Friday, November 10, 2017

Temco GC-1B Swift , N2363B: Fatal accident occurred November 10, 2017 near Pineville Municipal Airport (2L0), Louisiana

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2363B

NTSB Identification: CEN18FA030
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, November 10, 2017 in Pineville, LA
Aircraft: TEMCO GC 1B, registration: N2363B
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 10, 2017, about 1120 central standard time, a Temco GC 1B airplane, N2363B, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and then terrain while maneuvering north of Pineville Municipal Airport (2L0), Pineville, Louisiana. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The cross-country flight departed Lake Water Wheel Airport (XS99), Shepherd, Texas, about 1000.

According to an employee with the fixed base operator at 2L0, the pilot called on the airport UNICOM frequency and asked for assistance verifying that the landing gear were down and locked. The airplane was observed to fly from south to north over the airport and at the north end of the airport the airplane pulled up and turned to the right. The employee confirmed that the landing gear appeared to be down but the pilot did not respond. The airport manager of 2L0 was flying in the area and flew to the location that the airplane was last seen. The wreckage of the airplane was located about 30 minutes later.

The wreckage of the airplane came to rest in heavily forested terrain about half a mile north of 2L0. The main wreckage came to rest inverted on a 60 degree heading. The main wreckage included the inboard sections of the left and right wings, fuselage, the left elevator and its horizontal stabilizer, the rudder, the vertical stabilizer, the right horizontal stabilizer, and the engine and propeller assembly. The outboard section of the left wing was found about 140 feet from the main wreckage. The outboard section of the right wing, sections of canopy, right elevator, ailerons, flaps, sections of cowling, and a section of the throttle were found in trees and on the ground between the outboard section of the left wing and the main wreckage. All major components of the airplane were located.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




A small plane crashed near Buhlow Lake this morning, with the pilot believed to be the only fatality.

Rapides Parish Sheriff's deputies were notified shortly before noon that a small aircraft crashed near the lake and the Alexandria Veterans Administration Hospital, a spokesman said. 

Deputies along with VA Police, VA Fire Department, Pineville Fire Department, Alpine Fire Department and Louisiana State Police responded to the scene. 

They found the wreckage of a single engine private aircraft in a thick, brush covered area between the VA and Bulow Lake.  Deputies located the body of the pilot and what appears to be the only occupant of the aircraft, the spokesman said. 


The Rapides Parish Coroner's Office responded to the scene to take custody of the body.  The Federal Aviation Administration was notified and has taken over the investigation. Investigators say an autopsy and toxicology tests will be conducted as part of their investigation to determine official cause of death.  


The name of the deceased is being withheld at this time until proper notification of family members is made, the spokesman said. Deputies did determine the pilot was not from the central Louisiana area.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.katc.com


A pilot not from Central Louisiana died Friday in a crash of a small plane near Buhlow Lake, according to the Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office.

The crash was reported around 11:47 a.m. to the Tioga substation by the Pineville Police Department. The single-engine private airplane was found in thick brush between the lake and the Veterans Administration Medical Center, reads a release.


The Federal Aviation Administration has taken over the investigation.


The pilot appeared to be the only occupant. The identity of the pilot has not been released yet, reads the release.


Deputies were able to determine that the pilot is not from Central Louisiana, it reads.


Deputies responded to the scene, along with police and fire personnel from the VA, Louisiana State Police and the Alpine and Pineville fire departments.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.thetowntalk.com


PINEVILLE, La. (KALB) - UPDATED information from RPSO:

The pilot of a small plane is dead following a crash near the grounds of the Alexandria Veterans Administration Hospital around 11:47 a.m. Friday according to the Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office.

RPSO says the Tioga Sub-station received a call from the Pineville Police Department reporting the possible crash of a small aircraft near Buhlow Lake and the grounds of the VA.

Deputies along with VA Police, VA Fire Department, Pineville Fire Department, Alpine Fire Department and troopers with the Louisiana State Police, responded to the scene.

