Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-60-602P Aerostar, N326CW; fatal accident occurred October 05, 2019 near Kokomo Municipal Airport (KOKK), Howard County, Indiana

Dr. Daniel Greenwald
~

Piper PA-60-602P Aerostar, N326CW







Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Kokomo, Indiana 
Accident Number: CEN20FA002
Date & Time: October 5, 2019, 16:37 Local 
Registration: N326CW
Aircraft: Piper AEROSTAR 602P 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation

Analysis

The airline transport pilot arrived at the departure airport in the reciprocating engine-powered airplane where it was fueled with Jet A jet fuel by an airport employee/line service technician. A witness stated that she saw a "low flying" airplane flying from north to south. The airplane made a "sharp left turn" to the east. The left wing "dipped low" and she then lost sight of the airplane, but when she approached the intersection near the accident site, she saw the airplane on the ground. The airpane impacted a field that had dry, level, and hard features conducive for an off-airport landing, and the airplane was destroyed.

The wreckage path length and impact damage to the airplane were consistent with an accelerated stall.

Postaccident examination of the airplane found Jet A jet fuel in the airplane fuel system and evidence of detonation in both engines from the use of Jet A and not the required 100 low lead fuel. Use of Jet A rather than 100 low lead fuel in an engine would result in detonation in the cylinders and lead to damage and a catastrophic engine failure. According to the Airplane Flying Handbook, the pilot should witness refueling to ensure that the correct fuel and quantity is dispensed into the airplane and that any caps and cowls are properly secured after refueling.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle of attack following a dual engine power loss caused by the line service technician fueling the airplane with the wrong fuel, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and subsequent loss of control. Contributing was the pilot's inadequate supervision of the fuel servicing.

Findings

Personnel issues Incorrect action performance - Ground crew
Aircraft Fuel - Incorrect use/operation
Personnel issues Lack of action - Pilot
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Angle of attack - Capability exceeded

Factual Information

History of Flight

Prior to flight Fuel contamination
Maneuvering Fuel contamination
Maneuvering Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Maneuvering Aerodynamic stall/spin
Uncontrolled descent Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On October 5, 2019, about 1637 eastern daylight time, a Piper Aerostar 602P, N326CW, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Kokomo, Indiana. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight.

According to the airport employee who fueled the airplane, during the pilot’s approach to the Kokomo Municipal Airport (OKK), Kokomo, Indiana, he asked if the pilot wanted jet fuel, and the pilot said "yes." He said that the airplane looked like a jet airplane. When the airplane arrived, the employee parked the Jet A fuel truck in front of the airplane while the pilot was still inside the airplane. The employee said that he asked the pilot again if he was wanted jet fuel, and the pilot said "yes."

The employee fueled the airplane with about 163 gallons of Jet A from the fuel truck. The employee said that he was able to orient the different-shaped nozzle (relative to the 100 low lead fuel truck nozzle) from the Jet A fuel truck by positioning it 90° over the wing fuel tank filler necks and about 45° over the fuselage filler necks. He said that he initially spilled about 1 gallon of fuel during refueling and adjusted his technique so subsequent fuel spillage was minimal.

The student pilot, who received recurrent training from the accident pilot, said that when she arrived in her vehicle to meet the accident pilot, he was walking between the fuel truck that was parked by the airplane and her vehicle. She said that the accident pilot began training right away about 1045. They completed training, and after 1630, the student pilot drove the accident pilot to the airplane. The student pilot said the accident pilot visually checked the fuel tanks of the airplane to ensure they were fueled up and gave a "thumbs-up" to the student pilot. The student pilot did not stay for the rest of the accident pilot's preflight inspection and drove off. The student pilot heard the engines start and "they sounded normal." The student pilot did not see the takeoff. The student pilot said the winds favored runway 14, which was in use on the day of the accident.

A witness, on a nearby road, stated that she saw a "low flying" airplane flying from north to south. The airplane made a "sharp left turn" to the east. The left wing "dipped low" and she then lost sight of the airplane, but when she approached the intersection near the accident site, she saw the airplane on the ground.

