Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Beech M35 Bonanza, N339Z: Accident occurred August 29, 2017 near Lake Havasu City Municipal Airport (KHII), Mohave County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N339Z

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA190
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 29, 2017 in Lake Havasu City, AZ
Aircraft: BEECH M35, registration: N339Z
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 29, 2017, about 0639 mountain standard time, a Beechcraft M35, N339Z, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Lake Havasu City Airport (HII), Lake Havasu City, Arizona. The private pilot/owner received minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

According to the pilot, he based the airplane in a hangar at Hemet-Ryan Airport (HMT) Hemet, California, and he makes the trip between HMT and HII regularly. The airplane was equipped with six fuel tanks (two each main, auxiliary, and tip). The pilot did not recall his exact departure fuel from HMT, but he conducted the takeoff and climbout, as he always did, on the left main tank. Once at his cruise altitude of 7,500', he switched to the auxiliary tanks, and later, to the right main tank. While in cruise, he also turned on the two pumps to transfer fuel out of the tip tanks. He began his letdown for HII about 30 miles out, and when he had the airport in sight, as was his habit, he switched the fuel selector to the left main tank for the landing. The engine stopped producing power but continued to windmill. The pilot selected the landing gear down, advanced the mixture and propeller controls, and verified that the ignition switch was set to the 'BOTH' position. The engine continued to windmill, but did not start.

The pilot determined that he would not make the runway, and selected an open desert area as his landing location. He switched to the right main fuel tank, but there was no change in the engine; it continued to windmill only. A short time later, the pilot switched back to the left main tank, again to no avail. While on short final to his selected off-airport site, the pilot recognized that the airplane would strike a "gully" that was approximately perpendicular to his direction of travel; he intentionally pulled up/back to overfly the gully, with the knowledge that the airplane would likely stall as a result. The airplane overflew the gully, and came down hard on the nose landing gear. The nose landing gear collapsed, but the airplane slid to an upright stop. The pilot shut down the airplane and exited on his own. First responders arrived on scene shortly thereafter, and the airplane was recovered to a secure facility later that day. The recovery personnel reported that none of the fuel tanks were breached, and that the airplane had about 43 gallons of fuel on board, all of which was contained in the two main tanks. The airplane was retained for detailed examination at a later date.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot reported that he had about 400 hours total flight experience, including about 125 hours in the accident airplane make and model.

FAA information indicated that the airplane was manufactured in 1960, and was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-470 series engine. The pilot purchased the airplane in September 2016. According to the pilot, the most recent annual inspection was completed in July 2017.

The 0656 automated weather observation from Needles Airport (EED), Needles California, located about 18 miles northwest of HII, included calm winds, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 10,000 ft, temperature 35 degrees C, dew point 8 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.85 inches of mercury.




One person was injured in a plane crash north of Lake Havasu City Tuesday morning.

Lake Havasu City emergency dispatchers began receiving calls from concerned residents at about 6:40 a.m. Tuesday, in reference to an aircraft in distress. The remains of that aircraft rested in a rocky field near Chenoweth Drive when first responders arrived.

A California resident was making his approach toward Lake Havasu City Municipal Airport when his plane lost altitude and made a crash-landing on the relatively flat expanse of rough desert near the intersection of Chenoweth Drive and State Route 95.

The 1960 Beech M35 aircraft is a total loss, according to Lake Havasu City Police Sgt. Tom Gray, and the cause of the crash is still unknown. The plane’s single occupant safely exited the aircraft, and was taken to Havasu Regional Medical Center for treatment of minor injuries, Gray said.

The police department contacted the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, whose agents were as of Tuesday morning en route to investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.havasunews.com

Grumman American AA-1B, N8866L: Fatal accident occurred August 29, 2017 near Portland Municipal Airport (1M5), Sumner County, Tennessee

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee
Lycoming; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8866L

Location: Portland, TN
Accident Number: ERA17FA299
Date & Time: 08/29/2017, 1920 CDT
Registration: N8866L
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AA1
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 29, 2017, about 1920 central daylight time, a Grumman AA-1B, N8866L, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain while approaching Portland Municipal Airport (1M5), Portland, Tennessee. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight. The flight originated from 1M5 about 1831.

A student pilot, who was the pilot's grandson, flew the airplane 2 days before the accident flight. The student pilot stated that he completely fueled the airplane that day and then flew to Gallatin, Tennessee, to pick up his flight instructor for training. They flew for about 1.4 hours that day. The student pilot stated that the pilot did not purchase fuel before his accident flight, and no one else flew the airplane between the two flights.

Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane as it flew "low" shortly before the accident. They generally described that after it contacted the treetops it impacted the ground in a nose-down attitude.

A Garmin 196 GPS was recovered from the wreckage and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for data download. Review of the data revealed that the airplane departed 1M5, flew south, and circled the city of Gallatin, Tennessee, before returning to 1M5. The last recorded position was about 0.5 miles south of the threshold of runway 1. According to the data, the duration of the accident flight was 0.83 hour.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate issued September 23, 2015, limited by a requirement to have available glasses for near vision. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 450 total hours of flight experience. The pilot's logbook was not recovered.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate on October 20, 1976. According to the FAA type certificate data sheet for the Grumman AA-1B, the airplane was originally equipped with a 108-horsepower Lycoming O-235-C2C engine driving a two-bladed McCauley 1A105 SCM 7157 propeller. The engine had been replaced with a 150-horsepower Lycoming O-320-A2B engine driving a two-bladed Sensenich 74DM6-0-60 propeller.

According to FAA registration records, the pilot purchased the airplane on September 2, 2014.

According to the airplane's maintenance logbooks, the last annual inspection was completed on November 11, 2016. At that time, the airframe had accumulated a total time of 1,744.5 hours; the engine total time was 2,722.5 hours with 522.5 hours since overhaul. At the time of the accident, the recorded tachometer time was 1,786.4 hours.

The airframe maintenance logbook available for review was labeled "Book #2 Feb. 1999." The first page in this logbook indicated that the airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-320-A2B engine. It is unknown when the O-235-C2C engine was removed and the O-320-A2B engine installed. An updated pilot operating handbook or operating handbook supplement that would have provided fuel consumption figures for the higher horsepower engine was not located.

A review of the Grumman American AA-1B Owner's Manual revealed that the airplane held 22 gallons of useable fuel. When equipped with the original O-235-L2C engine, the airplane consumed 5.3 gallons of fuel per hour at 2,500 ft and 64% cruise power, and the fuel endurance at this altitude and power setting was 3.9 hours. The Lycoming Operations Manual for the O-320-series engine stated that the engine consumed 10 gallons of fuel per hour at 75% rated power settings and 8.8 gallons per hour at 65% rated power settings.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1953, the recorded weather at Bowling Green-Warren County Regional Airport (BWG), located 23 miles north of the accident site, included wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, and scattered clouds at 4,600 ft.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was about 2,500 ft from the threshold of runway 1 and 200 ft to the left of the runway centerline. The debris path was about 200 ft long from initial impact with 60-ft-tall trees to the main wreckage on a heading of 060° magnetic. A ground scar consistent with the engine and propeller was observed about 85 ft from the initial tree strike. The airplane came to rest upright on the landing gear on a heading of 240° magnetic. Flight control continuity was established to all flight controls.

The right wing separated and came to rest beside the main wreckage. The right fuel tank was crushed, and the fuel cap was missing. The right fuel tank appeared to be breached; however, there was no fuel odor or browning of vegetation. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage. The flap and aileron remained attached to the wing and were intact. The fuel tank was intact and not breeched. There was no fuel in the left tank. The fuel drain line was opened, and no fuel was present in the lines. The fuel selector valve was in the left tank detent. The electric boost pump filter was removed, and less than 1 teaspoon of fuel was captured. The mixture and throttle controls were full forward.

The fuselage and cockpit were substantially damaged. The canopy was shattered except for the sliding rails mounted on the fuselage. The seat belts were intact, and the pilot's seat belts were still connected. The passenger's seat belts were not connected, and there were no tears or stretch marks in the belt webbing.

The engine remained attached the fuselage. The engine was removed and placed on a lift for examination and partial disassembly. The top spark plugs were removed, and the engine was rotated by hand. Thumb compression was achieved on all cylinders. Continuity was established between the crankshaft to the rear gears and to the valvetrain. The cylinders were examined using a borescope, and no anomalies were noted. The propeller remained attached to the engine, however the propeller flange was fractured. One propeller blade was bent aft, and the spinner dome was crushed and fragmented. Neither of the propeller blades exhibited leading edge gouging or chordwise scratching.

The examination of the wreckage did not reveal evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Medical Examiner, Nashville, Tennessee, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The report listed the cause of death as multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. Citalopram was detected in urine and blood (0.411 µg/ml); N-Desmethylcitalopram was detected in urine and blood (0.083 µg/ml); and Verapamil and norverapamil were detected in the urine and blood.

