Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Expansion at Louisiana Regional Airport (KREG) expected to meet demand for hangars

Mike Todd, foreground, fuels his Cirrus airplane Wednesday, November 15th, 2017, at the Louisiana Regional Airport while Pat McGee, background, an airport line supervisor, handles the fuel line. Airport officials are planning to add hangars as demand for space at the airport south of Gonzales continues to grow. The expansion area, not pictured, is just to the right of the fuel price sign.



BURNSIDE — More than two years after a 1,000-foot runway extension was completed, Louisiana Regional Airport in Ascension Parish is closing in on building a long-planned hangar addition to meet growing demand for space, airport officials said.

The general aviation airport south of Gonzales is in line for more than $3 million in state and federal dollars this year and next to clear a 7-acre site, build an apron and other infrastructure and then construct 16 T-hangars used to house the smaller airplanes.

Janet Gonzales, general manager of the airport off La. 44 and Loosemore Road just northeast of Pelican Point subdivision, said continued growth in the region have individual aircraft owners and companies that support the region's chemical industry constantly looking for a hangar at the 180-acre facility located between the commercial airports in Baton Rouge and New Orleans.

The airport, which has more than 100 aircraft based there, has a waiting list for 45 hangars, she said. 

"We've been out of space for a very, very long time and people have been chomping at the bit for a long time to be able to come out here," Gonzales said.

The more than $4 million runway extension completed in April 2015 — which lengthened the runway from 4,000 feet to 5,000 feet as well as extended a corresponding taxiway — made the airport more attractive to corporate aircraft for use in all weather conditions.

In July 2015, the Ascension-St. James Airport and Transportation Authority, the entity that operates the airport, purchased 28.3 acres of woods along the southern border of the runway and taxiway for $677,567 to make space for more aircraft and operations.

Since then, officials have been moving toward the hangar expansion. As a first phase, the airport plans to develop the first seven acres that are essentially where the current asphalt and concrete end.

The planned T-hangars will accommodate single-engine and some twin-engine planes with wingspans of no more than 41 feet, but the 7-acre addition will also have room for a few larger commercial hangars.

Gonzales said airport officials want to attract long-term land lease tenants who will build their own larger commercial hangars. The airport would build the base for an access road to these hangars.

Rick Webre, a parish homeland security official who is chairman of the Ascension-St. James Airport and Transportation Authority, added those larger hangars could house private jets or aircraft avionics and maintenance shops.

The airport appears poised to get through a key phase of permitting in its wetlands mitigation effort through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Ricky Boyett, spokesman for the Corps of Engineers in New Orleans, said with the mitigation completed, the Corps is working on writing the final permit and developing any special conditions it will require. The airport will then have to agree to those conditions before the permit can be issued.

"We're ready to bid," Gonzales added.  

Gonzales and Webre said land clearing, base and apron construction could be completed as soon as six months once the project starts, depending on the weather.

Earlier this month, officials in Livingston Parish took a major step for a new $32 million airport in Satsuma with the donation of 242 acres of land, but Gonzales said she didn't see the future airport as competition that would diminish the demand for hangar space in Ascension.

She noted that the Federal Aviation Administration has a standard of having a general aviation airport within a 30-minute drive of a residence.

"So as Livingston develops, they'll have their own market," she said.

During a recent interview with airport officials, Mike Todd, 60, of Baton Rouge, just happened to come in for a landing in his single-engine Cirrus propeller driven plan after a morning cruise.  

Todd, who was fueling up near where the new hangar expansion is planned, said he lives off Highland Road, uses his plane mostly for personal travel and likes the Burnside facility for its location and because it's a more simple airport.

He added that, because of the location, where he lives and the times he uses his plane, he avoids rush-hour traffic. 

"Coming out here, I'd always be going the opposite way of the traffic, where in Baton Rouge, I'd have to be going through the traffic," said Todd, who is a sales engineer.

Todd said he was "very lucky" to even get a hangar back in 2013 in light of the current waiting list and welcomed the hangar expansion.   

"I think it's great. I think it's about time," he said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.theadvocate.com

Airport Commission Clears Van Nuys Construction Project

The Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners has accepted a report finding that construction of a new fixed-based operation at Van Nuys Airport will not harm the environment.

The commission’s unanimous vote on Nov. 16 means that Jet Aviation of America Inc. can move ahead with the project on the 17-acre site at 16644 Roscoe Blvd. The project would include a maintenance and repair facility operated by private aircraft manufacturer Gulfstream Aerospace Corp.

Both Jet Aviation, based at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey, and Gulfstream are subsidiaries of aerospace and defense firm General Dynamics Corp., in West Falls Church, Va.

The initial study and negative declaration accepted by the commission evaluates environmental topics as outlined in the California Environmental Quality Act.

“Based on the evaluation, (Los Angeles World Airport staff) determined that the proposed project will have a less than significant impact on the environment,” stated a staff report on the issue.

Jet Aviation will build 132,900 square feet of new hangar, terminal and office space on the property and upgrade ramps and taxiways for use by heavier, larger business jets.

A fixed-based operation sells fuel, provides hangar space and maintains and manages aircraft.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://sfvbj.com

Piper PA-28R-201 Cherokee Arrow III, N2241Q, A and N Company Inc: Fatal accident occurred July 16, 2016 near Hogan Airport (NY05), Esperance, Schoharie County, New York

Lisa Marie Quinn, 48, of New York City, New York.

Andrew M. “Mike” Mydlarz, 50, and his wife Susanne Hilgefort, 48, both of Stamford, Connecticut.  

Susanne and Mike passed away in a Piper PA-28R-201 Cherokee Arrow III plane crash on July 16th, 2016 in Esperance, New York. Also killed in the crash was their good friend, Lisa Quinn.  Jason Klein, owner of Connecticut-based Force3 Pro Gear, a baseball equipment company, piloted the aircraft and survived.