The airport employee said that he was inside the fixed base operator building about 1620 when he heard the engines start. After the engines started, the engines sounded "typical." He said that he did not hear any radio transmissions from the pilot during his departure and did not hear an engine runup.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport; Commercial; Flight instructor
Age: 59,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane multi-engine; Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: November 9, 2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 7500 hours (Total, all aircraft)

There were no pilot records provided to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Investigator-in-Charge (IIC) indicating the pilot's flight experience and a recent flight review as required under Part 61.56 received from the accident pilot's wife after two requests were made to her.

On November 28, 2008, the pilot was involved in an aviation accident that was investigated under NTSB accident identification number: ERA09CA073.

On December 2, 2016, the Federal Aviation Administration terminated the pilot's designation as a pilot examiner due to sub-standard performance while conducting examinations.

On November 9, 2018, the pilot reported his flight experience that included 7,500 total hours and 200 hours in last six months as of his last airman medical exam.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N326CW
Model/Series: AEROSTAR 602P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1981 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 62P08698165008
Landing Gear Type: Retractable 
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: August 22, 2019 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3002.3 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AA1A5
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The owner of the accident airplane stated he was supposed to receive initial training in the airplane from In Flight Review, Inc., but it never happened for "various reasons." He stated that he never gave permission for the accident pilot to fly the airplane. The owner declined to provide more information as who he gave the airplane keys to.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OKK,832 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 16:56 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 140° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Kokomo, IN (OKK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Kokomo, IN 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Kokomo Municipal Airport OKK
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 832 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.474998,-86.063331(est)

On-scene examination of the airplane revealed the airplane wreckage path was about 328 ft in length along an approximate heading of 046° on a dry and hard surfaced fallow bean field. The wreckage and the wreckage path displayed features consistent with an accelerated stall.

On-scene examination revealed the presence of a clear liquid consistent in color, viscosity, oiliness, and odor with that of Jet A jet fuel in a fuselage tank and in the fuel lines leading to the fuel manifolds of both engines. Several of the engine spark plugs exhibited damage consistent with detonation. Flight control continuity was confirmed. The landing gear was in the retracted position.

Additional Information

The Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-38), Chapter 2, Ground Operations, stated in part:

"Jet fuel has disastrous consequences when introduced into AVGAS burning reciprocating airplane engines. A reciprocating engine operating on jet fuel may start, run, and power the airplane for a time long enough for the airplane to become airborne only to have the engine fail catastrophically after takeoff.

Jet fuel refueling trucks and dispensing equipment are marked with JET-A placards in white characters on a black background. Because of the dire consequences associated with misfueling, fuel nozzles are specific to the type of fuel. AVGAS fuel filler nozzles are straight with a constant diameter. However, jet fuel filler nozzles are flared at the end to prevent insertion into AVGAS fuel tanks.

Using the proper, approved grade of fuel is critical for safe, reliable engine operation. Without the proper fuel quantity, grade, and quality, the engine(s) will likely cease to operate. Therefore, it is imperative that the pilot visually verify that the airplane has the correct quantity for the intended flight plus adequate and legal reserves, as well as inspect that the fuel is of the proper grade and that the quality of the fuel is acceptable. The pilot should always ensure that the fuel caps have been securely replaced following each fueling."

"During refueling operations, it is advisable that the pilot remove all passengers from aircraft during fueling operations and witness the refueling to ensure that the correct fuel and quantity is dispensed into the airplane and that any caps and cowls are properly secured after refueling."

On-scene inspection of the fuel truck used to refuel the airplane revealed that the truck had markings "JET A.".

 Dr. Daniel Greenwald, seen here with his wife, Julia Robbins Greenwald.

 Dr. Daniel Greenwald (top left), seen here with his family.

 Dr. Daniel Greenwald

Tampa plastic surgeon Dr. Daniel Greenwald, seen here with his wife, Julia Robbins Greenwald. 






Unique South Jersey Family Fun Venue May Be Gone Soon (Opinion): Flying W Airport (N14), Lumberton, Burlington County, New Jersey



By Dennis Malloy
Published: August 20, 2021

Our family recently had a great day in the hot sun at a public pool called the Landing Strip Beach Club. It's part of the Flying W Airport & Resort, a great little place for family fun and a truly unique space out in a rural part of Burlington County.