Upon arrival, first responders located the wreckage of a single-engine private aircraft in a thick, brush covered area between the VA and Bulow Lake. Deputies located the body of the pilot, who appeared to be the only occupant of the aircraft, deceased.

The Rapides Parish Coroner's Office responded to the scene to take custody of the body. The Federal Aviation Administration was notified and has taken over the investigation. Investigators say an autopsy and toxicology tests will be conducted as part of their investigation to determine official cause of death.

The name of the deceased is being withheld at this time until proper notification of family members is made. Deputies did determine the pilot was not from the central Louisiana area.

4:30 p.m. Story:

KALB has learned that a small, single engine plane crashed near the property of the Alexandria Veterans Administration Hospital in Pineville late Friday morning.

A source tells KALB that the crash involved a single fatality, though the name of the person or the plane’s tail number have not yet been released to the public.

Several agencies responded to the scene including the Pineville and VA Fire Departments, RPSO and State Police. The NTSB is working with those agencies in the investigation.

RPSO said that the wreckage was found in a thick, brush-covered area between the VA and Buhlow Lake.

The body was taken into custody by the Rapides Parish Coroner's Office. Investigators said an autopsy and toxicology tests will be conducted as part of the investigation.

It has been determined that the pilot was not from the Cenla area.

Original article can be found here ➤http://www.kalb.com

Socata TB-200, N207GT, Tipton Tampico: Accident occurred November 10, 2017 in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aircraft force landed on a highway and went into the grass and a guide rail.

Tipton Tampico:  http://registry.faa.gov/N207GT

Date: 10-NOV-17
Time: 20:20:00Z
Regis#: N207GT
Aircraft Make: SOCATA
Aircraft Model: TB200
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ANNAPOLIS
State: MARYLAND



FORT MEADE, Md. - The pilot who successfully landed a small plane along a highway during rush hour is recounting his experience to FOX 5.

The incident happened last Friday on Route 50 in Annapolis at around 3 p.m.
  
Christopher Curry, 32, told FOX 5 his sons, 4 and 8, got out of school early that day so he decided to take them up for a flight to see the fall foliage.

“I love doing fun things with them,” said Curry.

He has had his pilot’s license since he was 19. Curry also flew Harrier Jets in the Marine Corps.

It was about 40 minutes into the flight from Tipton Airport in Fort Meade when things started to go wrong. Curry noticed a slight shudder in the engine compartment. As he turned back toward the closest runway at Lee Airport in Edgewater, the nose of the plane started vibrating violently and the cabin filled with smoke.

He was still 14 miles from the airport, but Curry knew the plane wouldn’t go that far at that altitude, so he began to look for a safe landing space.

“I see a landfill there,” explained Curry. “I see some machinery, some people working and it is uneven terrain so I am thinking that is not going to work. And I am looking at the highway right there. [I realize] it’s either the trees or the highway. And the trees, the airplane will probably break apart and crumble up.”

But the highway was packed with rush hour drivers.

“I am looking at my airspeed to make sure I don’t fall out of the sky,” added Curry. “I am looking at the lanes and I see an off-ramp that has just enough room for me to set the plane down.”

It was a gamble.

“For all I know we could be knocked out cold as soon as we impact the ground, or a car could come out of the bend and hit us,” said Curry.

In avoiding the cars, Curry clipped a light pole and guardrail, which whipped them around and tore off the wings. The cockpit remained intact.

“I kind of had my instinctive parental driver arm kind of come down over my son’s chest,” added Curry. “We stop. I look back. The boys are okay. They are not crying. No one seemed completely freaked out. I’m like, ‘Hey, we’re alive!’”

Curry said during the ordeal, he talked his 8-year-old son through the process to keep him calm. His 4-year-old slept in the back.

“I am just so thankful to everyone who ran over and helped us,” said Curry. “They were all so nice. They gave my sons jackets to keep them warm.”

Despite the close call, Curry and his sons say they will fly again, after taking a break.

