggested the ban could affect all international flights in and out of the U.S.

Two months ago, the U.S. and the U.K. imposed a ban on some flights coming from the Middle East and North Africa. The U.S. rule affected 10 airports. Mr. Kelly didn’t say where the additional 71 airports are located.

Mr. Kelly said he was behind the decision to install the initial ban, and said intelligence reports indicated that those airports were most at risk and airport security personnel didn’t have sufficient ability to guard against explosives in electronic devices.

“It was a very, very real threat, a very sophisticated threat…and not just one” emanating from the Middle East to take out an airplane in flight, Mr. Kelly said.

On Wednesday, Mr. Kelly said a complication in a broader ban is a fire risk from lithium batteries that would have to be stored in the cargo holds of aircraft. He said there was disagreement among experts about the severity of that risk, and his agency is consulting with the Transportation Department on the issue.

He said DHS has consulted with officials in the European Union. The department is sending an official to a meeting in Malta next week to discuss the possible new security standards. The message is: “These are the new minimum security things you need to do at your airports so you can fly to the U.S. direct,” he said.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.wsj.com

United Parcel Service (UPS) flight 357, Boeing 767-300 and Cessna C750 Citation, N900QS: Incident occurred April 12, 2015 at Miami International Airport (KMIA), Miami-Dade County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this incident.

OPS15IA017A Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: OPS15IA017A
Incident occurred Sunday, April 12, 2015 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: BOEING 767 34AF, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

OPS15IA017B  Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: OPS15IA017B
Incident occurred Sunday, April 12, 2015 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 750, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On April 12, 2015 at 0821, a loss of required air traffic control separation occurred when United Parcel Service (UPS) flight 357, a Boeing 767-300, overflew N900QS, a Cessna C750 Citation holding in position on runway 8L at Miami International Airport (MIA), Miami, Florida. The conflict was detected when the tower's airport surface detection equipment, model X (ASDE-X) alarmed. The local controller (LC) instructed UPS357 to go around and turn 10 degrees left. UPS357 was at an altitude of 200 feet and approximately ½ mile from the runway 8L threshold when the crew was told to go-around. UPS357 overflew N900QS by 475 feet. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

What was helicopter doing at Gettysburg National Military Park?

Officials at Gettysburg National Military Park are still trying to determine what a low-flying helicopter was doing over Devil's Den Sunday morning.

Katie Lawhon, park spokeswoman, said they're asking the public to share any information they have with park law enforcement officers.

The park received reports Sunday about a helicopter flying low over Devil's Den around 10:15 a.m. possibly dropping materials.

With an estimated 100,000 followers on Facebook, Lawhon said that's where they reached out for information from the public.

There have been prior reports of low-flying helicopters at the park Lawhon said, but none recently.

The incident was reported to the FAA for investigation, and Lawhon said the public has responded with tips.

While some are wondering if the helicopter was dropping a deceased person's ashes, Lawhon said she has no information to support that hypotheses.

Lawhon said she's never heard of anyone asking for permission to spread remains by air.

"I do not think it's something we would permit," she said.

"Human remains may only be scattered at the park by permit, and only in certain areas," Lawhon said, which are a prescribed distance from monuments. "It is a broad area," she added.

It is not an uncommon occurrence, she added.

While there are no new interment sites available at the national cemetery at Gettysburg, Lawhon said there are occasional burials at graves of predeceased spouses.

Here's the post you can see on the park's Facebook page:

On Sunday June 4th, at approximately 10:15 AM, an incident was reported to park law enforcement where a helicopter was observed operating at low altitudes and possibly dropping materials while in flight in the vicinity of Devil's Den. Anyone having knowledge this incident is asked to please contact NPS Law Enforcement Ranger Dan Holler by email at dan_holler@nps.gov or by phone at 717-338-4498

Original article can be found here: http://www.pennlive.com

Ravn Alaska commits to highest international safety standards

Corvus Airlines, Inc. d/b/a Ravn Alaska announced today its plans to begin the process of obtaining the International Air Transport Association’s Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) certification. IOSA commits Ravn Alaska to being held to the highest standards of safety in the airline industry. Once achieved, Ravn Alaska will be the first and only Alaska-based airline to hold the certification.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) represents 265 airlines across the globe, 83 percent of total air traffic. Its mission is to represent, lead and serve the airline industry and drive a safe, secure and profitable air transportation industry.

