Friday, June 29, 2012

Blue Angels, Black Diamond Jets, and other aerial acts make practice runs for this weekend's Service Credit Union Boston-Portsmouth Air Show.

The Blue Angels, Black Diamond Jets and several other aerial acts that will perform in this weekend's Service Credit Union Boston-Portsmouth Air Show made their final practice runs on Friday. 

 A crowd of several hundred spectactors were onhand at Portsmouth International Airport to them then demonstrate the performances they will present on Saturday and Sunday. Air Show Director Greg Osborn said Friday's turnout is nothing compared to the crowds he expects to see this weekend.

Osborn said his staff of 400 people and 1,500 volunteers who have worked so hard to get everything read expect as many as 60,000 people from all over New England and elsewhere will come to the air show.

Osborn said the Navy's Blue Angels are always a big draw, especially when this may be the last year in the foreseeable future they will be able to perform in Portsmouth.

What follows is a video that shows a small sample of what air show goers can expect to see on Saturday and Sunday.

Watch Video:   http://portsmouth-nh.patch.com/articles/air-show-acts-fine-tune-shows-video#video-10490171 
 

Of Gabriel Nderitu: A little more work he could see his dreams take flight

 

This is a story of one man with a an unquenchable quest to fly. Gabriel Nderitu has fabricated a craft, which is almost hitting the skies. He finally ran some tests on a real airstrip. And as Rose Wangui reports, he is very optimistic. 

 

Residents of Kambirwa village in Murang’a east district were treated to a rare sight when an innovator sought to test his craft at the proposed Kambirwa airstrip. After three years spent building his own craft Gabriel Nderitu ferried it to Murang’a for a flight test….. While the craft did not get off the ground, Nderitu is confident that with a little more work he could see his dreams take flight.

Greenville, South Carolina: AeroCab expands aircraft

GREENVILLE, S.C. — AeroCab, LLC — based at the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport (KGSP) — continues to expand their aircraft charter services with the addition of a Learjet 35. The Learjet 35 is the second aircraft to be added to the AeroCab fleet in the past 30 days. 

With the addition of the Learjet 35, AeroCab’s private charter and aircraft management fleet now totals seven aircraft in the Upstate SC region, which includes: a Cirrus SR-22, Pilatus PC-12, Citation V, Citation Bravo, Beechjet 400, and a Hawker 800.

The Learjet 35 seats eight passengers and includes a full entertainment system with DVD/CD and Airshow in-flight information system, a forward refreshment galley, a full enclosed lavatory, and aft locker storage with cabin access.

In addition to aircraft charter services, AeroCab is pleased to announce the establishment of Aero Flight Solutions, a Domestic and International Flight Planning Services Company, co-located with AeroCab at the GSP airport. Aero Flight Solutions provides full 24-hour service to help clients with efficient and optimized flight plans, flight following, and concierge services.

Working collectively at the GSP airport, Aero Flight Solutions and AeroCab have expanded their employee base to 23 people.

AeroCab specializes in on-demand travel with charter coordinators and flight operations available 24/7/365. AeroCab’s experienced team of incredible pilots and crew members provide the highest level of service, both in the air and on the ground. AeroCab operates in strict accordance with FAA flight standards to ensure maximum safety and security.

To learn more about AeroCab or to book a charter reservation visit www.flyaerocab.com or call 864-416-0065.

To learn more about Aero Flight Solutions visit www.aeroflightsolutions.com or call 864-416-0041

Source:  http://data.greenvilleonline.com

Service Credit Union's Boston-Portsmouth Air Show: Seacoast traffic warning - Air show may cause weekend driving delays


PORTSMOUTH — Seacoast residents planning on traveling anywhere this weekend — both in and around town, as well as out of the state — will need to plan ahead and give themselves plenty of time because of the Service Credit Union's Boston-Portsmouth Air Show this weekend.

According to Bill Boynton of the N.H. Department of Transportation's Public Information Office, although no significant traffic measures have been established, planning and coordination with turnpike officials should help keep traffic moving as efficiently as possible. Boynton explained electronic messages such as 'DO NOT PULL OVER TO VIEW AIR SHOW' and 'REMAIN ON ROAD' typically send messages that motorists adhere to.

Although he couldn't speculate on how heavy the traffic or the amount of time expected for delays will be, Boynton did acknowledge there will be considerable traffic on both Saturday and Sunday.

"The Air Show is obviously going to generate a lot of traffic, people should realize this and give themselves extra time depending on where they need to go," said Boynton.