The Federal Aviation Administration is still investigating what went wrong with the plane, which is a single-engine Socata TB200.


Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.fox5dc.com








A Marine Corps pilot returning to Tipton Airport from a pleasure flight over the Eastern Shore with his sons on Friday made an emergency crash landing on the ramp off Interstate 97 near Annapolis.

The pilot and two children aboard were not injured when the rented single-engine airplane came down.

Maryland State Police said Friday night the pilot, Christopher Curry, 32, landed the plane after it lost RPMs as he was returning to Tipton Airport.

Police said the plane clipped a guardrail and a light pole, then crashed. A wing was ripped from the plane, but the passenger compartment was completely intact, police said.

Terence Russell, whose company leases the Socata Tobago XL, said Curry is a former Harrier jet pilot now stationed at Fort George G. Meade.

Capt. Russ Davies, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Fire Department, posted information on Twitter shortly after 3:30 p.m. that the plane crashed on the ramp from I-97 South to Aris T. Allen Boulevard.

A Maryland Department of Transportation traffic camera photo showed a plane near a wooded area just off the roadway with police and fire engines on the roadway. The camera was shut off shortly after the crash.

A Marine Corps pilot returning to Tipton Airport from a pleasure flight over the Eastern Shore with his sons on Friday made an emergency crash landing on the ramp off Interstate 97 near Annapolis.

The pilot and two children aboard were not injured when the rented single-engine airplane came down.


Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.baltimoresun.com




A small Socata plane crashed this afternoon on Route 50 Eastbound near the junction with I-97.

Fire crews were dispatched around 3:30pm for a small plane that had crashed. Witnesses on the scene said that the pilot and two passengers were uninjured. According to witnesses, the pilot had a military-type uniform and the passengers appeared to be children. Anne Arundel County Fire Department EMS evaluated them at the scene.

The Socata TB-200 is registered to Tipton Tampico, LLC out of Tipton Airport at Ft. Meade. According to their corporate registration, Tipton Tampico is a LLC engaged in providing rental and operation of aircraft.

As expected, traffic around the scene is snarled and motorists are advised to avoid the area is possible. Expect road closures for several more hours (4:47pm).

Original article ➤ http://www.eyeonannapolis.net




Authorities in Maryland say no one was hurt when a small plane crashed on an interstate exit ramp near the state capital.

Maryland State Police say the plane, with three people on board, took off from Tipton Airport in Fort Meade, Maryland, on Friday afternoon.

Troopers say the pilot reported he was losing power and made an emergency landing along Interstate 97 near Annapolis, Maryland.

Anne Arundel County Fire Department officials say paramedics checked an adult and two children who were on the plane and said they were not hurt.

Photos posted on the department's Twitter feed show the plane just off the road along a wooded area. The tail number is clearly visible.

Maryland State Police are investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://abcnews.go.com





A small plane crashed onto an interstate ramp near Annapolis, Maryland, on Friday and three people walked away unharmed, officials say. 

The single-engine plane crashed Friday afternoon on a highway ramp leading from southbound I-97 to Route 665, near busy Route 50. With two children on board, the pilot had engine trouble.

Remarkably, no one on the plane or on the road was hurt, Lt. Erik Kornmeyer of the Anne Arundel County Fire Department said live on News4. 

"We do not believe they're going to need further medical attention," he said about the three people on board the plane.

Chopper4 footage showed a man in uniform and two little boys alongside the plane.

The pilot took off from Tipton Airfield in Fort Meade and was trying to return, Maryland State Police said. 

But he had engine trouble and tried to made an emergency landing. 

The plane crashed onto the exit ramp and slammed into a guardrail, state police said. Dramatic Chopper4 footage shows the plane's wings snapped off.

No other vehicles were involved, and no one was reported to be hurt. 

Crews hauled off parts of the plane with a tow truck. Also, they are evaluating a small fuel leak at the crash site. 

"The containment of that fuel is what our major concern is," Kornmeyer said. 

