Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Cessna 172H Skyhawk, N2809L: Accident occurred November 03, 2018 in Denali, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Force landed after departure.

https://registry.faa.gov/N2809L

Date: 03-NOV-18
Time: 17:40:00Z
Regis#: N2809L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172H
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: DENALI
State: ALASKA

Hughes 369D, N5187S: Fatal accident occurred November 02, 2018 in McDougal, Clay County, Arkansas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N5187S

Location: McDougal, AR
Accident Number: CEN19FA020
Date & Time: 11/02/2018, 1330 CDT
Registration: N5187S
Aircraft: Hughes 369
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load

On October 2, 2018 about 1330 central daylight time (CDT), a Hughes 369D, N5187S/N454AR, was destroyed when it impacted a utility pole and, subsequently, terrain in McDougal, Arkansas. The helicopter departed from a grass landing zone with two linemen attached for short haul operations in connection with utility line work. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and the two lineman sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the external load operation that was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 133, and no flight plan had been filed.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Hughes
Registration: N5187S
Model/Series: 369 D
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft External Load (133) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPOF, 327 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 21 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots / 19 knots, 220°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.88 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 36.436667, -90.452500

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Erik John Raisanen
October 21, 1973 - November 2, 2018

The world is a much sadder place today because Erik John Raisanen, 45, formerly of Brainerd, Minnesota, and 18-year resident of Newport News and Hampton, Virginia, died unexpectedly of injuries sustained in a helicopter crash while at work in Arkansas on November 2, 2018. He is survived by his wife of 14 years, Frances Bright; his 12 year old son Jake Raisanen; daughter Kiera Raisanen; stepsons David Doss (Kelly), Andrew Doss (Shanena Smith), Kevin Doss (Shelby Smith) and Ben Doss; as well as his parents, Don and Sandy Raisanen, of Punta Gorda, Florida; his brother Davin Raisanen (Christa), sister Elin Le Claire (Jarod), and granddaughter Ivy Doss, as well as a host of other family members and many close friends, especially Matthew Miles and Elijah Kramer, both of Brainerd, Minnesota. All will miss him more than words can say, and his absence will be felt for many years to come.

Erik was born on October 21, 1973, in Saint Paul and was educated in Brainerd, Minnesota, earning Associate’s degrees in Business Administration and Small Engine Repair. He worked as a carpenter for many years but really came to life when he earned his helicopter pilot license in 2010. In flying helicopters, he found his real calling.

Erik was a man who saw the potential in life. He always embraced new experiences, learning new things, and lived life to the fullest- skydiving, motorcycle riding, scuba diving, camping, hunting, fishing, martial arts and all kinds of weaponry, reading, making beer, playing drums, and cooking. Everything he did was done with passion and a fully committed thoroughness that is rare. When he worked, he worked hard and strove for excellence, and when he spent time with his family and close friends, he did so with equal dedication. He saw the humor in situations and in people, and lightened the hearts of those around him. He could always make you laugh. In all he did, he earned the respect and admiration of those who knew him.

Erik was bold and never let the risk of failure prevent him from trying something new. He really enjoyed new adventures, new experiences, and children. He was a much beloved Boy Scout Leader of Troop 84 in Hampton, and his attention and guidance will be sorely missed by the young lives he touched. He dedicated a lot of his time to his children, and shared in their discovery and exploration of the world, offering guidance and sharing the adventure of life with them. It was not uncommon for him to sword fight and wrestle with his kids and their friends from the neighborhood all afternoon. As teens, he spent hours talking to them and taking them to watch movies and play video games. He stood as an example of what it means to be a good man, how to make sacrifices for others, and how to be strong in the face of adversity. He didn’t tell others what they should do or be; he illustrated how to work to build a better life and a happy family, and how to get back up when something knocks you down. He always chose to be happy.

Erik was fearless, and in his presence, he brought out courage in others. He encouraged them to be their best by his intrepid example and by his generous support. His actions were guided by a deep faith in God. He treated others fairly and accepted them exactly as they were. Erik was a man who really listened – he gave advice only if asked, and it was always carefully considered and wise. The light of his spirit helped others’ lights to grow brighter. He illuminated so many lives. His desire, above all, was to ensure the happiness of those that he loved.

Erik was a man who truly loved his life, his wife, all his children, his family, and his job with unbridled passion. Because his capacity to love was so immense, the loss of it is equally immense. His loss has literally torn a hole in our hearts. He will be dearly missed by all. Grief is the price we will pay for loving him so much.

Fly high Soumiman.