Read more here:  http://www.fosters.com

Bellanca 8GCBC Scout, Heads Up Advertising, N87020: Accident occurred August 02, 2011 in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey

http://registry.faa.gov/N87020 

NTSB Identification: ERA11LA437 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2011 in Egg Harbor Township, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
Aircraft: BELLANCA 8GCBC, registration: N87020
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After the airplane’s fourth unsuccessful attempt to pick up a banner, a witness reported that the airplane was flying about 100 feet above ground level and the wings were "wobbling." The airplane then descended, and spun before it impacted the ground. The pilot stated that he did not have any recollection of the accident or the events prior to the accident. No preimpact anomalies were noted with the airframe or engine during a postaccident examination.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering near the ground, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

On August 2, 2011, at 1500, eastern daylight time, a Bellanca 8GCBC, N87020, registered to an individual and operated by Heads Up Advertising, incurred substantial damage when it impacted terrain in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. The pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, banner towing flight. The flight originated from Woodbine Municipal Airport (OBI), Woodbine, New Jersey, about 1450.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector stated that the pilot fueled the airplane prior to flying towards the banner pick up area. The pilot attempted 3 banner pickups prior to the accident. He maneuvered the airplane for the fourth attempt but failed to pick up the banner. The banner ground handler looked away and started to prepare the banner for another attempt, when moments later he heard a loud impact noise and observed the airplane had crashed into the ground about half mile away from the pickup area, on the crosswind for the banner tow pattern.

According to a witness, the airplane was observed flying approximately 100 feet above ground level. She noted that the wings were "wobbling" and the airplane was not climbing although it was in a nose up attitude. Next, she saw the airplane begin to "nosedive" and start spinning but was unable to see the airplane impact the ground.

The pilot stated that he did not have any recollection of the accident or the events prior to the accident.

The airplane was manufactured in 1974 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-360 series, 180-horsepower engine. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on February 3, 2011. At the time of the inspection, the reported aircraft time was 6698.0 total hours and the recorded tachometer was 2090.15 hours. The tachometer located in the wreckage 2236.91 hours.

The pilot, age 20, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued in May 2011. He reported 600 total hours of flight experience, of which, 65 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

A post accident examination of the wreckage by the FAA revealed that control continuity was verified to all flight control surfaces. Fuel samples were taken from each wing with no water or contaminants noted. Examination of the engine was performed and the top and bottom sparkplugs were removed and no issues were noted. The crankshaft was rotated by the propeller flange and compression was observed on all cylinders. In addition, spark was obtained from the spark plug leads during the rotation.




Jason Flood


FRANKLINVILLE, N.J. -   A FOX 29 investigation: a young New Jersey pilot survives a devastating crash only to learn that his employer does not hold the important insurance policy that is vital in getting him back on his feet.

Jeff Cole and FOX 29 Investigates have the story tonight of Jason Flood and his fight for what he believes he's owed.

A warning, some of the images in this report are hard to look at.

"...This is what it's made to do. Doing the aerobatics--flips, rolls, spins..." said Flood.

Jason Flood is happy when he's around his aerobatic plane. He feels pure joy when he's strapped in its seat, control in hand---defying gravity.

"Free. I'm at home. It's a place of enjoyment. It's freedom. It's what I love..." said Flood.

Flood is a 23-year-old pilot who flies out of a small airfield near his Franklinville, New Jersey home. However, every time he soars, he remembers the day that he came tumbling to earth.

"...August 2nd. was a very devastating, life changing event for me..." he said. "I can't talk. I am in a strange room trying to figure out where I am. I can't get up to go to the bathroom. My life changed that day."

August 2nd., 2011, He's is flying low trying to hook-on an advertising banner to pull above beach goers along the Jersey Shore. Suddenly, the engine quits and Flood spirals down.

Federal Investigators found that the 20-year-old pilot made an error.

Flood says he had just moments to lift the nose of the aircraft before it slapped the earth.

"On the scene you could hear in the police recordings they said this doesn't look good," Flood said.

Jason Flood was knocked-out. Rescue workers found him bent-over and bloodied in the cockpit. Pictures show his crumpled body in the yellow tee-shirt. Flood had suffered massive injuries including broken bones, organ damage and internal bleeding.

Flood was eventually rushed to Camden's Cooper Hospital where, after 3 weeks in a coma and multiple surgeries, he emerged with rods and pins holding his broken body together.

"...How did you survive?" asked FOX 29's Jeff Cole.

"By the grace of God..." he replied.