The fixed wing plane was registered in Anne Arundel County, federal records show. 

Original article ➤ https://www.nbcwashington.com






ANNAPOLIS, Md. — A single-engine plane crashed Friday afternoon in a wooded area alongside Interstate 97 at U.S. Route 50.

Maryland State Police said the pilot took off from Tipton Airfield and was trying to return. The pilot advised that he lost engine RPMs and made an emergency landing around 3:30 p.m.

The pilot successfully landed the plane on the Maryland Route 665 exit ramp from southbound I-97. The plane struck a guardrail; No other vehicles involved.

An adult and two children were evaluated, but no injuries were reported, Anne Arundel County fire officials said.

Fire officials said crews were evaluating a small fuel leak.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wbaltv.com

'Personality plus' on display at WWI Platte Valley fighter pilot museum: Smithsonian courted Colorado family for its vintage memorabilia

Mike Gugeler, of Erie, welds on a tube frame for a biplane at the Vintage Aero Flying Museum near Fort Lupton Tuesday. 


Sunday dinners at his grandparents' home in Rapid City, S.D., often attracted a once dangerous band of men — World War I combat veterans from around the country who found each other through the grapevine and then kept in touch.

These mini-reunions gave the guests a soapbox to tell their stories and process their shared experiences, Andy Parks, 54, said of his father's childhood recollections.

"And for my dad, a kid then reading pulp fiction about the war, it was captivating — like watching a movie at the table," he added.

Long after the meal, the then middle-aged vets moved their conversation to the basement where Fred Parks — Andy Parks' grandfather — showcased a growing collection of memorabilia from the war in a small museum he built.

Part of his grandfather's eventual fascination with and focus on collecting aviation items stemmed from an unrealized dream, Andy Parks explained.

"He fought in World War I with the artillery," he continued. "But he was gassed in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and invalided out of the war before he could transfer from the artillery into the 166th Aero Squadron's American Expeditionary Forces to join his cousin, Capt. Victor Parks, the squadron commander."

Still, the front row seat on that generation's storytelling inspired Andy Parks' father, Dr. Jim Parks, to carry on the tradition and collect much more memorabilia donated by aviators the family befriended over multiple decades.

Dr. Parks — an obstetrician/gynecologist who practiced in Denver and taught at the University of Colorado — like his father wanted to pay his respects and show hospitality to veterans. 

"I think they both understood that the vets they visited and invited to visit us were living history. And the ones I met — about half of the pilots represented in the collection today — were like grandpas to me," Andy Parks, now a Highlands Ranch resident, said. "So, our family has a 'personality plus' way of sharing this sliver of distant World War I history."

For that reason, the Smithsonian Institution — the nation's flagship repository in Washington, D.C., for historical American artifacts — came calling a few years back.

"They wanted me to donate our collection, which highlights uniforms and memorabilia from American pilots who flew for the British and the French before U.S. involvement. But we have more than they have, and I told them that they should donate their collection to me," Andy Parks said. 

Tom Kooken and Julie Kinder, 17, work Tuesday on a wing for a biplane at the Vintage Aero Flying Museum near Fort Lupton. 


Inside the time capsule

That collection grew considerably in 1981, when Andy Parks' father organized a reunion in Paris attended by 48 World War I aces —fighter pilots from both sides with five or more victories. For this reason, the event drew media coverage from outlets such as the long running American television talk show, "Today," Andy Parks, who often traveled with his father to meet vets at home and abroad, said.

"Around those tables, the pilots said that they knew whenever they shot down another pilot that there would be a mother crying that night," he continued. "It was intimate combat. Sometimes they could see each other's eyes." 

Through that gathering in France the Parks family met more vets and collected more uniforms and memorabilia well before the last known World War I vet, an Englishman, died in 2012 at 110.

Besides about 100 uniforms, the collection today includes original art — both by the wildly famous and the relatively obscure.

