Sunday, May 6, 2018

Rhinelander-Oneida County Airport (KRHI) director Jim Brauer retires after 28 years



RHINELANDER - A new face will take over the role of Rhinelander-Oneida County Airport director Sunday. However, not before the community said goodbye to the man who created a legacy in the position for more than two decades.

Joe Brauer didn't hesitate to take the chance to make major changes for Rhinelander.

"Bob Heck came to me and said 'Mr. Brauer how would you like to become airport director now?' [It] took me ten seconds to say you got your man," said Brauer.

Brauer became the man with one of his biggest changes. He brought disabled passenger lifts to the airport.

"We're the airport that cares," said Brauer. 

This weekend after 28 years as director, a new face to the city but a familiar face to Brauer, will take over the wings. 

"I was the resident airport kid. I used to ride my bicycle out there and beg, plead or do odd jobs for flight instructions. Joe was a mentor of sorts," said Rhinelander- Oneida County Airport Director Matther Leitner.

Leitner takes over Brauer's job Sunday. However, he said he has no anxiety.

"I would say fortunate," said Leitner.

Leitner believes he learned from the best since he was a child.

"He's always been a consummate professional. He taught me how to maintain my composure well, when things weren't going so well," said Leitner. 

Leitner will use everything he learned since his days of shadowing Brauer, to make a new path of his own. 

"We go way back and I look forward to continuing his legacy," said Brauer. 

That gave Brauer some comfort when he said his final goodbyes.

"I can go out knowing we left some really great things behind for the city of Rhinelander," said Brauer.

Brauer worked in the airline business for 20 years before he became director. After retirement he said he looks forward to spending more time with his family and traveling.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wjfw.com

Apollo Gyro AG1, operated by the private pilot as personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N141C: Accident occurred May 06, 2018 in Smith Beach, Northampton County, Virginia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N141C


Location: Smith Beach, VA
Accident Number: ERA18TA142
Date & Time: 05/06/2018, 1510 EDT
Registration: N141C
Aircraft: BARRY MAGGIO APOLLO AG-1
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: VFR encounter with IMC
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 6, 2018, about 1510 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Apollo AG-1 gyroplane, N141C, was substantially damaged when it collided with power lines during a precautionary landing near Smith Beach, Virginia. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The gyroplane was operated by the private pilot as personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Halifax-Northampton Regional Airport (IXA), Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, about 1330. The flight was destined to Accomack County Airport (MFV), Melfa, Virginia.

The pilot reported that he started to fly across the Chesapeake Bay to the Cape Charles VOR at 1,300 ft above ground level. As the airplane approached the shoreline at the Cape Charles VOR, the pilot turned north toward MFV. At that time, the cloud ceiling began to lower very rapidly, so he made the decision to land at a private airstrip prior to MFV. He mistook a road for the private airstrip and the gyroplane collided with power lines during the attempted landing. The pilot added that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions with the gyroplane.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that it was intact and resting on its right side on a road. The inspector noted that the fuselage sustained substantial damage. He did not observe any anomalies with the flight controls and was able to successfully test-run the engine on the airframe.

The recorded weather at MVF, at 1515, was: wind from 170° at 4 knots; visibility 1 3/4 miles in mist; overcast ceiling at 500 ft; temperature 18° C; dew point 17° C; altimeter 29.85 inches of mercury. The pilot also reported that he utilized weather equipment onboard his gyroplane, but did not receive a weather briefing from flight service.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private; Sport Pilot
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/06/2018
Flight Time:  1700 hours (Total, all aircraft), 475 hours (Total, this make and model), 1700 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BARRY MAGGIO
Registration: N141C
Model/Series: APOLLO AG-1 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 0002
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/03/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1232 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 25 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 464 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 914ULS
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 115 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MFV, 48 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1515 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 220°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  1.75 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Mist; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Roanoke Rapids, NC (IXA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Melfa, VA (MFV)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1330 EDT
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 37.362778, -75.990833 (est)
======
Location: Smith Beach, VA
Accident Number: ERA18LA142
Date & Time: 05/06/2018, 1510 EDT
Registration: N141C
Aircraft: BARRY MAGGIO APOLLO AG-1
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 6, 2018, about 1510 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Apollo AG-1 gyroplane, N141C, was substantially damaged when it collided with power lines during a precautionary landing near Smith Beach, Virginia. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The gyroplane was operated by the private pilot as personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Halifax-Northampton Regional Airport (IXA), Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, about 1330. The flight was destined to Accomack County Airport (MFV), Melfa, Virginia.