As we were leaving a couple drove past and asked if they're still planning to tear the place down to make room for affordable housing. I wasn't aware, so I looked it up.

Sure enough, the Pine Barrens Tribune says the place's days are numbered. It may not be around for another season thanks to the heavy hand of state government in New Jersey.

As you may or may not know, every town in New Jersey has been court ordered to have a certain amount of "affordable housing" within their borders. You can read more details here. Towns can negotiate the number and even buy "credits" to reduce the number, but the state will still get their way no matter the impact on property owners, businesses, or the community at large.

It's like the mafia coming in and forcing their will on you and making you an offer you can't refuse. It's social engineering at its worst. Many people write to us every month complaining about the impact on their towns. It doesn't usually get the attention of most folks until it directly affects and impacts them.

In this case they chose this property as being "in need of redevelopment" because it way off the beaten path and out of the way. Most of the people in town won't see the 380-unit development but they'll feel its impact on traffic, schools, and general crowding of this quiet town. That doesn't matter.

The mafiosi in Trenton don't care. They force their will through the left-leaning courts and their decisions and just order towns to shut up and obey. Most people are busy and don't pay attention to what's going on in their towns and towns around them. Once they do it's too late and the town you moved into isn't what you bargained for when you got there.

Thanks State of New Jersey!

Beech 95-A55 Baron, N169SP: Incident occurred August 24, 2021 at Sacramento Mather Airport (KMHR), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aircraft struck a seagull on final. 

Pinnacle Consulting & Management  


Date: 24-AUG-21
Time: 17:15:00Z
Regis#: N169SP
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 95-A55
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: SACRAMENTO
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-28-181 Archer II, N46MD: Accident occurred August 24, 2021 near Eagle County Regional Airport (KEGE), Gypsum, Colorado










This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

iTechnology Design Inc


Location: Gypsum, CO
Accident Number: CEN21LA383
Date & Time: August 24, 2021, 09:33 Local 
Registration: N46MD
Aircraft: Piper PA-28-181
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N46MD
Model/Series: PA-28-181
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C /2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.3 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Gypsum, CO 
Destination: Gypsum, CO

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.623148,-106.93823 (est)



A lone pilot who appears to have encountered a mid-air malfunction is safe after crash landing his plane into a field near the Eagle County airport.

Eagle County Sheriff James van Beek said the pilot was able to bring the aircraft down safely in an area of private rangeland southwest of the airport in Gypsum.

“(The pilot) had turned and was trying to get back to where he needed to go and doing everything he could to fix the problem in the air, he was losing altitude, apparently he wasn’t going to make it back to the airport so he turned and went for the field,” van Beek said. “And he walked away from it unscathed.”

Van Beek said the Sheriff’s Office took pictures and noted where the plane came to a stop, but the remainder of the investigation will be performed by the National Transportation Safety Board.

“We took all the initial information, but then we turn all that over to the NTSB, so they’ll investigate that,” van Beek said. “My guys were calling for a tow, and they were going to load it up and take it over to the airport and secure it for the NTSB.”

Piper PA-28-161, N36583: Incident occurred August 24, 2021 at Pensacola International Airport (KPNS), Escambia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and NW Florida

Aircraft struck a pair of chocks on landing and blew a tire. 

Trident Aircraft Inc


Date: 24-AUG-21
Time: 17:25:00Z
Regis#: N36583
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PENSACOLA
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six E, N2843T: Incident occurred August 24, 2021 in Del Mar, San Diego County, California



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aircraft landed Interstate 5 under unknown circumstances and struck vehicles. 


Date: 24-AUG-21
Time: 23:56:00Z
Regis#: N2843T
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA




SOLANA BEACH, Calif. — Traffic is moving again after a single-engine plane landed on Interstate 5 Tuesday afternoon.

The pilot of a light plane made an emergency landing Tuesday on Interstate 5 near the Del Mar Fairgrounds, injuring several occupants of vehicles on the ground and forcing a closure of a stretch of the freeway on both sides as the plane hung over the center median.

From treating the whole person to working with teams across disciplines, PCOM students are trained for the front lines of health.