For instance, one jacket sports a leather squadron insignia patch sketched and hand-colored by Walt Disney, who enlisted — though underage at the time — to serve in World War I's Red Cross Ambulance Corps.

The Parks also acquired a detailed pencil sketch of an aerial dogfight with a three-dimensional perspective from above of planes in death spirals through clouds drawn by William Lambert on Jan. 27, 1918 — the day the Cincinnati native shot down his fifth plane to become an ace with, ultimately, 18 air-to-air victories.

Other memorabilia includes: sterling silver wings pins created by Tiffany and Cartier for high-ranking officers; soft leather trench coats called "teddy bears" for the plush fur lining that kept pilots warm as they flew in open cockpits; and aerial maps glued to plywood.

Because Andy Parks grew up the same way his dad did — with a basement museum honoring vets — he, too, got many closeups with veterans who heard about the collection in Colorado and arrived from all over to view it after corresponding with the family.

"I remember my mom putting up with (ace fighter pilot) Ken Porter asking her to mix a third Boodles martini until she got it right," Andy Parks said. "... And I was old enough then to record interviews my dad or I did with them and just listen in on the conversations. I still remember dad saying, 'Go get that trunk.' And opening the stuff we hadn't sorted yet with them was like opening a time capsule."

Julie Kinder, 17, left, and her mother Rebecca Kinder clean the fuselage of a replica WWI biplane at the Vintage Aero Flying Museum near Fort Lupton on Tuesday.


New name, new digs

To give the public more access to the collection, Andy Parks used his inheritance after his father died in 2002 to build a more formal museum — now a nonprofit 501(c)(3) named the Vintage Aero Flying Museum and also still known as the LaFayette Foundation.

The international aviation museum today tells bits of both sides of the war's story in the skies from inside a nondescript hangar at the Platte Valley Airpark near Fort Lupton four miles northwest of Hudson and about 40 miles northeast of Denver.

There, volunteers —teenagers to octogenarians from Boulder, Weld, and Arapahoe counties — conduct tours, clean and enhance displays, and build or repair replica vintage aircraft including the Fokker DVII German biplane Andy Parks and his dad built between 1971 and 1978.

"At the Treaty of Versailles there was a line item that required Germany to destroy every one of them except for the 20 it needed to give to each Allied country so that they could study the superior technology then," he said.

Erie resident and volunteer, Mike Gugeler, 60, has helped with building and rebuilding planes within the collection. On Tuesday, he covered wings for an SE5a fighter plane under construction there.

He explained that flying vintage aircraft sometimes feels like driving a car in desperate need of an alignment.

"They pull hard," he said. "So, you could say that we've learned a lot about stability and aerodynamics in the last 100 years."

Another volunteer, Rebecca Kinder of Centennial, said she shows up with her 17-year-old daughter, Julie, to give back and get out of her comfort zone.

"I didn't think I could weld or cover wings," she said. "But the opportunity to learn was here, and it gives me a chance to touch history every time."



The Vintage Aero Flying Museum near Fort Lupton.


Out of the closet

In telling this century-old story, it helps that the uniforms are out of the closet.

Somehow, the mannequins modeling them within the tall glass cases flanking the hangar's mezzanine level humanize World War I.

Instead of displaying random uniforms sewn into history and mostly forgotten there, these threads speak to lives understood with more context given the personal knowledge the Parks family had of the vets who donated them, according to Andy Parks, now the museum's executive director.

Space constraints today prompted the Parks family to exhibit about half of its collection at the Platte Valley Airpark hangar museum and the other half — which concentrates more on World War II aviation history — at the Pueblo Weisbrod Aircraft Museum in Pueblo, he noted.

Yet, the cramped hangar exhibit still pulls a strong thread through this momentous era.

For most of these characters, their story begins in the same way — by volunteering to fly for the Allies before the U.S. officially engaged in World War I in April 1917.

"These pilots weren't usual soldiers of fortune," Andy Parks said during a museum tour. "They were men often from prominent families like the Vanderbilt family who didn't want their assets in Europe threatened by an aggressor."

