Thursday, August 13, 2015

Incident occurred Auust 13, 2015 near Sac City Municipal Airport (KSKI), Iowa

SAC CITY — Authorities say a crop-dusting plane has crashed shortly after taking off from an airport in northwest Iowa.

The Sac County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release Thursday that the accident was reported about 4 p.m. Wednesday. 

The Sac City Airport manager said the plane had crashed south of the airport and that airport officials were in contact with the pilot, who said he hadn’t been injured.

The pilot was identified as 50-year-old Randall Sievert, of Alta. He reported that he noticed engine trouble after takeoff and was trying to return to the airport when he crashed into a cornfield.

Airport manager Ken Myers says the plane went down a couple miles from the airport. Sievert didn’t immediately return a call from The Associated Press.

The crash is being investigated.

Source:  http://www.kcrg.com

SAC CITY, Iowa (KTIV) -  The Sac County Sheriff's Office says the plane went down south of the Sac City airport Wednesday at about 4 in the afternoon.

The pilot, 50-year-old Randall Sievert of Alta.

Sievert told authorities after he took off from the airport, he experienced engine trouble and was trying to turn the plane around to head back to the airport when he crashed in a cornfield. 

He wasn't hurt in the crash. 

Source:  http://www.kwwl.com

Federal Aviation Administration Finds Deficiencies at Martha's Vineyard Airport (KMVY), Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts

Airport commission met Thursday to grapple with latest set of problems. 



The Martha’s Vineyard Airport is under an Oct. 15 deadline to correct several deficiencies in airport operations or face potential sanctions that could include the loss of millions of dollars in federal funds and its status as a commercial airport.

In a meeting with the chairman and vice chairman of the airport commission Tuesday, officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation detailed four areas of concern including an incomplete building construction project, wildlife management plan, poor employee performance and inadequate runway markings, commission chairman Myron Garfinkle said. Two of the four areas, the runway markings and a wildlife management plan, “present significant areas of noncompliance,” he said.

Mr. Garfinkle described the FAA’s findings Thursday when airport commissioners met at the West Tisbury Library.

“[The FAA] made it plain that we have not made a material effort to correct these noncompliance issues for a significant period of time, in some cases well over a year,” Mr. Garfinkle said in a prepared statement that was read into the record of the meeting. “It is our firm understanding that if we do not take these issues very seriously and respond to our licensing, funding and enabling agencies in a forthright and prompt manner, we will be putting any future funding at risk,” he said. An $8 million federal grant is potentially at risk, Mr. Garfinkle said.

Airport manager Sean Flynn did not attend the commission meeting, and Mr. Garfinkle said he was on an unscheduled two-week vacation that began Monday, August 10. Asked if Mr. Flynn was expected to return, he replied, “No comment.” Last Friday, airport commissioners had met in executive session to discuss a non-union employee management issue.

Mr. Garfinkle said assistant manager Deborah Potter is in charge of operations and management “until we have a full-time manager again.”

The FAA’s findings follow an annual inspection conducted in May.

“This was highly unusual from the standpoint of not necessarily that airports are in noncompliance but the FAA’s experience is when these are pointed out there is a high priority and due diligence to correct them,” vice chairman Robert Rosenbaum said. “Their feeling is that the Vineyard has been very difficult to get these issues resolved.”

One area of concern cited by the FAA was the lack of any action on a new aircraft rescue and fire fighting (ARFF) building. The airport originally received $850,000 in 2011 to draw up plans and permits for the ARFF building, with the expectation that the FAA would have a complete design drawn within one year. No action has been taken on the project, Mr. Garfinkle said.

“After four years, there has been limited communication from the airport to the FAA regarding our progress on this project,” Mr. Garfinkle said. That communication should have come from management, he later added.

He continued: “Any delay of the ARFF building plans, permits and approval will certainly put our funding into jeopardy. It is forecast that the next fiscal period the FAA will be shifting funding focus towards” other projects.

The deficiencies cited ultimately put in jeopardy is the airport’s 139 status, which allows use by commercial airliners.

“We have to be 139 compliant to have scheduled service,” Mr. Garfinkle said.

The airport is under a strict Oct. 15 deadline to come up with an acceptable wildlife management plan and to correct the problems with airport runways.

Commissioner Christine Todd, speaking via phone remotely, asked if the deadline could be met.

“Can we with full and unquestionable confidence know that these matters are being dealt with in an efficient matter with the time frame they have set for us?” she asked.

“I can only answer with the commitment that we will give you our best efforts,” Mr. Garfinkle said. “There’s a lot of work to be done to be brought into compliance.”

- Story and comments: http://vineyardgazette.com


FAA has set an Oct. 15 deadline for deficiencies to be corrected.

Cessna T182T Skylane, N6289Z: Fatal accident occurrd August 13, 2015 in Oroville, Okanogan County, Washington

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA241 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 13, 2015 in Oroville, WA
Aircraft: CESSNA T182T, registration: N6289Z
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 13, 2015, about 0845 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T182T, N6289Z, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Oroville, Washington. The pilot, who was the registered owner of the airplane, and a pilot-rated passenger sustained fatal injuries. The flight was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Dorothy Scott Airport (0S7), Oroville, about 0830, with an intended destination of Spokane International Airport (GEG), Spokane, Washington. 

On August 13, 2015, about 0930, the Okanogan County Sheriff's department received a notification of a forest fire near Oroville. Upon arrival to the scene, sheriff department personnel discovered an airplane that was destroyed. The airplane was not positively identified at that time.

On August 14, 2015, at 0031, an Alert Notification (ALNOT) was issued for an airplane after family members of the pilot became concerned when he did not arrive at his intended destination. Later that day, the aircraft wreckage was identified as the missing airplane. 

