Friday, November 24, 2017

Cessna 182S Skylane, N7111W, registered to Better Living Aviation Inc and operated by A&M Aviation: Accident occurred November 22, 2017 at Bolingbrook's Clow International Airport (1C5), Will County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N7111W   

Location: Bolingbrook, IL
Accident Number: CEN18LA041
Date & Time: 11/22/2017, 1040 CST
Registration: N7111W
Aircraft: CESSNA 182S
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 22, 2017, about 1040 central standard time, a Cessna 182S airplane, N7111W departed the runway and impacted terrain while taking off from the Bolingbrook's Clow International Airport (1C5), Bolingbrook, Illinois. The pilot, sole occupant, was not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to Better Living Aviation, Inc, Wilmington, Delaware, and operated by A&M Aviation, Bolingbrook, Illinois, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that he used the airplane's checklist to complete a preflight inspection. He taxied the airplane to the warm-up pad to complete the checklist items and configure the airplane for the takeoff. He then taxied on to runway 36. The pilot continued that he aligned the airplane with the centerline and slowly added takeoff power. The initial takeoff roll was straight down the runway, but the airplane started to turn right. The pilot was unable to correct the turn or stop the airplane, before the airplane exited the side of the runway. The airplane became airborne, settled and impacted a ditch, and came to rest upside down.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane's nose landing gear, and wings were damaged, and the fuselage sustained substantial damage during the accident. Additionally, an examination of the airplane's steering and rudder system did not find any preimpact abnormalities.

The pilot added that he did not remember what else he did when the airplane started to turn, and why it did not work. Nor did he noticed any undirected braking of the airplane, or unusual taxi characteristics of the airplane prior to it turning to the right.

At 1055, the automated weather observation facility located at the Lewis University Airport (KLOT), about 5 miles south of the accident site recorded; wind at 240 degrees at 4 knots. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 80
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:  Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/15/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/03/2017
Flight Time: 786 hours (Total, all aircraft), 99 hours (Total, this make and model), 22 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N7111W
Model/Series: 182S NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No 
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18280550
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/06/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4989 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-540 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLOT
Observation Time: 1055 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 180°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -9°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 240°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.37 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Bolingbrook, IL (1C5)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Bolingbrook, IL (1C5)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information


Airport: Bolingbrook's Clow Int'l (1C5)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 675 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3360 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  41.695556, -88.128889

Cessna 310D, N6906T, AeroTech Mapping Inc: Incident occurred November 23, 2017 at McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.

http://registry.faa.gov/N6906T

Date: 23-NOV-17
Time: 01:00:00Z
Regis#: N6906T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C310
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LAS VEGAS
State: NEVADA

Piper PA-12, N4040M, registered to and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred November 22, 2017 in Dickinson, Stark County, North Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4040M

Location: Dickinson, ND
Accident Number: CEN18LA039
Date & Time: 11/22/2017, 1253 MST
Registration: N4040M
Aircraft: PIPER PA 12
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 22, 2017, at 1253 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-12 airplane, N4040M, was substantially damaged during an in-flight collision with a truck trailer immediately after takeoff from an industrial truck yard near Dickinson, North Dakota. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident. The intended destination was the Sloulin Field International Airport (ISN), Williston, North Dakota.

The pilot stated that during the accident takeoff, when the airplane attempted to climb out of ground effect, it banked to the right and the right-wing tip contacted the ground. The airplane continued to roll and came to rest on a truck trailer. He commented that the airplane might have encountered a wind gust which contributed to a right wing stall. He did not perceive anomalies with respect to the airplane during the accident takeoff.

The pilot informed Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors that he did not feel that there was any hindrance to the airplane during the accident takeoff. The airplane was positioned at the east end of the truck yard to use all the available takeoff area. He set two notches of flaps and executed a short field takeoff procedure. The tail of the airplane lifted off the ground at about 30 knots, at which time he applied full flaps causing the airplane became airborne. Shortly afterward, the right wing dropped possibly due to a gust of wind. He responded by applying full left aileron and full left rudder to compensate. As he was recovering from the right bank, he retracted the flaps from full (third notch) to one-half (second notch) and confirmed throttle was full forward. At that time, the airplane tucked and turned sharply to the right.

