Thursday, June 13, 2019

Helio H-391B Courier, N10CJ: Accident occurred June 11, 2019 in Hope, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N10CJ

Location: Hope, AK
Accident Number: ANC19LA027
Date & Time: 06/11/2019, 2230 AKD
Registration: N10CJ
Aircraft: Helio H391
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 11, 2019, about 2230 Alaska daylight time, a Helio H-391B airplane, N10CJ, sustained substantial damage after a loss of control during a precautionary landing following a partial loss of engine power near Trapper Joe Lake about 15 miles southwest of Hope, Alaska. The private pilot and pilot rated passenger received no injuries. The airplane was registered to the pilot and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from McGahan Industrial Airpark (AK73), Nikishka, Alaska, about 2100.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that he was flying in the left seat and his pilot rated passenger was seated in the right seat. While flying over the abandoned Alaska natural gas pipeline between Sterling, Alaska and Hope, the engine started to surge and run rough, and the engine manifold pressure decreased. He cycled the throttle lever, increased the mixture lever to full rich, and turned on the electric fuel boost pump, but full power was not restored. The pilot rated passenger pulled the carburetor heat lever out (heat on) with no effect on engine performance. The pilot was able to maintain airplane altitude, but engine power was limited, so he searched for a landing location. He located an abandoned airstrip along the pipeline road and performed an approach to land to the north. The pilot stated that during the landing, the airplane drifted to the right, and touched down further than he intended. During the landing roll out, the right wing tip struck vegetation, the airplane veered rapidly to the right, and the empennage and left wing trailing edge impacted trees. Subsequently the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left aileron and left horizontal stabilizer.

The airplane was recovered, and a detailed examination is pending.

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming GO-435 reciprocating engine. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Helio
Registration: N10CJ
Model/Series: H391 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PANC, 132 ft msl
Observation Time: 0553 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 21 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots / 27 knots, 150°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 25000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Nikishka, AK (AK73)
Destination: Nikishka, AK (AK73)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 60.811944, -150.006667 (est)

Kenai Air Traffic Control contacted State and Wildlife Troopers at 9:18 pm on Tuesday night and informed them of an emergency landing by a private plane near Trapper Joe Lake.

At the time of the initial report, it was not known if anyone had sustained injuries in the incident. 

Wildlife Troopers along with Kenai National Wildlife Federal Law Enforcement Officers responded to the area and were able to make contact with those involved. They would find that neither the pilot, identified as 65-year-old Paul Dale, of Kenai, and the passenger aboard the craft suffered no injuries.

Dale reported that his plane suffered a mechanical issue that forced the landing 18 miles down Mystery Creek Road near the lake.

The two individuals were transported from the incident site to their vehicle in Soldotna.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://alaska-native-news.com

The Alaska State and Wildlife Troopers in Soldotna were advised by the Kenai Air Traffic Control tower of small plane making a reported emergency landing approximately 18 miles down Mystery Creek Road near Trapper Joe Lake, on Tuesday. 

Wildlife Troopers responded to the area along with Kenai National Wildlife Federal Law Enforcement Officers and were able to contact the plane occupants. 

The pilot, Paul Dale, 65, of Kenai, and his passenger reported sustaining no injuries after having to perform an emergency landing when their plane suffered mechanical issues.

Both the pilot and passenger were transported from the incident location back to their vehicle in Soldotna.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.radiokenai.net

Cessna A185F Skywagon, N1296F: Incident occurred June 12, 2019 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft made emergency landing on floats in a private airfield.

https://registry.faa.gov/N1296F

Date: 12-JUN-19
Time: 19:20:00Z
Regis#: N1296F
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 185
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA

Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-22-150, N6865B; accident occurred June 09, 2019 at Riverside Municipal Airport (KRAL), California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside,California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N6865B

Location: Riverside, CA

Accident Number: GAA19CA333
Date & Time: 06/09/2019, 1115 PDT
Registration: N6865B
Aircraft: Piper PA22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, while landing on a grass runway, the airplane encountered a "strong crosswind that blew [the airplane] to the left side of the grass." Upon landing, he observed "small grass mounds" rising higher than the mowed grass. As he continued the landing roll, he realized that the grass mounds were runway lights. The airplane hit a runway light and then ground looped to the right.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

An automated weather observation station located 3 miles south of the accident site reported that, about 38 minutes after the accident, the wind was from 270° at 15 knots. The pilot was landing the airplane on runway 24. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to the maintain the runway heading during landing with a crosswind, which resulted in impact with runway lighting and a subsequent ground loop during the landing roll.