Jason Flood's rehab was painful and long. Furthermore, he says it was made more difficult when he learned the family friend who'd hired him to fly banner planes failed to carry state-required insurance that would have gone a long way to help him get back on his feet."

That man is Herbert Degan of Woodbine, New Jersey. He can be seen behind the wheel of the Lexis recording FOX 29's Jeff Cole and his crew with his cell phone.

You can see Degan in happier times with Jason Flood in a photo posted on a web site which documents aerobatic air shows. They're also side by side in a video of a fund raiser held for Flood.

According to a State of New Jersey Workers Compensation Order, Degan's banner business Heads Up Advertising, LLC, which is under his and his wife's names, was uninsured. It did not carry state-mandated workers' compensation insurance.

While the Degan's did pay Flood his weekly wages of about 200 bucks for half a year in 2012, Flood's won a 190,000 dollar workers' compensation judgment against Heads Up Advertising and the Degan's, but he has not collected.

And there's something else you should know about Herbert Degan. He's an air traffic controller at the Atlantic City Airport. He's directed aircraft to depart and land safely for 22 years. In fact, he's listed as the "safety rep." at the Atlantic City air traffic control Tower for the National Air Traffic Controllers Union.

Jeff Cole tried to talk to Herbert Degan, but as he approached his SUV, he noticed his young son in the back seat, so he asked Degan to take his card so they could talk later.

Degan would not talk. His bankruptcy attorney, in an e-mailed statement to FOX 29, accused Jason Flood and his parents of spreading "venomous lies" about the Degan's.

He wrote that the Degan's would like "nothing more than to respond" but are unable to because the "Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Case is still pending."

Herbert Degan and his wife filed the Chapter 7 bankruptcy in November of 2013 claiming that they owe between One-million and 10-million dollars.

Listed as creditors: Jason Flood for his 190,000 dollar workers' comp. judgment and the State of New Jersey for almost 1.2-milion dollars, most of it for Flood's medical bills. Those bills have now been cut to $400,000 and paid by a special state fund.

In a recording of the December bankruptcy hearing, Herbert Degan admits his banner business had no workers' compensation insurance at the time of Flood's devastating crash, but claimed it was an accountant's fault.

"He failed to obtain workers compensation insurance for us without us knowing," Degan said.

In the meantime, Jason Flood is back fighting gravity and battling for what he believes he's owed.

"I'm left in the dust, left at the bottom, trampled on again--even after the plane crash," said Flood.

FOX 29 called New Jersey accountant Michael Shumski who's listed on the Degans' bankruptcy filing. He said he did work for Degan's Heads Up Advertising but does not recall Degan asking him to arrange workers' comp insurance. He says he forwards such requests to insurance brokers. The Degan's Attorney calls the crash a "tragic event" which has forever altered the lives of the Floods and the Degans.

Degan's attorney says they will also not respond at this time due to an "open criminal charge" against Jason Flood's father. Flood's father was charged with harassment after he accused the Degan's of lying on their bankruptcy filing after that December hearing. Flood says he'll fight the charge.

Story, video, photo gallery:  http://www.myfoxphilly.com

 





 


Published on Mar 17, 2013
PLEASE READ THE DESCRIPTION
WARNING: Graphic material. Viewer discretion is advised.

This is a video montage of photos that were acquired by Jason Flood, an aerobatic pilot based in Southern New Jersey. On August 2, 2011, Jason was flying a Bellanca 8GCBC Scout on a routine banner tow flight when, in the process of picking up a banner, the engine seized on the airplane and he and the aircraft crashed in Egg Harbor Township.

As a result of the accident, Jason sustained the following injuries: crushed left calcaneus heel, right ankle explosion, broken right tibia and right femur, an assortment of broken ribs, lumbar spine explosion, the total loss of his left kidney and spleen, and lastly a ruptured aorta. Jason underwent numerous surgeries to fix his heel, ankle, and tibia with rods and screws as well as the insertion of plates and screws in his body, including rods and screws in his back.

Amazingly, Jason made a full recovery. He took his first airplane flight a mere two months after the accident and flew the family's Piper Cub shortly afterwards. Ten months after the accident, in late June 2012, Jason competed in the Widlwood Acroblast competition in Cape May County, NJ, placing second in the intermediate category out of nine competitors. Not even two months after that Jason flew his first airshow performance since the accident - the airshow taking place at the New Garden Flying Field in Toughkenamon, PA.