Citalopram is an antidepressant medication also marketed with the name Celexa; N-Desmethylcitalopram is a metabolite of citalopram. Although not considered impairing by itself, the use of citalopram by pilots requires a special issuance medical certificate because the underlying depression can cause cognitive impairments. The pilot did not report the use of citalopram to the FAA at the time of his last medical examination. Verapamil is a prescription blood pressure medication that is not considered impairing. Norverapamil is a metabolite of verapamil. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/23/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 450 hours (Total, all aircraft), 250 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: GRUMMAN
Registration: N8866L
Model/Series: AA1 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1976
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: AA1B0666
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/11/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1561 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 42 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1786.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBWG, 537 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0053 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 6°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Portland, TN (1M5)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Portland, TN (1M5)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1831 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: PORTLAND MUNI (1M5)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 817 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 01
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal

Latitude, Longitude: 36.584722, -86.477500

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA299
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 29, 2017 in Portland, TN
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AA1, registration: N8866L
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 29, 2017 about 1957 central daylight time, a Grumman AA-1B, N8866L, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain while on approach to the Portland Municipal Airport (1M5), Portland, Tennessee. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Lebanon Municipal Airport (M54), Lebanon, Tennessee about 1940. The airplane was owned and operated by the private pilot as a personal flight in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Several witnesses stated they saw the airplane on approach coming in low, contact some tree tops and impact the ground.

The debris path was approximately 200 ft long from initial tree impact to the main wreckage on a heading of 060° magnetic. The accident site was about 2,500 ft from the runway threshold and 200 ft to the left of centerline. The airplane contacted tree tops about 60 ft above the ground. It then traveled approximately 225 ft, and impacted terrain. The right wing separated and came to rest beside the main wreckage. A ground scar consistent with the engine and propeller was observed about 85 ft from the initial tree strike. The airplane cartwheeled and came to rest upright on the landing gear, on a heading of 240° magnetic. Flight control continuity was established to all flight controls.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued September 23, 2015. At the time of the medical examination the pilot reported 450 total hours of flight experience.

According to the aircraft log book, the last annual inspection was performed on November 11, 2016. At that time, the airframe had accumulated a total time of 1744.5 hours, and the engine total time was 2722.5 hours, with 522.5 hours since overhaul. The airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate on October 20, 1976. The airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-320-A2B, 150 horsepower engine and driving a two-bladed Sensenich propeller. At the time of the accident, the recorded tachometer time was 1786.4.

The airplane was retained for further investigation. 

Harold "Ray" McKissack 


Harold "Ray" McKissack, age 67, of Hendersonville, passed away Aug. 29, 2017.

Mr. McKissack was preceded in death by his parents, William and Lola Godsey McKissack; brother, Billy McKissack.

He is survived by his wife, Elaine Pace McKissack; daughters, Angie (Brent) Cotten and Amanda (Kevin) Swinger; sister, Clara (Charles) Tidwell; grandchildren, Morgan Cotten, Anna Cotten, Ike Swinger, Zane Swinger and Chaz Swinger; great-granddaughter, Ava Grace Cotten; many members of the Pace Family along with numerous nieces and nephews.

Ray was born on June 12, 1950 in Winston County, Alabama. He met the love of his life at church in the Spring of 1965 and later married her on November 23, 1967. They had two daughters, Amanda and Angie. He loved his family and they adored him.

In addition to his family, Ray loved the Lord and his church. He was proud to be a Christian and loved sharing his faith with others. He was a member of First Baptist Church in Hendersonville (The Mike Brown Class).

He lived life to the fullest with a passion for playing guitars, flying airplanes and watching Alabama football. He was an avid guitar player and received his first guitar as a gift from his Grandpa Godsey at the age of 8. He loved gospel music and could often be found picking and singing with friends and family. His flying career began in his early 30's. He has been in the air ever since. He especially loved flying with his grandkids, nephew and airport buddies. In the Fall if he wasn't picking or flying he could be found watching the game with Elaine who traditionally wore her "Bama Jamas" for good luck.

Funeral Services were held on Sunday, Sept. 3rd at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Hendersonville, TN, with Dr. Bruce Chesser officiating. Interment was at Hendersonville Memory Gardens.

Visitation with the family began at the funeral home on Saturday, Sept. 2 from 4 to 7 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 3 from 1 p.m. until service time at the First Baptist Church.