The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.
 
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Spokane FSDO-13

ALBERT E. LOSVAR:   http://registry.faa.gov/N6289Z

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov





OKANOGAN – On Friday, Aug. 14 members of the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office, FAA and Okanogan County Coroner returned to the scene of the plane crash off of Rise Road out of Oroville and have now released the names of the two victims.

“Due the heat from the fires yesterday the scene could not be processed until early this morning. It was determined today that there were two victims involved in the crash, the pilot and a passenger. The bodies were removed from the crash scene this afternoon,” said Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers.

Deputies and Okanogan County Coroner Dave Rodriguez met with family members to inform them of the fatal crash. Coroner Dave Rodriguez has released the names of the two men killed in the crash. Albert Losvar, 88, of Loomis and Brian Downing, 62, of Surrey, B.C. The Cessna T182 flew out of Oroville’s Dorothy Scott Airport at 8:45 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 13, never reaching its destination of Spokane.

The men were both pilots but it is not known who was piloting the plane at the time of the crash, which, according to Rodriguez, resulted in a large explosion that consumed most of the Cessna. The victims remains were submitted for dental identification, according to the Coroner.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.






Spokane, North Idaho News 

OKANOGAN COUNTY, Wash. -   UPDATE 12:30 p.m. Friday: Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers tells KHQ two people died in a plane crash near Oroville Thursday. 

The victims have not yet been identified, but Sheriff Rogers said they were in a Cessna 182 and authorities believe they were from the Oroville area. 

The crash site was discovered as firefighters were responding to several fires that popped up Thursday afternoon. The Federal Emergency Management Agency said Friday it was sending federal funds because of the fire's impact. Authorities say more than 400 people have been evacuated and 660 homes are threatened.
  
An evacuation shelter has been set up at Oroville High School.

UPDATE 9:20: According to the Washington Department of Natural Resources, 10-12 structures were lost in Nine Mile Fire. None were homes. The Okanogan County Emergency management says there are evacuations for homes on Nine mile Road, Wagon Wheel Road, Old Tressle Road, and Point Road. The Red Cross shelter for Nine Mile Fire will be opened at the Oroville High School.

UPDATE 8:50, Thursday: According to the Washington Department of Natural Resources, the fire is more than 3,500 acres. They say structures have been lost, and a type two team is helping to fight the fire.

UPDATE: 

According to Sheriff Rogers there were about four fires that were burning along Chesaw Road that have now appeared to merge into one and is heading toward Canada.  Investigators are trying to determine how these fires started.

People who live along Chesaw Road near Nine Mile Road, Old Tressle Road, Point Road and Old Wagon Wheel road were asked to evacuate.

Road closures are in place on Chesaw Road from Mile Post 4 to Mile Post 9. Nine Mile Road is also closed. 

A Red Cross Shelter has been set up at Oroville High School for those evacuated because of this fire. 

Responders are still trying to find out who the victim of that plane crash on Rise Road was, also where that plane took off and where it was headed before it crashed. 

"There's no tail numbers of anything because the plane was destroyed in the fire," says Okanogan Sheriff Frank Rogers.  "Crews are talking to the FAA and the NTSB trying to find out about an overdue plane or what planes are missing." 

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers says fire personnel are responding to several reported fires in the Oroville area off of Chesaw Road. 

Rogers said at one of the fires on Rise Road off of Chesaw, Deputies have confirmed the wreckage of an aircraft with at least one person confirmed dead at the scene. 

Rogers says he has several units in the area attempting to determine what happened. 

Source:  http://www.khq.com

Federal Bureau of Investigation files
 on airport 
still sealed: Grand Junction Regional (KGJT), Colorado

The dismissal of two forfeiture cases that stemmed from what is now a nearly two-year-old investigation into the Grand Junction Regional Airport included provisions that left sealed the evidence that sparked the investigation.

The agreement between the owners of two seized vehicles and the U.S. Attorney’s Office includes a provision that the complaint under which the vehicles were seized in 2014 and the affidavit on which it was based remain off limits to public inspection.

A spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Denver declined to comment on whether an investigation is continuing.

The two men whose vehicles were returned agreed to take no further action against the federal government and that they would pay their own costs and attorney fees.

The FBI seized the GMC Denali pickups owned by Denny Granum, a former member of the Airport Authority, and Travis Vallin, a principal in Jviation, a company that did business with the airport, last year.

Both men denied wrongdoing.

The seizures took place soon after the FBI seized a similar truck owned by Rex Tippetts, the former director of aviation at the airport.

The airport had purchased the diesel-fueled vehicles, kept them for a contracted period and then sold them with low mileage in an effort to reduce overall costs. That practice has since been discontinued and the airport last year bought a gasoline-powered pickup for airport work.

Tippetts’ truck was to have been returned to him, but a creditor who had been tipped off took possession of it before he could do so.

The episode surrounding the trucks did little to clear up the questions still bedeviling the Airport Authority. The airport more than a year ago ceased construction on an administration building that was begun under Tippetts and suspended when the FBI investigation raised questions about how the airport gained federal approval and funding for the project.

The airport also has been without a permanent staff chief since Tippetts was fired in December 2013, a month after the Nov. 6, 2013, raid on airport offices. No arrests have been made.