Pilot Jason Klein, founder of Force3 Pro Gear


SCHOHARIE COUNTY — A plane that crashed shortly after takeoff last year, killing a Major League Baseball official and two others, was over its maximum allowable gross weight at the time, according to a new National Transportation Safety Board report.

The report also cites air conditions at the Schoharie County airport as contributing to the accident.

No probable cause was included in the report, which was filed online late last week. Such a determination could come in the final report, which may come by the end of the year.


The small Piper PA-28 aircraft, with four people aboard, crashed into a wooded, swampy area about 6:45 p.m. July 16, 2016. All three passengers died. The pilot survived but suffered severe injuries.


The plane was en route from the private Hogan Airport near the Schoharie County hamlet of Sloansville, town of Esperance, to Tweed-New Haven Airport in Connecticut.


Those killed were Andrew M. "Mike" Mydlarz, 50, and his wife, Susanne Hilgefort, 48, both of Stamford, Connecticut, and Lisa Marie Quinn, 48, of New York City.


Hilgefort served as MLB's senior director of broadcasting and business affairs and was one of the league's longest-serving employees, the league said. Her husband was an optician, according to their obituaries.


Jason Klein, owner of Connecticut-based Force 3 Pro Gear, a baseball equipment company, piloted the aircraft and survived. Klein continues to recover, more than 16 months later, a Force 3 company spokeswoman said this week.


NTSB investigators did not interview Klein, due to his injuries, the new report reads. Instead, he submitted a written statement in which he indicated he has no memory of the incident. 


The report also ruled out drugs or alcohol as factors, noting test results from samples taken from the pilot.


The four people aboard the plane were in Esperance to attend a gathering of family and friends near the airfield, sheriff's officials have said. Several of those remaining at the gathering saw the plane gain altitude and then descend into the trees.


They made their way to the crash site and found one man outside the plane with burns to his face and hands trying to help the others still in the wreckage, officials have said.


The NTSB estimated the takeoff weight of the aircraft, including fuel and passengers, to be about 66 pounds over the maximum allowable gross weight. They estimated the takeoff weight as 2,816.5 pounds; the maximum is 2,750 pounds.


At the maximum weight, the "estimated takeoff ground roll" is 2,180 feet, the report states. The plane got off the ground in about 1,500 feet, based on surveillance footage cited in the report.


The report also highlights the air density at the Schoharie County airport. The report says an FAA pamphlet and pilot handbook warn that air densities at higher altitudes require increased takeoff distances and cause reduced rates of climb, among other complications.


Witnesses described the takeoff as slow and sluggish. Another reported the plane as under full power the entire time. The engine did not fail, according to witnesses. 


The report confirms an examination of the engine showed no evidence of any pre-impact mechanical problems.


Another issue cited by the report is that the "flap control handle" was found set at 10 degrees. The plane's handbook did not include performance charts or procedures for 10-degree flaps during takeoff.


Read more here: https://dailygazette.com


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albany, New York
Piper Aircraft Inc.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

A and N Company Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2241Q

Location:  Esperance, NY
Accident Number:  ERA16FA257
Date & Time: 07/16/2016, 1845 EDT
Registration:  N2241Q
Aircraft:  PIPER PA 28R-201
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 16, 2016, about 1845 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201, N2241Q, collided with terrain after takeoff from Hogan Airport (NY05), Esperance, New York. The private pilot was seriously injured, the three passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. No flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that originated at NY05 and was destined for Tweed-New Haven Airport (HVN), New Haven, Connecticut.

According to a fixed base operator at HVN, on the day of the accident, the airplane was fueled with 14 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel, which brought the fuel level to "just above the tabs." The pilot then flew the airplane with the three passengers onboard from HVN to NY05. According to witnesses, the pilot and passengers attended a party at NY05. A witness reported that the accident airplane was the last of a group of airplanes to depart from NY05 and that another pilot had suggested to the accident pilot that he depart on runway 12L. A review of surveillance video revealed that the airplane took off on runway 30R, which was 3,000 ft long; the first 600 ft and the final 400 ft of runway 30R were turf, and middle 2,000 ft was asphalt. The surveillance video showed that the pilot began the takeoff roll where the paved section of the runway began (with 2,400 ft of available runway). During the takeoff roll, the nosewheel of the airplane lifted off and then settled back onto the runway. The nosewheel lifted again, and the airplane became airborne with about 900 ft of runway remaining.

Several witnesses observed the airplane's takeoff from runway 30R. They consistently described the airplane's takeoff as "slow" and "sluggish" and reported that it entered a "gentle" left turn immediately after takeoff. One witness stated that the airplane attempted to rotate earlier than the other airplanes that were departing that day. When the airplane became airborne, "the nose was pitched so high that the wings wallowed;" the witness then reached for his phone to dial 911. The airplane overflew a hangar located left of the departure end of the runway at a low altitude as it continued its left turn before descending into trees. Another witness stated that "the airplane was under full power the entire time. The engine did not fail."

Due to his injuries, the pilot was not interviewed. In a written statement, the pilot reported that he had "no personal recollection of the subject flight."

Radar track data obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) depicted the airplane in a left turn after takeoff. The airplane climbed to about 100 ft above ground level, and its groundspeed ranged between 58 and 67 knots from takeoff to the final radar target. The radar track ended about 100 ft beyond the departure end of the runway and about 1,000 ft left of the runway centerline.



Pilot Information

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on May 1, 2015. The pilot reported about 561 total hours of flight experience. The pilot's logbooks were not recovered and no determination could be made of his flight experience in the accident airplane make and model.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by a 200-horsepower Lycoming IO-360 engine driving a McCauley two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on March 1, 2016, at 6,573.6 total aircraft hours.