A memorial service for Erik John Raisanen will be held on Friday, November 16, 2018, at 1:00 pm at Altmeyer Funeral Chapel, 12893 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA, 23608.


https://www.altmeyerfuneralandcremation.com


"At approximately 1:15 pm on November 2nd E-911 received a call from Air2 Electrical Construction Company operating East of McDougal reporting a helicopter crash. Upon arriving at the scene Emergency Medical Services and First Responders discovered the pilot of the rotorcraft to be deceased. The Clay County Coroner's Office recovered the body and it has been sent to the Arkansas State Crime Lab to determine cause of death. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified and will be arriving tomorrow for further investigation. Sheriff Miller has nothing more to report at this time. The Clay County Sheriff's Department would like to extend our condolences to the family of the pilot and prayers to all those involved." -Clay County Sheriff's Department




CLAY COUNTY, AR (KAIT) - A Virginia man died Friday when his helicopter crashed in Clay County.

Clay County Sheriff Terry Miller tells Region 8 News the pilot was Erik John Raisanen of Hampton, Virginia. He was flying a helicopter belong to Air2, which was contracted by Entergy Arkansas.

His helicopter crashed just before 1:30 p.m. Friday off Highway 62 near County Road 245, just west of McDougal.

Entergy Arkansas released the following statement;

Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the victim of this tragic event as well as with the entire Air2 family. Air2 is a contractor and was working for Entergy at the time of the accident. - Kerri Jackson Case, Sr. Communications Specialist Entergy Arkansas

Arkansas State Police, local fire crews, EMTs, and the Clay County Office of Emergency Services were also on the scene.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.kait8.com

Piper PA-28-236 Dakota, N2956B: Incident occurred November 04, 2018 at Merced Regional Airport (KMCE), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

Struck and damaged several approach lights.

https://registry.faa.gov/N2956B

Date: 04-NOV-18
Time: 11:21:00Z
Regis#: N2956B
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 236
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MERCED
State: CALIFORNIA

Bushby Mustang II, N287BM: Fatal accident occurred November 02, 2018 near Erie Municipal Airport (KEIK), Weld County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado
Lycoming Engines; Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N287BM

Location: Broomfield, CO
Accident Number: CEN19FA022
Date & Time: 11/02/2018, 1153 MDT
Registration: N287BM
Aircraft: MUSTANG II
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 2, 2018, about 1153 mountain daylight time, an amateur-built MUSTANG II airplane, N287BM, impacted terrain while on final approach to the Erie Municipal Airport (EIK), near Broomfield, Colorado. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The airplane departed EIK at an unknown time for a local flight.

Multiple witnesses in the area to the south of EIK reported seeing the accident airplane just before the accident. These witnesses reported that the airplane was traveling from west to east at a low altitude. The airplane banked "hard" or "steep" to the north and the nose of the airplane came down or "dropped". One witness stated that the bank angle was near 90°.

The airplane impacted a grassy area and trees in a park near Anthem Ranch about 0.4 miles south of the approach end of runway 33 at EIK. The main wreckage included the right wing, left wing, instrument panel, fuselage, and empennage. The engine separated from the airplane and came to rest 18 ft to the north of the main wreckage. The left main landing gear tire separated and came to rest 50 yards north of the main wreckage.

A weather observation at EIK, taken at 1154 recorded wind from 300° at 7 knots. The observation taken at 1212 recorded wind from 310° at 10 knots, gusting to 15 knots. A weather observation taken at Boulder Municipal Airport (BDU), Boulder, Colorado, (located 8 miles west of the accident site), at 1130 recorded wind at 290° at 24 knots, gusting to 34 knots. A weather observation taken at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport (BJC), Denver, Colorado, (located 7 miles southwest of the accident site), at 1150 recorded wind at 270° at 26 knots, gusting to 35 knots. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MUSTANG
Registration: N287BM
Model/Series: II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEIK, 5119 ft msl
Observation Time: 1154 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 300°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Erie, CO (EIK)
Destination: Erie, CO (EIK)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.997500, -105.045833 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



BROOMFIELD, Colo. — The pilot who was flying a small plane that crashed in a field in Broomfield Friday afternoon had an invalid private pilot license, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

John Durward Campbell, 58, of Erie, was flying the plane when it crashed. According to Federal Aviation Administration documents, his pilot license had been suspended since 2012, though it's unclear why. 

Both Campbell and a passenger, 20-year-old Tobias Campbell of Erie, died in the crash.

The Bushby Mustang II was built from a kit. It is unclear why it crashed.

Original article ➤ https://www.thedenverchannel.com







The Adams County Coroner's Office has identified the two men who died last week in a plane crash in Anthem Ranch as John Campbell, 58, and Tobias Campbell, 20, both of Erie.

Cause and manner of death are still under investigation, according to the coroner's office.

The plane , a small Mustang II home-built aircraft, reportedly crashed just before noon Friday in a greenbelt area near Anthem Ranch Road and Aspen Lodge Drive. Preliminary investigation indicates the craft was being piloted for a landing at Erie Municipal Airport. Neighbors called the area an easement to the Erie airport.

Senior Air Safety Investigator Jennifer Rodi, with the National Transportation Safety Board, said the crash occurred about 11:50 a.m.

"We do not have a flight plan for this airplane at this time so we don't know where the plane departed from or what time the airplane departed," Rodi said Friday.

The plane was not communicating with air traffic control, nor was it required to, she said. She declined to speculate as to the probable cause of the crash.

Rodi said investigators will be looking into "man, machine and environment," including the pilot's health, experience and any toxicology findings. They also will examine the craft's frame and engine for mechanical anomalies and review radar data associated with the aircraft to understand how fast it was flying at the time of the crash and the course of flight.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration and Adams County Coroner's Office will participate in the investigation.

They also will look at weather. Strong winds were present Friday, but Rodi said it was too early to tell if weather played a role in the crash.

Investigators were on scene Friday to examine the wreckage and talk to witnesses who reported the plane was flying west to east and initiating a turn north toward the Erie Municipal Airport.

Witnesses said the plane was both "fast in its speed" and was flying low, or lower, than what they normally expect for the area when planes are heading to Erie.

A preliminary report should be available on the National Transportation Safety Board website at ntsb.gov by Thursday or Friday, Rodi said, but a more-detailed report could take between 10 to 18 months.

Original article ➤ http://www.broomfieldenterprise.com

Pilatus PC-12/45, N728MG: Incident occurred November 04, 2018 at Jacksonville International Airport (KJAX), Duval County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Nose gear collapsed.

MG Flight Group LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N728MG

Date: 04-NOV-18
Time: 23:23:00Z
Regis#: N728MG
Aircraft Make: PILATUS
Aircraft Model: PC 12/45
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: JACKSONVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Bell 430, N430ST: Accident occurred October 30, 2018 in Kailua, Honolulu County, Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Weight on rotor blade dislodged.

K&S Helicopters Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N430ST

Date: 30-OCT-18
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N430ST
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: 430
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: SIGHTSEEING
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 135
City: KAILUA
State: HAWAII

Challenger II, N723T: Incident occurred November 02, 2018 in Farmington, Dakota County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis–Saint Paul

Aircraft was discovered in a field with unknown damage.

https://registry.faa.gov/N723T

Date: 02-NOV-18
Time: 21:45:00Z
Regis#: N723T
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: CHALLENGER II
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: FARMINGTON
State: MINNESOTA

Cirrus SR22, N514DT: Incident occurred November 04, 2018 at Long Island MacArthur Airport (KISP), New York, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New York, New York

Made a hard landing.

North Shore Aviation Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N514DT

Date: 04-NOV-18
Time: 18:40:00Z
Regis#: N514DT
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NEW YORK
State: NEW YORK

Flight Design GMBH CTLS, N21ZA: Accident occurred November 04, 2018, Incidents occurred September 16, 2018 and October 17, 2012; Accident occurred July 19, 2012 in Lorain County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

RAS Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N21ZA

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA049
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 04, 2018 in LORAIN/ELYRIA, OH
Aircraft: Flight Design CTLS, registration: N21ZA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Gear collapsed.


Date: 04-NOV-18
Time: 18:35:00Z
Regis#: N21ZA
Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN
Aircraft Model: CTLS
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LORAIN
State: OHIO

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

September 16, 2018: Landed in a field.

Date: 16-SEP-18
Time: 17:25:00Z
Regis#: N21ZA
Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN
Aircraft Model: CTLS
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LORAIN
State: OHIO

Aviation Incident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Incident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Elyria, OH
Incident Number: CEN13IA024
Date & Time: 10/17/2012, 1330 EDT
Registration: N21ZA
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN CTLS
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The flight instructor reported that the airplane’s fixed right main landing gear collapsed during landing. He reported that the landing was “not extraordinarily hard” and that it should have been well within the airplane’s typical performance.

Postincident examination of the composite right main landing gear leg revealed several manufacturing defects, including wrinkled layers and layers that terminated at the surface when they should have been continuous, which reduced the landing gear leg’s strength and its ability to resist longitudinal cracks. As a result of this investigation, the airplane manufacturer conducted an audit of the subcontractor that manufactured the landing gear legs. The audit revealed that, before the incident, the landing gear manufacturer had become aware of quality issues related to the mold closing process of the landing gear legs during manufacture and had implemented steps to reduce the recurrence of these issues. Based on the available evidence, the manufacturing defects in the composite main landing gear leg likely reduced the leg’s load-carrying capacity and resulted in its eventual failure. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this incident to be:
The manufacturing defects in the main landing gear leg, which resulted in its eventual failure.

Findings

Aircraft
Main gear strut/axle/truck - Failure (Cause)

Organizational issues
Equipment manufacture - Manufacturer (Cause)

Factual Information

On October 17, 2012, about 1330 eastern daylight time, a Flight Design GMBH model CTLS, N21ZA, sustained substantial damage while landing on runway 25 at the Lorain County Airport (LPR), Elyria, Ohio. The flight instructor and student pilot were not injured. The airplane sustained minor damage to the landing gear during the mishap. The aircraft was registered to RAS Aviation LLC, Elyria, Ohio, and operated by Zone Aviation, Elyria, Ohio, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated at an unconfirmed time.

The flight instructor reported that the flight was a training flight and on the first landing the right main landing gear collapsed. He stated that the landing was "not extraordinarily hard". He went on to add that based on his experience in the same model airplane that the landing should have been well within typical performance of the airplane.

During the investigation it was discovered that this same airplane was involved in a landing accident on July 19, 2012 (CEN12LA676). The July accident also resulted in a fracture of the right main landing gear leg.

The damaged right main landing gear leg from this incident was retained for further examination.  The main landing gear leg was made of composite material. The fiber reinforcements used in the composite construction included unidirectional glass fibers, glass fiber fabric, and basalt fiber fabric. Flexible plastic tubes extended the length of the legs enclosed within ribbed plastic tubes located near the leading and trailing edges of the leg. Foam filled space between the plastic tubes and a center internal cavity. The legs were manufactured in a mold with the split line at the leading and trailing edges. During the layup process, layers were placed in a mold half representing the upper half of the leg, and layers were wrapped around the internal tubes, foam, center cavity, and preformed layers. The mold was then closed with a mold piece representing the lower half of the landing gear, and the center internal cavity was pressurized during curing. Examination and sectioning of the landing gear leg showed wrinkling of the fibers resulting in their orientation being angled with relation to the surface rather than parallel to the surface. Additionally several layers terminated at the leading and trailing edges. The location of theses terminating layers corresponded with the location of longitudinal cracks found along the leading and trailing edges of the landing gear.

As a result of the investigation, the manufacturer of the airplane was contacted regarding the landing gear manufacturing process. The landing gear legs were manufactured by a sub-contractor to the airplane manufacturer. The airplane manufacture conducted an audit of the sub-contractor and determined that there were some previous quality issues with regard to mold closing during the manufacture of the landing gear legs. It was reported that the landing gear manufacturer had recognized these issues and had implemented steps to reduce the risk of recurrence of these issues. The airplane manufacturer also conducted a search of part requests and difficulty reports related to the main landing gear. This records search showed 3 occurrences which resulted in complete collapse of the landing gear leg out of a fleet of 370 airplanes. All other reported landing gear leg fractures were discovered either during inspection after a hard landing, or during taxi operation when significantly reduced stiffness was encountered.

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Landing gear collapse (Defining event) 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 38
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Seatbelt, Shoulder harness
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/04/2011
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  910 hours (Total, all aircraft), 425 hours (Total, this make and model), 135 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 23
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Seatbelt, Shoulder harness
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/18/2011
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  30 hours (Total, all aircraft), 30 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN
Registration: N21ZA
Model/Series: CTLS
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: F-10-09-04
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: ROTAX
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912
Registered Owner: RAS Aviation LLC
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: Zone Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Zone Aviation
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LPR, 793 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1353 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 8 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 9000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.77 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Elyria, OH (LPR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Elyria, OH (LPR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Lorain County Regional Airport (LPR)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 793 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 25
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5002 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.344167, -82.177778

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Elyria, OH
Accident Number: CEN12LA676
Date & Time: 07/19/2012, 2200 EDT
Registration: N21ZA
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN CTLS
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot reported that, on the day of the accident, he had accomplished three landings in the accident airplane and that he was pleased with these landings. Forty-five minutes after the last day landing, he took off for a night flight. During the first attempted landing, he misjudged the flare, and the airplane bounced. He subsequently performed a go-around and again misjudged the landing flare. The airplane subsequently bounced hard on the runway, which resulted in a flat nosewheel tire and firewall and right main landing gear damage. Although examination of the right main landing gear leg revealed several manufacturing defects that have since been addressed by the landing gear leg manufacturer, the accident was likely caused by the pilot’s misjudged landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing and the subsequent right main landing gear damage.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot’s misjudged landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

