Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Loss of Control in Flight: Let L-23 Super Blanik, N317BA; fatal accident occurred June 09, 2018 in Moose, Teton County, Wyoming

Figure 2: Accident Site

Exemplar photograph of N317BA

Aerial view of the accident site 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Air Accidents Investigation Institute; Letnany, FN
Blanik Aircraft CZ s.r.o.; Letnany, FN
Teton Aviation Center; Driggs, Idaho

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N317BA 


Location: Moose, WY
Accident Number: CEN18FA217
Date & Time: 06/09/2018, 1115 MDT
Registration: N317BA
Aircraft: LET L 23 SUPER BLANIK
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Business - Sightseeing 

On June 9, 2018, about 1115 mountain daylight time, a LET L-23 glider, N317BA, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Moose, Wyoming. The pilot and passenger sustained fatal injuries. The glider was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 sightseeing flight.

The glider was operated by Teton Aviation Center (TAC), based at Driggs-Reed Memorial Airport (DIJ), Driggs, Idaho. The accident flight was a sightseeing flight to view the Teton Range . The operator reported that a sightseeing flight was typically about 1 hour in duration; the first 30 minutes was conducted under tow before the glider released and spent the remaining 30 minutes gliding back to DIJ. The tour predominately flew over the Caribou-Targhee National Forest, encompassing both Idaho and Wyoming.

The tow pilot reported that he and the glider pilot discussed the planned route and briefed safe altitudes for the flight, and then completed the preflight duties for the glider together.

After departing from DIJ, the tow airplane and glider proceeded south and climbed to 11,000 ft mean sea level (msl) and turned west toward Darby Canyon. The aircraft arrived at the foothills of Darby Canyon at 11,500 ft msl and the tow pilot reported that "there wasn't much lift." They then flew east toward the boundary of Grand Teton National Park, gaining "a little lift" off the various ridgelines. The tow pilot reported that, prior to reaching the park boundary, they flew north, paralleling the Teton Range, and were "slowly climbing." About 3 miles west of the South Teton peak, at an altitude of 13,800 ft msl, the glider pilot released from tow at 1037. The tow pilot visually confirmed the release in his rearview mirror and returned to DIJ, where he landed about 1045.

The tow pilot reported that he maintained radio communication with the glider pilot throughout the tow and that they worked together to find lift to gain sufficient altitude for release. The tow pilot did not report any anomalies with the glider during the tow.

The passenger's cell phone was recovered from the accident site and a video recording of the accident flight was retrieved. The recording, taken from the front seat by the passenger, began when the glider was near the Teton Range during the flight, flying over Grand Teton National Park. After about 2 minutes, the footage showed Middle Teton in front of the glider and off to the left; the glider was nearly level with the top of Middle Teton. The pilot stated "this is not good.". The glider then banked slightly right parallel to the ridgeline of Middle Teton.

The last frame where the airspeed indicator was visible showed an indicated airspeed of about 42 kts. The top of the ridgeline was above the altitude of the glider. The glider then appeared to enter a steep descent. The pilot again stated "this is not good." The glider appeared to exit the steep descent as it passed by a cliff marking the end of the ridgeline. The glider then appeared to enter another steep descent. The pilot stated, "I'm in trouble." The glider returned to a neutral pitch attitude but appeared to be descending. The glider was traveling along the ridgeline between Middle Teton and South Teton. As the glider descended, it began a right turn pointing toward the ridgeline. In the last frame before the recording ended, the yaw string mounted in front of the passenger's windshield was hanging about 45° to the right.

When the flight did not return as expected, TAC personnel attempted to reach the glider pilot via radio. At 1220, the glider was reported overdue to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and an alert notice was subsequently issued.

A National Park Service (NPS) search and rescue team consisting of NPS rangers from Jenny Lake Rescue, working in conjunction with Teton County (Wyoming) Search and Rescue, used cell phone data to determine the last known coordinates of the glider. The owner of TAC departed from DIJ about 1435 in a private helicopter and flew to the area of the last known coordinates, where he located the wreckage in steep mountainous terrain about 11,000 ft msl, between Middle Teton peak (12,809 ft msl) and South Teton peak (12,519 ft msl) near the frozen Icefloe Lake in Grand Teton National Park, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Accident Site Location 


Pilot Information


Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 65, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Glider
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/03/2014
Occupational Pilot:No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/30/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 1200 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The pilot previously held an FAA second class medical certificate, which expired on June 20, 2016. Glider operations under 14 CFR Part 91, including personal flights, flight instruction, and sightseeing tour flights, do not require the pilot to hold an FAA medical certificate.