Story and comments:  http://www.gjsentinel.com

Beech N35 Bonanza, N390Z: Fatal accident occurred August 12, 2015 at Love Field Airport (97FL), Weirsdale, Marion County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA308
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 12, 2015 in Weirsdale, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: BEECH N35, registration: N390Z
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot was departing in his airplane on a personal flight. A witness, who was a pilot and had seen the airplane take off many times before, reported that, on this takeoff, the airplane appeared lower and slower than he expected. He further noted that the engine initially sounded normal but then started to "stall" as if a cylinder was "missing." The airplane impacted tress about 1,000 ft past the end of the runway and was partially consumed by a postcrash fire. Damage to the propeller blades was indicative of some engine power being produced at the time of impact. Examination of the engine's throttle body metering unit revealed that the mixture control arm remained attached to the unit; however, when turned, it rotated on the shaft with no shaft movement. Disassembly of the unit revealed the internal splines of the throttle and mixture arms were stripped, and brass material from the bronze arms was transferred to the external splines of the steel shafts. The bronze arms should have been replaced with stainless steel arms per a service bulletin issued by the engine manufacturer 8 years before the accident. Because of impact and fire damage to the metering unit; it could not be determined if the stripped arms were the result of impact or an undertorque condition.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power during takeoff. The reason for the partial loss of power could not be determined due to the extensive fire and impact damage to the engine.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Dauphin Rich Womack: http://registry.faa.gov/N390Z

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA308
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 12, 2015 in Weirsdale, FL
Aircraft: BEECH N35, registration: N390Z
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 12, 2015, about 0930 eastern daylight time, a Beech N35, N390Z, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain shortly after takeoff from Love's Landing (97FL), Weirsdale, Florida. The airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. An instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the personal flight from 97FL to Page Field (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida.

According to a witness, the airplane took off from runway 36. At the departure end of the runway, there was a crossing runway, designated 9/27. The witness, who was a pilot working outside his home located near the departure end of runway 36, reported that airplanes using runway 9/27 would typically stay low during takeoff, while those taking off from runway 36 would typically climb at a relatively high angle to avoid airplanes using the crossing runway.

The witness had seen the accident airplane take off many times on runway 36 and use a high climb angle, but, on the day of the accident, when he expected to see the airplane climb above houses about halfway along the runway, he was surprised when he did not see it. When he finally saw the airplane at a point about 300 to 400 ft before the departure end of the runway, it was about 50 ft in the air, with landing gear retracted, and about level with the eaves of the houses lining the runway. The witness then lost sight of the airplane and subsequently heard two loud "bangs."

The witness further noted that the airplane's engine sounded normal until takeoff, when it then started to "stall" as if a cylinder was "missing." He also noted that, when he saw the airplane, it appeared to be flying in ground effect and that it was in slow flight with a high angle of attack.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 78, held an airline transport pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land and airplane multi-engine land ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine, airplane multi-engine, and instrument airplane ratings, a ground instructor certificate, a flight engineer certificate, and a mechanic certificate (airframe and powerplant). He held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate with a restriction to wear corrective lenses.

A review of the pilot's personal logbook revealed that, as of the last recorded flight on August 9, 2015, he had logged about 10,545 hours, including 9,891 hours as pilot-in-command and 7,069 hours in single-engine airplanes. His most recent flight review was recorded on July 19, 2014.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable landing gear airplane was manufactured in 1961. It was powered by a 260-horsepower Continental IO-470-N reciprocating engine, which drove a Hartzell two-bladed, constant-speed propeller.

According to the maintenance logbooks, the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on July 15, 2015. At that time, the airframe total time was 6,663 hours. Based on pilot logbook entries, at the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated about 5.5 hours since the last annual inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Leesburg International Airport (LEE), Leesburg, Florida, was located about 10 nm east-southeast of the accident site. The LEE 0853 weather observation included wind from 220° at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, sky clear, temperature 28°C, dew point 24°C, and altimeter setting 30.01 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage path began with broken tree branches about 40 ft up a tree, located about 355° true, and about 1,000 ft from the airport fence at the north end of the runway. The path continued at a downward angle of about 20° for about 130 ft to a ground impact mark containing the two-bladed propeller and spinner, which had separated from the engine crankshaft. One propeller blade exhibited "S" bending and blade twist signatures, and the other had relatively light twisting. Both blades exhibited leading edge burnishing and chordwise scratching.

About 10 ft beyond the propeller, the airplane was resting vertically against two trees, nose down, with the empennage bent over the fuselage. The right wing and the cabin area were consumed in a postcrash fire; there was no evidence of an inflight fire. The left wing and the right ruddervator exhibited tree impact marks.

All flight control surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the empennage and the wings.

The throttle and propeller controls were found full forward, and the mixture control was found pulled out about ½ inch as measured from the panel bulkhead. The fuel boost pump was found in the "ON" position. The pump switch did not appear to be impact-damaged and could be switched on and off without binding.

Engine crankshaft continuity was confirmed. Eleven of the 12 spark plugs were removed and examined. One plug was broken off in the cylinder and could not be removed. No anomalies were observed in the removed plugs. Five fuel injectors were examined and found to be internally clear of debris; one had molten metal around it and could not be removed.

The engine's throttle body metering unit was broken from its mount and was held onto the engine by fuel lines. The mixture control arm remained attached to the unit; however, when turned, it rotated on the shaft with no shaft movement. The throttle body metering unit was shipped to the manufacturer's facility for further examination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Medical Examiner, District 5, Leesburg, Florida, performed autopsies of the pilot and pilot-rated passenger. The cause of death of the pilot was blunt force and thermal injuries, and the manner of death was accident. The cause of death of the pilot-rated passenger was multiple blunt force injuries, and the manner of death was accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot and pilot-rated passenger.