The pilot tried to land the Piper PA-32 in a nearby field but couldn't and touched down on the southbound side of the freeway, south of Via de la Valle in the North City area shortly after noon, according to the California Highway Patrol and Federal Aviation Administration.

The aircraft "clipped" several vehicles before rolling to a stop against a center-divider wall, said Jose Ysea, a spokesman for the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department. 

The plane was removed around 4p.m. CHP says several occupants of the damaged cars were transported to a hospital for treatment of apparently minor injuries, including superficial cuts from shattered glass. There were no immediate reports of injuries to anyone else.

CHP says shortly after taking off from Montgomery Field the pilot and passenger noticed the plane was having mechanical problems.

"He tried to land the plane in a nearby field but was unable to and landed in south bound lanes of Interstate 5," said Salvador Castro, CHP.

Dane and Sarah Tribett were visiting from Austin for their anniversary when they were hit by the plane. 

"I was just like what the heck what happened and I looked over to make sure he was ok," said Tribett.

CHP says the pilot and the passenger walked away from the crash unharmed. They declined to comment to News 8. 

Authorities shut down the southbound side of the freeway due to the emergency. Aviation fuel spilled and the freeway will be closed for hours. Jet fuel spilled and the freeway will be closed for hours. 

All southbound lanes of the freeway in the area and part of the northbound side remained blocked off into the mid-afternoon due to the emergency. The closures were expected to last into late-afternoon rush hour, Caltrans advised. 

The aircraft took off from Montgomery and landed on Interstate 5 shortly after 12 p.m.

Video images from the scene showed that one of the vehicles struck by the plane, a white sedan, sustained a shattered rear window in the impact, and another, an SUV, was left with a torn-off piece of the aircraft protruding from its back end. The crash-landing left most of the right wing of the airplane sheared off.

Another car had the back window of their rental car smashed during the landing. The individual in the car said that the items in the car seemed to have jet fuel on them. 

Tribett says fortunately no one was seriously injured.

"I feel like angels were definitely watching over us today and we felt really blessed and grateful," said Tribett. 

Just Aircraft Highlander, N101KL: Accident occurred August 24, 2021 in Crittenden, Kentucky

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Warbler Creek Holdings LLC


Location: Crittenden, KY
Accident Number: ERA21LA338
Date & Time: August 24, 2021, 19:26 Local
Registration: N101KL
Aircraft: SCHMITT Just Acft Highlander 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On August 24, 2021, at 1926 eastern daylight time, a Just Acft Highlander, N101KL was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Crittenden, Kentucky. The private pilot and the passenger were not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, who was also the owner of the experimental, amateur-built airplane, the accident occurred at the end of a 45-minute “sightseeing” flight. He departed from his farm, flew to Gene Snyder Airport (K62), Falmouth, Kentucky, performed two touch-and-go landings, and established the airplane on a northwest heading for the return flight. While in cruise flight, the pilot confirmed there was fuel visible in the “sight windows” of each wing tank and estimated that the airplane contained “an hour of fuel reserves.”

The pilot stated the airplane was established on the left base leg of the traffic pattern for landing on a field oriented 030° when at 300 ft, he decided to land on the same field to the south. He added “full” engine power and initiated a climb; however, the engine stopped producing power and the pilot performed a forced landing. The airplane crossed a road and came to rest upright with the right main landing gear separated, and substantial damage to the right wing and empennage.

A satellite image of the pilot’s property revealed two turf runways arranged end to end and divided by a paved road. The first runway was oriented 030° and about 940 ft long. The second runway bent sharply to the left, was oriented 345° and about 725 ft long.

Data downloaded from the airplane’s avionics suite depicted the airplane at 35 knots airspeed on a 290° heading about 800 ft above ground level (agl) as it crossed above the road that bisected the runways. The airplane entered a left descending 260° turn, aligned with the 030° runway, flew its full length, and was at 100 ft agl, 35 knots airspeed, and 1,024 engine rpm when it overflew the departure end and through the extended centerline at the approach end of the 345° runway. Five seconds later, the airplane was 215 ft right of centerline, at 75 ft. agl, 43 knots airspeed and 0 engine rpm. The final two targets depicted the airplane bisecting the 345° runway on the ground travelling at 35 knots before the data ended.