The pilot reported that he started to fly across the Chesapeake Bay to the Cape Charles VOR at 1,300 ft above ground level. As he approached the shoreline at the Cape Charles VOR, he turned north toward MFV. At that time, the cloud ceiling began to lower very rapidly, so he made the decision to land at a private airstrip prior to MFV. He mistook a road for the private airstrip and the gyroplane collided with power lines during the attempted landing. The pilot added that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions with the gyroplane.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that it was intact and resting on its right side on a road. The inspector noted that the fuselage sustained substantial damage. He did not observe any anomalies with the flight controls and was able to successfully test-run the engine on the airframe.

The recorded weather at MVF, at 1515, was: wind from 170° at 4 knots; visibility 1 3/4 miles in mist; overcast ceiling at 500 ft; temperature 18° C; dew point 17° C; altimeter 29.85 inches of mercury. The pilot also reported that utilized weather equipment onboard his gyroplane, but did not receive a weather briefing from flight service. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BARRY MAGGIO
Registration: N141C
Model/Series: APOLLO AG-1 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MFV, 48 ft msl
Observation Time: 1515 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 170°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 500 ft agl
Visibility: 1.75 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Roanoke Rapids, NC (IXA)
Destination: Melfa, VA (MFV)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  37.362778, -75.990833 (est) 






NORTHAMPTON COUNTY, Va. - Law enforcement and first responders are on-scene of a autogyro crash that happened in Northampton County on Sunday.

According to officials, Local dispatch received a call about the crash around 3 p.m. in the 16000 block of Candy Lane in Cape Charles. They say that the autogyro hit power lines near the intersection of Smith Beach Road and Candy Lane, causing the aircraft to crash.

The pilot was the only person in the autogyro, and is being attended to by local EMS. The extent of his injuries are unknown at the time.

Story and video ➤ http://wtkr.com

Cessna 182R Skylane, registered to and operated by Civil Air Patrol Inc, N5419E: Accident occurred May 06, 2018 at Clarksville–Montgomery County Regional Airport / Outlaw Field (KCKV), Tennessee

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5419E

Location: Clarksville, TN
Accident Number: GAA18CA260
Date & Time: 05/06/2018, 1525 EDT
Registration: N5419E
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing area overshoot
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

According to the pilot, the weather began to deteriorate during the previous approach and the airplane encountered updrafts and downdrafts. Additionally, he noticed that it had begun to rain, and he aborted the landing.

During the next approach, he reported that there was a variable crosswind and that the updrafts and downdrafts continued. During the landing roll, the wind direction may have shifted to a tailwind, and that the brakes did not have "the normal stopping effect." The airplane overran the runway and the airplane struck a fence before coming to rest on a public road.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left-wing spar.

10 minutes prior to the accident, the METAR at the airport reported that the wind was from 260° at 09 knots and lightning in the distance from the west to northeast.

About the time of the accident, the wind was from 350° at 24 knots, gusting to 33 knots with peak wind from 350° at 33 knots and lightning in the distance from the west to northeast.

10 minutes after the accident, the wind was reported as being from 10° at 20 knots and gusting to 31 knots, with peak wind being from 350° at 33 knots and shifting, lightening in all quadrants with thunderstorms and light rain. The pilot landed to runway 23.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 76, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/07/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/29/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 4377 hours (Total, all aircraft), 918 hours (Total, this make and model), 4000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N5419E
Model/Series: 182 R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1983
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18268317
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/19/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5616.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:  C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-U-38B
Registered Owner: CIVIL AIR PATROL INC
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: CIVIL AIR PATROL INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CKV, 551 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2022 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 198°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 24 knots / 33 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Thunderstorms - No Precipitation
Departure Point: Clarksville, TN (CKV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Russellville, KY (4M7)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1415 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: OUTLAW FIELD (CKV)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 549 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 23
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4004 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 36.621944, -87.415000 (est)


















CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (CLARKSVILLENOW) – A Cessna 182 aircraft crashed on landing at the Clarksville Regional Airport about 3:30 p.m. Sunday, May 6. 

According to Clarksville police, the aircraft touched down, went through the perimeter fence, and came to rest on the shoulder of Outlaw Field Road, blocking one lane of traffic.

Officials believe the pilot was the only occupant of the plane. The pilot’s injuries do not appear to be life-threatening.

Lt Colonel Wilson Polidura with the Civil Air Patrol was on the scene and said the aircraft was on an Air Force assigned training mission and a thunderstorm took control of the aircraft.