Findings


Aircraft

Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Organizational issues
Equipment manufacture - Manufacturer

Factual Information

On July 19, 2012, about 2200 eastern daylight time, a Flight Design GMBH model CTLS, N21ZA, sustained substantial damage while landing on runway 7 at the Lorain County Airport (LPR), Elyria, Ohio. The private pilot who was the sole occupant was not injured. The airplane sustained damage to the landing gear, engine mount and firewall during the mishap. The aircraft was registered to RAS Aviation LLC, Elyria, Ohio, and operated by Zone Aviation, Elyria, Ohio, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airplane was rented by the pilot for a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated at an unconfirmed time.

The accident was not initially reported to authorities and was discovered while investigating another incident that happened with this airplane. On October 17, 2012, about 1330 the airplane sustained minor damage while landing on runway 25 at LPR (CEN13IA024). In both instances, the right composite landing gear leg fractured. 

Regarding the July accident, the pilot reported that he was performing takeoff and landing practice. He performed 3 landings during the daylight and he reported that he was pleased with these landings.  After a 45 minute break he took off again to perform night landings to regain night currency requirements. He reported that on the first night landing he misjudged the landing and bounced. He performed a go-around and came back in for another landing. He again misjudged the landing and "bounced hard". The airplane came back down striking the nose wheel. As the airplane came to a stop the pilot realized there was something wrong and upon de-planing, discovered a flat nose tire. He pushed the airplane from the runway and acquired a tow from ramp personnel.

The damaged right main landing gear leg was retained for further examination.  The main landing gear leg was made of composite material. The fiber reinforcements used in the composite construction included unidirectional glass fibers, glass fiber fabric, and basalt fiber fabric. Flexible plastic tubes extended the length of the legs enclosed within ribbed plastic tubes located near the leading and trailing edges of the leg. Foam filled space between the plastic tubes and a center internal cavity. The legs were manufactured in a mold with the split line at the leading and trailing edges. During the layup process, layers were placed in a mold half representing the upper half of the leg, and layers were wrapped around the internal tubes, foam, center cavity, and preformed layers. The mold was then closed with a mold piece representing the lower half of the landing gear, and the center internal cavity was pressurized during curing. Examination and sectioning of the landing gear leg showed wrinkling of the fibers resulting in their orientation being angled with relation to the surface rather than parallel to the surface. Additionally several layers terminated at the leading and trailing edges. The location of theses terminating layers corresponded with the location of longitudinal cracks found along the leading and trailing edges of the landing gear.

As a result of the investigation, the manufacturer of the airplane was contacted regarding the landing gear manufacturing process. The landing gear legs were manufactured by a sub-contractor to the airplane manufacturer. The airplane manufacture conducted an audit of the sub-contractor and determined that there were some previous quality issues with regard to mold closing during the manufacture of the landing gear legs. It was reported that the landing gear manufacturer had recognized these issues and had implemented steps to reduce the risk of recurrence of these issues. The airplane manufacturer also conducted a search of part requests and difficulty reports related to the main landing gear. This records search showed 3 occurrences which resulted in complete collapse of the landing gear leg out of a fleet of 370 airplanes. All other reported landing gear leg fractures were discovered either during inspection after a hard landing, or during taxi operation when significantly reduced stiffness was encountered. 

History of Flight

Landing-flare/touchdown

Abnormal runway contact (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 55
Airplane Rating(s):  Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Seatbelt, Shoulder harness
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/20/2010
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: 119 hours (Total, all aircraft), 48 hours (Total, this make and model), 59 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN
Registration: N21ZA
Model/Series: CTLS
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: F-10-09-04
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: 912
Registered Owner: RAS Aviation LLC
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: Zone Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: LPR, 793 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 10000 ft agl
Visibility: 9 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 70°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 20°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Elyria, OH (LPR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Elyria, OH (LPR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information


Airport: Lorain County Regional Airport (LPR)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 793 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 07
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5002 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:   41.344167, -82.177778

Socata TBM 700, N850TJ: Incident occurred November 02, 2018 at Corvallis Municipal Airport (KCVO), Benton County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Left wing scraped the runway.

https://registry.faa.gov/N850TJ

Date: 02-NOV-18
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N850TJ
Aircraft Make: SOCATA
Aircraft Model: TBM 700
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CORVALLIS
State: OREGON