The pilot recovered the airplane from the accident site and placed it in his hangar prior to its examination by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector. According to the inspector, examination of the airplane revealed the left-wing tank was empty, and “less than two gallons” of fuel was drained from the right-wing tank. Fuel fed from the wing tanks to a small header tank (about 1/3 gallon), then to an electric fuel boost pump, to the gascolator, to the engine driven pump, then to a “splitter” which supplied fuel to the two carburetors.

The gascolator was full of fuel, and fuel was present in the inlet line to the engine driven fuel pump. There was no fuel in the outlet line of the pump, or in either carburetor bowl. The pilot reported that he did not turn on the electric boost pump during the flight, nor did he turn it on as a matter of practice.

The FAA inspector resecured the fuel lines, primed the fuel system with the electric boost pump and then attempted an engine start with the airplane’s battery. The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly and ran continuously without interruption until it was stopped with the engine controls in the cockpit.

The pilot reported that he had 427 total hours of flight experience, of which 40 were in the accident airplane make and model.

At the time of the accident, the airplane had accrued 168 total aircraft hours.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SCHMITT
Registration: N101KL
Model/Series: Just Acft Highlander 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCVG,883 ft msl 
Observation Time: 19:52 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C /21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Falmouth, KY (K62)
Destination: Crittenden, KY

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 38.808056,-84.559444 (est)

Aerofab Lake 250, N59CA: Incident occurred August 24, 2021 on Snipatuit Pond, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aircraft floats were damaged while taxiing on lake. 

Purpurea LLC


Date: 24-AUG-21
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N59CA
Aircraft Make: AEROFAB
Aircraft Model: LAKE 250
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: SNIPATUIT POND
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Airbus A320-232, N503JB: Incident occurred August 24, 2021 at Boston Logan International Airport (KBOS), Suffolk County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aircraft struck a bird on final and left a dent in right wing leading edge. 


Date: 24-AUG-21
Time: 20:13:00Z
Regis#: N503JB
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: JET BLUE
Flight Number: JBU1138
City: BOSTON
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Aeronca Champion 7AC, N35FT: Encountered crosswind on landing rollout; collided with runway perimeter berm




















AIRCRAFT: 1946 Aeronca Champ 7AC N35FT, s/n 7AC-1300, TTAF reported to be 3,567.2

The last Annual Inspection is dated 09/06/20 at Aircraft Total Time 3,537.2, Tach Time 2,569.0

Logbooks Extracts                       

ENGINE:  Continental C-65-8, s/n: 30584-6-8, TSN 3,567.2, TSMOH approximately 122.65 – see log extracts.

The last Annual Inspection is dated 09/06/20 at Aircraft Total Time 3,537.2, Tach Time 2,569.0      
                                                

PROPELLER:  McCauley IB90/CM7443, s/n 48938, approximately 43.97 – see log extracts.


EQUIPMENT:   No avionics installed.

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  N35FT encountered a crosswind on landing roll out at Airport Manatee, departed the runway, and came to rest after colliding with the runway perimeter berm and bushes.

DAMAGE:  The damage includes but may not be limited to the follow: 

The prop struck the berm and the engine stopped.
The engine experienced a prop strike/sudden stoppage.
Exhaust is bent and crushed
The right gear leg folded under
Right door is damaged and sprung.
The nose section, cowling, and lower skins are significantly damage.
The firewall is buckled
The carburetor manifold is broken
The windshield is cracked
The oleo gear frame is broken
There is a tear in the fabric
Airframe may be twisted.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Airport Manatee (48X) in Palmetto, Florida

REMARKS:  
*Logs appear to begin in 1964 for this 1946 aircraft;
*LOGS ARE NOT GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATE OR COMPLETE;                          
*Insurer reserves the right to reject any and all bids;
*Salvage is as is/where is;
*The posting information is the best to our knowledge; 
*An inspection of the salvage is highly recommended.

WARRANTY:  There is no warranty, express or implied for the information provided herein or the condition, useability, workability, operability or marketability of the aircraft salvage.  All times are approximate and the logbooks and aircraft should be inspected by each bidder BEFORE BIDDING.  Failure of the bidder to view the salvage or wreckage, or confirm any information provided is NOT grounds for a claim or withdrawal of bid after bid closing date.  
                      
HOURS estimated from logbooks or other information - not guaranteed or warranted.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.coml

Boeing 737-823, N946NN: Incident occurred August 24, 2021 in Lincoln, Nebraska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aircraft encountered severe turbulence injury to passenger who was not wearing a seatbelt and a flight attendant. 

American Airlines


Date: 25-AUG-21
Time: 01:13:00Z
Regis#: N946NN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: AAL1398
City: LINCOLN
State: NEBRASKA

Beech A36 Bonanza, N67CW: Accident occurred August 24, 2021 in Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Humanity2Others LLC


Location: Cleburne, TX
Accident Number: CEN21LA382
Date & Time: August 24, 2021, 10:30 Local
Registration: N67CW
Aircraft: Beech A36 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On August 24, 2021, about 1030 central daylight time, a Beech, A36 airplane, N67CW, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Cleburne, Texas. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported to the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that shortly after departure from the Pecan Plantation Airport (0TX1), the engine lost power. The pilot selected a nearby field for the forced landing. A preliminary inspection of the airplane noted damage to the airplane’s wings and fuselage. Fuel was available in the airplane’s fuel tanks, and the engine had about 8 quarts of oil in it.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N67CW
Model/Series: A36 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGDJ,778 ft msl
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C /20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Cleburne, TX
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 32.340946,-97.646717 (est)

Cirrus SF50 Vision Jet, N1GG: Accident occurred August 24, 2021 at Capital Region International Airport (KLAN), Lansing, Clinton County, Michigan

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Grand Rapids, Michigan
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota 

N1GG LLC


Location: Lansing, MI 
Accident Number: CEN21LA384
Date & Time: August 24, 2021, 18:58 Local 
Registration: N1GG
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SF50
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Business

On August 24, 2021, at 1858 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SF50 airplane, N1GG, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Lansing, Michigan. The pilot and 3 passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight.

The flight was departing from runway 10R at Capital Region International Airport (KLAN). The pilot reported a loss of left rudder effectiveness and left brake authority during the takeoff roll. He decided to reject the takeoff but was unable to stop on the remaining runway available resulting in a runway excursion. The airplane subsequently encountered an airport perimeter fence and a ditch. A postimpact fire ensued.

The recoverable data module (RDM) has been retained by the NTSB for download.

A postaccident airplane examination is pending a review of the RDM data.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP 
Registration: N1GG
Model/Series: SF50 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLAN,859 ft msl 
Observation Time: 18:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C /24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4900 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 250°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 9 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Lansing, MI (LAN)
Destination: Melbourne, FL (MLB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 None 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.778514,-84.564772 (est)



LANSING, Michigan (WILX) - Tuesday evening a plane crashed at Capital Region International Airport, causing emergency responders to rush to the location and fight to extinguish the fiery wreckage.

Despite the apparent severity of the crash, none of the passengers on board were harmed.

The crashed plane was a Cirrus SF50 Vision Jet. Airport officials confirmed that they were first alerted to the crash at 6:59 p.m., though they did not state what caused the plane to go down.

Emergency responders, including the Lansing Fire Department, DeWitt Township Fire Department and Delta Township Fire Department worked quickly to extinguish the plane, which caught fire shortly after impact at the crash site.

“We are grateful that everyone walked away from the plane without injuries,” said Nicole Noll-Williams, President and CEO of the Capital Region Airport Authority. “We applaud our CRAA emergency response team and our mutual aid partners in response to the aircraft accident.”

News 10 spoke with an eyewitness, Victoria Vanholder, who says she saw the crash just after it happened. She says she saw the passengers and their dog get out of the plane as it was burning.

“It was three gentleman and an older lady, all maybe in their 50′s,” Vanholder said. “One of them-- I don’t know if he flew the plane or what-- but he just kept looking at it like he was about to cry. When the local fire department showed up I went up to them immediately and let them know everyone was out and they seemed really relieved.”

Officials from the Lansing Fire Department told News 10 all passengers successfully self-evacuated the plane. Although the plane was badly damaged, neither the humans nor the dog sustained any injuries.