TAC reported the pilot was hired in March 2001. Since the date of hire, she flew 650 hours of instruction in the glider and flew 559 sightseeing tour flights in the glider. The pilot's most recent recurrency flight was conducted on April 27, 2018.

In postaccident interviews, TAC personnel described the pilot as, "very safety conscious," "very by the book," "very cautious," and "always thorough." The pilot's husband reported that she never expressed any concerns about working at TAC and she "enjoyed taking passengers on flights and working with her coworkers." 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: LET
Registration: N317BA
Model/Series: L 23 SUPER BLANIK NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Glider
Year of Manufacture:1997 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 978406
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tandem
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/23/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1124 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:
Airframe Total Time: 3782.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: Teton AvJet, LLC
Rated Power:
Operator: Teton AvJet, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The LET L-23 Super Blaník Sailplane Flight Manual stated:


The LET L-23 Super Blaník sailplane is a cantilever, high-wing, two-seat glider of all-metal structure with fabric covered control surfaces. Both flight compartments are covered by a single-section canopy which may be emergency jettisoned in flight. Both cockpits are equipped with all sailplane flight control including flight and navigation instrument panels.

The operator kept the glider fully assembled. Review of weight and balance information revealed that, with the pilot and passenger onboard, the glider was within weight and balance limitations for the flight. Review of the glider's maintenance records revealed no evidence of uncorrected mechanical discrepancies. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJAC, 6419 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1656 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 153°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: Terrain-Induced / Terrain-Induced
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: Moderate / Moderate
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: DRIGGS, ID (DIJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: DRIGGS, ID (DIJ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0950 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

The National Weather Service (NWS) Storm Prediction Center's forecast upper air constant pressure charts for 0600 showed the conditions at about 10,000 ft and 18,000 ft msl.

The charts depicted a long wave trough over the western United States with southwesterly winds over Idaho and Wyoming; wind speeds increased with height with little change in direction. The front side of an upper level trough implies upper-level divergence and general rising motion of the area and the development of clouds and precipitation if adequate moisture is available. Upper level troughs also support surface fronts.

AIRMET Tango was current for moderate turbulence below 16,000 ft over a large portion of the central and southwestern United States. The accident site was located within the boundary of the advisory area.

High-Resolution Rapid Refresh numerical model data was plotted and indicated a lifted condensation level (LCL) about 3,200 ft agl. The profile below 10,000 ft was characterized as conditional unstable with a Lifted Index of -1. The sounding thermal structure did not support any strong thermal activity. The sounding profile indicated that the glider likely encountered southerly winds from 185° at 25 to 27 knots, with the potential for light turbulence at 12,700 ft msl. With this wind direction, no significant orographic lift would be generated on the western slopes of the Teton Mountain Range.

There was no record that the pilot obtained a preflight weather briefing from the FAA contract Automated Flight Service Station (AFSS) provider, Leidos, or from a third-party provider. It could not be determined what weather information the pilot may have reviewed before departure.

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.724722, -110.819167 (est)

Photos provided by the NPS showed both wings and an impact crater located on a west-facing, snow and ice-covered saddle, which originated at South Teton Peak and extended to the northeast, culminating at Middle Teton peak. The photos showed the fuselage, empennage, and miscellaneous debris located near the base of the saddle by Icefloe Lake.

The wreckage was extracted via external load with an NPS-contracted helicopter to a secure location for a wreckage layout and examination. All major structural components of the glider were accounted for. Flight control continuity was established throughout the airframe, and no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the glider were noted.

Medical And Pathological Information


Teton Pathology, Jackson, Wyoming, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of the death was attributed to multiple blunt force injuries. The autopsy revealed no significant natural disease that could pose a hazard to flight safety.