Testing of the pilot identified 0.053 (ug/ml, ug/g) diphenhydramine in blood and diphenhydramine in urine. Ibuprofen was also detected in urine. Testing was negative for cyanide, ethanol, and major drugs of abuse, and 17% carbon monoxide was detected in blood.

Testing of the pilot-rated passenger identified cetirizine, quinine, and tolterodine in the liver and blood. Testing was negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and major drugs of abuse. Testing for cyanide was not performed.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The engine's throttle body metering unit was examined on April 5, 2017, at the Continental Motors facility at Mobile, Alabama. The unit displayed fire and impact damage; the fire damage appeared to be greater on the mixture side of the unit than on the throttle side of the unit. The mixture and throttle control lever arms were secured to their respective shafts by attachment nuts. The attachment nuts were removed, and the spline areas of both arms were inspected. The internal splines of both arms were stripped, and brass material from the bronze arms was transferred to the external splines of the steel shafts.

The throttle and mixture control arms were manufactured from bronze. According to the engine manufacturer, both lever arms should have been replaced with stainless steel arms per Continental Motors Category 2 Critical Service Bulletin (CSB) CSB08-3C, dated March 14, 2008. The CSB was issued after reports that bronze mixture and throttle control arms were inadequately torqued and became loose, which could lead to a loss of engine control or engine power. A copy of the CSB is included in the public docket for this investigation.

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA308
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 12, 2015 in Weirsdale, FL
Aircraft: BEECH N35, registration: N390Z
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject
to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 12, 2015, about 0930 eastern daylight time, a Beech N35, N390Z, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain shortly after taking off from Love's Landing (97FL), Weirsdale, Florida. The airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. An instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed from 97FL to Page Field (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91.

The airplane took off from runway 36. At the departure end of the runway there was a crossing runway, 9/27. According to a witness, a pilot who was working outside his home located near the departure end of runway 36 (third house back from the runway), airplanes utilizing runway 9/27 would typically stay low during takeoff, while those taking off from runway 36 would typically climb at a relatively high angle to avoid airplanes utilizing the crossing runway.

The witness had seen the accident airplane take off many times to the north, utilizing the higher climb angle, but on the day of the accident, when he thought he'd see the airplane climb above houses about halfway along the runway, he was surprised that he didn't see it. When he finally saw the airplane [about 300-400 feet prior to the departure end of the 3,600-foot runway], it was about 50 feet in the air, landing gear retracted, and about level with the eaves of the houses lining the runway. The witness then lost sight of it, but subsequently heard two loud "bangs."

The witness further noted that the engine sounded "normal" until takeoff, when it then started to "stall" as if a cylinder was "missing." He also noted that when he saw the airplane, it appeared to flying in ground effect; it was as if it was in slow flight with a high angle of attack.

There were no witnesses to the accident.

The wreckage path began with broken branches about 40 feet up in a tree located about 355 degrees true, 1,000 feet from the airport fence at the northern end of the runway. It continued at a downward angle of about 20 degrees for about 130 feet to a ground impact mark containing the two-bladed propeller and spinner, separated from the engine crankshaft. One propeller blade had significant twisting, while the other had relatively minor twisting. Both blades exhibited leading edge burnishing and chordwise scratching.

About 10 feet beyond the propeller, in the vicinity of 28 degrees, 58.168 minutes north latitude, 081 degrees, 53.497 minutes west longitude, the airplane came to rest vertically against two trees, nose down, with the tail bent over the fuselage. The right wing and the cabin area were consumed in a postcrash fire; there was no evidence of an inflight fire. The left wing and the right ruddervator exhibited tree impact marks.

All flight control surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the tail and the wings.

The throttle and propeller controls were found pushed in, and the mixture was found pulled out about ½ inch (of rod as measured from the panel bulkhead.) The fuel boost pump was found in the "on" position. The pump switch did not appear to be impact-damaged and could be switched on and off without binding.

Engine crankshaft continuity was confirmed. Eleven of the 12 spark plugs were examined - one was broken off in the cylinder and could not be removed - with no anomalies observed in the plugs removed. Five fuel injectors were examined and found to be internally clear of debris; one had molten metal around it and could not be removed.

The fuel throttle/metering unit was retained for further examination.


Dauphin Rich Womack, and his wife, Merry K. Womack
~



WEIRSDALE --   A Marion County couple was killed Wednesday after crashing their single-engine plane near their home in the Love's Landing Aviation Community in the Weirsdale area.

The plane, a fixed-wing, single-engine Beech aircraft, went down around 9:30 a.m., crashing between two homes off Southeast 155th Avenue, just north of Love Field.

The pilot, Dauphin Rich Womack, and his wife, Merry K. Womack, were pronounced dead at the scene. Both were 78.

Investigators said the plane crashed during takeoff. No one saw the plane go down, but neighbors said they heard the crash.

Hunter Rice said he was inside his home when he heard what sounded like an explosion.

"I started running out there, and I saw the plane was on fire," Rice explained. "So, I grabbed a fire extinguisher and started helping out as much as I can. Two other people were over there with me with a watering hose."

Firefighters said by the time they arrived and put out the fire, the couple was dead.

"The debris field does not span that large of an area," said Capt. James Lucas, with the Marion County Sheriff's Office. "There are two wings; there's a bunch of debris that's burned up in a pile."

According to property records, the Womacks moved to Love's Landing in 2014. The community has a private airstrip which ends close to where the couple's 1961 Beechcraft Model 35 Bonanza aircraft crashed.

"They usually land and fly from over there all the time, and usually they are really experienced," Rice said. "No one would ever think they'd ever crash over here."

Records show the Womacks were both experienced pilots; Dauphin was a registered flight instructor as late as December 2014, and Merry recently won a prestigious award for pilot safety from the Federal Aviation Administration.