“We carry more than a million passengers and 41 million pounds of cargo each year and every passenger trusts us to get them safely to where they need to be,” said Ravn Alaska’s CEO, Bob Hajdukovich. “At Ravn Alaska, safety is our highest priority; we’re constantly making improvements to our safety procedures at every stage of our operation.”

IOSA is an internationally recognized standard that assesses an airline’s operational management and control systems. IOSA-certified airlines are held to the most stringent rules and practices for aviation safety. There are 34 other airlines in the United States that are IOSA certified and registering for IOSA certification is a non-mandated choice for carriers. Once Ravn Alaska is certified, it will be included in the IOSA registry. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.akbizmag.com




Ravn Alaska could be the first Alaska-based airline to be certified under international safety standards.

Bruce Joseph is Ravn Alaska’s Executive Vice President of Safety, Security, and Compliance. He says the airline has begun the process of becoming certified with the International Air Transport Association’s Operational Safety Audit (I-OSA):

“One of the things that is noteworthy about the I-OSA standard is that it is the gold standard worldwide. It is worldwide best practices and operation. It’s many, many years of history and cycles and repetition by some pretty major hitters around the world: British Airways, CafĂ© Pacific, those kind of operations. And what it does is, it brings the benefit of their experience from worldwide best practices to us.”

If Ravn Alaska is successfully I-OSA certified, then they will be the first Alaska-based airline to have that status. Joseph says Ravn and other Alaska planes need these specific safety requirements to reduce the number of future crashes:

“The decision was made before a couple of those accidents that just helped shed some light on the need to enhance safety all around. The interesting statistic that goes with it that I’ve heard is, although only a quarter of 1% of the U.S. population lives in the State of Alaska, 20% of aviation accidents occur here. That’s somewhat of a skewed statistic, because it doesn’t take into consideration that there’s probably 50% more aviation in Alaska than there is in every other state in the lower 48.”

Joseph believes other Alaska-based airlines haven’t gone through the International certification yet because I-OSA imposes “rigorous” standards on their operations.

“It’s every aspect of the operation, from flight maintenance, cabin flight attendants, how we handle airplanes on the ground, how we ship cargo, how we handle the luggage that our passengers check, how we fuel the airplane, how we de-ice the plane. It is a top-to-bottom, very rigorous standard.”

For Ravn Alaska passengers, Joseph says these standards and audits will make for a more consistently operated flight from any Ravn terminal, including Ted Stevens International Airport and the Ravn terminal in Nome.

It is expected that the IOSA certification could be a year-long process for Ravn, and Joseph says the airline took its first steps towards this international safety status three weeks ago.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.knom.org

Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport (KPKB) Manager Jeff McDougle to retire: Authority approves 2017-18 budget

Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Manager Jeff McDougle presents the 2017-18 fiscal year budget to the Wood County Airport Authority during its meeting Tuesday. The budget was approved as presented. Earlier in the meeting, McDougle announced his plans to retire this fall. 



WILLIAMSTOWN — Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Manager Jeff McDougle announced his impending retirement at Tuesday’s Wood County Airport Authority meeting, during which the 2017-18 budget was approved.

The budget includes $5,000 to pay the incoming manager during September to shadow McDougle and learn the ropes before McDougle steps down in October after four years on the job.

“If there’s trouble finding a replacement, I’m here. I’m not going anywhere,” he said.

Authority President Bill Richardson, reappointed to the group by the county commission Monday, thanked McDougle for his service.