The airplane's weight and balance condition at the time of takeoff was calculated based on the estimated fuel onboard the airplane and the estimated weights of the passengers. According to the information provided by the fixed base operator at HVN, the airplane departed HVN with about 25 gallons or about 300 lbs of usable fuel. Fuel burn from HVN to NY05 was estimated to be about 8 gallons or 48 lbs. 

The airplane's takeoff weight at NY05 was calculated to be 2,816.5 lbs, which was 66.5 lbs above the maximum allowable gross weight of 2,750 lbs. There are no performance charts for any weight above the maximum gross weight. 

The performance charts indicated that at the airplane's maximum allowable gross weight, the estimated takeoff ground roll was 2,180 ft and the total distance to clear a 50-ft obstacle was 2,750 ft. 

According to the pilot's operating handbook for the airplane, the rotation speed for a normal takeoff was between 65 and 75 knots indicated airspeed (KIAS). With a flap setting of 25°, the rotation speed for a short-field takeoff was between 50 and 60 KIAS. After liftoff, the pilot was to increase airspeed to 55 to 65 KIAS. 

There are no performance charts or procedures for a 10° flap setting during takeoff. The performance charts do not consider the effects of a grass runway surface on takeoff and landing performance. 

The gross weight stalling speed with power off and full flaps is 55 KIAS, and, with flaps up, this speed is increased 5 knots. Loss of altitude during stall can be as great as 400 ft depending on configuration and power. The manufacturer did not publish power-on stall speeds for the airplane. The best rate of climb speed at gross weight is 90 KIAS, and the best angle of climb speed is 78 KIAS.



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

At 1851, the weather reported at Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York, located about 23 nautical miles east of the accident site, included wind from 030° at 3 knots, visibility 10 statute miles; few clouds at 5,000 ft, scattered clouds at 11,000 ft, broken clouds at 22,000 ft, overcast at 25,000 ft; temperature 27°C; dew point 16°C; and altimeter 30.04 inches of mercury. The calculated density altitude at NY05 was about 3,000 ft.

The density altitude at HVN when the airplane departed at 1845 was 1,971 ft.

Airport Information

NY05 was a private-use airport at 1,260 ft elevation, configured with two parallel runways, each of which was 3,000 ft long. Runway 12R/30L was a turf runway, and runway 12L/30R combined both asphalt and turf surfaces.

The elevation of HVN was 12.4 ft. HVN is equipped with two asphalt runways; runway 2/20 is 5600 ft long, and runway 14/32 is 3,626 ft long.

Wreckage and Impact Information

The airplane came to rest in swampy, wooded terrain and was destroyed by impact and postcrash fire. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented on a 180° magnetic heading and was 60 ft in length. The main wreckage was oriented on a magnetic heading of 350° and rested upright about 1,400 ft beyond the departure end of the runway and about 700 ft left of the runway's centerline.

The right stabilator and a portion of the right wing were separated and found in trees along the debris path. All flight controls surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to each control surface. The left wing was separated at the wing root and had thermal damage on the inboard portion. The right wing was still attached to the fuselage and sustained substantial thermal damage. The flap control handle indicated a flap position of 10°.

The cockpit and fuselage were destroyed by fire. Both propeller blades exhibited aft bending and leading-edge polishing. The landing gear was retracted.

The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller, and continuity of the drive train, valve train, and accessory section were established. The sparkplugs showed signs of normal wear. The magnetos were destroyed by fire. Thumb compression was confirmed on all cylinders. Examination of the engine and disassembly of its accessories revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies.

Medical And Pathological Information
The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of samples from the pilot, which were negative for ethanol and drugs of abuse.

Additional Information
According to FAA Pamphlet FAA-P-8740-2, Density Altitude:

Whether due to high altitude, high temperature, or both, reduced air density (reported in terms of density altitude) adversely affects aerodynamic performance and decreases the engine's horsepower output. Takeoff distance, power available (in normally aspirated engines), and climb rate are all adversely affected. Landing distance is affected as well; although the indicated airspeed (IAS) remains the same, the true airspeed (TAS) increases. From the pilot's point of view, therefore, an increase in density altitude results in the following:

• Increased takeoff distance.
• Reduced rate of climb.
• Increased TAS (but same IAS) on approach and landing.
• Increased landing roll distance.

Because high density altitude has particular implications for takeoff/climb performance and landing distance, pilots must be sure to determine the reported density altitude and check the appropriate aircraft performance charts carefully during preflight preparation. A pilot's first reference for aircraft performance information should be the operational data section of the aircraft owner's manual or the Pilot's Operating Handbook developed by the aircraft manufacturer. In the example given in the previous text, the pilot may be operating from an airport at 500 ft MSL, but he or she must calculate performance as if the airport were located at 5,000 ft. A pilot who is complacent or careless in using the charts may find that density altitude effects create an unexpected –and unwelcome – element of suspense during takeoff and climb or during landing.