The National Transportation Safety Board arrived Wednesday and planned to be back out at the scene Thursday, along with manufacturers of the plane and engine, to investigate what could have caused the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.mynews13.com







































Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Harry Clever Field (KPHD), Ohio: Federal grant helping New Philadelphia airport



NEW PHILADELPHIA --  Federal grant dollars are helping the city cover costs of replacing the wind cone at Harry Clever Field and update the municipal airport’s master plan, which will identify its current condition and future needs.

Assistant City Service Director Amy Gilland said the city was awarded a $237,794 grant recently from the Federal Aviation Administration to go toward covering most of the cost of updating the master plan and replacing the wind cone, which indicates wind direction and speed.

The combined total cost for both items is $264,216. The FAA grant is covering 90 percent of the total cost of replacing the wind cone and updating the master plan. After figuring in the grant, local share is $26,422.

“The wind cone (replacement) is housekeeping,” City Service Director Jim Zucal said. “The (master plan) update is part of the business of having a small municipal airport. You’re looking over the whole airport and determining the future of the airport.”

Zucal said an updated master plan is required because council reclassified the runway from a B-I to a B-II classification in accordance with FAA guidelines. The runway is 3,951 feet, making it short of a mile. That meant a new Airport Layout Plan had to be created.

Gilland added that the updated master plan would be required for any future pavement or resurfacing.

“This has to be done prior to make sure runway safety areas are in compliance,” she said.

Harry Clever Field, named for its founder, was established in 1927 in a hayfield near the Historic Schoenbrunn Village on Delaware Drive.

During World War II, the airport had a civilian pilot training program under the sponsorship of Muskingum University. From 1953 to 1961, Lake Central Airlines operated out of Harry Clever Field and offered three flights daily to Columbus, one to Pittsburgh and one to Youngstown.

“It’s still a viable functioning part of our city, and it’s economically important to our city,” Zucal said. “And it’s important to our daily business and we’re committed to it.”

Source: http://www.timesreporter.com

Dutchess County Airport (KPOU), Poughkeepsie, New York: Details presented for new fixed base operator

WAPPINGER – It’s now official, Dutchess County Airport has a new fixed-base operator. County Executive Marcus Molinaro executed a contract with Flight Level Aviation (FLA) to help revitalize operations and wean the facility off taxpayer subsidies.

The airport, once a thriving hub for companies like IBM, has become under-utilized. Increases in the yearly operating deficit are covered by the county, to the tune of $300,000 in recent years. The new deal with FLA guarantees Dutchess a $100,000 initial investment and $200,000 in revenues annually.

Details were presented to the Airport Advisory Committee on Monday afternoon, at their quarterly meeting, which was attended by dozens of small plane pilots who are tenants at the airfield in Wappinger.

A fixed-base operator (FBO) is a commercial business granted the right to operate on the airport and provide aeronautical services such as fueling, hangaring, tie-down and parking, aircraft rental, aircraft maintenance, and other related functions.

Most of the existing staff will remain intact, including county employees and manager John Mouris. FLA will take over the fuel sales, maintenance, and occupy Hangar #9, until a new hangar can be built to modern standards.

The county has also obtained $2.9 million in funding to provide water and sewer infrastructure, which is crucial to attract new tenants and supply much-needed fire suppression capability. Solar panels are also being installed, which exceed the energy use of the airport, generating a surplus.

Molinaro acknowledged that the county airport is a controversial subject, with many residents questioning its value to the average household. He maintains that the airport is a vital engine for private sector economic development, and keeps its continued existence a high priority.

“The question for us has been how do we continue to move the county airport forward in a way that holds onto the benefits that you have participated in, how do we hold onto the county airport that is a benefit and resource to the community as a whole, but at the same time how do we use it to increase economic investment, economic benefit for the county, and in the end, how do we eliminate the taxpayer subsidy to the airport,” Molinaro said.

Consultant Steven Baldwin provided overview of the proposed five-year agreement, which can be extended to 40 years. He went over rates for fuel and space leasing, and spoke about FLA’s history running similar airports in Norwood, Massachusetts, Brunswick, Maine and Cape May, New Jersey.

FLA executives were not present for the meeting, but will be meeting with tenants soon. Specific details of the agreement will be made available online over the next few months, as they become finalized within the 2016 county budget in November.

Source: http://www.midhudsonnews.com

U.S. Airline Accident Rate Remained Near Record Low Last Year • Experts say recent high-profile crashes have prompted mistaken public perception of risk

The Wall Street Journal
By ANDY PASZTOR
Aug. 11, 2015 12:40 p.m. ET



The accident rate for U.S. airlines hovered near a record low in 2014, according to preliminary data released by federal crash investigators, even as aviation experts see a spate of foreign crashes leaving average fliers increasingly concerned about safety.

As U.S. passenger airlines racked up their fifth straight year without a fatal crash, last week the National Transportation Safety Board reported that the overall mishap rate for domestic carriers was one accident for roughly 300,000 departures, barely higher than the record low 250,000 figure the year before. By another measure, the latest data amounts to one accident per roughly 700,000 flight hours, or about half as frequently as during the late 1990s.

Commercial aviation in this country has become so safe that pilots routinely go through an entire career without ever experiencing engine trouble serious enough to result in an in-flight shutdown. In the extremely rare circumstance that an engine falters precisely during the moment of takeoff—the most critical moment of any flight—some jetliner models have automated systems able to compensate and safely make the plane climb with minimal input from the cockpit crew. Based on statistics, taxiing around crowded airports has become the most hazardous portion of flights in this country.