Findings

Aircraft
Heading/course - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Runway/taxi/approach light - Effect on operation (Cause)
Crosswind - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Other weather encounter
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Loss of control on ground
Runway excursion

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/12/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/22/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 262 hours (Total, all aircraft), 32 hours (Total, this make and model), 129 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N6865B
Model/Series: PA22 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1956
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 22-4165
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/11/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3592.3 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRAL, 804 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 213°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / Terrain-Induced
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / Moderate
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 35°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: San Diego/El Cajon, CA (SEE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Riverside/Rubidoux, CA (RIR)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1015 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Flabob (RIR)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 767 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Vegetation
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3190 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.988889, -117.410000 (est)

Piper PA-12, N78559: Incident occurred June 12, 2019 in Denver, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Lost control during touch and goes.

https://registry.faa.gov/N78559

Date: 12-JUN-19
Time: 15:48:00Z
Regis#: N78559
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 12
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Cessna 182E Skylane, N3051Y: Fatal accident occurred February 12, 2019 in Maitland, Orange County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3051Y

Location: Maitland, FL
Accident Number: ERA19FA193
Date & Time: 06/12/2019, 1100 EDT
Registration: N3051Y
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 12, 2019, about 1100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182E, N3051Y, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Maitland, Florida. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight destined for Massey Ranch Airpark (X50), New Smyrna, Florida. The airplane was owned and operated by Golden Corner Flying Club, under the provisions of Title14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The personal flight originated from Executive Airport (ORL), Orlando, Florida, about 1055.

Earlier during day of the accident, the pilot and passenger flew the airplane from Oconee County Regional Airport (CEU), Clemson, South Carolina, to ORL. A fuel receipt revealed that the pilot purchased 21.1 gallons of fuel prior to departing CEU. The flight plan that was filed indicated that the airplane departed CEU with 4 hours of fuel on board. According to radar data obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the flight from CEU to ORL took about 3.10 hours. The pilot did not purchase fuel at ORL before departing for X50.

According to preliminary air traffic control radio communication information provided by the FAA, the pilot declared an emergency at 1059 to Central Florida Terminal Radar Approach Control and stated that the airplane was not getting fuel out of the right tank. The pilot asked for the closest airport to land and the controller told him that ORL was the closest airport. The controller cleared him to land and advised the pilot he was cleared to make a left or right turn back to the airport and to switch radio frequency back to the tower controller at ORL. The pilot also reported to the tower controller that the airplane was not getting fuel out of the right tank. The controller cleared him to land on runway 13, but the pilot did not respond, and no further communications were received from the accident airplane.

A witness stated that he was in a boat on the northeast side of Lake Maitland when he heard and saw an airplane flying overhead. The engine was sputtering "like it was running out of gas." He watched the airplane fly over the lake to the north, make a 180° turn back to the lake, and thought the pilot was trying to make a water landing. The witness was in the path of the airplane, so he started the boat motor and drove perpendicular to the airplane's path to stay out of the way. The witness further stated it looked like the airplane may have hit some treetops at the edge of the water because the airplane drastically nosed over and went straight into the water and hit "very hard." He immediately went over to the airplane, which was still on top of the water; however, it quickly sank.

The airplane was located about 5 miles north of ORL in Lake Maitland, at a depth of 20 ft. Two gallons of fuel was removed from each wing tank and the single auxiliary tank. The left wing remained attached to the airframe. The flap and aileron were still attached to the wing. The fuel tank was intact and not breached. The fueling cap was attached and secured to the fuel tank. The fuselage was intact and not damaged. The rudder, elevator and vertical stabilizer were attached and not damaged. The right wing remained attached to the airframe. The flap and aileron were still attached to the wing. The fuel tank was intact and not breached. The fueling cap was attached and secured to the fuel tank. The main landing gear was attached and not damaged. Both doors were attached and not damaged.

The instrument panel was intact; however, the panel was separated from its mounts. The throttle, mixture, and propeller controls were all in the most forward position. The fuel selector valve was in the right tank position. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was in the off position. The lap belts and shoulder harnesses remained attached. The propeller was attached to the engine; one blade was bent forward, the second blade tip was bent, and the third blade was straight. The bottom engine cowl was crushed consistent with impact damage. The muffler and airbox were crushed. The top engine cowling was not damaged. The engine remained attached to the engine mounts and was not damaged. Flight control continuity was established to all flight controls by moving the control wheel and rudder pedals to verify movement.

The airplane was recovered to a salvage facility and secured to a trailer in preparation for an engine run. The magnetos were dried out and the carburetor and spark plugs were cleaned of water. The aviation fuel that was removed from the airplane was separated from the water and used to start the engine. The engine started without hesitation and ran continuously for about 3 minutes at different power settings.