According to the passenger, the airplane was gaining speed during the takeoff run until it neared the west end of the maintenance building located in the yard. About 10 or 15 feet above the ground, the airplane seemed to come to a "complete dead stop" and subsequently rolled to the right. The pilot was able to recover momentarily; however, the airplane banked to the right again and ultimately impacted a truck trailer.

A witness reported that the airplane became airborne about 400 feet into the takeoff run. Shortly afterward, when the airplane was about 6 feet above ground level, the right wing dipped to 35 or 40 degrees of bank. The pilot corrected, but the airplane remained in a 20-degree right bank. At that point, the airplane started a more abrupt climb, at which time the airplane "snap rolled" to the right and impacted a truck trailer inverted. He described the airplane attitude as "significantly nose up" and estimated the pitch angle as about 15-degrees angle of attack. The right-wing tip was about 6 feet off the ground when the airplane started the roll. The witness noted that the engine sounded as it if came to full power at the beginning of the takeoff and did not vary. He did not perceive and issues with respect to the engine.

One of the FAA inspectors that responded to the accident site reported that the truck yard consisted of dirt and gravel. The portion of the yard used for the accident takeoff was rough and uneven. The takeoff distance available was about 750 feet. A postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction. Flight control continuity was confirmed, which included the wing flap control system. The cockpit flap handle appeared to be in the retracted (up) position at the time of the examination. The flaps were also in the retracted position; however, the exact position of the wing flaps at the time of impact could not be determined.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 33, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/14/2015
Flight Time:  185 hours (Total, all aircraft), 78 hours (Total, this make and model), 103 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N4040M
Model/Series: PA 12 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 12-2923
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/10/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2168 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 1500 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DIK, 2592 ft msl
Observation Time: 1256 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 179°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 3°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 24 knots/ 31 knots, 290°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Dickinson, ND (N/A)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Williston, ND (ISN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1253 MST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 47.021389, -102.810278 (est)

Location:  Dickinson, ND
Accident Number: CEN18LA039
Date & Time: 11/22/2017, 1245 MST
Registration: N4040M
Aircraft: PIPER PA 12
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On November 22, 2017, about 1245 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-12 airplane, N4040M, was substantially damaged during an in-flight collision with a truck trailer near Dickinson, North Dakota. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident. The intended destination was the Sloulin Field International Airport (ISN), Williston, North Dakota.

The accident occurred shortly after takeoff. The pilot noted that the airplane seemed to lose lift once out of ground effect and he was not able to maintain control. The airplane ultimately came to rest on the trailer of a truck located in the industrial yard from which the airplane was attempting to takeoff. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N4040M
Model/Series: PA 12 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DIK, 2592 ft msl
Observation Time: 1956 MST
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 24 knots/ 31 knots, 290°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Dickinson, ND
Destination: Williston, ND (ISN)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 47.021389, 102.810278 (est)

Luscombe 8F, N1780K: Accident occurred November 23, 2017 in Caldwell, Burleson County, Texas

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms



Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1780K

Location: Caldwell, TX
Accident Number: GAA18CA061
Date & Time: 11/23/2017, 1650 CST
Registration: N1780K
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 


Analysis 

The pilot reported that, during the right downwind in the traffic pattern, he was about 1/4 mile from the runway, which was "too close." He added that, "during a poorly planned and executed base to final approach," he performed an "uncoordinated" right bank about 45°, and the right wing dropped, which resulted in a descending right roll. He attempted to recover, but the airplane impacted terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The pilot's failure to maintain yaw control and the exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack in the traffic pattern, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall/spin.