“You’ve done a great job here, and we appreciate everything you’ve done,” Richardson said.

McDougle was retired when he and his wife returned to the area 10 years ago. With his experience in aviation, he wound up serving on both the Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Authority, the airport’s marketing arm, and the Wood County authority, which oversees day-to-day operations.

In the fall of 2013, he was hired as manager, succeeding Terry Moore, who now serves on the Wood County Airport Authority.

Moore said perhaps McDougle’s most notable accomplishment was paying off the $283,000 debt the airport had when he took over.

“That was such an albatross, and it no longer exists,” Moore said.

McDougle said he feels good knowing his successor won’t be dealing with the same issue.

Moore said the authority should begin accepting resumes immediately, as well as formally advertise the position by next week. Richardson suggested a deadline to receive resumes of 45 days after the job is advertised.

“That gives you to the end of July,” Moore said. “Then you go through your process in August and hopefully have someone in place” by September.

The lack of debt gives the airport the ability to replace its annual contribution from the county, which was eliminated this year as the commission struggled to balance its budget in the face of rising regional jail bills. The current year’s contribution was $50,000 and before that it was $100,000, so McDougle suggested using $100,000 in airport funds to help offset an estimated $177,000 in one-time projects this year, more than half of which is expected to go toward repairs to the roof of Hangar 5.

Multiple private aircraft are stored in that hangar. The repairs could allow the authority to consider raising the rates on the space, McDougle said.

Some authority members were initially hesitant to approve using so much money from what McDougle described as the airport’s rainy day fund, which has about $585,000 in it.

“So what do we do next year with that?” Moore said.

McDougle said the money is intended to address the one-time expenditures that wouldn’t be repeated in the next year’s budget. Richardson asked what other one-time expenditures are coming up, and McDougle said some are known and some are not. However, he said $500,000 is a good number to have in the fund.

Payroll and benefits are projected to rise by a little over $75,000, due in large part to the airport taking over operations at its restaurant, which employs a manager and multiple part-time workers, for total personnel expenses of $50,888.

McDougle included in the budget a 50-cents-an-hour wage for hourly, full-time employees, bringing their average rate of pay to $13.54 an hour. With benefits, that represents an increase of $15,182 per year.

Members also discussed whether a new car for the manager was needed. McDougle has been using his own vehicle and recommended the authority advise his replacement to expect the same. However, he noted that’s something they will have to consider as they try to attract a new manager.

“You’re also going to have to consider the salary,” he said.

McDougle’s annual salary is $55,000. He did not change that in the budget, leaving any adjustment up to the authority in the future.

The budget projects income of $1,219,291 and expenses of $1,211,621, both up about 7 percent from the current year. Some of that is due to money carried over for items, like the Hangar 5 roof, that were not addressed this year.

The budget does not include any revenue from a proposed leasing of the former National Guard facility, an updated proposal for which could be considered at its July 11 meeting.

“So if that comes through, that’s a little icing,” Richardson said.

The authority approved the budget 4-0, with member John Pfalzgraf absent.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.newsandsentinel.com

Low-cost airlines shake up market for long haul flights



Low-cost, long-haul air travel has taken off across the Atlantic, shaking a club of major airlines meeting in Mexico this week and forcing established flag carriers to set up budget subsidiaries or lower fares.

Transatlantic routes are among the industry's most popular and profitable, and budget carriers are trying to grab a slice of that business by boosting capacity on them by 68 percent this summer, according to data from air travel intelligence company OAG.

A looming fare war has gained fresh momentum from lightweight new planes with fresh, appealing interiors that help to keep costs down.

Norwegian Air Shuttle and Icelandic rival Wow have grabbed headlines with fares as low as $69 and $55 this summer, although Wow's flights involve a stop in Reykjavik.

Legacy carriers are not idly standing by, and executives at the International Air Transport Association meeting in Cancun, Mexico, said in interviews they were confident their plans to offer low-cost long-haul flights would succeed.

