Wednesday, December 04, 2019

Birdstrike: De Havilland Canada Dash 8-400, N402QX; accident occurred October 29, 2019 near Boise Airport (KBOI), Ada County, Idaho

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N402QX

Location: Boise, ID
Accident Number: DCA20CA010
Date & Time: 10/29/2019, 1433 PDT
Registration: N402QX
Aircraft: De Havilland DHC8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Birdstrike
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

Analysis

On October 29, 2019 at 1433 mountain daylight time, Horizon Air as flight 2337, a Bombardier De Havilland DHC8, N402QX, struck a bird during climb out from Boise Airport (KBOI), Boise, Idaho. After the collision, the flight crew saw visual evidence of the bird remains on the left wing, determined there were no indications of control problems, and decided to continue to Seattle/Tacoma International Airport (KSEA), Seattle, Washington, where the flight landed with no further incident. Postflight inspection of the airplane revealed that the the bird impact had partially severed the left wing leading edge composite structure and cracked the front spar web. The flight was operating was operating under 14 CFR Part 121 and there were no injuries to the 80 passengers and crew onboard.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
a bird strike during climb out.

Findings

Environmental issues
Animal(s)/bird(s) - Effect on equipment (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Initial climb
Birdstrike (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 41
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/16/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/12/2019
Flight Time:   9628 hours (Total, all aircraft), 994 hours (Total, this make and model), 4474 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 57 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 14 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 28
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/12/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/25/2019
Flight Time:  1813 hours (Total, all aircraft), 575 hours (Total, this make and model), 441 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 134 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 80 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: De Havilland
Registration: N402QX
Model/Series: DHC8 402
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2001
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Transport
Serial Number: 4032
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 82
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/12/2019,
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 65400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2
Airframe Total Time: 43991.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PW150A
Registered Owner: Bcc Equipment Leasing Corp
Rated Power:
Operator: Horizon Air Industries Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121); Supplemental 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBOI
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1953 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 260°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4100 ft agl
Visibility:   
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.34 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Boise, ID (KBOI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Seattle, WA (KSEA)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1330 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Boise Airport (KBOI)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2871 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.500000, -116.300000 (est)

AgustaWestland A109SP, N271HC: Accident occurred November 12, 2019 near Spanish Fork, Utah

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Leonardo Company; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N271HC

Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Accident Number: WPR20LA029
Date & Time: 11/12/2019, 2008 MST
Registration: N271HC
Aircraft: Agusta A109
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Discretionary)

On November 12, 2019, about 2008 mountain standard time, an AgustaWestland A109SP helicopter, N271HC, was substantially damaged during cruise flight near Spanish Fork, Utah. The airline transport pilot and flight nurse were not injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by IHC Health Services Inc as an unscheduled air medical flight, conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the local flight, which was destined for an off-airport location in Spanish Fork, Utah.

According to the pilot, the helicopter departed its base in Murray, Utah about 1952 and was bound for a motor vehicle accident. When the helicopter was about 5 minutes from its destination, the flight nurse, seated in the left front seat, attempted to contact personnel on the ground to coordinate their landing. He attempted to step on the press-to-talk button located on the cabin floor, to activate the radio microphone, but instead he inadvertently stepped on the left anti-torque pedal, which caused a rapid yaw to the left. A flight recorder indicated that the yaw was about 11°; however, the pilot recounted the yaw to be much more severe and violent. He immediately countered the movement and re-established straight and level flight. They landed the helicopter uneventfully and conducted a walk-around inspection in dark night conditions, which did not reveal any anomalies. During a subsequent flight, after they arrived at the company's home base and went off-duty, the oncoming pilot conducted a walk-around inspection in daylight conditions and discovered damage to the tailboom as he approached the helicopter. The helicopter was immediately taken out of service, repaired, and ferried to the company's maintenance facility.

Postaccident photographs provided by the helicopter operator showed substantial damage to the composite tailboom and tail rotor blades.

The tail section has been retained for further examination.

Rotorcraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Agusta
Registration: N271HC
Model/Series: A109
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: IHC Health Services Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft External Load (133); On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: Murray, UT (UT11)
Destination: Spanish Fork, UT

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.170556, -111.645000 (est)

British Aerospace BAe-125-800A, N469RJ: Accident occurred December 03, 2019 at Coleman A. Young International Airport (KDET), Wayne County, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; East Michigan FSDO; Belleville, Michigan
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Honeywell Aerospace; Phoenix, Arizona
L3 Harris Aviation Products; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

https://registry.faa.gov/N469RJ

Location: Detroit, MI
Accident Number: CEN20LA028
Date & Time: 12/03/2019, 0833 EST
Registration: N469RJ
Aircraft: Bae BAE 125 SERIES 800A
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On December 3, 2019, about 0833 eastern standard time, a BAE 125 800A airplane, N469RJ, impacted terrain during an instrument landing system (ILS) approach to runway 33 at the Coleman A. Young Municipal Airport (DET), near Detroit, Michigan. The airline transport pilot and copilot were uninjured, and the airplane's right wing sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by Business Jet Managers Inc. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 repositioning flight for a subsequent Part 135 flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Willow Run Airport (YIP), near Detroit, Michigan, about 0819, and was destined for DET.

According to initial information from the pilot in command who was flying the accident airplane, the crew was conducting an ILS approach to runway 33. The airplane broke out of the clouds about 1,500 ft above ground level (AGL), and the airplane had picked up rime icing during the flight. The air traffic controller at YIP advised them of the icing conditions present. The airplane had a TKS [Tecalemit-Kilfrost-Sheepbridge Stokes] type weeping wing for deicing. Spots where the weeping wing panels joined had an ice build up. The airplane did not have any airspeed oscillations during the approach, and the crew maintained 140 knots on approach. The flight's calculated Vref speed was 128 knots. The pilot reported that the right wing "dropped" and a stall occurred. He said that there was no shaker activation during the flight.

According to initial information, about 0807, a BAE 125 800A airplane landed at DET. The pilot of that airplane stated that he was in his own airplane on the ramp waiting for passengers and witnessed another 800A exiting runway 33 traveling through the grass and across the taxiway coming to rest in the grass past the taxiway. His airplane's flight to DET lasted approximately 18 minutes. Before entering the clouds, the witness reported the TKS ice protection system, engine heat, and engine ignitions were turned on. The witness, in part, stated, "Soon afterwards our ice detected light came on. We were vectored at 3000 ft for the ILS 33. We reported light ice and outside air temperature was -9 C. ... Approximately 1000 ft AGL we broke out and landed visually. All operations were normal. Our landing weight was 22,500 lbs. We bugged the airspeed indicator for Ref 129 and approach 139. On final our airspeed varied from 134 to 140 knots. Our touchdown speed was approximately ref minus 8. After landing we had some minor ice on the wing leading edge. The small temperature probe had an umbrella shaped ice formation. The outboard ends of the horizontal stabilizer had the typical "T" ice formation on about the outer 9 inches of both horizontals."

DET, located approximately five miles northeast of downtown Detroit, Michigan, was a publicly owned, towered airport that was owned by the City of Detroit. It was continuously attended by air traffic control. DET's surveyed field elevation was 626 ft above mean sea level. DET was serviced by two runways, 7/25 and 15/33. Runway 7/25 was a 3,714 ft by 100 ft asphalt runway and runway 15/33 was a 5,090 ft by 100 ft, asphalt runway. Runway 15/33 was marked as a precision approach runway and was serviced by a four-light precision approach path indicator on the runway's left side. The airport had 4 published approaches, which included the ILS OR LOC RWY 33 approach.

The airplane was equipped with a magnetic tape cockpit voice recorder (CVR), Fairchild model A100A, serial number 58758, which was removed from the accident airplane and retained for readout and evaluation.

The airplane was equipped with a L3 Communications Avionics Systems, Inc. Landmark TAWS 8000 unit and two digital electronic engine control units. These units were removed from the accident airplane and retained for readout and evaluation.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bae
Registration: N469RJ
Model/Series: BAE 125 SERIES 800A 800B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Business Jet Managers Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: U48A

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDET, 626 ft msl
Observation Time: 0844 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -2°C / -3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 280°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Detroit, MI (YIP)
Destination: Detroit, MI (DET) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.409444, -83.010278 (est)


DETROIT - A landing gear "mishap" caused a small plane to go off the runway at Detroit City Airport on Tuesday.

The Detroit Fire Department said a small plane experienced a 'mishap' with its landing gear while taxiing. The plane's nose landing gear collapsed, causing the plane to skid 50-60 feet off the runway.