For instance, the museum features the uniform of John Stetson of Stetson hat fame for volunteering to fly as a fighter pilot for the Allies and being forced instead to teach pilots due to his old age of 33.

The estate of James Norman Hall — coauthor in 1932 of "Mutiny on the Bounty" (Little, Brown and Company) — also donated his uniform.

Others with humble beginnings stand out, too. Eddie Rickenbacker, dubbed "Ace of Aces," dropped out of school in seventh grade.

Eugene Bullard is another underdog featured in the collection for being the first black American fighter pilot in combat.

Institutional racism kept him from flying with the Americans when the U.S. entered World War I. But before then, he flew with the French and became known as the "Black Swallow of Death."

"Today, there's almost a fear of military collections, like it's wrong to focus on this history because it glorifies war," Andy Parks said, glancing at the array of mannequins on the mezzanine before getting back to work on aircraft parked below.

"No. We are not glorifying war. We are glorifying the personal sacrifices made by young people and remembering what they did so there would be no more war. I know for a fact that every one of these guys — if they could —would say that they hated what they saw and did to keep the next generation from having to do it again."

If you go

What: Tours and volunteer opportunities at the Vintage Aero Flying Museum featuring World War I aircraft, uniforms and memorabilia. Projects include building and repairing vintage aircraft; designing displays and dioramas; learning to give tours; and sorting donations. Welding, woodworking and painting skills appreciated, but no experience necessary!

When: Anytime between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., most Tuesdays. (Please contact VAFM to discuss projects and how you can help.)

Where: Platte Valley Airpark, 7507 County Road 39, Fort Lupton


More information: To schedule a tour for individuals or groups; volunteer; get specific hangar directions; or make a tax deductible donation, contact Andy Parks, VAFM executive director, at andy@vafm.org. To learn more, please visit www.vafm.org.

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.timescall.com

Cessna 180 Skywagon, N6547A: Incident occurred November 10, 2017 at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (KECP), Panama City, Bay County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham

http://registry.faa.gov/N6547A  

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA039
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, November 10, 2017 in Panama City, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N6547A

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Aircraft on landing, flipped over.

Date: 10-NOV-17
Time: 17:05:00Z
Regis#: N6547A
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PANAMA CITY
State: FLORIDA

PANAMA CITY, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) - A few tense moments at a local airport Friday after a crash landing caused some commotion.

"I was sitting out in the truck trying to make something for my partner and a plane flew in," witness Jacob Castille said.

While working on a new plane hanger Friday morning at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport, Castille said he saw something unusual.

"I guess the wind caught the tail [of the plane] and it just flipped over onto the front," Castille said.

What he saw was a Cessna 185 plane crash landing on the airport's runway.

"Well, we had a little incident involving a small aircraft on landing. We've got a little bit of gusty wind and the plane had a little trouble navigating the wind on touchdown," Deputy Executive Director of Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport Richard McConnell said.

According to airport officials, a side wind on the runway caused the pilot to have a difficult time sticking his landing.

"It's a tail dragger and it is... sometimes they get a little difficult to navigate when you're in the wind," McConnel explained.

"I've never seen that before so it was kind of something new," Castille said. "It was scary."

Witnesses said the crash was not like one would expect.

"It happened really slow actually, surprisingly for as fast as a plane would go. It really flipped over kinda slow," Castille described. 'You didn't really hear that much like it wasn't really that loud. It was actually kinda quiet. I mainly just looked over and just happened to catch a glimpse of a white airplane just flipping over."

"It's something that's not overly common, but it is something we prepare for and you can see the staff, the fire department, were very capable, very ready to respond," McConnell said.

Airport officials said the only passenger, the pilot, was not injured in the crash.


They have since cleared the runway and it is back up and running.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wjhg.com



PANAMA CITY – The main runway at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport was closed for nearly two hours late Friday morning after a Cessna 185 plane had an “incident” upon landing and flipped over on the runway.