“We find ourselves with the kind of problem you want to have,” according to Peggy Gilligan, the Federal Aviation Administration’s top safety official. “Safety numbers are already so low that you must count close calls, accidents that didn’t happen” to target safety enhancements, she noted in the text of a speech to state aviation officials last Saturday in Washington.

Last year, a total 641 people died around the world in commercial aviation, and the rate of serious jet accidents hit a historic low, according to the International Air Transport Association, the leading global airline industry trade group.

But despite such dramatic gains, experts agree that recent crashes—including high-profile fatal events in fast-growing Asian markets—have prompted the mistaken public perception that airline travel may be more risky today than in recent years. Roughly 3.5 billion airline passengers are expected to fly world-wide this year on almost 40 million scheduled flights.

Tony Tyler, IATA’s chief executive, has said that “Asia certainly grabbed the headlines” recently, “and not in the way they would have wanted.” Earlier this year, Mr. Tyler said that unless one-of-a-kind events such as the mysterious 2014 disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 are resolved, they will leave “a shadow over us for a while” and potentially erode public confidence in the industry.

Patrick Ky, Europe’s top safety regulator, has gone further. While “safety indicators have never been better,” the executive director of the European Aviation Safety Agency believes general public perception of industry safety probably has never been worse. The reason, Mr. Ky said during an interview earlier this summer, “is that there were a couple of recent, very dramatic” events that grabbed the public’s attention, including Flight 370 and the suspected pilot suicide that brought down Germanwings Flight 9525 in March.

“One Germanwings is one too many, for sure,” Mr. Ky said. “The challenge that I put to our organization is to aim for zero accidents, which we will never reach.”

In the U.S., the preliminary NTSB data shows there was a roughly 15% increase in the number of fatal general aviation accidents in 2014, climbing to 253 from 222 a year earlier. In spite of government and industry efforts to reduce crashes involving private planes, there also was an uptick in the overall rate of all types of accidents involving such aircraft, measured against estimated flight hours nationwide.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com

Frederick Municipal Airport (KFDK), Maryland: Airport Commission opposes Renn Farm rezoning




The Frederick Airport Commission will recommend that the city not rezone a development near the municipal airport for mixed use.

The Renn Farm development, which includes plans for 1,050 residences, will go before the Frederick Board of Aldermen at a workshop Wednesday.

The area is zoned light industrial, so changing the status paves the way for the development, which is encircled by the traffic pattern for runway 12-30.

Airport commissioner Dan Loftus said building houses around the airport would lead to noise complaints, which could jeopardize the future of the airport.

“It is going to encroach on this jewel that we will probably lose,” he said.

Commissioner Ted Gregory said the City Council in Santa Monica, California, is considering shutting down its airport because of noise complaints after houses were built around it.

“And we’re setting up the same thing right here,” he said.

Jackie Marsh, city planner, said the city will be able to add conditions to usage such as prohibiting development in the runway inner safety zone and requiring future house sales to include a notice about proximity to the airport.

Gregory moved to recommend that the city keep the zoning light industrial. If the zoning is changed, he said, developers ought to provide a map of the airport’s noise abatement zone in addition to the written alert to home-seekers. A sign with the map should also be posted at the development site, he said.

Commissioner Steve Southworth concurred, saying that people don’t tend to read settlements. A graphic would draw their attention.

Equipment storage

The airport will design a new building to house its snow removal equipment.

It will be in the grass lot by the Hughes Ford Road entrance.

The design will cost around $138,000, according to airport manager Rick Johnson. Frederick would have to shoulder 25 percent of the costs while the state would manage the rest.

Staff plan to design this year, he said, and construct it next year.

The old storage needed to be removed as part of a planned runway extension.

Original article can be found here: http://www.fredericknewspost.com

Monday, August 10, 2015

Incident occurred August 10, 2015 at Waukesha County Airport (KUES) Wisconsin

A pilot escaped injury Monday evening when a plane slid off a runway at Crites Field in Waukesha, according to the Waukesha County sheriff's office.

The aircraft had taken off from the airport but returned shortly before 7 p.m. after the pilot noticed mechanical problems, according to a news release from the sheriff's office.

The plane landed and struck a landing light at the end of the runway before it came to a stop on grass adjacent to the runway, according to the release.

The 57-year-old pilot was not injured, the plane sustained minor damage and the accident remained under investigation late Monday, according to the sheriff's office.

Source:  http://www.jsonline.com

Grumman American AA-5A Cheetah, N9684U: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, Illinois

Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov 

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA347
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, IL
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 5A, registration: N9684U
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 9, 2015, about 2050 central daylight time, a Grumman AA-5A airplane, N9684U, impacted terrain in the Shawnee National Forest near Harrisburg, Illinois. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the route of flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Marion-Crittenden County Airport (5M9), Marion, Kentucky, about 2030, and was en route to the Williamson County Regional Airport (KMWA), Marion, Illinois.

The pilot was not on a flight plan and was not in radio contact with any air traffic control center. An unconfirmed message from the pilot to his spouse about 2045 reported that the pilot was going to return to the airport; presumably 5M9. The airplane was located on August 10 in a heavily wooded area of the Shawnee National Forest.

A search of radar facilities did not find any primary or secondary radar targets consistent with the accident airplane. The airplane's exact route of flight could not be determined.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 36, held a combined student pilot and second class medical certificate issued on May 21, 2015. At the time of his application for the medical certificate, the pilot reported logging 30 hours of total time with 20 hours accumulated in the preceding six months.

The pilot's log book was not recovered during the course of the investigation, and the pilot's total experience could not be determined. It could not be determined if the pilot had received recent flight instruction and if he possessed a current solo endorsement. The amount of experience he had flying at night could not be determined.