The pilot and co-pilot were the only people aboard the plane at the time of the incident and did not need medical attention. The plane is a twin-jet aircraft.  

The engine was running, and sources say the controls and cable to turn the engine off were damaged. Meanwhile, 7,000 pounds of fuel were in the engine. Because of the potential danger, the Mobile gas station nearby had to shut off its gas line and was unable to sell any gas.

Flight officials say the used water on the plane and after a few hours, the engine finally stopped.

According to Flight Aware, the plane took off from Willow Run at 8:19 a.m. and was scheduled to land at KDEP at 8:34 a.m. The incident was reported around 8:40 a.m.. 

The city put out a statement:

"We received a quick response from Detroit Fire and EMS, which have the scene under control. At this time it does not appear runway conditions played any role in the incident. The National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA will conduct a joint investigation into the accident."

Story and video ➤ https://www.fox2detroit.com



DETROIT – A small jet slid off a runway Tuesday while trying to land at Coleman A Young International Airport, officials said.

A small, personal twin engine jet was trying to land around 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, according to officials.

The plane had taken off from Willow Run Airport and was occupied by a pilot and co-pilot, officials said. There were no passengers on board, according to authorities.

Officials said neither crew member was seriously injured. They both declined to be taken to the hospital, authorities said.

It doesn’t appear runway conditions played a role in the incident, officials said.

Detroit firefighters and emergency medical officials responded to the scene.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating.

Original article ➤ https://www.clickondetroit.com

Cessna 177RG Cardinal, N8084B: Incident occurred December 03, 2019 at Decatur Municipal Airport (KLUD), Wise County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aircraft landed gear up.

Six4aSix Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N8084B

Date: 03-DEC-19
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N8084B
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 177RG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DECATUR
State: TEXAS

Cessna 172L Skyhawk, N2876Q: Accident occurred December 03, 2019 in Potts Camp, Marshall County, Mississippi

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

 
https://registry.faa.gov/N2876Q


Location: Potts Camp, MS
Accident Number: ERA20LA047
Date & Time: 12/03/2019, 2130 CST
Registration: N2876Q
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On December 3, 2019, about 2130 central standard time, a Cessna 172L N2876Q, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during a forced landing near Potts Camp, Mississippi. The private pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot/owner under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Tupelo Regional Airport (TUP), Tupelo, Mississippi about 2110 and was destined for Olive Branch Airport (OLV), Olive Branch, Mississippi.

The pilot reported that he conducted an instructional flight with a flight instructor earlier during the day and flew 1.5 hours from OLV to TUP, then back to OLV, where they landed about 1400 and "topped off" the fuel tanks with about 13 gallons of 100 low-lead aviation fuel, which brought the total to about 40 gallons. The previous flight was unremarkable with no engine indications or anomalies noticed.

Several hours later, the pilot conducted a night solo flight that departed about 1900. After departure, he flew to McKellar-Sipes Regional Airport (MKL), Jackson, Tennessee, and conducted some sightseeing; then he proceeded to TUP, where he performed a touch-and-go landing before flying back to OLV at a cruise altitude of 3,000 ft mean sea level. There were no indications or anomalies noticed during the flight until the engine experienced a total loss of power about 20 minutes after departing TUP and 2.7 hours since the original departure.

After establishing best glide speed and performing the emergency checklist, the pilot was successful in getting the engine restarted; it operated for an additional 5 minutes before stopping a second time. The pilot elected to land on a highway and during the approach, the airplane cleared a bridge, but the airspeed was degrading, and he was not sure if he would clear the second bridge. He decided to land on the left side of the road, trying to avoid a concrete structure. The airplane bounced, then struck terrain near the second bridge before coming to rest inverted.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that it was inverted. Both wings were deformed, and the right wing was folded down about 12 inches outboard of the wing strut, which was bent. The nose landing gear was sheared aft and there was damage to the bottom of the engine compartment and multiple fuselage buckles in the airframe. The two-blade metal propeller was undamaged, and the spinner was crushed uniformly. In addition, about 18 gallons of fuel was recovered from the airplane; thirteen gallons in the left tank and 5 gallons in the right tank.