The pilot was not injured, said Airport Executive Director Parker McClellan.


The incident occurred shortly after 11 a.m. A crane had to be brought in to flip the plane over and clear the runway, which was opened back up at about 1 p.m.


Delta flight 1733 from Atlanta that was scheduled to land while the cleanup was going on and had to be diverted to Tallahassee for a landing.


McClellan said the airport had to call a wrecker company to flip over the plane.


“That is part of our emergency response,” he said, noting that the airport had to get FAA clearance to remove the plane from the runway.


McClellan said he did not have the pilot’s name readily available.


“I was told it was not a local airplane,” McClellan said.


The pilot’s wife was waiting in the Sheltair Aviation hangar for private pilots.


She didn’t want to talk about the incident.


“We are private people,” she said.


Original article ➤ http://www.newsherald.com





Panama City Beach, Fla. - A plane crash temporarily shut down the runway at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport Friday.


The Cessna 185 flipped over and was upside down. A wrecker crew was on scene at 12:30 p.m. trying to remove the plane from the runway. 


It's unclear if anyone was injured in the crash. Airport officials are expected to release more information about the incident this afternoon.  


Original article ➤ http://www.mypanhandle.com

Martha's Vineyard Airport (KMVY) Unveils New $10.5 Million Fire Facility

Airport commissioners cut the ribbon Thursday at new state-of-the-art facility.



Thirteen months after construction began on a new airport fire station, the Martha’s Vineyard Airport Commission held a ceremonial ribbon cutting and building tours for about 40 people Thursday afternoon.

“We’re really excited to have this thing done,” airport manager Ann Richart told the guests, who gathered on the blacktop of the new building’s still-unstriped parking lot as aircraft engines whined on the nearby tarmac.

Replacing a structure built by the Navy in 1942, the 23,000-square-foot facility is known, cumbersomely but comprehensively, as the Airport Rescue and Firefighting/Snow Removal Equipment (ARFF/SRE) building. Wood-shingled on the exterior, which will weather to match other Martha’s Vineyard Airport buildings, it cost $10.47 million to build and equip.


Facility will house firefighting and snow removal equipment, among other things.


Most of the project was funded by grants from the Federal Aviation Administration ($8.3 million) and the aeronautics division of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation ($461,683). The remainder of the funding came from airport operations and lease income from the port’s business park, Ms. Richart said.

The two-story building has already been profiled in the current issue of Airport Improvement Magazine, which details the FAA’s 2015 ultimatum to the airport commission: Replace the 73-year-old fire station, or lose critical funding.

“This is something that was long overdue on Martha’s Vineyard,” said FAA regional administrator Mary Walsh, who traveled to the Island for Thursday’s ceremony. “I think it’s spectacular.”


Building replaces structure built by the Navy in 1942. Larger grand opening is planned for December.


In addition to massive bays for firefighting and snow-removal equipment — including one plow with a 20-foot-wide sweep for clearing runways — the new building has a command center with runway views and a clear sightline of the control tower, and workspace for airport operations employees who formerly had no desks to call their own.

A roomy, fully fixtured eat-in kitchen, bunk rooms with Murphy beds and a locker room will make it easier for workers to put in long hours at the airport during emergencies. Still to come: federally-funded workout equipment for a basement fitness room. “So if we need an emergency response, everybody’s ready,” Ms. Richart said.

The airport commission also has its own place in the new building: a conference room with its own bathroom, sink, coffee machine and a personalized mug for each commissioner.

Thursday’s ribbon cutting was a preview of what Ms. Richart said would likely be a Christmastime open house for the public at the new fire station.