The FAA's Forensic Sciences Laboratory performed toxicology tests on specimens from the pilot; testing was negative for ethanol and drugs. A test for carbon monoxide and cyanide was not performed. 

Organizational And Management Information


The 14 CFR Part 91 Letter of Authorization for Teton Aviation Center was managed by the FAA Salt Lake City Flight Standards District Office, Salt Lake City, Utah. FAA Letters of Authorization for sightseeing tour flights only include powered aircraft (such as airplanes and helicopters). Non-powered aircraft, such as gliders or balloons, are not included.

The TAC Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) discussed sightseeing tour flights and stated in part:

Teton Aviation Center scenic flights are operated under §119.1(e)(2) and a Letter of Authorization under 91.147, which authorize us to conduct non-stop scenic air tours within a 25 nautical mile radius of the Driggs airport (KDIJ). We do not have authorization to overfly Grand Teton National Park, and are required to remain at least ½ mile outside Park boundaries. Minimum altitude is 2000' AGL [above ground level] over mountainous terrain.

No TAC aircraft may be flown below 500' above ground (AGL) unless it is taking off or landing. Maneuvers require at least 2000'AGL unless otherwise specified on TAC maneuver summary sheets, or the FAA Practical Test Standard (PTS). Glider pilots are required to adhere to the minimum station altitudes.

Additional Information

Previous Flight


The day before the accident, the pilot flew with another passenger and provided a sightseeing tour flight. The passenger reported that the flight consisted of four passes on the backside of the Teton mountain range in the Grand Teton National Park, and provided various photos he took during the flight showing the proximity to terrain, as shown in Figure 3.


Figure 3: Aerial View of Terrain, captured the day before the accident flight 

During the flight, the pilot talked with the passenger about his lack of interest in roller coasters. The pilot asked the passenger what kind of tour flight he would like to receive. He reported that she jokingly asked if he wanted a "rock and roll flight." The passenger responded that he wanted the relaxing version of the tour flight. The passenger described the pilot as a "very competent" pilot who had "smooth flying skills." He reported the overall flight was "peaceful and enjoyable."


Kristine Ciesinski poses for a portrait for the Teton Valley Magazine at the Driggs Airport. Ciesinski, an international opera star, teacher and pilot, died June 9th, 2018 while piloting a glider that crashed over the Tetons. A passenger with her also died. He was David Ross, 65, of Salt Lake City.

David J. Ross

The son of a man who died in a 2018 scenic glider accident in Grand Teton National Park is suing Teton Aviation for wrongful death.

The complaint, filed in Teton County District Court on June 8th, claims Teton Aviation Center failed to properly service the glider David J. Ross was in when he died and claims the company hired and retained “careless and dangerous pilots.”

Ross, 65, of Salt Lake City, was on a scenic trip with pilot Kristine Ciesinski, 65, of Victor, Idaho, on June 9th, 2018, when the glider crashed between the Middle Teton and South Teton, above Icefloe Lake.

The pair left that day from Teton Aviation Center in Driggs, Idaho. Around noon they were reported overdue to the Teton Interagency Dispatch center.

The wreckage was found at 10,800 feet in rocky and steep terrain.

Ciesinski, a soprano opera singer and a commercial pilot, also died in the crash.

Ciesinski’s estate is also listed on the lawsuit as a defendant.

“Defendant Kristine F. Ciesinski had a duty to exercise reasonable care and obligation not to fly the glider in a negligent, unsafe, dangerous, reckless or careless manner,” the complaint states. “The acts and omissions of defendant Kristine F. Ciesinski, including but not limited to flying a glider in an unsafe, careless, or dangerous manner, including but not limited to being towed and released at an altitude that exceeded the certification and rating of the glider by the manufacturer, flying too close to the mountainous terrain, exercising poor judgment while operating the glider, and failing to operate the glider in a safe and prudent manner.”

The complaint claims negligence on the part of Teton Aviation, or Teton Avjet, caused the crash, the death of Ross and the “extreme fear, pain, and suffering in Mr. Ross prior to his death.”

In an accident report the National Transportation Safety Board states that it reviewed cellphone video on Ross’s phone that was recovered from the wreckage.