"Disrupters such as Norwegian Air Shuttle and AirAsia X  have shaken up the airline market and forced scheduled operators to rethink their transatlantic strategies," Euromonitor travel project manager Nadejda Popova said.

Lufthansa's Eurowings budget carrier is in its second year of long-haul flying, while Air France is planning to launch a lower-cost long haul brand this fall in a project dubbed Boost.

"It confirms our decision that others are following," Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr said, adding that the German carrier would not have invested in Eurowings without the potential for profit.

International Airlines Group, the holding company for British Airways, Iberia, Aer Lingus and Vueling, launched low-cost long-haul brand Level on Thursday with surprisingly strong ticket sales.

IAG CEO Willie Walsh said at the launch that Level would fly five planes next summer and expand to other European cities.

Level's hub is in Barcelona, where Norwegian will also launch U.S. flights this summer with two A330s.

British Airways is putting more seats on its 777 planes, moving to 10 abreast in economy.

"BA's seat cost will be lower than Norwegian's by this time next year," Malaysia Airlines CEO Peter Bellew predicted.

U.S. carriers, stung by previous efforts to set up low-cost units in the 1990s, have introduced new, no-frills fare classes that let passengers pay for extras while booking online.




PROFIT DOUBTS AND LAKER LEGACY

The 68 percent increase in low-cost transatlantic capacity equates to a 5 percent market share, up from 3 percent last year.

Aviation consultant John Strickland said he doubted whether low-cost long-haul can be profitable, especially on some less popular destinations.

He pointed out that even Michael O'Leary, CEO of the highly profitable European low-cost carrier Ryanair has held back because he said he could not get planes at the right price.

"On the North Atlantic you have volume markets where it can work. Asia can work, but the extent to which the model can be delivered at levels of sustainable profitability is far from clear," Strickland said.

Air France-KLM CEO Jean-Marc Janaillac said low-cost carriers would have a hard time on transatlantic routes unless they also offer an attractive business travel service.

"It's not just about the seats. It's whether you have the right frequencies, the air miles, the connections with other destinations," Janaillac said.

In September 1977, Freddie Laker challenged legacy carriers by offering cut-price Skytrain flights between London's Gatwick Airport and New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport. But it went bust in 1982 after established rivals cut fares and forced it out of the market.

Norwegian is pressing on anyway, shifting away from short-haul routes to focus on long-haul. It is deploying narrow body 737 Max planes on transatlantic routes and has converted some Airbus orders to larger A321neo planes that can fly longer routes.

In homage to Laker and in a pointed signal to established rivals, his portrait will adorn the tail fin of Norwegian's new 737 Max planes taking off this summer on transatlantic routes.

It is also in talks with Ryanair over the Irish carrier feeding its own short-haul customers to Norwegian's long-haul flights, which would help fill planes.

Younger travellers especially find the new budget carriers appealing.

Qubilah Huddleston, a 26-year-old graduate student from Baltimore, Maryland, in January flew Norwegian Air roundtrip from Boston to London for about $300.

"The first time I flew to Europe, I flew Delta, and I think I paid like $1,000," Huddleston said. "And I got way better service on Norwegian." 

Original article can be found here: http://www.reuters.com

Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. model PC-12/47E airplanes

This document is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on 06/08/2017 and available online at https://federalregister.gov/d/2017-11411, and on FDsys.gov

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2017-0194; Directorate Identifier 2017-CE-006-AD; Amendment 39-18915; AD 2017-11-16]
RIN 2120-AA64

Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD. Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT).

ACTION:Final rule.

SUMMARY:We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD. Model PC-12/47E airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product.The MCAI describes the unsafe condition a san error within the flight management system caused by installing Primus APEX software Build 10 or 10.9, which could cause deviation from the correctly calculated barometric vertical navigation nominal glide path. We are issuing this AD to require actions to address the unsafe condition on these products.