Jason would like to thank the Egg Harbor Township Police Department, the Scullville Fire Company, the Cardiff Fire Department, and their respective EMS personnel for assisting in his rescue as well as the EMTs and pilots for the New Jersey State Police's SouthStar Medevac unit, along with staff at AtlantiCare Regional Medicare Center and Cooper University Medical Center in Camden for going above and beyond to ensure Jason got the best medical care possible. He would also like to thank his family and friends for always being by his side during that time, and of course throughout the entire recovery phase and beyond.

You can visit Jason's website at http://www.jasonfloodairshows.com 


Video of Jason's performances at the 2012 New Garden Airshow can be found at http://www.zingeraviation.com .



 

Published on Mar 17, 2013
PLEASE READ THE DESCRIPTION
WARNING: Graphic material. Viewer discretion is advised.

This is a video montage of photos that were acquired by Jason Flood, an aerobatic pilot based in Southern New Jersey. On August 2, 2011, Jason was flying a Bellanca 8GCBC Scout on a routine banner tow flight when, in the process of picking up a banner, the engine seized on the airplane and he and the aircraft crashed in Egg Harbor Township.

As a result of the accident, Jason sustained the following injuries: crushed left calcaneus heel, right ankle explosion, broken right tibia and right femur, an assortment of broken ribs, lumbar spine explosion, the total loss of his left kidney and spleen, and lastly a ruptured aorta. Jason underwent numerous surgeries to fix his heel, ankle, and tibia with rods and screws as well as the insertion of plates and screws in his body, including rods and screws in his back.

Amazingly, Jason made a full recovery. He took his first airplane flight a mere two months after the accident and flew the family's Piper Cub shortly afterwards. Ten months after the accident, in late June 2012, Jason competed in the Widlwood Acroblast competition in Cape May County, NJ, placing second in the intermediate category out of nine competitors. Not even two months after that Jason flew his first airshow performance since the accident - the airshow taking place at the New Garden Flying Field in Toughkenamon, PA.

Jason would like to thank the Egg Harbor Township Police Department, the Scullville Fire Company, the Cardiff Fire Department, and their respective EMS personnel for assisting in his rescue as well as the EMTs and pilots for the New Jersey State Police's SouthStar Medevac unit, along with staff at AtlantiCare Regional Medicare Center and Cooper University Medical Center in Camden for going above and beyond to ensure Jason got the best medical care possible. He would also like to thank his family and friends for always being by his side during that time, and of course throughout the entire recovery phase and beyond.

Music by Matchbox Twenty - How Far We've Come.

You can visit Jason's website at http://www.jasonfloodairshows.com .
Video of Jason's performances at the 2012 New Garden Airshow can be found at http://www.zingeraviation.com .



 

Until last August, the only thing miraculous about Jason Flood was his youth — the young pilot flew alongside men more than twice his age.

But after a banner plane crash left him critically injured in a medically-induced coma, no one imagined he would be here, competing at the Wildwoods AcroBlast Competition that begins today.

But today Flood, 21, will go through his usual pre-flight routines this morning. He will walk around the plane, checking the aelerons and the propeller. He will walk through his routine — the dips and rolls and inverses — on the ground before taking off from Cape May County Airport.

Jason Flood was trying to pick up a banner from a grassy airfield when his single-engine airplane crashed into an area of dense brush in Egg Harbor Township. Responders spent 40 minutes freeing the bloodied pilot from the wreckage. Eventually, he was flown to Cooper Medical Center, where a series of surgeries mended his broken bones and a torn aorta, and ultimately saved his life.

While family and friends remained hopeful the aerobat would return to the skies, Jason’s recovery was a dim hope in the weeks and months that followed.

“What if I never fly again?” Flood asked his father after he awoke and the tracheostomy tube had been removed.

Read more here:  http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com

Taking the message sky high


You’re stuck in traffic. Or lying on the beach gazing up at a blue sky. Perhaps you’re hiking on Table Mountain or hanging out at a pavement café in Parkhurst. A small plane flies overhead, quite low in the sky. It’s pulling a massive banner. You crane your neck to read what it says…

And that’s the rub: did you get the message? Did it stay with you? Did the company paying for advertising on a sky-high banner get what it was looking for?

Thomas Kritzer, from Sky Messaging, believes this particular out of home advertising media delivers major impact – and he can prove it. “Results hinge entirely on the message that clients choose to fly. We can positively demonstrate the recall rate that banners have achieved in the past, which is a result of the brand itself and/or of the message that is being displayed, that has been proven to be around 27% over 50 flight hours and as high as 48% over 100 flight hours. In one instance we even had 89% of all sampled respondents recall a banner that flew for only 10 hours!” he says.

Read more here:   http://themediaonline.co.za/2012/06/taking-the-message-sky-high/