Pallbearers were Kevin Swinger, Brent Cotten, Ike Swinger, Zane Swinger, Chaz Swinger, Kevin Tidwell, Brian Tidwell and Brian Harrell. Honorary Pallbearers were friends at Portland Municipal Airport along with The Mike Brown Sunday School Class at First Baptist Church in Hendersonville.

The family requests in lieu of flowers that memorial donations be made to First Baptist Hendersonville Benevolence Fund.

Arrangements by Sellars Funeral Home at Hendersonville, 108 Monthaven Blvd., Hendersonville, TN 37075, www.sellarsfuneralservices.com.

Raferal Johnson
Nashville, TN

Raferal Johnson, age 33, passed away on August 29, 2017. He was preceded in death by his mother, Theresa Johnson-Harris. He is survived by his son Jeremiah Johnson, his grandparents, Walter and Annie Marie Johnson, his great-grandmother, Caroline Reynolds and a host of relatives and friends. Services will be held on Tuesday, September 5, 2017 at Ebenezer Community Church, 2624 Morena Street, Nashville, TN 37208. Visitation will occur from 11:00am - 12:00pm with funeral services to follow.



PORTLAND, Tenn. — Two Middle Tennessee men are dead after their plane crashed Tuesday night as they approached a runway.

The Grumman American AA-1B crashed roughly 2,500 feet from the end of Runway 1 at the Portland Municipal Airport around 7:55 p.m. Tuesday, according to a spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration. 

Portland Police Department Assistant Chief Dewel Scruggs said the aircraft hit a tree before crashing into a field on Airport Road near the airport.

The two passengers were ejected from the plane upon impact. Harold Ray Mckissack, 67, of Hendersonville, was pronounced dead at the scene. Police believe he was the plane's pilot.

The second occupant, Raferal Johnson, 33, of Nashville, was flown to Vanderbilt University Medical Center, where he later died.

The flight originated in Lebanon, Tenn. a spokesperson for the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. 

Passenger's family mourns loss

As an FAA investigator began examining the site of the crash Wednesday morning, Annie Johnson approached the wreckage.

She had received a call around 9:15 p.m. the night before saying her grandson, Raferal Johnson, whom she raised, was in life-threatening condition. Annie Johnson and family members were able to make it to the hospital before he succumbed to his injuries, she said.

"We prayed, and then he took his last breath," said Raferal Johnson's cousin Dontaria Summers, who stopped by the wreckage Wednesday morning with her grandmother as they attempted to retrieve his truck from the airport.

Annie Johnson said her grandson and Mckissack had just been flying around in the area, as they sometimes did.

The two men were business partners in a local trucking company, she said, where Raferal Johnson had become a partial owner after driving for 14 years.

Raferal Johnson leaves behind a 3-year-old son.

Ryan Rhodes, manager of the Portland Municipal Airport, said he still knew little about what led to the fatal crash as the men approached the runway.

"We really don't know very much," Rhodes said.

The Portland Municipal Airport is located at 601 Airport Road, off of Highway 52 West.

The FAA will investigate and work with the National Transportation Safety Board to determine a probable cause of the crash.

Neighbors say plane was silent

For 32 years, Patty Greer has lived across from the Airport Road field where the plane crashed Tuesday night.

She has long been accustomed to the sound of planes flying overhead, not infrequently having to adjust the photos on her walls when someone’s private jet flies in.

“For all those years, I’ve known when a plane is coming in or going out,” Greer said Wednesday, standing in her doorway surveying the wrecked aircraft across the road.

But when the plane crashed the night before, she didn’t hear anything flying overhead. There was only a loud bang, something she thought was lightning at first.

She and her soon-to-be daughter-in-law went to the door.

“I looked out and seen the plane and all the tree limbs in the road,” Greer recalled. “I thought, ‘Oh Lord, that plane hit the tree, then went down.’”

The tree the plane struck was to the right of Greer’s home.

A next-door neighbor ran down the driveway toward the plane.

“What she seen was pretty gruesome,” Greer said.

Firetrucks, volunteer firefighters’ vehicles, ambulances and police cars soon lined the residential street by the airport. Police vehicles returned again Wednesday to continue the investigation.

The plane hit treetops about 100 yards from nearby houses, about 2000 yards short of the end of the runway, NTSB spokesperson Peter Knudson said. Due to rain moving into the area, the wreckage will be moved to a secure location as NTSB investigators continue to document the evidence. 