Read more here:  https://s3.amazonaws.com/pdf

Boeing studies 'mild to wild' design for pivotal mid-market jet

CANCUN, Mexico, June 7 (Reuters) - Boeing has looked at options "from mild to wild" for the design of a proposed mid-market jet, a senior executive said, hinting at a breakthrough that industry sources say will create building blocks for future models.

Marketing Vice President Randy Tinseth said Boeing would leapfrog reported plans by Airbus to update its hot-selling A321neo, as Boeing eyes a gap between narrow-body jets and long-haul aircraft for a potential new mid-market airplane.

"We have looked at the mild and we have looked at the wild and I can tell you we know that if you are going to address that market, you need a new airplane," Tinseth told Reuters after a two-day meeting of airline leaders in Mexico.

Industry sources have said the mid-market development is pivotal for Boeing since it will spawn the industrial jigsaw, systems and cockpits likely to be used for the next plane after that, a three-aircraft replacement of Boeing's 737 cash cow.

Getting the "production system" right now would partially allow Boeing to develop the next jet, which is expected to revolve around a model carrying 180 passengers, as an industrial spin-off of the mid-market one, albeit with major differences.

This would result in significant cost savings and avoid repeating a patchwork of different production architectures.

Two further derivatives could extend that post-737 jet family to 160-210 seats, based on current market forecasts.

Boeing has not yet talked about its plans beyond the mid-market plane, which is expected to enter service by 2025.

Boeing officials declined comment on the long-term options or specific details of the mid-market project, which one leasing company has dubbed "797".

GOODBYE STEAM ENGINE

For the mid-market jet, industry sources have said Boeing is settling on a family of two wide-body aircraft.

These would effectively combine a twin-aisle cabin sitting on top of the reduced belly space of a single-aisle jet.

The aim is to reduce wind resistance or drag and therefore operating costs.

However, it involves a risky gamble that airlines will not need to carry much paid cargo on the routes for which the airplane is designed, delegates at the airlines meeting in Cancun said.

The two mid-market models, designed to carry about 220-260 passengers over 3,500 to 5,000 nautical miles (6,400-9,260 km), will also have a wing resembling the distinctive stiletto design of the 787 Dreamliner but with significant internal differences.

Seen from the front, the outline of traditional metal airplane fuselages is usually closer to a true circle.

That allows pressurised air inside the cabin to push out uniformly in all directions, easing loads and removing the need for heavy strengthening materials.

That well-tested concept is as old as the steam engine.

Carbon composites allow manufacturers to make complex pieces in one shape and are well suited to the more elliptical design that Boeing has in mind for the new mid-market fuselage.

However, composites are more expensive to produce.

Reuters reported last month that the new aircraft could be built using cheaper and faster new production techniques without costly pressurised ovens, or autoclaves.

That technology was used to weave the carbon wings of Russia's new MS-21 jet, which first flew last month.

Airbus this week played down a project called A321neo-plus-plus in response to the Boeing mid-market jet, first reported by Reuters, and said it was always reviewing options.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.businessinsider.com

Cessna 177 Cardinal, N302DB: Minor hail damage to wings, control surfaces and right-hand side of rudder/vertical stabilizer




































































AIRCRAFT:   1968 Cessna 177 Cardinal N302DB

ENGINE - M&M, S/N:  Lycoming O-320-E2D S/N L-21812-27A

PROPELLER – M&M, S/N: McCauley Ic172/TM7650 Serial# E16832

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information): 3998.30 TT and 602.65 SMOH

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Hail damage while aircraft was parked outside.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Minor hail damage to wings, control surfaces and RH side of rudder/vertical stabilizer

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:       Private Grass Strip in Scottsburg, IN     

REMARKS: B/K KLX 135, KN 53 NAV, Narco MK12D NAV/COMM, GTX 320A Transponder- Seats come with the aircraft and can be reinstalled upon request.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N302DB.htm