According to the pilot and FAA airmen records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He reported 530 hours total time, of which 348 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. In addition, he flew 4.2 and 16.1 hours during the last 24-hours and 30 days, respectively. He was operating under basic medical regulations.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was issued a standard airworthiness certificate in the normal and utility category on July 20, 1971. It was a four-place, externally braced high-wing airplane, that was equipped with fixed tricycle landing gear, and a Lycoming O-320-E2D, 150-horsepower engine driving a two-blade metal fixed-pitch propeller. The airplane had accumulated 3,778.4 hours total time and the engine had accumulated 224 hours total time since overhaul and was operated for 10 hours since its last annual inspection on October 13, 2019.

The weather conditions reported at TUP, the departure airport located about 40 miles southeast of the accident site, at 2053 included winds calm, visibility 10 statute miles and clear, temperature 03° C, dew point 01° and an altimeter setting of 29.92 inches of mercury.

The weather conditions reported at the destination airport OLV, located about 35-miles northwest of the accident site, at 2135 included winds calm, visibility 10 statue mile and clear, temperature 05° C, dew point 03° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.94 inches of mercury.

The airplane was recovered from the accident site and retained for additional examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2876Q
Model/Series: 172 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: OLV, 401 ft msl
Observation Time: 2135 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 35 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 5°C / 3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Tupelo, MS (TUP)
Destination: Olive Branch, MS (OLV)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 34.646111, -89.305278 (est)



POTTS CAMP, Mississippi — A Collierville man walked away relatively unharmed after an emergency landing on a Mississippi interstate overnight.

According to initial reports, the pilot – identified by a source as Doug Woods of Collierville –  was flying from Tupelo, Mississippi to Olive Branch when he experienced engine trouble. He was forced to make an emergency landing on Interstate 22 near Potts Camp.

Video from the scene showed the plane was discovered upside down in a ditch on the side of the highway.

Miraculously, the pilot walked to the ambulance on his own despite having several broken ribs, a broken nose and bruises all over his body. He was taken to Collierville Baptist Memorial Hospital for an evaluation and subsequently released.

Melissa Moon spoke to Woods after his release. He didn’t want to go on camera at this time, but said about 25 people stopped to help and took care of him until help arrived.

The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to inspect the aircraft on Wednesday to determine what went wrong.

Story and video ➤ https://wreg.com

BENTON COUNTY, Mississippi - The pilot of a small plane that crashed in Mississippi Tuesday night has been released from the hospital.


The crash happened around 9:30 p.m. near the 43 mile marker on I-22 at the Marshall County and Benton County line.

Officials told FOX13 that the pilot, identified as Doug Woods of Collierville, made radio calls stating that he was having engine problems and needed to make an emergency landing.

Woods ended up landing in the westbound lane of I-22, which is also known as Highway 78.

The plane was removed from the road and taken to a nearby field where the FAA is expected to arrive to investigate Wednesday.

Story and video ➤ https://www.fox13memphis.com

Zenith CH-701 STOL, N701WJ: Accident occurred November 30, 2019 at Byron Airport (C83), Contra Costa County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N701WJ


Location: Byron, CA
Accident Number: WPR20LA035
Date & Time: 11/29/2019, 1545 PST
Registration: N701WJ
Aircraft: ZENITH STOL CH701
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Flight Test 

On November 29, 2019, about 1545 Pacific standard time, an experimental Zenith CH-701 STOL, N701WJ, experienced a partial loss of engine power after takeoff from the Byron Airport, Byron, California. The pilot, who was the registered owner, was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was uninjured; the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wing struts. The personal local flight was departing from Byron. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot stated that he had recently fabricated and installed a cowling for the airplane. After completing an uneventful high-speed taxi test run, he decided to depart and remain in the pattern. The pilot configured the airplane for takeoff on runway 23 and applied full-power. He turned onto the crosswind leg of the traffic pattern and felt a abnormal vibration accompanied with a slight loss in engine rpm. He continued onto the downwind leg and the airplane was about 500 ft above ground level (agl) when he was midfield. The airplane started to lose altitude and he observed the water temperature gauge indicating 250° F; maximum operating temperature was 220° F.

The pilot further stated that the airplane continued to descended to 100 ft agl, he reached the threshold of runway 23 and made a left turn in an attempt to land on runway 30. While trying to align with the runway, the wind pushed the airplane onto the grass. The airplane touched down hard and nosed over, coming to rest inverted. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ZENITH
Registration: N701WJ
Model/Series: STOL CH701
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSCK, 27 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 PST
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 7500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Byron, CA (C83)
Destination: Byron, CA (C83)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 37.830278, -121.626111 (est)