According to the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Information, Chapter 3 (pg. 3-3, para. 1) per the section entitled Density Altitude (DA):

DA is the vertical distance above sea level in the standard atmosphere at which a given density is to be found. The density of air has significant effects on the aircraft's performance because as air becomes less dense, it reduces:

• Power because the engine takes in less air.
• Thrust because a propeller is less efficient in thin air.
• Lift because the thin air exerts less force on the air foils.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 38, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  (Estimated) , 561.3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N2241Q
Model/Series: PA 28R-201 201
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28R-7737029
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2749 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6573.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-C1C6
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KALB, 312 ft msl
Observation Time: 2251 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 95°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 22000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 30°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Esperance, NY (NY05)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: NEW HAVEN, CT (HVN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1845 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: HOGAN (NY05)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt; Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1260 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3000 ft / 27 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  42.780556, -74.331944



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA257
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Esperance, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-201, registration: N2241Q
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2016, about 1845 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201, N2241Q, was destroyed by collision with terrain and a post-crash fire after takeoff from Hogan Airport (NY05), Esperance, New York. The private pilot was seriously injured and three passengers were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that originated at NY05, and was destined for Tweed-New Haven Airport (HVN), New Haven, Connecticut. There was no flight plan filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Several witness provided statements, and their accounts of the accident were consistent throughout. During the takeoff roll from runway 30R, the nose wheel of the airplane lifted off and then settled back onto the runway. The nose wheel lifted again and the airplane became airborne. Witnesses stated that the airplane rotated with approximately 500 feet of the 2,000-foot paved runway remaining. The airplane overflew a hangar at the departure end of the runway "at a very low altitude" as it began a left turn.

Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation administration depicted a target correlated to be the accident airplane in a left turn after takeoff. The target climbed to about 100 feet above ground level (agl), and the radar track ended about 1,000 feet laterally beyond the departure runway.

The airplane was examined at the accident site on flat, swampy, wooded terrain, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path began in trees about 50 feet above the ground, was oriented about 170 degrees magnetic. The main wreckage came to rest oriented 350 degrees magnetic and was consumed by post-crash fire.

The right stabilator and a portion of the right wing were separated and found in trees along the debris path. All flight controls surfaces were accounted for at the accident site, and flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to their respective control inputs. The left wing was separated at the wing root and had thermal damage on the inboard portion. The right wing was still attached to the fuselage and sustained substantial thermal damage. The cockpit and fuselage were destroyed by fire.

The flap control handle indicated a flap position of 10 degrees. Both propeller blades exhibited aft bending. The landing gear was retracted.

The four seat, low wing, retractable tricycle landing gear-equipped airplane, was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360, 200 horsepower engine, equipped with a McCauley two-blade, constant-speed propeller.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on May 1, 2015, and he reported 385 total hours of flight experience on that date.

At 1851, the weather reported at Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York, located about 23 nautical miles east of the accident site, included wind from 030 degrees at 3 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, few clouds 5,000 feet agl, scattered clouds at 11,000 feet agl, a broken ceiling at 22,000 feet agl, overcast skies at 25,000 feet agl. The temperature was 27 degrees C, the dew point was 16 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 30.04 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Pietenpol Air Camper, N502R: Accident occurred November 22, 2017 at DeKalb Taylor Municipal Airport (KDKB), DeKalb County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N502R

Location: De Kalb, IL
Accident Number: CEN18LA043
Date & Time: 11/22/2017, 1030 CST
Registration: N502R
Aircraft: RUTTEN PHIL J PIETENPOL
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning

On November 22, 2017, about 1030 central standard time, a Phil J Ruttan Pietenpol Air Camper airplane, N502R, nosed over on the runway after landing at De Kalb Taylor Municipal Airport, (DKB), De Kalb, Illinois. The pilot was not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Hartford Municipal Airport (HXF), Hartford, Wisconsin, about 0845 and was en route to Terre Haute International Airport (HUF), Terre Haute, Indiana.

The pilot reported that he was hired to deliver the airplane to its new owner. The seller warned him of sensitive brakes and that the right brake was "mushy", but they were still effective. Since this was the pilot's first flight in this airplane type, before departure he taxied the airplane to become familiar with the brakes during which time he noticed no anomalies. He intended to fly to HUF with planned en route fuel stops. He first stopped at DKB to take a break for fuel and to warm up for the next leg of the flight. The wind sock was reportedly showing 3 to 4 knots from 350° to 360°. He entered the traffic pattern for runway 02 and made a 3-point landing with the engine at idle power. The airplane continued down the runway 300 to 400 ft as he held the control stick back. The airplane veered left about 30° so the pilot attempted to counteract the unexpected movement with right rudder application; the airplane did not respond to the right rudder application. The airplane was about 10 ft from the runway edge when the airplane finally responded to the right rudder input and began to travel parallel to the runway centerline. About 20 to 30 ft later the pilot reported that "it was as if someone slammed on the brakes" and the airplane nosed over. The pilot later stated that he did not accidentally apply the brakes during landing and that there could have been frozen moisture in the brake lines. He added that the right brake had undergone recent maintenance.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector stated that he performed a postaccident functional test of the brakes and they worked normally.

The airplane has been retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: RUTTEN PHIL J
Registration: N502R
Model/Series: PIETENPOL
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDKB, 915 ft msl
Observation Time: 1035 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -2°C / -10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.37 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: HARTFORD, WI (HXF)
Destination: De Kalb, IL (DKB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  41.931667, -88.705000 (est)







DEKALB, Ill. (WLS) -- The DeKalb Fire Department responded Wednesday morning to the DeKalb Municipal Airport for an incident involving a plane.

The pilot was traveling from Wisconsin to Texas and stopped in DeKalb to refuel. During landing, the plane flipped for unknown reasons, a DeKalb official said.

The pilot got out of the plane before emergency crews arrived and refused medical attention. There were no immediate reports of injuries.

The plane will remain at the DeKalb airport while the Federal Aviation Administration investigates.

Reports of the incident came in after 10 a.m.

The airport is located in the city of DeKalb, which is about 70 miles west of Chicago.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://abc7chicago.com






CHICAGO -- A small plane flipped over Wednesday morning while landing at DeKalb Taylor Municipal Airport, CBS Chicago reports.

DeKalb Deputy Fire Chief James Zarek said it happened around 10:30 a.m.

The pilot was headed from Wisconsin to Texas, and was stopping at the airport in DeKalb to refuel and take a break, Zarek said.