“After about two minutes the footage showed Middle Teton in front of the glider and off to the left; the flier was nearly level with the top of Middle Teton,” the report states. “The pilot stated, “this is not good.” The glider then banked slightly right parallel to the ridgeline of Middle Teton.”

In the recording Ciesinski be heard saying “I’m in trouble” shortly before the recording ends, according to the report.

In interviews after the accident Teton Aviation Center employees described Ciesinski as “very safety conscious, very by the book, very cautious and always thorough.”

Ciesinski was hired at Teton Aviation Center in 2001 and flew 650 hours and 559 sightseeing tours, the report stated.

The glider information was listed as a 1997 LET L 23 Super Blanik.

“The operator kept the glider fully assembled,” the report stated. “Review of weight and balance information revealed that, with the pilot and passenger onboard, the glider was within weight and balance limitations for the flight. Review of the glider’s maintenance records revealed no evidence of uncorrected mechanical discrepancies.”

Teton Aviation suspended glider flights after the accident and they have not been resumed, employees there confirmed on Tuesday. Efforts to reach manager Peter Kline were unsuccessful.

The amount in controversy listed on the complaint is $3 million.

https://www.jhnewsandguide.com



Kristine Ciesinski

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Mooney M20K 231, N5756W; accident occurred December 09, 2018 near Lincoln Park Airport (N07), Morris County, New Jersey










The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N5756W

Location: Paramus, NJ
Accident Number: ERA19LA062
Date & Time: 12/09/2018, 1215 EST
Registration: N5756W
Aircraft: Mooney M20K
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 Minor, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 9, 2018, about 1215 eastern standard time, a Mooney M20K, N5756W, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Paramus, New Jersey. The private pilot and a passenger received minor injuries, and two other passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight, which originated from Lincoln Park Airport (N07), Lincoln Park, New Jersey, about 1200. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and had an intended destination of Hudson Valley Regional Airport (POU), Poughkeepsie, New York.

According to the pilot, while in cruise flight, he noticed an increase in cylinder head temperature on two cylinders. He attempted to reduce the temperatures; however, he soon heard "an explosion," and noted a hole in the engine cowling. The pilot performed a forced landing to a golf course and during the landing roll, the airplane impacted a berm, became airborne again, and struck the ground resulting in the landing gear collapsing and substantial damage to the right wing.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the airplane was manufactured in 1984 and was registered to the pilot in November, 2017. It was equipped with a Continental Motors Inc. TSIO-360-LB1, 210-hp, engine. According to the airframe maintenance logbook, the most recent annual inspection was performed on August 15, 2018, at a total time of 2,401.3 hours. According to the engine logbook, the engine was overhauled on January 11, 2016, at a total time of 2,185 hours. At the time of the accident, the Hobbs meter indicated 2,440.8 hours.

The engine was examined at the manufacturer's facility under NTSB supervision. The examination revealed that the engine case was breached over the No. 2 cylinder. The oil sump was removed and metallic debris was noted. The oil filter was removed and disassembled, and metal was noted in the filter. The oil pump was examined and scoring was noted inside the pump housing. The crankcase was split and the No. 1 connecting rod was separated from the crankshaft, and the Nos. 1 and 2 connecting rods exhibited thermal discoloration. Further examination of the mating surfaces of the main bearing saddles had remnants of silk thread around the through-bolt holes (see figure 1).


Figure 1. View of No. 2 main bearing saddle and No. 2 main bearing. Note remnants of silk thread. 

The break-away torque was measured for the through-bolts on the engine. Eight out of the 12 through bolt torque values were below the manufacturer's recommended torque values as can be seen in the engine teardown report in the public docket associated with this case. The through bolts associated with the Nos. 2 and 3 main bearings and measured between 172 in-lbs and 395 in-lbs, which was below the manufacturer specification of 590-610 in-lbs of torque. The No. 2 main bearing saddles exhibited impingement damage and the No. 2 bearing was partially rotated clockwise, which blocked the oil passage to the connecting rod bearings.