Outlaw Field Rd. will be down to one lane until the investigation is complete. 

Original article can be found here ➤  http://clarksvillenow.com

Cessna 182T Skylane, N65903: Accident occurred October 09, 2016 in Toone, Hardeman County, Tennessee

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Memphis, Tennessee 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N65903

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Toone, TN
Accident Number: ERA17LA019
Date & Time: 10/09/2016, 1050 CDT
Registration: N65903
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 9, 2016, about 1050 central daylight time, a Cessna 182T, N65903, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in a field, following a partial loss of engine power during cruise flight near Toone, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that that originated from Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida, about 0730. The flight was destined to McKeller-Sipes Regional Airport (MKL), Jackson, Tennessee.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 4,000 feet mean sea level, nearing the destination airport, an instrument panel warning sounded and the oil pressure indicator was in the red arc; however, the engine was running smoothly. The pilot began to look for airports or fields to divert to and notified air traffic control (ATC) of the abnormal engine indication. The pilot then requested, and ATC approved a direct course to the destination airport. A few minutes later, a light "clanging" noise was heard from the engine and the pilot alerted ATC that the airplane did indeed have an engine problem. The controller then advised the pilot that there was a private airstrip 5 miles west of his position and the pilot attempted to divert to that airstrip. The "clanging" noise grew louder and the engine did not have enough power to reach the private airstrip. The pilot then performed a forced landing in a field. During the landing, the airplane encountered uneven terrain, which collapsed the nose landing gear.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the firewall had sustained damage. The inspector also noted that the engine's No. 3 cylinder had suffered a catastrophic failure. Examination of photos provided by the inspector revealed evidence of oil on the exterior of the engine and exhaust system in the immediate vicinity of the No. 3 cylinder. The inspector added that the No. 3 cylinder exhaust valve was stuck in the closed position. The No. 3 cylinder was retained and forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, D.C. Examination of the No. 3 cylinder revealed that the rocker arm shaft bosses, bushings, and exhaust valve keeper were fractured. The rocker arm cover was fractured and bent outward. All of the fracture surfaces exhibited features consistent with overstress failure. No indications of pre-existing damage, such as corrosion or fatigue cracking, were observed. Dimensional review of the stuck exhaust valve revealed that it exhibited deposits on its surface up to 0.006-inch thick.

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed-tricycle gear airplane was manufactured in 2004. It was equipped with a Lycoming IO-540, 230-horsepower engine. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on July 12, 2016. At that time, the engine had accumulated 2,188.6 hours since new. The airplane had flown 79.8 hours from the time of the inspection, until the accident, which resulted in 2,268.4 total engine hours since new at the time of the accident. The manufacturer recommended overhaul time for the make and model engine was 12 years or 2,000 hours, whichever occurred first.

Review of an engine data plot for the accident flight reveled that the engine monitor was indicating that the No. 3 cylinder was about two-thirds below the exhaust gas temperature and cylinder head temperature of the other five cylinders during the entire approximate 3-hours cruise portion of the accident flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/07/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/29/2016
Flight Time:  369 hours (Total, all aircraft), 236 hours (Total, this make and model), 251 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 73 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N65903
Model/Series: 182 T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18281501
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3110 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 80 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2268 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AB1A5
Registered Owner: EASY AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MKL, 434 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 5°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 4°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots, 50°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.36 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Destin, FL (DTS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Jackson, TN (MKL)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0730 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.320000, -88.950000 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA019
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 09, 2016 in Toone, TN
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N65903
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 9, 2016, about 1050 central daylight time, a Cessna 182T, N65903, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in a field, following a partial loss of engine power during cruise flight near Toone, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that that originated from Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida, about 0730. The flight was destined to McKeller-Sipes Regional Airport (MKL), Jackson, Tennessee.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 4,000 feet mean sea level, nearing the destination airport, an instrument panel warning sounded and the oil pressure indicator was in the red arc; however, the engine was running smoothly. The pilot began to look for airports or fields to divert to and notified air traffic control (ATC) of the abnormal engine indication. The pilot then requested, and ATC approved a direct course to the destination airport. A few minutes later, a light "clanging" noise was heard from the engine and the pilot alerted ATC that the airplane did indeed have an engine problem. The controller then advised the pilot that there was a private airstrip 5 miles west of his position and the pilot attempted to divert to that airstrip. The "clanging" noise grew louder and the engine did not have enough power to reach the private airstrip. The pilot then performed a forced landing in a field. During the landing, the airplane encountered uneven terrain, which collapsed the nosegear.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the firewall had sustained damage. The inspector also noted that the engine's No. 3 cylinder had suffered a catastrophic failure.

The engine was retained for further examination.

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N208SD, Hageland Aviation Services / Ravn Connect: Fatal accident occurred October 02, 2016 in Togiak, Alaska

Drew Edward Welty

The two pilots that died in the plane crash are identified as Timothy Cline, 43 of Homer, and Drew Welty, 29 of Anchorage. The passenger has been identified as Louie John, 49 of Manokotak. 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Pratt & Whitney Canada; Montreal, MB
Hageland Aviation Services Inc; Anchorage, Alaska 
Hartzell Propellers; Piqua, Ohio
Honeywell Aerospace; Phoenix, Arizona 
Hageland Aviation; Anchorage, Alaska
Federal Aviation Administration;  Washington, District of Columbia 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N208SD



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Togiak, AK
Accident Number: ANC17MA001
Date & Time: 10/02/2016, 1157 AKD
Registration: N208SD
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: VFR encounter with IMC
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Scheduled

Analysis 

The NTSB's full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Pages/AccidentReports.aspx. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-18/02.

On October 2, 2016, about 1157 Alaska daylight time, Ravn Connect flight 3153, a turbine-powered Cessna 208B Grand Caravan airplane, N208SD, collided with steep, mountainous terrain about 10 nautical miles northwest of Togiak Airport (PATG), Togiak, Alaska. The two commercial pilots and the passenger were killed, and the airplane was destroyed. The scheduled commuter flight was operated under visual flight rules by Hageland Aviation Services, Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at PATG (which had the closest weather observing station to the accident site), but a second company flight crew (whose flight departed about 2 minutes after the accident airplane and initially followed a similar route) reported that they observed unexpected fog, changing clouds, and the potential for rain along the accident route. Company flight-following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Quinhagak Airport, Quinhagak, Alaska, about 1133 and was en route to PATG. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The flight crew's decision to continue the visual flight rules flight into deteriorating visibility and their failure to perform an immediate escape maneuver after entry into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain (CFIT). 

Contributing to the accident were

(1) Hageland's allowance of routine use of the terrain inhibit switch for inhibiting the terrain awareness and warning system alerts and inadequate guidance for uninhibiting the alerts, which reduced the margin of safety, particularly in deteriorating visibility; 

(2) Hageland's inadequate crew resource management (CRM) training; 

(3) the Federal Aviation Administration's failure to ensure that Hageland's approved CRM training contained all the required elements of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations 135.330; and 

(4) Hageland's CFIT avoidance ground training, which was not tailored to the company's operations and did not address current CFIT-avoidance technologies. 

Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Ground proximity system - Not used/operated
Ground proximity system - Related operating info
Ground proximity system - Capability exceeded
Ground proximity system - Design

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Flight crew (Cause)
Lack of action - Flight crew (Cause)

Environmental issues
Below VFR minima - Decision related to condition (Cause)
Below VFR minima - Response/compensation (Cause)
Mountainous/hilly terrain - Response/compensation (Cause)
Mountainous/hilly terrain - Contributed to outcome (Cause)

VHF/HF radio - Not specified
Meteo equip coverage/avail - Not specified

Organizational issues
Adequacy of policy/proc - Operator (Factor)
CRM/MRM training - Operator (Factor)
CRM/MRM training - FAA/Regulator (Factor)
Training - Operator (Factor)
Safety programs - FAA/Regulator
Safety programs - Other institution/organization

Factual Information 

The NTSB's full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Pages/AccidentReports.aspx. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-18/02.

On October 2, 2016, about 1157 Alaska daylight time, Ravn Connect flight 3153, a turbine-powered Cessna 208B Grand Caravan airplane, N208SD, collided with steep, mountainous terrain about 10 nautical miles northwest of Togiak Airport (PATG), Togiak, Alaska. The two commercial pilots and the passenger were killed, and the airplane was destroyed. The scheduled commuter flight was operated under visual flight rules by Hageland Aviation Services, Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at PATG (which had the closest weather observing station to the accident site), but a second company flight crew (whose flight departed about 2 minutes after the accident airplane and initially followed a similar route) reported that they observed unexpected fog, changing clouds, and the potential for rain along the accident route. Company flight-following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Quinhagak Airport, Quinhagak, Alaska, about 1133 and was en route to PATG. 