Findings

Aircraft
Yaw control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Angle of attack - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-VFR pattern base
Miscellaneous/other
Aerodynamic stall/spin (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/02/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/04/2016
Flight Time: (Estimated) 589 hours (Total, all aircraft), 589 hours (Total, this make and model), 589 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: LUSCOMBE
Registration: N1780K
Model/Series: 8 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 4507
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: C90-12F
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 90 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRWV, 391 ft msl
Observation Time: 0015 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 232°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Caldwell, TX (PVT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Caldwell, TX (PVT)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1610 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Private (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 268 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2700 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 30.699444, -96.654722 (est)

Preventing Similar Accidents  

Prevent Aerodynamic Stalls at Low Altitude

While maneuvering an airplane at low altitude in visual meteorological conditions, many pilots fail to avoid conditions that lead to an aerodynamic stall, recognize the warning signs of a stall onset, and apply appropriate recovery techniques. Many stall accidents result when a pilot is momentarily distracted from the primary task of flying, such as while maneuvering in the airport traffic pattern, during an emergency, or when fixating on ground objects.

An aerodynamic stall can happen at any airspeed, at any altitude, and with any engine power setting. Pilots need to be honest with themselves about their knowledge of stalls and preparedness to recognize and handle a stall situation. Training can help pilots fully understand the stall phenomenon, including angle-of-attack (AOA) concepts and how weight, center of gravity, turbulence, maneuvering loads, and other factors can affect an airplane's stall characteristics. The stall characteristics may be different in each type of airplane, so learn them before you fly.

The stall airspeeds marked on the airspeed indicator (for example, the bottom of the green arc and the bottom of the white arc) typically represent steady flight speeds at 1G at the airplane's maximum gross weight in the specified configuration. Maneuvering loads and other factors can increase the airspeed at which the airplane will stall. For example, increasing bank angle can increase stall speed exponentially.

Reducing AOA by lowering the airplane's nose at the first indication of a stall is the most important immediate response for stall avoidance and stall recovery. This may seem counterintuitive at low altitudes, but is a necessary first step.

See http://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-alerts/documents/SA_019.pdf for additional resources.

The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).

Hughes 269C, N9685F, Charlottesville Aero LLC: Accident occurred November 22, 2017 in Woodlawn, Carroll County, Virginia

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston, West Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N9685F

Location: Woodlawn, VA
Accident Number: GAA18CA060
Date & Time: 11/22/2017, 1100 EST
Registration: N9685F
Aircraft: HUGHES 300
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis


The helicopter pilot reported that, he was landing on a pad in a confined area. He added that, as he approached the landing pad, he slowed the helicopter to transition to a hover. The main rotor RPM began to drop and he applied full throttle, but the RPM continued to decline. The helicopter was unable to maintain altitude and slowly settled into the trees on the hillside about 20 ft. short of the landing pad. Subsequently, the helicopter struck the trees, and rolled onto its right-side.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and main rotor system.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that, after the accident, he noticed there was a significant right quartering tailwind, which required the application of more left pedal than anticipated. He further explained that the increased application of anti-torque pedal lessened the available power to maintain the main rotor RPM. He concluded the approach could have been completed safely with a steeper and faster approach to better manage engine power. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 

The pilot's inappropriate descent profile during landing with a quartering gusting tailwind, which resulted in a loss of main rotor rpm. 

Findings

Aircraft
Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tailwind - Effect on operation
Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Miscellaneous/other
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Settling with power/vortex ring state
Landing area undershoot
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Roll over

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/11/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/26/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 4241 hours (Total, all aircraft), 127 hours (Total, this make and model), 4173 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 34 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: HUGHES
Registration: N9685F
Model/Series: 300 C
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1972
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 620147
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 3
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/08/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2050 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5598 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: HIO-360-D1A
Registered Owner: CHARLOTTESVILLE AERO LLC
Rated Power: 190 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHLX, 2693 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 96°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / -2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 17 knots/ 25 knots, 320°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: GALAX HILLSVILLE, VA (HLX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Woodlawn, VA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1045 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  36.771944, -80.898333 (est)

Van's RV-4, N999ZF: Fatal accident occurred October 17, 2015 in Cortland, Gage County, Nebraska

Jerry Allen Allder
Jerry was an avid fisherman, talented woodworker, and enthusiastic pilot. He was in the U.S. Navy where he attended submarine school and served on the USS Forrestal in the Mediterranean during the Vietnam War.