"We won’t get to probable cause until the end of the investigation, right now we're still documenting," Knudson said. "We have a lot more work to do before we can analyze the information to come to a conclusion on the cause of the crash."

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.tennessean.com




PORTLAND, TN (WSMV) -  Police have identified the two people who were killed in a plane crash near the Portland Municipal Airport on Tuesday.

The FAA said the Grumman American AA-1B aircraft crashed about 2,500 feet from the end of the runway around 7:20 p.m.

Portland Police Chief Anthony Heavner said the plane crashed after hitting a tree while attempting to land.

The two people who were on board were both thrown from the aircraft upon impact.

Harold Ray Mckissack, 67, was pronounced dead at the scene. The second victim, 33-year-old Raferal Johnson, died late Tuesday night after being flown to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

A News 4 viewer said he heard a noise that sounded like an engine backfiring and saw the plane turn around before it crashed.

Heavner said the crash is certainly unusual and was very devastating.

"Anytime you have something tragic like this happen ... it's a sad day ... we just want to wish the families of those involved comfort at this time," Heavner said.

Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.wrcbtv.com





PORTLAND, Tenn. (WKRN) – Two people died after a plane crashed at the Portland Municipal Airport in Sumner County Tuesday night.

Officials said the plane took off from Lebanon before it hit a tree on the side of the ride and lost control just before 8 p.m. as it was coming in to the airport just off Highway 52 West.

Authorities said both occupants, identified as Harold Mckissack of Hendersonville and Raferal Johnson of Nashville, were thrown from the plane upon impact.

Mckissack, 67, died at the scene. Johnson, 33, was airlifted to Vanderbilt University Medical Center where he died just before midnight.

The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane as a Grumman American AA-1B, saying it went down about 2,000 feet from the runway. The wreckage was removed on Wednesday.

The FAA is investigating, and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident. Authorities said there are a number of witnesses and the NTSB is working to meet with them for statements.


The investigation is ongoing. The preliminary report is expected to be complete in about two weeks.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wkrn.com





PORTLAND, Tenn. - A second person has died after a small plane crashed in Portland.  

The incident happened around 7:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Portland Municipal Airport. 

Portland's Police Chief said the Grumman American AA-1B was preparing to land when it experienced a problem, hit a tree, and crashed about 2,500 feet from the end of Runway 1.

Two men were on board at the time, and both were ejected from the plane upon impact. Reports stated 61-year-old Harold Ray Mckissack, of Hendersonville, was found dead at the scene.

Authorities said the second occupant, identified as 33-year-old Raferal Johnson, of Nashville, was found injured. He was taken to Vanderbilt University Medical Center by LifeFight. Authorities said they were notified around 11:58 p.m. Tuesday that Johnson had also passed away.

The FAA and the National Transportation and Safety Board are investigating.

Story, video and photo gallery   http://www.newschannel5.com











PORTLAND, TN (WSMV) -  Police have identified the two people who were killed in a plane crash near the Portland Municipal Airport on Tuesday.

The FAA said the Grumman American AA-1B aircraft crashed about 2,500 feet from the end of the runway around 7:20 p.m.

Portland Police Chief Anthony Heavner said the plane crashed after hitting a tree while attempting to land.

The two people who were on board were both thrown from the aircraft upon impact.

Harold Ray McKissack, 67, was pronounced dead at the scene. The second victim, 33-year-old Raferal Johnson, died late Tuesday night after being flown to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Johnson’s grandmother told News 4 he loved planes and flying. He leaves behind a 3-year-old son.

McKissack also leaves behind a family in Hendersonville.

A News 4 viewer said he heard a noise that sounded like an engine backfiring and saw the plane turn around before it crashed.

Heavner said the crash is certainly unusual and was very devastating.

"Anytime you have something tragic like this happen ... it's a sad day ... we just want to wish the families of those involved comfort at this time," Heavner said.

Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.


Story and video: http://www.wsmv.com

Ruling overturns Federal Aviation Administration rerouting of Sky Harbor International Airport (KPHX) departure paths



PHOENIX - The city of Phoenix and residents of historic neighborhoods on Tuesday cheered a court ruling to force the Federal Aviation Administration to abandon its decision three years ago to set new flight paths for one of the busiest airports in the United States.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit earlier in the day agreed that the FAA's decision in 2014 to change the routes in and out of Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix was "arbitrary and capricious."