The engine manufacturer published a Service Information Letter (SIL) titled "Sealants, Lubricants, and Adhesives Authorized by CMI" in 1999 (revised September 16, 2014). This guidance, which was applicable at the time of the accident engine's overhaul stated that the when reassembling the crankcase halves, maintenance personnel should "...apply and position P/N 641543 (a continuous, single piece of grade 'D' silk thread on the 2-4-6 case half as specified (see Figures 5 through 8…). Ensure the free ends of your thread are covered by gaskets (except the nose oil seal)." Figure 2 below is from the SIL, and shows that the #2 main bearing saddle was one of four "prohibited" areas where silk thread should not be placed.

Figure 2 – Areas where silk thread application is prohibited noted in red, which include the No. 2 main bearing saddle.

The Continental Aircraft Engine Maintenance Manual, "Six Cylinder Engine Crankcase Threading," which was released in April 2016, just after the engine overhaul, stated, "Do not apply any form of sealant to the crankcase cylinder deck, chamfer, cylinder mounting flange, cylinder base O-ring, or cylinder fastener threads. The use of RTV, silicone, Gasket Maker or any other sealant on the areas listed above during engine assembly will cause a loss of cylinder deck stud or through-bolt torque. Subsequent loss of cylinder attachment load, loss of main bearing crush and/or fretting of the crankcase parting surfaces will occur. The result will be cylinder separation, main bearing movement, oil starvation and catastrophic engine failure."

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/23/2018
Occupational Pilot:No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/29/2018
Flight Time:  916 hours (Total, all aircraft), 114 hours (Total, this make and model), 916 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N5756W
Model/Series: M20K No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 25-0822
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/15/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3131 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 40 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2440.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors Inc
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-360-LB1
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 210 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TEB, 7 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1151 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 167°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.4 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C / -8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Lincoln Park, NJ (N07)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Poughkeepsie, NY (POU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1200 EST
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.946389, -74.089722 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Rans S-12XL, N3165V; accident occurred December 16, 2018 in McClure, Henry County, Ohio



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio; North Olmsted, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N3165V

Location: McClure, OH
Accident Number: CEN19LA047
Date & Time: 12/16/2018, 1530 EST
Registration: N3165V
Aircraft: Rans S12
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries:2 None 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 16, 2018, at 1530 eastern standard time, a Rans Inc. S-12XL experimental light sport airplane, N3165V, experienced a partial loss of engine power during a departure climb from the pilot's private airstrip near McClure, Ohio. The pilot subsequently performed a forced landing to a field about 100 ft north of departure end of the runway after the airplane was unable to maintain a positive climb rate. The private pilot and a passenger were uninjured and the airplane was substantially damaged on impact with terrain. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot stated that after he performed a walk around inspection of the airplane and loaded the passenger and pushed the airplane outside. He started the airplane in front of hanger and allowed the engine to warm up to 120°F using an engine speed of 3,000 rpm. He taxied about 1,500 feet to the southern end of the north runway, where he performed an engine runup, checked both ignitions, and checked the flight controls. During the takeoff roll, the airplane lifted off the runway about 500 feet down the runway and climbed 50 - 100 ft above ground level at which point engine sound "backed off gradually." He ensured the throttle control was full forward and pumped the throttle control twice, but the engine speed continued to decrease. The pilot decided to perform an off-airport landing on a field which the airplane stuck a powerline pole and the right wing impacted the ground.

Following the accident, the pilot reported the engine, Rotax 582, had low cylinder compression and scoring on the piston and cylinder walls. There were also aluminum fragments within the cylinder. He said that the engine was overhauled about one year prior to his purchase of the airplane by the previous owner. He was "fairly certain" that the engine did not have any problems before the accident flight. The pilot installed a heater that used the engine's cooling system, and on the following flight after the installation, there was a differential exhaust gas temperature between two cylinders, one was high in temperature and the other cylinder was low in temperature. He said that the engine runup after the installation was normal.

The pilot stated a thermostat was installed on the coolant system and coolant was used for cabin heat. He said the engine radiator was not covered for cold weather operation. He felt the piston failure was due to cold seizure.

According to the Rotax 2-Stroke Maintenance Schedule, the Rotax 582 engine had a minimum coolant temperature of 150°F.