History of Flight

Enroute-cruise
VFR encounter with IMC (Defining event)
Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 43, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/22/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/07/2016
Flight Time: 6481 hours (Total, all aircraft), 781 hours (Total, this make and model), 6181 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 271 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 102 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/13/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/03/2016
Flight Time: 273 hours (Total, all aircraft), 84 hours (Total, this make and model), 139 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 84 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 83 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N208SD
Model/Series: 208B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 208B0491
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/15/2016, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 7449 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 20562.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: P&W
ELT: C126 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: PT6-114A
Registered Owner: ICECAP LLC TRUSTEE
Rated Power: 675 hp
Operator: HAGELAND AVIATION SERVICES INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter Air Carrier (135); On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: RAVN CONNECT
Operator Designator Code: EPUA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PATG, 20 ft msl
Observation Time: 1156 AKD
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 124°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3900 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / 6°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4700 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.88 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain
Departure Point: QUINHAGAK, AK (PAQH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: TOGIAK, AK (PATG)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1133 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: TOGIAK (PATG) 
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 18 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Fire At Unknown Time
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Explosion At Unknown Time
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 59.165556, -160.653333


NTSB Identification: ANC17FA001
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Togiak, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B, registration: N208SD
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 2, 2016, about 1154 Alaska daylight time, a turbine-powered Cessna 208B Grand Caravan airplane, N208SD, sustained substantial damage after impacting steep, mountainous, rocky terrain about 12 miles northwest of Togiak, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as flight 3153 by Hageland Aviation Services, Inc., dba Ravn Connect, Anchorage, Alaska, as a scheduled commuter flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 and visual flight rules (VFR). All three people on board (two commercial pilots and one passenger) sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the Togiak Airport, Togiak, and company flight following procedures were in effect. Flight 3153 departed Quinhagak, Alaska, at 1133, destined for Togiak.

Earlier, flight 3153 had originated in Bethel, Alaska; made scheduled stops in Togiak and Quinhagak; and was scheduled to return to Togiak before returning to Bethel, the intended final destination for the day. 

According to the director of operations for Hageland Aviation Services, Inc., about 1214, he received a notification from the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) that it received a signal from a 406 megahertz (MHz) Emergency Location Transmitter (ELT), which activated about 1208 and was registered to N208SD. After accessing the aircraft location data provided by an on-board flight tracking system and discovering the aircraft had been stationary for about 20 minutes, the Hageland director of operations contacted the Hageland Operational Control Center (OCC) in Palmer, Alaska, to verify the information. At that time, the operator initiated a company search for the airplane.

At 1326, the Alaska State Troopers (AST) were notified by the RCC personnel of an ELT activation near the village of Togiak, within the confines of the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge. 

Shortly before 1430, an AST helicopter was dispatched from Dillingham, Alaska, about 67 miles east of Togiak, to the coordinates associated with the ELT signal, but poor weather conditions kept the searchers from locating the accident airplane until about 1630. Alaska State Troopers were able to access the scene on foot shortly before 1730 and subsequently confirmed there were no survivors. 

On October 3, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), along with another NTSB investigator and two Alaska State Troopers reached the accident site. The airplane's fragmented wreckage was located on the southeast side of a steep, loose rock-covered mountainside, adjacent to the Quigmy River, about 12 miles northwest of Togiak. 

An area believed to be the initial impact point was discovered on the northwest side of a mountain ridgeline at the 2,300-foot level. The initial impact point was located north of and about 200 feet below the 2,500-foot mountain summit. The initial impact point contained fragmented portions of fuselage and two severed propeller blades. From the initial impact point, the wreckage path extended southeast to the main wreckage, which was located downslope on the southeast side of the ridgeline at the 1,550-foot level. The outboard portion of the left wing had separated and was located about 200 feet further downslope below the main wreckage site. A postcrash fire incinerated a large portion of the fuselage and right wing.

The airplane was equipped with a Spidertracks flight tracking system, which provides real-time aircraft flight tracking data. The flight tracking information is transmitted via Iridium satellites to an internet-based storage location at 6-minute intervals. According to the Spidertracks data, the airplane's last known location was reported at 1153, about 19 nautical miles northwest of the Togiak Airport, at an altitude of 1,043 feet, traveling at 144 knots across the ground, on a heading of 140 degrees.

At 1156, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the Togiak Airport (the closest weather reporting facility) reported, in part: wind calm; visibility 7 statute miles; light rain; sky condition, scattered clouds at 3,900 feet, overcast at 4,700 feet; temperature 45 degrees F, dewpoint 43 degrees F; altimeter, 29.88 inHg.

A detailed wreckage examination is pending. 

The airplane was equipped with a Pratt & Whitney PT6 series engine.