While landing, "something went wrong," and the plane flipped over, coming to a rest on its windshield and the front of its wings.

Paramedics checked out the pilot, but he refused to be taken to a hospital.

Zarek said the plane's owner is in Texas, and the pilot works for the owner transporting planes from one location to another.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.cetusnews.com





DeKALB – An airplane flipped over Wednesday morning at the DeKalb Taylor Municipal Airport, causing no serious injuries, but it left the main runway closed for about an hour and a half, according to reports heard on police radio traffic.

The DeKalb Fire Department responded to a call about 10:30 a.m. and left about an hour later, once the plane had been taken to one of the hangars.

DeKalb Deputy Fire Chief James Zarek said the plane had been traveling from Wisconsin to Texas and stopped at the airport to refuel. During the landing process, something happened that caused the plane to flip over.

Airport manager Tom Cleveland said he does not know what caused the plane to flip, but aircraft maintenance workers are looking into it.

Zarek said that the pilot got himself out of the plane and refused medical service.

Although the plane was not badly damaged, it will be a while before it can fly again because the engine needs to be taken apart for inspection, Cleveland said.

The Federal Aviation Administration will continue to investigate the incident, Zarek said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.daily-chronicle.com

State agencies urged to use Connecticut airports for travel

HARTFORD, Conn. -    Connecticut state agency heads have been told to make sure their employees use Bradley International Airport and the state's other public airports for any air travel while on official state business to help ensure the success of new nonstop routes.

In a recent letter to top state officials, Department of Administrative Services Commissioner Melody Currey said Democratic Gov. Dannel P Malloy and the state's Office of Policy and Management have directed agencies to use state-based public airports for all new travel arrangements moving forward, provided they're more cost-effective.

"In order for the Aer Lingus service and all other nonstop routes at Bradley to be successful, and for Connecticut to continue to grow as a transportation hub for the region, it is critical that we support our airports and utilize their services to the greatest extent possible," Currey said in the Oct. 3 letter. She wrote how the six-year-old Connecticut Airport Authority relies on "support and loyalty" from Connecticut passengers.

The quasi-public agency has been working to establish more nonstop routes at Bradley in Windsor Locks, including the reestablishment last year of trans-Atlantic service to Dublin, Ireland on Aer Lingus. Bradley is New England's second-largest airport.

It's unclear how many state employees have been flying in or out of out-of-state airports for state-related travel, especially considering the state's budget challenges and pressure to cut costs.

Alisa Sisic, public information officer for the Connecticut Airport Authority, said her organization doesn't know how often state employees use other airports. OPM officials also did not have the information, explaining how state travel expenses are broken down by in-state, or out-of-state, not by the kind of transportation used, such as air or rail.

"We just thought that it was important to ensure that state employees are prioritizing support of the state's airports when traveling on state business," Sisic said in an email.

In her letter, Currey notes how the airport authority has continued the practice of providing free parking to state employees on state business. She said that should be considered when agencies are comparing costs at other airports. Also, Currey said nonstop service available at another airport should not take priority over connecting service at Bradley, unless timing is crucial.

"It is critical that we utilize Bradley to the greatest extent practicable for state travel so that Bradley, and all Connecticut public airports, continue to thrive and airlines will continue launching new nonstop routes at our state's premier international airport," Currey wrote. Norwegian Air launched nonstop service between Bradley and Edinburgh, Scotland in June, marking the airport's second trans-Atlantic non-stop flight. Spirit Airlines also announced in June it would run additional nonstop flights between Bradley and Florida cities.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.mcclatchydc.com

Holiday laser light displays causing issues for pilots

Colorado -  Are your holiday light displays causing issues for pilots? This probably isn't a question people normally ask themselves, but it's a concern of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

When setting up light displays, some people are using devices that refract laser lights to display different holiday designs onto houses. But according to the FAA, some people are angling their laser light displays too high, causing issues for pilots.

The FAA is implementing a Laser Safety Initiative, which says aiming a laser at an aircraft is a serious risk and violates federal law. The FAA says, high-powered lasers can completely incapacitate pilots who are trying to fly safely, sometimes carrying hundreds of passengers.

The FAA is working with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies to pursue civil and criminal penalties against people who purposely do this. 

The Sheriff's departments refer their laser pointer and Christmas display calls to the FBI, as they investigate these incidents. The FBI couldn't put a number on how many incidents have happened in Colorado, but there have been some reported in the state. 

Centennial Pilot Nate Duehr told our partner station 9News in Denver, that lasers can be one of the most dangerous hazards pilots face, aside from weather related elements.

A conviction proving malicious intent can carry a sentence of up to five years in prison and/or up to $250,000 fine. 

For more information on laser safety visit the FAA's website

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.koaa.com

Bugatti-Demonge 100P, N110PX, registered to Le Reve Bleu LLC and was operated by the pilot: Fatal accident occurred August 06, 2016 at Clinton-Sherman Airport (KCSM), Burns Flat, Washita County, Oklahoma



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Le Reve Bleu LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N110PX 


Creating a classic from TulsaPeople Magazine on Vimeo.

Location: Burns Flat, OK
Accident Number: CEN16FA307
Date & Time: 08/06/2016, 0820 CDT
Registration: N110PX
Aircraft: WILSON BUGATTI-DEMONGE 100P
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Flight Test

On August 6, 2016, about 0820 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Wilson Bugatti-DeMonge 100P airplane, N110PX, impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from runway 35L at the Clinton-Sherman Airport (CSM), near Burns Flat, Oklahoma. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed during impact and a subsequent postcrash fire. The airplane was registered to Le Reve Bleu LLC and was operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 test flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight was originating from CSM at the time of the accident.

A witness at the airport reported that the airplane lifted off the runway. During the initial climb, the airplane banked to the right and then to the left. The airplane's left bank increased, it descended nose down, and subsequently impacted terrain inverted. Review of a chase helicopter's video was consistent with the witness statements. 

Pilot Information

The 66-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airline transport pilot certificate with single-engine land, multi engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He held a second-class FAA medical certificate issued on May 12, 2016. This medical certificate was issued with limitations: "Must wear corrective lenses. and Not valid for any class after 05/31/2017." The pilot reported on that medical certificate application 10,700 hours of total flight time and 25 hours of flight time in the previous six months.


Scotty Wilson of Broken Arrow 


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

N110PX was an experimental amateur-built, twin-engine, single-seat, tailwheel monoplane built as a replica of the Bugatti-DeMonge 100P, a 1930's era air racer that was never flown. There was only one original airplane produced, and the accident airplane was the first and only replica produced to the date of this report. According to airworthiness documents, the airplane was constructed to duplicate the original airplane's structure, systems, and dimensions. The accident airplane was powered by two Suzuki Hyabusa reciprocating, clutched motorcycle engines mounted in tandem aft of the cockpit. The engines drove two coaxial two-blade contra-rotating Hercules fixed-pitch wooden propellers. The forward engine was installed with the output drive shaft forward and was directly connected to the propeller reduction gearbox through universal joints and drive shafts on the left side of the fuselage. The rear engine was installed with the output drive shaft aft and was indirectly connected to the propeller reduction gearbox through a chain drive and sprockets that drove the drive shafts and universal joints on the right side of the fuselage. Both engine gearboxes were set in 6th gear and could not be changed. The propeller reduction gearbox was contained in a single housing with two separate drive trains to drive the forward and aft contra rotating propellers. The forward engine engaged the left gearbox drivetrain and drove the forward propeller. The aft engine engaged the right drivetrain and drove the aft propeller.

Engine throttle control was accomplished through two levers installed side-by-side on the left side of the cockpit with the left throttle lever controlling the forward engine and the right throttle lever controlling the aft engine. Engagement of the hydraulic clutches on the engines was accomplished independently by two levers mounted side-by-side on the right side of the cockpit. Each engine could be run without propeller movement until the respective clutch was engaged.

The airplane's maximum gross weight was listed as 2,939 pounds and its empty weight was 2,470 pounds. The airplane received its FAA Special Airworthiness Certificate in the experimental category on August 4, 2015.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

At 0753, the recorded weather at CSM was wind 040° at 9 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, sky condition clear, temperature 23° C, dew point 21° C, and altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury.

Airport Information 

CSM was a public, towered airport, which was owned by the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority/State of Oklahoma. It was located about 2 miles west of Burns Flat, Oklahoma. The airport had an estimated elevation of 1,922.1 ft above mean sea level. Two runways, 17R/35L and 17L/35R serviced the airport. Runway 17R/35L was a 13,503 ft by 75 ft runway with a concrete surface. Runway 17L/35R was a 5,193 ft by 75 ft runway with a concrete surface. Airport operations personnel examined the runway after the accident and no liberated airplane parts were found.



Wreckage and Impact Information

The airplane wreckage was found about 1,900 ft and 335° from the departure threshold of runway 35L. The airplane came to rest inverted on an approximate 330° heading. A depression was observed in the ground about 110° and 23 ft from the wreckage. Sections of clear plastic were found in the depression and the surface of sections of the depression contained a blue color transfer consistent with the color of the airplane. The airplane, forward of its empennage, was discolored, deformed, and charred, with sections consumed by fire. The rudder's skin was consumed by fire. The lower section of the right main landing gear separated from its strut and the lower section was found resting on vegetation northwest of the main wreckage. Splintered wooden propeller blade fragments were found resting on the ground in the area around the wreckage.

An on-scene examination of the wreckage was conducted. The rudder control cables were traced from the rudder to the rudder pedals. The elevators' push/pull tubes were attached to the control arms for each elevator. Forward of the empennage, the elevator tubes were found to be consumed by fire. Sections of the aileron tubes were found to be consumed by fire outboard of the fuselage. However, outboard sections of the aileron's control tubes were found connected to each aileron. Control continuity for the elevators and ailerons could not be established due to the fire damage. The propulsion drivetrain was traced from the engines to the gearbox and propellers, and no preimpact anomalies were detected. There were no observed damage or witness marks to indicate that the chain and sprockets for the aft engine became disengaged under power. The engines sustained thermal damage. The engines could not be rotated by hand and their clutches were not examined on scene. However, no external indications of engine anomalies were observed. The propeller gearbox was intact but had sustained thermal damage and sooting. The propeller hub was attached and charred. A portion of the left driveshaft remained attached to the universal joint and the right drive shaft was separated from the universal joint. There were no external indications of gearbox anomalies observed.




Medical And Pathological Information

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and toxicological samples were taken. The autopsy listed multiple blunt force injuries as the cause of death and accident as the manner of death.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) prepared a Final Forensic Toxicology Accident Report on the samples taken during the autopsy. The report indicated that the samples sustained putrefaction and subsequently, in part, stated:

178 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Muscle
38 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Brain
N-Butanol detected in Muscle
Propanol (N-) detected in Muscle
Propanol (N-) detected in Brain

The CAMI description of Ethanol indicated that it is "primarily a social drug with a powerful central nervous system depressant. After absorption, ethanol is uniformly distributed throughout all tissues and body fluids. The distribution pattern parallels the water content and blood supply of each organ. Postmortem production of ethanol also takes place due to putrefaction processes, but vitreous humor and urine do not suffer from such production to any significant extent in relation to blood. Vitreous humor would normally have about 12% more ethanol than blood if the system is in the post absorptive state, and urine would normally have about 25% more ethanol than blood. The average rate of elimination of ethanol from blood is 18 mg/dL (15-20 mg/dL) per hour."

The CAMI description of N-Butanol indicated that it is "an alcohol. It is also produced postmortem, along with ethanol and other alcohols."

Fire

Review of a chase helicopter's video showed that there was no inflight fire and that the accident airplane's fire started after the ground impact.




Tests And Research

The airplane was fitted with GoPro cameras for the flight. Six of these cameras were found in the area of the wreckage and were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Recorder Laboratory. The airplane wreckage was released and subsequent to the release, a mechanical engineer in the recorder laboratory examined the cameras, convened a Video Group as its Chairman, and subsequently produced an Onboard Image Recorder Factual Report.

The Onboard Image Recorder Factual Report stated that the cameras exhibited witness marks consistent with various levels of impact damage. The cameras recorded video data on micro secure data (microSD) cards. Five of the six microSD cards contained retrievable video data for the entire flight and one microSD card contained retrievable data for a portion of the flight before impact.

The report, in part, described the timing and correlation of the cameras' data and the group's observations of the accident flight recorded video and a previous flight's recorded video. The description of the accident flight, in part, indicated that the pilot was in a conscious state during the recording. No pilot or ground crew conversations pertinent to the investigation were captured. All preflight activities appeared to be consistent with known procedures. The pilot was seated and belted during the recording. He moved the left/forward ignition master switch to its "on" position and depressed the starter button. Then a sound consistent with a running engine was heard and the front propeller rotated counter-clockwise. The pilot depressed the right/rear starter button. No additional engine sound was heard and the pilot moved the right/rear ignition master switch to its "on" position. The pilot then depressed the starter button again, the rear propeller spun clockwise, and the sound consistent with a running engine was heard. The pilot appeared to manipulate the area consistent with the location of the engine clutch engagement lever and the front propeller began to spin counter-clockwise. The pilot movements were consistent with flight control check. The engine and gearbox gauge indications, which included engine oil temperature, engine oil pressure, fuel pressure, water temperature, volts, gearbox oil temperature, and gearbox oil pressure for both engines were within their respective green ranges at the start of the taxi to runway 35L and through the remainder of the recording. The airplane crossed the runway edge marking for runway 35L, the pilot added power, and the airplane tracked the right side of the runway centerline. The pilot added power and the airspeed indication became alive during the takeoff roll. The airspeed was about 60 knots during the roll abeam taxiway E. The airspeed indicated 80 knots after the airplane passed abeam taxiway D. The pilot applied backpressure to the control stick when the indicated airspeed was above 80 knots. The airplane crossed abeam taxiway C and it became airborne. The left/forward throttle lever was about 3/4 knob-width behind the right/rear throttle lever. The airplane laterally transitioned from the right side of the runway centerline to the left side of the centerline. The pilot moved the gear selector switch to the "up" position, a red light nearby illuminated, and the light extinguished about five seconds later. The runway centerline was visible below and to the right of the airplane. A change in pitch was heard in the ambient engine sounds. The rpm indication for the left/forward engine began to climb and the right rear engine appeared to remain stabilized. The pilot looked downward in the cockpit area near the hydraulic valve lever. The end of runway 35L became visible and the airplane was left of runway centerline. The pilot's right arm appeared to reach in the direction of the hydraulic valve lever. The left forward throttle lever appeared to be a knob and a half width distance from the right/rear throttle lever. The left/forward rpm indications trended upward, the pilot returned his left hand to the throttles, and his right hand to the control stick. The airplane entered an uncommanded slight left roll. The left/forward engine rpm indication reached about 10,000 rpm and the pilot pulled back the left/forward throttle lever near the closed position. Engine sounds decreased, the left/forward rpm indication decreased, and the airspeed was around the start of the green arc about 70 knots. The ambient engine sound surged. The pilot appeared to have pushed the right/rear throttle forward. The left/forward engine rpm indicated an increase in rpm near its redline. The left/forward throttle lever was positioned near its closed position. The airplane exhibited an uncommanded right roll and some flutter was observed on the left aileron. The airspeed was below the green arc about 65 knots. The right roll was arrested and the airplane appeared level. About a second later, the airplane entered an uncommanded left roll. The airspeed indication was about 65 knots. The control stick was in a neutral position. The left/forward rpm indication was near redline and the right/rear engine indication was about 4.500 rpm. As the airplane rolled through 90° of left bank, the pilot placed both hands on the control stick and commanded a right roll with a positive pitch attitude. The airplane continued to roll left, the nose dropped, and a green field came into view out of the front of the windscreen. The airplane rolled inverted and the recording continued until the subsequent ground impact. The altimeter during the recording did not exhibit an increase in altitude. However, an estimate from a chase helicopter video showed that airplane reached a maximum altitude between 80 and 100 ft above ground level. Additionally, a plot of observed parameters during the accident flight video was produced. The Onboard Image Recorder Factual Report is appended to the docket associated with this investigation.

An NTSB aerospace engineer, who was a member of the video group, reviewed the video recordings, assisted in observed video documentation, and produced an Airplane Performance Study. The performance study, in part, reviewed instrument readings as a function of camera elapsed time. The readings included indicated airspeed (VIAS), indicated angle-of-attack (α), left/forward and right/rear engine throttle lever angles (TLA), and the corresponding engine speeds (rpm).

A plot of the tabulated TLA's, rpm's, and VIAS's as a function of camera elapsed time was produced and the data showed that the engine speed for the forward engine began increasing from 6,000 rpm about 7 seconds elapsed time without any apparent TLA input from the pilot. The pilot responded by reducing TLA for the forward engine at 31 seconds elapsed time, about two seconds before the forward engine reached its maximum operating speed (red line) of 9,500 rpm.

The pilot continued to reduce TLA to a minimum of about 40° for the forward engine until, about 38 seconds elapsed time, he increased the forward TLA by 10°. The airplane's airspeed was observed decaying. The forward engine reached red line for a second time about 42 seconds elapsed time.

The input TLA and engine rpm for the right/rear engine appeared more consistent than for the left/forward engine. The rpm for the rear engine remained at approximately 5,800 rpm for most of the recording until, about 31 seconds elapsed time, the pilot began increasing the rear engine TLA by 7° through the next ten seconds. During this time, the rear engine rpm remained constant despite the 7° increase in TLA. The right engine rpm reduced to about 4,500 rpm after the pilot pulled the TLA back to 45° about 41 seconds elapsed time.

The airspeed plot showed that the airplane decelerated below the published stall speed of 70 knots equivalent airspeed (based on a gross weight of 2,850 lb and a normal load factor of 1.04) about 41 seconds elapsed time and remained below the stall speed for the remainder of the recording. The video evidence reflected a sequence of events consistent with an aerodynamic stall.

The performance study used the tabulated airspeed and an estimated operational gross weight of 2,650 lb and determined the airplane lift coefficient that was extracted from the data as a function of indicated angle-of-attack. Where angle of attack data was available, the lift from the observed accident data compared consistently with design estimates derived by the Le Reve Bleu team. The Airplane Performance Study is appended to the docket associated with this investigation.

Additional Information

Examination of the terrain from the accident site to one quarter mile north of the accident site revealed that a suitable field for an emergency landing was present there.



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA307
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 06, 2016 in Burns Flat, OK
Aircraft: WILSON BUGATTI-DEMONGE 100P, registration: N110PX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 6, 2016, about 0820 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Wilson Bugatti-DeMonge 100P airplane, N110PX, impacted terrain during takeoff from runway 35L at the Clinton-Sherman Airport (CSM), near Burns Flat, Oklahoma. A subsequent ground fire occurred. The airline transport rated pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed during the impact and ground fire. The airplane was registered to Le Reve Bleu LLC and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 test flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from CSM at the time of the accident.

Witness at the airport reported that the airplane lifted off. During the climbout, the airplane banked to the right and then to the left. The airplane's left bank steepened, it descended nose down, and subsequently impacted terrain inverted.

The 66 year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airline transport pilot certificate with multi engine land, single engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He held a FAA Second Class Medical Certificate issued on May 12, 2016. This medical certificate was issued limitations: Must wear corrective lenses. Not valid for any class after 05/31/2017. The pilot reported on the application for that medical certificate that he had accumulated 10,700 hours of total flight time and 25 hours in the six months prior to the medical examination.

N110PX was an experimental amateur-built, twin engine, single seat, tailwheel airplane built as a replica of the Bugatti-De Monge 100P airplane. According to airworthiness documents, the airplane was constructed to duplicate the original airplane's systems, dimensions, and structure. The airplane was powered by two Suzuki reciprocating engines and they each drove a Hercules fix-pitched wooden propeller. The propellers rotated in counter directions to each other. The airplane's maximum gross weight was listed as 2,939 pounds and its empty weight was 2,470 pounds. The airplane received its Special Airworthiness Certificate in the experimental category on August 4, 2015.

At 0753, the recorded weather at CSM was: Wind 040 degrees at 9 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 23 degrees C; dew point 21 degrees C; altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury.

CSM was a public, towered airport, which was owned by the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority/State of Oklahoma. It was located about two miles west of Burns Flat, Oklahoma. The airport had an estimated elevation of 1,922.1 feet above mean sea level. Two runways, 17R/35L and 17L/35R serviced the airport. Runway 17R/35L was a 13,503 feet by 75 feet runway with a concrete surface. Runway 17L/35R was a 5,193 feet by 75 feet runway with a concrete surface. Airport operations personnel examined the runway after the accident and no liberated airplane parts were found.

The airplane wreckage was found about 415 feet and 75 degrees from of the intersection of E1140 Road and N2120 Road and about 1,900 feet and 335 degrees from the departure threshold of runway 35L. The airplane came to rest inverted about a 330-degree heading. A depression was observed in the ground about 110 degrees and 23 feet from the wreckage. Sections of clear plastic were found in the depression and the surface of sections of the depression contained a blue color transfer consistent with the color of the airplane. The airplane, forward of its empennage, was discolored, deformed, and charred, with sections consumed by fire. The rudder's skin was consumed by fire. The lower section of the right main landing gear separated from its strut and the lower section was found resting on vegetation northwest of the wreckage. Wooden propeller blades were found splintered in sections resting on the ground in the area around the wreckage.

An on-scene examination of the wreckage was conducted. The rudders control cables were traced from the rudder to the rudder pedals. The elevators' push/pull tubes were attached to the control arms for each elevator. Forward of the empennage, the tubes were found to be consumed by fire. The aileron's control tubes were found connected to each aileron. These tubes were found to be consumed by fire outboard of the fuselage. Control continuity for the elevators and ailerons could not be established due to the fire damage. The propulsion drivetrain was traced and no preimpact anomalies were detected. The engines sustained thermal damage and could not be rotated by hand. However, no indications of engine anomalies were observed. The localized area where the airplane came to rest exhibited discoloration and charred vegetation consistent with a ground fire.

The coroner was asked to perform an autopsy on the pilot and take toxicological samples.

The airplane was fitted with cameras for the flight. Some of these cameras were found in the area of the wreckage. The recovered cameras were retained and are being sent to the National Transportation Safety Board Recorder Laboratory to see if they contain video data in reference to the accident flight.