An Ultralight News article discussed cold seizures occurring in Rotax 532/582 engines by coolant having been cooling in the radiator, in winter in cold temperatures, which can mean that the temperature is down below 100°F. The engine on the other hand is under load and is creating heat, the pistons are expanding. As the cold liquid enters the area around the cylinders, the cylinder shrink and this causes a cold seizure.

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation (FAA) Safety Inspector from the Cleveland Flight Standards District Office stated the pilot reported that an engine cylinder compression check was not performed when he purchased the airplane, and a cylinder compression check was not performed during the last condition inspection of the airplane. The engine was not examined by the FAA, and the engine manufacturer declined to attend an examination. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/24/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/30/2018
Flight Time:  192 hours (Total, all aircraft), 30 hours (Total, this make and model), 192 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Rans
Registration: N3165V
Model/Series: S12 XL
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 04284
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/01/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 975 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 115 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 582
Registered Owner: Pilot
Rated Power: 65 hp
Operator:Pilot 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: USE, 781 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1330 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 145°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  9 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:  MCCLURE, OH (PVT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: MCCLURE, OH (PVT)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 2030 EST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Private (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 677 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1200 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.371111, -83.942222 (est)

Boeing B75N1, N75623: Incident occurred June 21, 2020 at Falcon Field Airport (KFFZ), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft landed and incurred prop strike.

Wings Of Flight Foundation

https://registry.faa.gov/N75623

Date: 21-JUN-20
Time: 14:58:00Z
Regis#: N75623
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B75
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MESA
State: ARIZONA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N7815D and Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N655ND: Incident occurred June 20, 2020 at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport (KIWA), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft was taxiing to hold bay and completing the run-up when they were struck by NDU655.

Aviation Training LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N7815D

Date: 20-JUN-20
Time: 14:34:00Z
Regis#: N7815D
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Aircraft while taxiing to runway clipped the wing of N7815D.

UND Aerospace Foundation

https://registry.faa.gov/N655ND

Date: 20-JUN-20
Time: 14:34:00Z
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
Flight Number: NDU655
City: PHOENIX
State: ARIZONA

Cessna 150, N7905E: Incident occurred June 20, 2020 at Charles M. Schulz–Sonoma County Airport (KSTS), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aircraft rolled away with no one onboard after being hand prop started and rolled into a fuel truck.


https://registry.faa.gov/N7905E


Date: 21-JUN-20

Time: 03:04:00Z
Regis#: N7905E
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 91
City: SANTA ROSA
State: CALIFORNIA




Sheriff’s deputies responded Saturday evening to a collision between a fuel truck and a Cessna 150 plane at Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport.

Shortly after 7 p.m., the pilot of a Cessna 150 was “hand-cranking” the propeller, to start the motor. “He was hand-cranking the aircraft and apparently it got away from him,” said Jon Stout, the airport manager.

The plane rolled 15 to 20 feet and “clipped a fuel truck,” leaving a slight dent on the truck, Stout said. The truck had been fueling another plane nearby.

No fuel was spilled, and there were no injuries or environmental issues, according to Sgt. Scott McKinnon of the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office.

Stout could not provide the pilot’s name. He did say the pilot was not local and had flown in from another airport.

While the incident was reported to the National Transportation Safety Board, which is standard procedure, Stout said.

Asked how often such collisions occur, Stout replied, “The is the first one I’ve heard of at my airport, and I’ve been here 18 years.”

https://www.pressdemocrat.com

Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer, N3617L: Incidents occurred September 25, 2020, June 18, 2020 and June 10, 2018

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California 

September 25, 2020:  Aircraft crashed just outside of airport while conducting pattern work. 

Associated Aircraft LLC


Date: 25-SEP-20
Time: 00:14:00Z
Regis#: N3617L
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: G2T1
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

June 18, 2020: Aircraft nosed over on taxi at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California.

Date: 18-JUN-20
Time: 20:45:00Z
Regis#: N3617L
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: 2T1A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

June 10, 2018: Aircraft departed left side of runway 28L and nosed over at Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California.

Date: 10-JUN-18
Time: 14:49:00Z
Regis#: N3617L
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: G2T1
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
Flight Number: SKYTRS3
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA