Sunday, February 28, 2021

Accident occurred February 28, 2021 at Wakulla County Airport (2J0), Panacea, Florida

Wakulla County Sheriff's Office

WCSO is currently at the scene of a plane crash with injuries at the airport in Panacea.  We are awaiting for for investigators from the FAA who will be conducting the investigation. More information will be released when it is appropriate and available.

WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida (WTXL) — A Panacea man is injured following a minor single-engine plane crash at the airport in Panacea.

According to The Florida Highway Patrol, who was assisting the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office on the call, the aircraft lost power and landed short of the grass runway.

The pilot and sole occupant received "non-incapacitating injuries" as a result of the crash landing, FHP said.

Both agencies are waiting for the FAA, who will be conducting further investigation.

Nosed Over: Cessna 175A Skylark, N7023E; accident occurred March 22, 2020 at Soldotna Airport ( PASX), Alaska

 





Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
https://data.ntsb.gov/Docket

https://registry.faa.gov/N7023E

Location: Soldotna, Alaska 
Accident Number: ANC20CA036
Date & Time: March 22, 2020
Registration: N7023E
Aircraft: Cessna 175 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Flight test

Analysis

The pilot reported that, on the day of the accident, about 6 inches of fresh snow covered the runway's surface. He added that, during the approach to land, he lined up with what he thought was the appropriate runway, slowed the airplane, and applied flaps. Upon touchdown, the nosewheel "dug" into the snow, and the airplane nosed over. The pilot reported that he had unintentionally landed on the ski strip, which had accumulated about 2 ft of snow, and not the intended runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's unintentional selection of the wrong landing surface, which was covered with 2 ft of snow and resulted in a nose-over.

Findings

Personnel issues Incorrect action selection - Pilot
Personnel issues Monitoring environment - Pilot
Environmental issues Snow/slush/ice covered surface - Effect on operation
Aircraft Pitch control - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach Miscellaneous/other
Landing-flare/touchdown Wrong surface or wrong airport
Landing-flare/touchdown Nose over/nose down (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport; Private
Age: 46,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 1, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: December 1, 2019
Flight Time: (Estimated) 23000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Total, this make and model), 22700 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 400 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 120 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N7023E
Model/Series: 175 A 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1960 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 56523
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Unknown 
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series: GO-300
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 145 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PASX,113 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 19:56 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 314°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 80° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.48 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 1°C / -6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Soldotna, AK (SXQ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Soldotna, AK (SXQ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: SOLDOTNA SXQ 
Runway Surface Type: Dirt; Gravel; Ice;Snow
Airport Elevation: 113 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Snow
Runway Used: 7S IFR 
Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2300 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop;Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 60.475276,-151.032501(est)

Lancair 320, N670BS: Fatal accident occurred February 24, 2021 in Ataltoffshore Boca Raton, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida


Location: Atlantic Ocean, AO
Accident Number: ERA21LA141
Date & Time: February 24, 2021, 11:04 Local 
Registration: N670BS
Aircraft: STEINMAN MARK E LANCAIR 320 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 24, 2021, about 1104 eastern standard time, about 16 nautical miles southeast of Boca Raton, Florida, radar contact was lost with an experimental amateur-built Lancair 320, N670BS. The airplane was presumed to have impacted the Atlantic Ocean and to have sustained substantial damage, and the pilot was presumed to be fatally injured. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane departed DeLand Municipal Airport (DED), DeLand Florida about 0949 and flew southeast toward Boca Raton Airport (BCT), Boca Raton, Florida. A review of audio recordings provided by the FAA revealed the pilot contacted the BCT air traffic control tower when the airplane was about 10 miles northwest of the airport. The pilot reported that the airplane was at an altitude of 2,400 ft mean sea level (msl), with intentions to land at BCT. The controller instructed the pilot to report a left downwind for runway 5, and the pilot acknowledged the instruction. No further communications were recorded from the pilot, or from the controller to the pilot. The airplane entered the BCT class D airspace from the northwest as it descended through 1,700 ft msl. It continued to track toward the southeast and passed BCT before exiting the Class D airspace about 1 mile east of the coastline from Lake Boca Raton at an altitude of about 1,100 ft msl. The airplane continued to descend on its southeast heading until track data was lost at 1104:02, about 16 nautical miles southeast of BCT at an altitude of about 100 ft msl and a groundspeed of about 155 knots (see figure 1). 

Figure 1 - The airplane’s radar-derived ground track (depicted in yellow) as it flew through the BCT class D airspace (orange) southeast toward the Atlantic Ocean.


Family members of the pilot reported the airplane overdue to the FAA on February 26, 2021, after which the FAA issued an alert notification and coordinated with the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and the U.S. Coast Guard for search and rescue efforts. A search was initiated by the U.S. Coast Guard, which was suspended on February 28, 2021. The airplane and pilot were not found.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: STEINMAN MARK E 
Registration: N670BS
Model/Series: LANCAIR 320 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BCT,16 ft msl 
Observation Time: 10:47 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C /20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2000 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: DeLand, FL (DED)
Destination: Boca Raton, FL (BCT)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 26.178064,-79.920067 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

BOCA RATON — Wednesday will mark three weeks since an 87-year-old Boca Raton pilot went missing at sea, and with no agency stepping forward to investigate, the disappearance likely will remain a mystery.

The fact no agency is currently investigating how the pilot, Brendan Spratt, went missing concerned aviation experts. They say agencies usually at least try to piece together what happened in such cases.

“You can interview witnesses,” said Jeffrey Guzetti, a former air safety investigator with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Security Board. “You can look at any kind of aircraft documents that might have been left behind. You can get weather information, and you open up a file and put a case number on it.”

Disappearing off the coast

The FAA says it lost track of the pilot, Brendan Spratt, about 17 miles southeast of Boca Raton last month. Spratt was returning home from a trip in northern Florida on Feb. 24 when aviation officials say Spratt and his 1991 Lancair 320 plane dropped off the radar.

Spratt’s pilot’s license was revoked by the FAA in 2015. The agency wouldn’t say why, but he was prohibited by law from flying ever since.

When he vanished, a search at sea kicked off: The Coast Guard scoured about 16,000 square miles from Miami to Fort Pierce, but never found any debris. The FAA and NTSB each told the South Florida Sun Sentinel that there would be no inquiry underway unless plane wreckage were retrieved.

Representatives from five other agencies all said they, too, are not investigating, given the disappearance wasn’t in their jurisdiction.

It would be helpful for there to be an investigation, even if the case ultimately remains unsolved, Guzetti said. He said he was shocked to see that the Boca man had no pilot’s license or medical certificate.

A spokeswoman for the Boca Raton Airport — Spratt’s apparent destination, where he owns a hangar — said air traffic in and out of the airport is handled by the FAA, not the airport authority. An FAA spokeswoman said Monday that FAA air traffic controllers had no contact with Spratt before his disappearance.

Longtime pilot

Spratt has been flying his whole life. He learned to fly as a young man, went on to invent numerous airplane safety devices, managing a team of airplane engineers and built his own plane, which he’s flown for 30 years.

While the pilot’s discipline records were not immediately available, he did have one notable run-in with federal officials years ago.

The Volusia County Sheriff’s Office, where Spratt visited frequently, said the only report they have mentioning him is from 2013, where he was accused of violating the airspace of Air Force One, when then-President Barack Obama was on board, enroute to West Palm Beach.

Spratt was detained upon landing, but nothing more apparently came from that encounter with the Secret Service.


Brendan Spratt




Collision During Takeoff/Landing: Quad City Challenger II, N6138Z; accident occurred March 22, 2020 in Lettsworth, Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana








Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
https://registry.faa.gov/N6138Z

Location: Lettsworth, LA 
Accident Number: CEN20LA131
Date & Time: 03/22/2020, 1630 CDT
Registration: N6138Z
Aircraft: BOWER Challenger II
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Factual Information 

On March 22, 2020, about 1630 central daylight time, amateur-built Bower Challenger II airplane, N6138Z, was substantially damaged when it collided with a tree and impacted the ground near Lettsworth, Louisiana. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that he purchased the airplane about 1-1/2 weeks before the accident flight. This was his first flight. He had no previous flight time, nor had he received any flight instruction. He noted some familiarization with flying obtained from the internet. He had planned only to taxi; however, a wind gust caused the airplane to become airborne, and he ultimately flew for about 25 minutes "to get the hang of things." He attempted to land several times but was unable because of the turbulence. After another landing attempt, he again decided to go-around due to the turbulence. He thought the airplane had cleared trees near the flight path; however, the airplane was momentarily overcome by the continuing turbulence which resulted in it striking a tree. He stated there were no issues with the airplane; it was "performing flawlessly."

Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 36, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  0 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BOWER
Registration: N6138Z
Model/Series: Challenger II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: CH2-0997-R-1657
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:2 
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 960 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: 503 DCDI
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 50 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HZR, 39 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 21 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1637 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 129°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2800 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Lettsworth, LA (PVT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lettsworth, LA (PVT)
Type of Clearance:None 
Departure Time: 1600 CDT
Type of Airspace:Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Private (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 39 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 30.938333, -91.793056

Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage, N6962S: Incident occurred February 28, 2021 at Aspen-Pitkin County Airport (KASE), Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado 

Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing.


Date: 28-FEB-21
Time: 18:13:00Z
Regis#: N6962S
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA46
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ASPEN
State: COLORADO



A collapsed front landing gear caused a small inbound aircraft to skid to a stop Sunday morning in the middle of runway 33 at the Aspen/Pitkin County Airport around 11:15 a.m., according to Caroline Bonynge, Director of Operations, Safety and Security for the airport.

Two passengers were on board the private plane but neither showed signs of immediate injury, Bonynge said.

“Both passengers did exit safely — there were no injuries,” Bonynge said.

The plane was towed from the runway at 12:40 p.m. and operations resumed shortly after 1 p.m. Sunday.

The Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage sustained some damage in the accident. As of 12:45 p.m. Sunday, it was not yet clear what had caused the landing gear to collapse, Bonynge said.

Several emergency vehicles from the airport, the Pitkin County Sheriff’s Office, the Aspen Ambulance District and the Aspen Fire Department responded to the scene, according to Bonynge.

“It was a great show of our mutual aid agreement,” she said of the response.

Several commercial flights were delayed due to a closure at the airport that lasted nearly two hours. The airport reopened and departures resumed at 1:01 p.m., Bonynge confirmed.

Luscombe 8A, N2960K: Fatal accident occurred February 28, 2021 at Tailwinds Airport (FD15), Jupiter, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Location: Jupiter, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21FA142
Date & Time: February 28, 2021, 12:30 Local
Registration: N2960K
Aircraft: Luscombe 8E 
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 28, 2021, at 1230 eastern standard time, a Luscombe 8E, N2601T, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Jupiter, Florida. One pilot sustained fatal injuries and the second pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to a mechanic, who was also a close friend of the pilot, the pilot purchased the tailwheel-equipped airplane in October 2020 in order for his son, the second pilot, to gain additional experience flying tailwheel-equipped airplanes. The airplane was based at the Tailwinds Airport (FD15), Jupiter, Florida, a residential fly-in community. A witness stated that the day before the accident, the pilot was performing multiple engine runups in front of his hangar for about 45 minutes, then returned the airplane to the hangar, where it remained until the following day. On the day of the accident, the pilots, taxied the airplane for departure on runway 09, a 2,700-ft-long paved runway.

Additional witnesses located near the last third of the runway observed the takeoff and captured video (with audio) of a portion of the flight. They reported that the engine sounded “strong” as the airplane lifted off the runway after a ground roll of about 1,000 ft. After liftoff, the airplane immediately leveled off at an altitude of about 40 ft above ground level, the engine power was reduced, and the wings began rocking back and forth. A review of the video recording revealed that during the level off, the left engine cowl was open and flapping up and down. At the first sign of the open cowl in the video, the airplane had reached a point where there was about 1,400 ft of runway remaining. The engine noise then reduced, and the airplane appeared to descend back down towards the runway. The engine noise then increased, and the airplane began to climb. The wings continued to rock back and forth before the airplane made a gradual left turn to the north and disappeared out of the camera view.

A review of preliminary automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that a portion of the takeoff and initial climb were recorded. During the final seconds of the data, as the airplane turned left, the ground track was about 028° and the groundspeed was about 47 knots.

The 1230 weather observation recorded at North Palm Beach County General Aviation Airport (F45), West Palm Beach, Florida, located 8 nautical miles south of the accident site, included wind from 150° at 9 knots, with gusts to 18 knots, which correlated to a left crosswind during accident takeoff.

The airplane impacted dense woods and terrain about 800 feet northeast of the departure end of runway 09. The wreckage path and damage to trees was about 70 ft-long on a magnetic heading of about 025°. The airplane came to rest on its right side, with the left wing oriented near vertically. The outboard leading edge of the left wing was impact-damaged. The right wing was separated from the fuselage at its root. A 16-inch diameter semicircular impact mark (consistent with the diameter of trees at the accident site) was found in the leading edge, about mid span and the corresponding damage to the tree was located about 50 ft up a mature tree. There were fresh damage signatures on nearby trees and broken tree branches and large limbs spread along the path, including two distinct 45° angular cuts on a 6-inch-diameter limb. The entire right wing strut was separated from the wing and fuselage and was located at the beginning of the wreckage path. First responders reported that, upon their arrival there was a strong odor of fuel at the site.

The gascolator was about 1/2 full of blue-tinted fuel with no water or sediment/debris present. A total of about 2 gallons of fuel was recovered from both tanks, which remained intact, and there was damage to the fuel lines leading out of the right tank. Fuel was leaking from the right wing near its root, and the ground underneath was saturated with fuel. The left fuel tank line appeared devoid of fuel as the airplane rested, but upon moving the wing forward, fuel flowed from the tank into the line.

The engine cowl remained attached on the right side and the winged head-style fasteners were secured in place. The left side engine cowl, which had flush mounted screw fasteners, was found unlatched and damaged. The cowl was then reconnected and secured with the fasteners. All fasteners were present and operated properly with no damage noted to the fastener screws or their respective receptacles. The rudder, horizontal stabilizer, elevator, and elevator trim tab (found deflected about 4° nose up) remained intact. The rudder and elevator cables remained intact and were attached to their respective control horns and cockpit controls. Control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to both ailerons through fractures in the cables consistent with overload. The right aileron bell crank was found separated from its mount.

The propeller remained attached to the hub and both blades exhibited aft bending and sbends. One blade exhibited chordwise scrapes.

All of the spark plugs were removed and examined. All had minimal wear when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug chart and did not display any evidence of carbon or lead fouling. The bottom spark plugs on the right side of the engine were coated in oil and the top right spark plugs fractured at the top and separated the magneto leads. Both left and right magnetos were undamaged.

Thumb compression and suction on all cylinders was confirmed and crankshaft continuity was confirmed through a full 720 degrees of rotation. All valves, pushrods and springs operated normally, and the crankshaft rotation was smooth. About 4 quarts of oil remained in the sump. The carburetor and gascolator were undamaged. The carburetor contained fuel in the bowl, and the floats functioned smoothly and were undamaged. The needle valve and inlet screen were free of obstructions and the throttle and mixture controls at the carburetor
operated smoothly.

A post-accident engine run was performed after cutting away the damaged portions of the propeller, replacing the ignition leads from the right magneto, replacing the damaged top spark plugs on the Nos. 1 and 3 cylinders, and plumbing the engine with an alternate fuel supply. The engine was started and cycled from idle to 2,100 rpm with no anomalies noted.

An engine monitor instrument was recovered from the airplane and retained for examination and download.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Luscombe
Registration: N2960K
Model/Series: 8E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: F45,22 ft msl 
Observation Time: 12:30 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C /19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / 18 knots, 150°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3600 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 3020 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Jupiter, FL
Destination: Jupiter, FL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious 
Latitude, Longitude: 26.978355,-80.211607
 
Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




MARTIN COUNTY —  A 71-year-old pilot died Sunday when his two-seater plane crashed in the Tailwinds community near Jupiter, according to Martin County Sheriff’s officials.

Larry Keith Carpenter, a resident at the airpark, was killed when his 1947 Luscombe 8A single-engine plane crashed into the woods around 12:30 p.m., near the northeast end of a runway, a Martin County sheriff’s report stated.

Jupiter attorney and pilot Lawrence “Skip” Burrell, who represents Carpenter’s family, said Monday the passenger in the plane was Carpenter’s teenaged son David.

“His son was injured but is expected to recover,” Burrell said Monday. “I think he's 18.”

A few residents at the small airport located at 2400 S.E. Downwinds Road witnessed Carpenter crash, Burrell confirmed, who also was at the scene Sunday.

The National Transportation Safety Board is in charge of investigating the crash but on Monday hadn’t confirmed a cause for the fatal mishap.

Burrell, though, who called Carpenter a “very experienced pilot,” said the crash appeared to be an aircraft failure and not pilot error.

“It was a power failure on takeoff,” he said Monday. “It's just something that happens with aviation sometimes.”

Carpenter’s family, he said, is “grief stricken” and distressed over the tragedy.

“Everyone is praying for them,” Burrell said.

Zvignew “Ziggy” Ignato, 46, said he was working in a hangar near the airstrip and went out to watch Carpenter’s plane take off.

It appeared the aircraft was having trouble from the start, he said.

“When he was passing over us, you can see the cover on the plane engine was not secured; it was flapping in the wind,” Ignato recalled Monday.  “It was flopping back and forth … you could hear the engine, it was like sputtering, and then he just crashed into the woods.”

They called 911 and jumped into a four-wheeler to race toward the crash site.

Ignato said he, Burrell and others there heard the aircraft hit the ground.

“We were sure he crashed into a house because there was a loud noise that sounded like thunder,” he said. “We drove toward the golf course but nobody could see anything. We got to the woods, tried to locate the plane, but we couldn’t.”

Rescue personnel found the wreckage in thick brush.

“I cannot even express deepest condolences for the family,” Ignato said. “Nobody could expect anything like this.”

Tailwinds Airpark is east of Jupiter and borders Martin and Palm Beach County lines, according to its web site.

The airpark is one of five communities that comprise Ranch Colony and has a 2,700-foot lighted runway.

Fuel Contamination: Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion II, N5553C; accident occurred March 25, 2020 at Mid-Way Regional Airport (KJWY), Ellis County, Texas

Left Header Tank Sample. 

Right Header Tank Sample.

Fuel Flow Divider





Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 


Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: 

https://registry.faa.gov/N5553C

Location: Waxahachie, TX
Accident Number: CEN20LA132
Date & Time: 03/25/2020, 1655 CDT
Registration: N5553C
Aircraft: Cessna T210
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel contamination
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Factual Information

On March 25, 2020, about 1655 CDT, a Cessna T210 N airplane, N5553C, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Waxahachie, Texas. The private pilot sustained serious injury. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight.

A family member told investigators the pilot was going to fly the airplane to Live Oak County Airport (8T6), George West, Texas. Witnesses observed the airplane takeoff from Mid-Way Regional Airport (JWY) on runway 18 and reported the engine did not sound like it was making takeoff power. The airplane reached 50-100 ft above ground level (AGL), started a right turn, and then made a hard left downwind turn. The airplane then descended in a nose down attitude and impacted terrain. The airplane cartwheeled two times before it come to rest upright. The left wing was fractured mid-span and the engine was separated from the fuselage. The pilot said he did not think he could safely land off the departure end of the runway when the engine lost power because of a creek and trees in the area. Witnesses said the pilot could have landed on the runway or the ½ mile of open space past the end of the runway, and there was a strong tailwind when the pilot turned downwind.

One witness reported the airplane had flown very little in the three years before the accident and it had been stored outside at JWY during that time. The mechanic who performed the last two annual inspections on the airplane, was also a witness to the accident. The mechanic stated during the 2019 annual inspection he completely drained the fuel tanks and ran the engine for about 45 minutes without any problems noted. He anticipated the pilot was going to pick up the airplane following the inspection, but the pilot did not for an unknown reason. When the pilot arrived the day of the accident the mechanic helped the pilot sump several cups of water from the fuel tanks before the airplane was refueled. He advised the pilot to sump all the tanks again and to taxi the airplane for a while and do a good run-up before flying it. He said the pilot told him he did not have time for that and needed to get going.

The pilot had the airplane fueled prior to departing. The lineman who refueled the airplane stated the pilot was sumping the fuel tanks while he was present, and the pilot told him to fuel the left tank first because "he was getting a lot of stuff" out of the right tank. The lineman noted he did not observe any rust or debris around the left fuel cap. He did note rust around the right fuel tank filler, rust on the right fuel cap, and rust stains on the fuel cap gasket. He topped off both the left and right tanks (total capacity 90 gallons) with 41.2 gallons of fuel.

The pilot said it had rained a couple days prior to the accident and he drained a lot of water from the fuel tanks prior to the flight. He said he let the airplane sit for a while and came back and sumped the tanks again until only fuel came out. He said he planned to fly around the pattern a few times to make sure everything was working correctly.

Following the accident, a Federal Aviation Administration inspector drained two sump cups full of contaminants and water from the left header fuel tank and 12 sump samples of water from the right header fuel before fuel was sumped from the tank.

An examination was conducted on the engine. Liquid consistent with AVGAS was found in the fuel injector lines to the cylinders 2, 3, and 6. The injector lines to cylinders 1, 4, and 5 contained water. The inlet line to the fuel divider was removed and water and "a thick grey paste" came out of the fuel inlet. Upon disassembly of the fuel flow divider the diaphragm and spring were intact. A fine sand-like material was located on top of the diaphragm. The steel ring in the center of the fuel screen was completely covered in rust. The inlet side of the fuel screen also contained the sand-like material. Upon removal of the diaphragm and spring there was a large amount of foreign material in the fuel divider. There was no odor or indication of AVGAS in the fuel divider. No other anomalies that would have contributed to a loss of engine power were identified during the examination.

A review of the airplane maintenance logbooks showed the last three annual inspections were conducted on September 27, 2016, at 4,973.4 hours total time, December 18, 2017, at 4,981.2 hours total time, and September 19, 2019, at 4,981.7 hours total time. The airplane tachometer read 4,981.9 hours at the time of the accident. The pilot said that after he had the annual inspection completed in September, 2019, he decided to leave the airplane at JWY and have it repainted. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/08/2011
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 250 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5553C
Model/Series: T210 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 21063791
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/17/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 0 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4981.9 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520-R
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJWY
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 2155 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 14 knots / 19 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Waxahachie, TX (JWY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: George West, TX (8T6)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: CDT 
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Mid-Way Rgnl (JWY)
Runway Surface Type:Asphalt 
Airport Elevation: 727 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 32.448056, -96.913889 (est)

Fuel Exhaustion: Cessna 150E, N4729U; accident occurred March 25, 2020 near Aero Country Airport (T31), McKinney, Collin County, Texas






Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: 

https://registry.faa.gov/N4729U

Location: McKinney, Texas
Accident Number: CEN20LA133
Date & Time: March 25, 2020, 18:30 Local 
Registration: N4729U
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Factual Information

On March 25, 2020, about 1830 central daylight time, a Cessna 150E airplane, N4729U, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident after departing Aero Country Airport (T31), McKinney, Texas. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, he performed a preflight inspection with no anomalies noted and confirmed 14 gallons of fuel onboard by using a dipstick, which would have yielded about 1.5 hours of flight time with a 30-minute reserve. He departed T31 about 1730 and flew 26 miles north to an airport for three touch-and-go landings. The pilot then flew back to T31 and completed three more touch-and-go landings. He reported that before the final landing, the fuel gauges indicated 1/4 tank and 1/8 tank of fuel. On climb out from the final touch-and-go, about 200 ft above ground level, the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot advanced the throttle and mixture controls full forward and turned off the carburetor heat, but the engine did not respond. The pilot made a forced landing to a golf course, during which the airplane collided with a tee box and nosed over.

Figure 1 shows the accident airplane on the golf course after it had been flipped upright. The wings are slightly damaged but remained attached to the fuselage and the fuel caps are still installed. 

Figure 1 – The accident airplane upright on the golf course.

The pilot reported that fuel was leaking from the fuel tank caps while the airplane was inverted and when the airplane was recovered to a hangar at T31, about 3 gallons of fuel were drained from the fuel tanks.

According to the airplane owner's manual, the fuel tanks hold a total of 26 gallons with 3.5 gallons unusable (1.75 gallons per tank). A postaccident examination was completed by a mechanic with oversight provided by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector. The inspector noted that 2 to 3 gallons of fuel were found in a container, which held the fuel previously drained from the tanks. The fuel strainer and its attached fuel line remained attached to the firewall and were undamaged. The strainer, fuel lines, and carburetor did not contain any fuel and were completely dry and clear of contaminants. The examination did not reveal any other preaccident anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor 
Age: 38, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: September 1, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: November 13, 2018
Flight Time: 1670 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Total, this make and model), 1520 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 70 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N4729U
Model/Series: 150 E 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1965 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Other 
Serial Number: 15061177
Landing Gear Type: 
Tricycle Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: August 8, 2019 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1601 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 12.6 Hrs
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3832.7 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-200-A
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 100 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDAL,488 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 18:53 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 195°
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Visibility:  
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 13 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.26 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: McKinney, TX (T31) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: McKinney, TX (T31)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 18:28 Local
Type of Airspace: Class E; Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Aero Country T31 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 765 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Vegetation
Runway Used: 17 IFR 
Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4352 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.202499,-96.743614(est)

Landing Gear Not Configured: Aero Commander 500-B, N516DT; accident occurred March 27, 2020 at Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport (KOPF), Miami-Dade County, Florida








Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: 

https://registry.faa.gov/N516DT

Location: Opalocka, FL
Accident Number: ERA20CA148
Date & Time: 03/27/2020, 0015 EDT
Registration: N516DT
Aircraft: Aero Commander 500
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled

Analysis

The pilot reported that, during the descent to final, he began the GUMPS checklist. As he turned on the fuel tanks, he picked up interference on the radios. After fixing the radio situation, he continued the checklist. During the landing flare, he noticed that the "runway sight picture" seemed lower than normal. As he noticed this, he looked at the landing gear indicator, and the landing gear warning horn simultaneously sounded, so he initiated a go-around. While climbing to traffic pattern altitude, he noticed that he had failed to extend the landing gear. He added that he had not heard or felt the airplane contact the runway before the go-around. The pilot subsequently landed without incident and noted no damage during a cursory postflight inspection. He then departed and landed at another airport. Subsequently, he performed a more thorough postflight inspection of the airplane, during which he noticed that the marker beacon antenna was shaved off and that the lower fuselage of the airplane had sustained substantial damage consistent with ground contact.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to extend the landing gear due to distraction and his delayed go-around, which allowed the airplane to get too low and contact the runway with the landing gear retracted.

Findings

Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Pilot
Aircraft Configuration - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-aborted after touchdown Landing gear not configured (Defining event)
Landing-flare/touchdown Abnormal runway contact

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:Lap Only 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/31/2020
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/07/2020
Flight Time:  2156 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1093 hours (Total, this make and model), 1980 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 210 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 36 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Aero Commander
Registration: N516DT
Model/Series: 500 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1574
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/18/2020, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 25876 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO540-E145
Registered Owner: Central Airlines Inc
Rated Power: 290 hp
Operator: Central Airlines Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: OPF, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1153 EDT
Direction from Accident Site:95° 
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:3 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:None / None 
Wind Direction: 140°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 20°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tampa, FL (VDF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Miami, FL (OPF)
Type of Clearance:IFR 
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Unknown

Airport Information

Airport: MIAMI-OPA LOCKA EXECUTIVE (OPF)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 8 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6800 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 25.907222, -80.283056 (est)