The passenger was not pilot rated and the student pilot was not authorized to fly with passengers.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a Grumman AA-5A, serial number AA5A-0050, manufactured in 1975. It was powered by a 150-horsepower, normally aspirated, Lycoming O-320-E2G engine which drove a metal, 2-bladed, fixed-pitch, McCauley 1C172/BTM7359 propeller. The airplane's logbooks were not recovered and the airplane's maintenance history was not established. A September 7, 2013 auction listing for the airplane on an internet page, reported the engine hours at 7,578 hours, which also appeared in an included interior photo of the airplane's instrument panel.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A review of weather information revealed that at 1900 a low pressure system was over western Illinois with an associated frontal wave. A warm stationary front was in the immediate vicinity of the accident site which had the potential to form a partially cloudy sky. The closest weather reporting facility was the Harrisburg-Raleigh Airport (HSB), Harrisburg, Illinois, located about 15 nautical miles north of the accident site at an elevation of 398 feet mean sea level (msl). At 2035 the weather reporting facility at HSB reported wind from 070° at 3 knots, visibility 5 miles in mist, a clear sky, temperature 77° F, dew point 77° F, and a barometric pressure of 29.91 inches of mercury.

Data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 13 system found that at 2035, the accident site was located in an area ahead of a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Severe Storms Laboratory defines a MCS as "a collection of thunderstorms that act as a system. An MCS can spread across an entire state and last more than 12 hours." Astronomical Conditions for the accident site found that the moon had set at 1648 and was below the horizon at the time of the accident.

There is no evidence of the pilot receiving a weather briefing prior to the flight.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

At the beginning of the debris path, several broken and downed trees tops were found with airplane wing parts suspended in the trees and on the ground. About 55 yards from the start of the tree strikes, generally aligned along a 320° magnetic heading, was an impact point that was about 2.5 feet deep. The main wreckage had come to rest partially outside of the impact point. The debris field continued another 25 yards through the trees. Impact signatures were consistent with the airplane impacting the ground at least 25° nose low.

Portions of the right wing were found near the tree strikes with left wing components found next when walking towards the impact crater. The engine and propeller were found at the bottom of the impact crater with the fuselage and empennage resting on top of the engine. Both wings were fragmented in multiple locations. When reconstructed, all flight controls were accounted for without any evidence of preimpact damage. The engine was removed from the fuselage and examined down to its crankshaft. No preimpact anomalies were detected with the engine. The propeller remained attached the engine at the propeller flange. One blade was curled rearward and displayed chordwise scratches, gouges, and leading edge polishing. The other blade remained straight with light leading edge polishing. No preimpact anomalies were detected with the airframe or engine.

A majority of the cockpit instrumentation was destroyed by impact force. The ignition switch was in the both position. The turn and slip indicator displayed a 45° right bank. The altimeter's Kollmans window displayed 29.92. The emergency location transmitter (ELT) was found separated from the airplane and the switch was found in the OFF position. Soil was deposited in the area surrounding the switch and its preimpact position could not be determined.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Although requested, the Pope County Coroner's Office did not perform an autopsy on the pilot, as the office deemed it not necessary due to the high velocity nature of the airplane crash.

A few milliliters of blood were recovered by the Country Coroner's Office. The entire sample was sent to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) for toxicology. The sample was marked putrefied. Testing detected 29 mg/dL of ethanol.

ERICH J. SNYDER: http://registry.faa.gov/N9684U

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA347
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, IL
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 5A, registration: N9684U
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2015, about 2050 central daylight time, a Grumman AA-5A airplane, N9684U, impacted terrain in the Shawnee National Forest near Harrisburg, Illinois. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the route of flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Marion-Crittenden County Airport (5M9), Marion, Kentucky, about 2030, and was en route to the Williamson County Regional Airport (KMWA), Marion, Illinois.

The airplane was located on August 10 in a heavily wooded area of the Shawnee National Forest. At the beginning of the debris path, several broken and downed trees tops were found with airplane wing parts suspended in the trees and on the ground. About 55 yards from the start of the tree strikes was an impact point that was about 2.5 feet deep. Near the impact point was the main wreckage. The debris field was aligned with a 320° magnetic heading and continued another 25 yards.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

At 2055, an automated weather reporting facility located at KMWA, about 20 nautical miles northwest of the accident site reported a wind from 210° at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, a broken ceiling at 8,000 feet, temperature 81° F, dew point 77° F, and barometric pressure of 29.92 inches of mercury. It listed a remark for lightning to the distant west and northwest of the station.

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Springfield FSDO-19

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

POPE COUNTY, IL (KFVS) - Pope County Sheriff Jerry Suits has released the name of the victims of the small plane crash. 

He said the two victims, father and son, were Tommy Snyder, 59, of Zeigler, Ill., and Erich Snyder, 36, of Carterville, Ill.

Sheriff Suits say it took a while to identify the bodies and the Pope County Coroner had been waiting to notify the family members.

He said he was told it was a leisure trip for the two men. They spent the day in Marion, Ky.

NTSB and FAA are still investigating the crash. They are still on scene with the wreckage.

The Pope County sheriff said the investigation into a plane crash is just getting started.

Investigators say hikers found debris from the plane just after 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 10 and called for help.

Members of the search crew identified the plane. They say it was in a ditch off of one of the main cliffs in Burden Falls in the Shawnee National Forest. We're told both people on board the plane were killed, their names have not been released.

"The works not done," said Sheriff Jerry Suits. "We've got a big part of this completed, but the works not done here. We've got an incident, a scene here that we're going to have to clean up and we have the proper people here that's going to make that happen for us. We've still got to identify the bodies that was there."