The agency had implemented the new flight paths in September 2014 as part of an effort to streamline aircraft routing for safety and fuel efficiency for flights to and from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, which sees about 1,200 aircraft and more than 120,000 passengers arrive and depart each day.

The FAA has made similar changes in flight paths at other airports around the country in recent years under the NextGen program designed to modernize the nation's air traffic-control system.

Other cities where residents have complained of noise amid the resulting new flight paths include Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and Boston.

In Phoenix, residents and the city complained that the FAA did not consult sufficiently beforehand with senior city officials, elected officials or residents of the affected communities that feature Craftsman-style cottages and other vintage homes that can sell for more than $500,000.

"By keeping the public in the dark, the agency made it impossible for the public to submit views on the project's potential effects -- views that the FAA is required to consider," the court ruled.

It was not immediately clear what the agency's next move would be. The FAA issued a statement saying only, "We will carefully review the decision before deciding on our next steps."

The news was welcomed by neighborhood residents and city officials. Phoenix's historic community associations say several thousand homeowners were affected by the rerouting of the flights and collectively filed their own legal challenge of the FAA decision, in addition to a challenge the city filed.

"We are thrilled that the court saw the errors the FAA made, and agrees that the process was faulty and needs to be done right," said Steve Dreiseszun, a longtime homeowner in Phoenix's F.Q. Story Historic District who helped lead the charge against the FAA decision.

"Overnight, we woke up to aircraft flying over our neighborhood all the time," he said. "We had never had that before.  Since then, thousands and thousands of planes have flown over our homes."

Dreiseszun said everyday life changed significantly in the affected neighborhoods, where people shut themselves inside their air-conditioned homes when summer temperatures soar into the triple digits. "We could no longer go outdoors when the weather was beautiful or sleep with the windows open when the temperatures finally dropped," he said.

Simon Wheaton-Smith, who lives in Phoenix's historic Palmcroft neighborhood, noted that "a major battle has been won, but that doesn't mean the war has been won." 




The one-time airline pilot and former FAA operations inspector said he expected the agency would fight the decision.

Having the commercial jets flying over his home has been "highly distracting, even with my lawn mower going," said Wheaton-Smith. "In essence, when one is outside it is very difficult to get any peace and tranquility. "

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton said in a statement that it was "just wrong" of the FAA to take a step "that negatively impacted the lives of thousands of Phoenix residents without seeking meaningful input from our community or the city. Today's decision affirms that the FAA needs to go back to the drawing board and do this right."

Phoenix Vice Mayor Laura Pastor called the ruling "great news for the impacted neighborhoods who have been fighting these changes for the past three years."

After the FAA implemented the new flight paths three years ago, over the following two weeks "the airport received more noise complaints than it had received in all of the previous year," the ruling read.

It quoted local news reports at the time that said the flights rattled the doors and windows in their homes and that they had trouble sleeping, sometimes even wearing earmuffs to mute the noise when they were indoors.

Story and video ➤ http://www.abc15.com

Incident occurred August 29, 2017 at Lakeland Airport / Noble F. Lee Memorial Field (KARV), Vilas County, Wisconsin

The pilot of a single engine airplane landed safely at Lakeland Airport in Arbor Vitae Tuesday, after the landing gear of his craft failed to properly deploy, according to authorities.

The pilot, 73-year-old Klaren Alexander of Glidden, was alone in the Cessna 172 Skyhawk. He did not suffer any injuries, according to Vilas County Sheriff Joe Fath.

The four-seat, high-wing plane did sustain some damage, but it’s not known to what extent. 

The pilot, who reportedly has ties to Hazelhurst area, called in the emergency at 11:54 a.m. He circled the airport for 40 minutes to burn off fuel before setting the aircraft down on the north end of the runway. “I talked with my lieutenant (Lt. Dale Soltow) and he said he thought (Alexander) was a very skilled pilot, as it was a very smooth landing,” the sheriff said.

The fire departments did not have to deploy any fire suppression foam, the sheriff added.

Responding to the scene were the Minocqua, Woodruff, Arbor Vitae fire departments, the Vilas County Sheriff’s Department, Woodruff and Minocqua police departments and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, in addition to Vilas County Emergency Management.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wxpr.org

Bliss' Combat Aviation Brigade rolling out to help with hurricane relief efforts

Maj. Paul Hanson, the operations officer for the 2nd Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment, stands in front of a specially equipped medical evacuation Black Hawk on Tuesday. Soldiers from the 2-501st will be leading a task force from Fort Bliss that will provide relief from devastating Hurricane Harvey. 



Soldiers and helicopters from Fort Bliss’ Combat Aviation Brigade are joining the relief effort in the wake of devastating Hurricane Harvey.

About 90 soldiers from the Combat Aviation Brigade — primarily from its 2nd Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment — were scheduled to leave Tuesday with some additional elements from the brigade headquarters leaving on Wednesday, Fort Bliss officials said.

The task force will bring up to 25 Black Hawk and Chinook helicopters with it, said Maj. Paul Hanson, the operations officer with the 2-501st.

These soldiers will do their initial staging at Kelly Airfield in San Antonio and then will conduct search-and-rescue and other relief operations, as called upon, in the Gulf Coast area hit hard by the hurricane.

“We are excited to do our mission and excited to be able to provide some relief from some suffering in the Houston area,” said Hanson, from Rapid City, S.D. “It is unfortunate it has happened. Our thoughts and prayers are with the people who have been affected by Hurricane Harvey.”

The 2-501st and the Combat Aviation Brigade headquarters are both part of a larger response force that is tasked with providing quick help after a natural disaster or an attack on the United States. They are expecting to be gone anywhere from two weeks to a month.

The 2-501st returned just a few days ago from doing a training rotation at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., where it supported Fort Bliss’ 2nd Brigade Combat Team.

“It is a quick turn for us to reset our soldiers and reset our aircraft and equipment and go out on a mission like this,” Hanson said. “But we are happy to support and ready to support and provide whatever we can.”

The team was busy loading up about 2,600 pounds of bottled water and 220 boxes of Meals, Ready-To-Eat to sustain themselves in the field and not be a burden on the Gulf Coast when they arrive, Hanson said.

In addition to the 2-501st and elements from the brigade headquarters, the task force will also consist of soldiers from sister units the 3-501st and the 127th Aviation Support Battalion.

Sfc. Brandon Didier, a Black Hawk mechanic with Delta Company, 2-501st, will be among the team going to the Gulf Coast.

“The mood is really high,” said Didier, from Frontenac, Kan. “A lot of soldiers are ready and willing and want to go help our fellow people in Texas.”

The brigade is the latest area group to be deployed to help those impacted by Harvey.

The El Paso City-County Office of Emergency Management, which activated its Emergency Operation Center late Sunday to assist in relief efforts, is working with a slew of area groups to send emergency response crews to east Texas.

Already more than 40 El Paso police, fire and sheriff's personnel, including a diving team, have headed out to Houston. A 25-member Rapid Response Team from the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations office in El Paso also left to the area on Monday. 

Several area doctors and nurses have also been dispatched to assist, as have some Red Cross El Paso and Salvation Army volunteers. 

The emergency management office is also working with the Red Cross of El Paso and other agencies to prepare to receive up to 1,500 evacuees, although their arrival has not yet been confirmed, officials said.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://www.elpasotimes.com

Keesler Air Force Base hoping to inform public on drone usage and restrictions: If we don't know that you're out there flying, how can we give traffic calls to our pilots?



KEESLER AFB, BILOXI (WLOX) -

New unmanned flight technology is requiring Keesler Air Force Base to be a step ahead of the game.

Drones, or as they're called in military speak, small unmanned aircraft systems, are becoming more and more popular and accessible. Military bases are trying to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to security.

Officials at Keesler are trying to inform the public about what can and can't be done near a military base, especially one with a strict air space surrounding it.

"The main issue that we're having, and not necessarily here, but in the United States in general, is that when they're purchasing these aircraft, they're not following the proper steps," said Tech. Sgt. Blaine Caudill.

Proper steps, according to Caudill, include registering with the Federal Aviation Administration and making sure you've done your homework.

Keesler is under a TFR, or temporary flight restriction.

"So, at no time should you be flying your sUAS over Keesler," said Caudill.

The base is requiring drone pilots to email flight requests with scheduled time of flight, duration of flight, and planned altitude before flying within a five-mile radius of the restricted air space. Some of the needed information is easily accessed through the base's new app.

This controlled radius means many public areas are included, like the beach.

"When we have those bigger events come down to the coast, what we're trying to do is make our main focus to be able to educate the public on where you can and cannot fly these things and keep them out of our airspace," said Senior Master Sgt. Kevin Lambert, who is in charge of security and law enforcement on the base.

Drones pose a potential threat with surveillance capabilities, or even safety issues.