David A. Schneider
David graduated from Union College in 1986 with a degree in nursing. He was a member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and the Midwest Aerobatic Club-Chapter 80. 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket Aviation - National Transportation Safety Board:https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Jerry Allen Allder: http://registry.faa.gov/N999ZF



Location: Cortland, NE
Accident Number: CEN16FA014
Date & Time: 10/17/2015, 0841 CDT
Registration: N999ZF
Aircraft: Zidek Vans RV-4
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On October 17, 2015, about 0841 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Vans RV-4 single-engine airplane, N999ZF, collided with terrain while maneuvering near Cortland, Nebraska. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The personal flight departed Crete Municipal Airport (CEK), Crete, Nebraska, at 0833, and the intended destination was Lincoln Airport (LNK), Lincoln, Nebraska.

According to available air traffic control radar track data, after departing CEK on runway 17, the airplane proceeded southeast and climbed to an altitude of about 2,600 ft mean sea level (msl). At 0836:30, the airplane turned south and descended to 2,400 ft msl. At 0837:44, the airplane turned east and continued to descend. Between 0839:23 and 0841:42, the airplane completed four low-altitude passes centered over a small lake located about 1/3 mile northeast of the intersection of West Ash Road and Southwest 29th Road. The small lake was located adjacent to a residence owned by the pilot's brother. The low-altitude passes and associated course reversals were completed within a 1/2 mile radius of the small lake. According to available topography data, the terrain elevation immediately surrounding the lake was about 1,470 ft msl.

According to radar track data, the airplane's first low pass over the lake was from southeast to northwest at an altitude at or below 100 ft above ground level (agl). The airplane then entered a climbing right turn to about 1,900 ft msl before it descended back toward the lake from north to south at an altitude at or below 100 ft agl. The airplane then completed a 180° turn at 1,600 ft msl before it descended for a low pass from south to north at an altitude at or below 100 ft agl. The airplane then entered a climbing right turn to about 1,800 ft msl before it descended for a fourth and final low pass from northeast to southwest at an altitude at or below 100 ft agl. Following the fourth low pass, the airplane entered a climb on a southwest heading to about 2,000 ft msl before it entered a sharp right turn toward north. The final radar return was recorded at 0841:42 and showed the airplane at 1,700 ft msl and about 472 ft east of the initial ground impact point.

The pilot's brother stated that he witnessed the airplane complete several low-altitude passes over his property immediately before the accident. He stated that following the final low pass, the airplane pitched up into a climbing right turn. He stated that, during the climbing turn, the airplane suddenly pitched nose-down and descended rapidly. The airplane recovered briefly to a wings-level attitude before it quickly rolled wings-left and -right and entered a descending right turn into terrain.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification:
Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:
11/01/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/16/2014
Flight Time: 512.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 148.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 501.9 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 15.8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5.9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the 68-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on November 1, 2013, with a limitation for corrective lenses. On the application for his current medical certificate, the pilot reported having accumulated 323 total hours of flight experience, of which 35 hours were flown within the previous 6 months.

The pilot's flight history was established using his logbook. The final logbook entry was dated October 14, 2015, at which time he had accumulated 512.5 hours total flight time. All logged flight time had been completed in single-engine airplanes. He had logged 501.9 hours as pilot-in-command, 3.4 hours at night, and 4.3 hours in simulated instrument conditions. He had flown 91.7 hours during the year before the accident, 47.8 hours during the 6 months before the accident, 15.8 hours during the 90 days before the accident, and 5.9 hours during the month before the accident. The pilot had accumulated 148.3 hours in the accident airplane make/model. His last flight review was completed in the accident airplane on July 16, 2014.
  
Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/04/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/18/2014
Flight Time: 245.8 hours (Total, all aircraft)

According to FAA records, the 54-year-old passenger held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 4, 2013, with a limitation for corrective lenses. The medical certificate expired on February 28, 2015. On the application for his expired medical certificate, the pilot reported having accumulated 222.4 total hours of flight experience, of which 18.5 hours were flown within the previous 6 months. The pilot's flight history was established using his logbook. The final logbook entry was for a flight review on July 18, 2014, at which time he had accumulated 245.8 hours total flight time. The pilot had not logged any flight time during the year before the accident.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: Zidek
Registration: N999ZF
Model/Series: Vans RV-4
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1996
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 2407
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/15/2014, Conditional
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 590.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-320-D1C
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The airplane, serial number 2407, was a single-engine, low-wing, fixed conventional landing gear, monoplane of conventional aluminum construction, configured to seat two occupants in a tandem seating arrangement. The airplane was powered by a 160-horsepower, 4-cylinder Lycoming IO-320-D1C reciprocating engine, serial number L-5910-55A. The engine provided thrust through a fixed-pitch, two-blade, Sensenich 70CM7S16-0-79 propeller, serial number 31698K. The airplane had a useful load of 628 pounds, a maximum allowable takeoff weight of 1,600 pounds, and a total fuel capacity of 32 gallons. A previous owner assembled the airplane from a kit. The FAA issued the airplane a special airworthiness certificate with an experimental classification and associated operating limitations on October 22, 1996. The pilot was the registered owner of the airplane, and FAA records indicated that he purchased the airplane in November 2013.

The airplane's recording tachometer was destroyed during the postimpact fire, which precluded a determination of the airplane's total service time at the time of the accident. According to the maintenance logbooks, the last condition inspection was completed on November 15, 2014, at 590.5 total airframe hours. At the time of the condition inspection, the engine had also accumulated 590.5 hours since new. The final logbook entry, dated October 8, 2015, was for an engine oil change at 674.5 total airframe/engine hours. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.




Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LNK, 1219 ft msl
Observation Time: 0854 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / -1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 120°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.49 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):

Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Crete, NE (CEK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lincoln, NE (LNK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0833 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

At 0854, the LNK automated surface observing system located about 25 miles north of the accident site reported: wind 120° at 9 knots, a clear sky, 10 miles surface visibility, temperature 8°C, dew point -1°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.49 inches of mercury.




Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  40.495000, -96.764722

The accident site was in a harvested soybean field. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a 265° magnetic heading and measured about 92 ft long. The initial impact crater contained the propeller and the right main landing gear. The impact crater also exhibited a well-defined propeller slash mark in the terrain. The estimated angle between the propeller slash mark and the surrounding terrain was about 30°. The two-blade propeller exhibited chordwise scratches near both blade tips. One propeller blade exhibited significant S-shape bending along its span.  A large area of burnt ground and vegetation surrounded the main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, empennage, both wings, and the engine. A majority of the fuselage, including the cockpit and cabin, had been consumed during the post-impact fire. Flight control continuity could not be established due to impact and fire damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress or damage caused by prolonged exposure to fire.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The internal oil pump discharged oil in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The mechanical fuel pump exhibited fire damage and did not function. Neither magneto provided a spark when rotated by hand; however, both magnetos exhibited damage consistent with impact and prolonged exposure to fire. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. The fuel metering assembly had separated from the engine and exhibited impact related damage. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal engine operation.

Medical And Pathological Information

The Douglas County Coroner's Office, located in Omaha, Nebraska, performed autopsies on the pilot and pilot-rated passenger at the request of the Gage County Attorney. The cause of death for both individuals was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on specimens obtained during each autopsy. The pilot's toxicology results were negative for ethanol. Ibuprofen was detected in the urine. Ibuprofen, sold under multiple brand names, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic drug that is not considered impairing.


The pilot-rated passenger toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Oxymetazoline was detected in urine but not in blood. Oxymetazoline, sold under multiple brand names, is an over-the-counter topical decongestant that is not considered impairing.


Friends and family gather at the scene of the plane crash on October 17th, 2015.