Story and photo gallery:  https://vineyardgazette.com

Beechcraft B100 King Air, N66804, registered to OIA Enterprises LLC: Accident occurred September 21, 2016 at McKellar-Sipes Regional Airport (KMKL), Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Memphis, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

OIA Enterprises LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N66804

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA320
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 21, 2016 in Jackson, TN
Aircraft: BEECH B100, registration: N66804
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 21, 2016, about 1620 central daylight time, a Beech B100, N66804, was substantially damaged when the right main landing gear collapsed during landing at the Mc Kellar-Sipes Regional Airport (MKL), Jackson, Tennessee. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the business flight that originated from Memphis International Airport (MEM), Memphis, Tennessee. The airplane was registered to OIA Enterprises LLC, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he was flying businessmen to different airports all day and was returning from MEM to his home airport. The en route portion of the flight was uneventful, and on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern for landing at MKL, he verified that the three green landing gear indicator lights were illuminated, and all instruments were indicating normal. He further stated that the airplane landed "firmly" and the right wing dropped down far enough that the right engine propeller blades contacted the runway. The pilot then pulled back on the control yoke and the airplane became airborne again momentarily, before settling back down on the runway. The right main landing gear collapsed. The airplane then veered off the right side of the runway, struck a runway sign and contacted a weather antenna.

According to witnesses, they watched the airplane land hard on the runway, then the airplane flew back up in the air and landed hard again on the runway. The right landing gear folded-up under the airplane and the airplane slid off the right side of the runway.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane was resting on its right wing, against the airport's weather service antenna. The right landing gear was inside the wheel-well. The left engine was hanging loose from the motor mounts. After the airplane was raised, the inspector noticed that the right main landing gear actuator was fractured in half.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA320
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 21, 2016 in Jackson, TN
Aircraft: BEECH B100, registration: N66804
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 21, 2016, about 1620 central daylight time, a Beech B100, N66804, was substantially damaged when the right main landing gear collapsed during landing at the Mc Kellar-Sipes Regional Airport (MKL), Jackson, Tennessee. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the business flight that originated from Memphis International Airport (MEM), Memphis, Tennessee. The airplane was registered to OIA Enterprises LLC, and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he was flying businessmen to different airports all day and was returning from MEM, to his home airport. The flight was uneventful, and on the final approach leg into MKL, he verified that the three green landing gear indicator lights were illuminated, and all instruments were indicating normal. He further stated that the airplane landed "firmly" and the right wing dropped down far enough that the right engine propeller blades contacted the runway. The pilot then pulled back on the controls and the airplane became airborne again for a short time before settling back down on the runway. The right main landing gear collapsed. The airplane then veered off the right side of the runway, struck a runway sign, and contacted a weather antenna.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane was resting on its right wing, against the airport's weather service antenna. The right landing gear was inside the wheel well. The left engine was hanging loose from the motor mounts. After the airplane was lifted up, the inspector noticed that the right main landing gear actuator was fractured in half.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Island Air started small — at the airports others ignored




HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Island Air got off to a humble start in 1980 as Princeville Airways, with scheduled flights between Honolulu and Kauai's Princeville Resort.

It started adding smaller airports that Hawaiian and Aloha airlines ignored.

"They did blaze a lot of new routes in the islands and that offered a tremendous amount of convenience," said aviation expert Rick Forman.

Seven years later, Aloha Airlines's parent company bought the carrier, renamed it Aloha Island Air and further expanded its daily schedule.

When Aloha sold the carrier to an investment group in 2004, it was Hawaii's third biggest airline.

Island Air acquired larger aircraft and doubled its staff to about 400 employees to compete directly with Aloha and Hawaiian Air.

"Once they got the bigger airlines, I think basically, their business model became very difficult," Forman said.

Four years ago, after buying Lanai, Oracle billionaire Larry Ellison acquired Island Air as a way to get more visitors to his hotels.

But mounting losses prompted Ellison to sell his shares to venture capitalist Jeffrey Au last year. The company filed for bankruptcy reorganization last month.

Island Air outlasted Aloha Air, Mid-Pacific Air, Mahalo Air, Discovery Airways and even Phoenix-based go! Airlines.

But after 37 years, it couldn't pay the bills on its new Q400 planes. And now, Island Air is flying into history, too.

Story and video ➤ http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com