"If we don't know that you're out there flying, how can we give traffic calls to our pilots?" said Caudill.

The base is hoping to hold town hall meetings for further discussion in the near future.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wlox.com

Bellanca 7GCBC Citabria, N36236: Accident occurred August 16, 2014 near Greenwood-Leflore Airport (KGWO), Mississippi

**This report was modified on July 25, 2017. Please see the public docket for this accident to view the original report.**

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N36236 

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA392
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 16, 2014 in Itta Bena, MS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/16/2016
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7GCBC, registration: N36236
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor and student pilot were practicing simulated forced landings. The flight instructor reported that, during the third simulated forced landing, when the student pilot applied engine power to go around, the engine began to sputter, and it then experienced a total loss of power. The flight instructor assumed control of the airplane and performed a forced landing to a cornfield, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. 

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed that a portion of the air intake filter had been ingested into the carburetor and was obstructing the venturi opening, which likely resulted in the loss of engine power. The remaining portion of the air filter was not located, and its preimpact condition could not be determined. The engine examination also revealed that an intake valve inner spring had broken; however, the outer spring remained intact, and the broken inner spring did not contribute to the accident. 

A review of the maintenance records indicated that the airplane had been operated for about 13 hours since its most recent annual inspection, which was performed about 8 months before the accident. A maintenance logbook entry noted that the induction filter was replaced at that time. The engine had accumulated about 1,265 total flight hours at the time of the accident and had not been overhauled since its manufacture about 41 years before the accident. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power during maneuvering due to an obstruction from air intake filter material being ingested into the carburetor, which resulted in a forced landing. 

**This report was modified on July 25, 2017. Please see the public docket for this accident to view the original report.**

On August 16, 2014, about 1830 central daylight time, a Bellanca 7GCBC, N36236, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged during a forced landing, after it experienced a total loss of engine power while maneuvering near Itta Bena, Mississippi. The flight instructor and a student pilot were seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the local flight that originated at the Greenwood-Leflore Airport (GWO), Greenwood, Mississippi, about 1810. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the flight instructor, the student pilot was practicing simulated forced landings, and had performed two simulated forced landings without incident. During a third simulated forced landing, when the student pilot applied engine power to go-around, the engine began to sputter and lost power. The flight instructor assumed control of the airplane and performed a forced landing to a corn field, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was purchased by its current owner on February 15, 2014. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-320-A2B, 150-horsepower engine.

On site examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector did not reveal any evidence of a catastrophic engine failure. Fuel sampled from the airplane's fuel tanks was consistent with 100-low-lead aviation gasoline and absent of contamination.

Subsequent examination of the engine by an investigator from the NTSB and the engine manufacturer revealed that the No. 4 intake valve inner spring was fractured in three locations. The outer spring remained intact. When the propeller was rotated by hand, camshaft, crankshaft, and valve train continuity were confirmed and thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. Both magnetos produced spark from all leads when rotated by hand. The carburetor remained attached to the engine, and the fuel inlet screen was absent of debris. Foam consistent with a portion of air intake filter material was observed obstructing more than half of the carburetor venturi opening. The carburetor heat air box was crushed and the air intake filter was not located amongst the recovered wreckage.

Examination of the fractured No. 4 intake valve inner spring and the material recovered from the carburetor was performed by an NTSB Materials Engineer. Fracture features consistent with fatigue, and pitting were present through the inner surfaces of the spring. In addition, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer examination of the material found in the carburetor was consistent with polyurethane. [Additional information can be found in the NTSB Materials Laboratory Factual Report located in the public docket]

According to maintenance records, at the time of the accident, the airplane had been operated for about 1,265 total hours, which included about 13 hours since its most recent annual inspection, which was performed on December 2, 2013. According to an entry in the airframe maintenance logbook, the annual inspection was "owner assisted" by the previous owner and included "Replaced induction filter." According to engine logbook entries, the No. 4 cylinder was replaced on August 9, 2001, about 70 hours prior to the accident, and the "Bracket air filter" was replaced on October 12, 2011, about 25 hours prior to the accident. In addition, there was no indication that the engine had been overhauled since it was manufactured in 1973. Lycoming Service Instruction No. 1009AW recommended that engines which have not accumulated the recommended hourly time in service be overhauled in the 12th year since the last overhaul.

According to the Bracket Aero Filters polyurethane foam information manual, "…All Brackett Air Filter elements are required to be replaced each 12 calendar months regardless of actual flight time…."