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA014
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 17, 2015 in Cortland, NE
Aircraft: Zidek Vans RV-4, registration: N999ZF
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 17, 2015, about 0841 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zidek model Vans RV-4 single-engine airplane, N999ZF, was destroyed during a postimpact fire after colliding with terrain while maneuvering near Cortland, Nebraska. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the accident site. The personal flight departed Crete Municipal Airport (CEK), Crete, Nebraska, at 0833, and had the intended destination of Lincoln Airport (LNK), Lincoln, Nebraska.

According to available air traffic control (ATC) radar data, after departing CEK on runway 17, the accident flight proceeded to the southeast and climbed to an altitude of about 2,600 feet mean sea level (msl). At 0837:30 (hhmm:ss), the flight turned to the south and descended to 2,400 feet msl. About 19 seconds later, the flight turned to easterly course and started to descend. Between 0839:23 and 0841:42, the accident flight made multiple low-altitude passes centered over a small lake located 1/3 mile northeast of the intersection of West Ash Road and Southwest 29th Road, near Cortland, Nebraska. The low-altitude passes, and the associated course-reversals, were completed within a 1/2 mile radius of the small lake. According to available elevation data, the terrain immediately surrounding the lake was about 1,470 feet msl. The small lake was located adjacent to a residence owned by the pilot's brother.

The first low-pass of the small lake was from the southeast to the northwest at an altitude at or below 100 feet above ground level. Following the first low-pass, the flight entered a climbing right turn to about 1,900 feet msl before it entered a descent back toward the small lake on a south heading. The second low-pass was from the north to the south at an altitude at or below 100 feet above ground level. Following the second low-pass, the flight completed a 180-degree turn at approximately 1,600 feet msl before descending for a third low-pass over the small lake. The third low-pass was from the south to the north at an altitude at or below 100 feet above ground level. Following the third low-pass, the flight entered a climbing right turn to about 1,800 feet msl before it entered a descent for another low-pass over the small lake. The fourth and final low-pass was from the northeast to the southwest and was at an altitude at or below 100 feet agl. Following the final low-pass, the flight entered a climb on a southwest heading to about 2,000 feet msl before making a sharp turn toward the north. The final radar return was recorded at 0841:42 at 1,700 feet msl. The final radar return was located about 472 feet east of initial impact point with the ground.

The pilot's brother stated that he witnessed the accident airplane complete multiple low-altitude passes over his property immediately before the accident. He stated that following the final low-pass the airplane pitched-up and entered a climbing right turn. The witness stated that, during the climbing turn, the airplane suddenly pitched nose down and descended rapidly. The witness stated that the airplane recovered briefly to a level attitude before it quickly rolled wings left-and-right and entered a descending right turn into the terrain.

The main wreckage was located in a harvested soybean field. There was a wreckage debris path that measured about 92 feet long and was oriented on a 265-degree magnetic heading. The initial impact crater contained the propeller and the right main landing gear. The impact crater also exhibited a well-defined propeller slash mark in the terrain. The estimated angle between the propeller slash mark and the surrounding terrain was about 30 degrees. The two-blade propeller exhibited chordwise scratches near the blade tips. One propeller blade exhibited significant S-shape bending along its span. A large area of burnt ground and vegetation surrounded the main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, empennage, both wings, and the engine. A majority of the fuselage, including the cockpit and cabin, had been consumed during the postimpact fire. Flight control continuity could not be established due to impact and fire damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress or damage caused by prolonged exposure to fire.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The internal oil-pump discharged oil in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The mechanical fuel pump exhibited fire damage and did not function. Neither magneto provided a spark when rotated by hand; however, both magnetos exhibited damage consistent with impact and prolonged exposure to fire. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. The fuel metering assembly was found separated from the engine and exhibited impact related damage. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal engine operation.

At 0854, the LNK automated surface observing system, located about 25 miles north of the accident site, reported: wind 120 degrees at 9 knots, surface visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 8 degrees Celsius, dew point -1 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.49 inches of mercury.