The sheriff said he was happy to have found the plane, but he was hoping for better results.

"I'm very pleased about that," he said. "I think I said earlier that I wasn't pleased with my results, I'm now pleased with the results. As for the family, I'm sadden by it. I'm Pope County sheriff. It's not supposed to happen in my county, it can happen somewhere else, but don't happen here. So, that bothers me, but it got some closure now for the families and we're hoping to get there real quick for them."

The NTSB and FAA have taken over the investigation and will be releasing information at it becomes available.

Sheriff Suits said the plane was headed to Illinois with two people on board.

He said contact with the plane was lost some time during a storm. He said the pilot sent his wife a text message around 8:55 p.m. on Sunday saying he was flying in rough weather and having trouble. The plane wasn't heard from again.

Earlier on Monday afternoon, while still looking for the plane, he said they were doing their best, but having no luck.

The dense forest and rugged terrain slowed down the search for debris.

"It makes it very difficult of us," Sheriff Suits said. "We've had planes in the air today, looking down. We're looking for anything and right now we're not finding it."

Crews were focusing the search in the Shawnee National Forest. Deputies with multiple sheriff's departments and volunteers searched for more than 16 hours before hikers found the plane in a ravine.

"I'm gonna tell you I'm not Superman, but I'm going to stay out here until we find that aircraft," Sheriff Suits said.

Officials say they received reports of a possible plane crash early on Monday morning involving a single engine Cheetah Tiger, blue/white in color.

Officials were searching for evidence of a crash by ground and air, reportedly near the One Horse Gap area.

The search had been going on since approximately 2:30 a.m. by planes, horses and ATVs. Police say the forest canopy was making it extremely hard for searchers to find debris.

Illinois State Police, Emergency Management personnel, and Forest Service personnel were aiding in the search.

The Saline County Sheriff's Office, who was also aiding in the investigation, said the aircraft left from Marion, Ky. and was en route to Marion, Ill. when officials lost track of it.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.kfvs12.com



POPE COUNTY, IL (KFVS) - The Pope County Sheriff's Department said they have found the wreckage of a plane in Pope County, Ill. on Monday, Aug. 10. 

According to Illinois State Police, there were no survivors from the crash in the Shawnee National Forest. Names of the victims are not being released pending family notification.

Pope County Sheriff Jerry Suits said the plane was found in western Pope County at about 6:40 p.m. by a U.S. Forest Service worker.

According to Peter Knudson with NTSB, they are investigating the crash of a Grumman AA-5B.

Knudson said on Monday night that an investigator was on his way to the area.

Sheriff Suits said a plane was headed to Illinois with two people on board.

He said contact with the plane was lost some time during a storm. He said the pilot sent his wife a text message around 8:55 p.m. on Sunday saying he was flying in rough weather and having trouble. The plane wasn't heard from again.

Earlier on Monday, while still looking for the plane, he said they were doing their best, but having no luck.

"It makes it very difficult of us," Sheriff Suits said. "We've had planes in the air today, looking down. We're looking for anything and right now we're not finding it."

Crews were focusing the search in the Shawnee National Forest.

"I'm gonna tell you I'm not Superman, but I'm going to stay out here until we find that aircraft," Sheriff Suits said.

Officials say they received reports of a possible plane crash early on Monday morning involving a single engine Cheetah Tiger, blue/white in color.

Officials were searching for evidence of a crash by ground and air, reportedly near the One Horse Gap area.

The search had been going on since approximately 2:30 a.m. by planes, horses and ATVs. Police say the forest canopy was making it extremely hard for searchers to find debris.

Illinois State Police, Emergency Management personnel, and Forest Service personnel were aiding in the search.

The Saline County Sheriff's Office, who was also aiding in the investigation, said the aircraft left from Marion, Ky. and was en route to Marion, Ill. when officials lost track of it.

Source:  http://www.kfvs12.com

Illinois State Police confirm that a hiker found a crashed plane roughly five miles northwest of Eddyville, Illinois Monday evening. 

The crash site is near Burden Falls in the Shawnee National Forest.  ISP Troopers confirm to Local 6's Holden Kurwicki  that the hiker discovered two deceased people inside the plane.  The identities of the deceased are not being released at this time.

ORIGINAL STORY:  The Pope County Sheriff's Office says they are looking for a plane that went missing Sunday night.

Pope County Sheriff Jerry Suits says they have set up a command center at Union Social Brethren Camp north of Eddyville, IL.

"They've been able to get an area here that we're getting more comfortable with searching and that's what we're going to do,” said Suits.

According to Suits, the plane took off from the Marion-Crittenden County Airport in Marion, Kentucky, Sunday afternoon with two people on board. The sheriff's office got a call around 2:30 a.m. that the plane may have gone missing.

They have already cleared a rural area of One Horse Gap Lake near Herod where they believed the downed plane might have been.

The entire search area is between Marion, Illinois and Marion, Kentucky and rough terrain has made coordinating search efforts a virtual nightmare.

"We don't have any cell service out here,” said Suits. “We have all of this technology, and I've got two of them and I can't get either one to work, but that's Pope County we're used to that."

To bridge the gaps in this rural area crews have relied on volunteers familiar with the terrain, but to this point no debris has been found.

"I've got some volunteers here on horseback and four wheelers that are helping us out,” said Suits. “It's a group effort for us and we appreciate their help."

However to this point, searchers have yet to find any evidence that the plane, and its two passengers, are nearby.

"I'm not Superman, but I'm going to stay out here until we find that aircraft,” said Suits.

Source:  http://www.wpsdlocal6.com