The four-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was built in 1962, and powered by a 375-horsepower Continental O-520-series engine, equipped with a three-blade, constant speed Hartzell propeller. The most recent annual inspection was completed on April 4, 2019. Review of maintenance records revealed that at the time of the most recent annual inspection, the airframe total time was 5,835.49 hours, and the engine time was 1,578.69 hours since major overhaul.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second class medical certificate was issued on October 1, 2018. He reported 1,000 total hours of flight experience at that time. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3051Y
Model/Series: 182 E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KORL, 112 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots / , 270°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Orlando, FL (ORL)
Destination: New Smyrna Beach, FL (X50)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 28.620278, -81.349167 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Daniel P. Boggs, Investigator In Charge

Stanley Alfred Rampey, MD






Two men from Seneca were killed in a plane crash Wednesday in Florida.


Police in Maitland, Florida, a suburb of Orlando, searched for the plane after it crashed into Lake Maitland around 11 a.m. Wednesday.


The men have been identified as Stanley Rampey and Raymond Dodd, according to Mari Drechsel, an administrative assistant with the Orange County Medical Examiner's Office in Florida.


The Cessna 182E Skylane is owned by Golden Corner Flying Club of Seneca, according to records from the Federal Aviation Administration. 


"We're really in shock right now," said Auby Perry, the CEO of Golden Corner Flying Club. 


Perry said the pilot of the Cessna was a Golden Corner Flying Club member. The nonprofit club has three aircraft and 28 members. 


"It's been a rough day," he said. "I'm just devastated for everybody. It's really tough to lose close friends." 


Rampey was a doctor at Seneca Medical Associates, according to a press release from Prisma Health. In his 35-year career Rampey placed an emphasis on teaching up-and-coming doctors, going on to help found Seneca Lakes Family Medicine Residency, Seneca's first family medicine residency program, according to a statement from Prisma Health.


“Dr. Rampey was a pillar of this community for many years, delivering generations of babies at Oconee Memorial Hospital and seeing them throughout their life as a family medicine physician. He was available to patients day or night, never turning someone away if they needed care,” Dr. Saria Saccocio, chair of family medicine at Prisma Health–Upstate, said in a prepared statement.


“Dr. Rampey was also a teacher and mentor to numerous physicians, training them to deliver patient care with the highest quality standards, and he was a perpetual learner. He was the type of physician we all strive to be, and a great advocate for access to primary care for all.”


Debra Brown, one of Rampey's former employees, said she was heartbroken to hear of Rampey's death. Brown worked for Rampey from 1998 to 2004 at Seneca Medical Associates.

"He is a wonderful person and physician," Brown wrote in a message sent to The Greenville News and Anderson Independent Mail. "Such a kind Christian man who loved his patients and employees very much... At Seneca Medical everyone was family, even when we no longer worked there. He will truly be missed by all of us!"


According to flight-tracking website flightaware.com, the plane departed from Oconee County Regional Airport early Wednesday morning and landed at Orlando Executive Airport at around 9:30 a.m. 


The plane later left Orlando Executive Airport and was headed to Massey Ranch Airpark in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, when it crashed, according to an FAA spokesperson.


The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash. 


FAA records show Rampey has had a private pilot certification since 2007. It is not clear if Dodd had certification.


Fuel problems may have preceded crash of Cessna 182E Skylane


A call about an aircraft crashing in water came in around 11:15 a.m. Wednesday, according to Maitland Police Department Public Information Officer Louis Grindle.


Orange County Fire Rescue's dive team, Maitland Fire Rescue and other first-responders had searched the lake for more than an hour without finding anything when efforts were temporarily halted due to lightning in the area.


The search resumed less than an hour later, which is when Grindle said divers found the plane and a body about 15 feet deep. The second person was found at about 5 p.m.


The crash is under investigation, but authorities have said already that fuel might have been an issue.


"We did receive information that the pilot did state that they were having fuel problems with the plane, but (we have) no other information other than that," Grindle said.


Witnesses said they saw the plane spiraling down into Lake Maitland. 


"Before you could even process what happened, the plane was under the water and so was the pilot," Fisher Omans said. "He kind of dusted these trees up here, and as the plane hit the water, he somersaulted once or twice." 


People nearby tried to help. 


"We saw the pilot come bop his head up for a second. It was minimal, but (by) the time the man in the other boat jumped in the boat to try to grab him, he was already sunk down; he was unconscious," Omans said.


Air traffic conversations from MCO and ORL towers


Air-traffic control recordings were reviewed by Robert Katz, a commercial air instructor who has previously helped analyze airplane crashes for The Greenville News.


Katz said the recordings show that the pilot was given four instructions, two on his approach into the Orlando airport and two upon his departure, reminding him to maintain certain heights and to be aware of lanes for larger aircraft.


In one of the recordings, an air traffic controller uses the word "immediately."


"This is extremely worrying and rarely happens," Katz said.


Katz said the air-traffic issues do not appear to be related to the potential fuel problems also mentioned in the recordings after departure. He said FAA investigators would likely look at two primary fuel issues: whether a fuel tank selector in the cockpit was switched to off rather than a secondary or third tank, and whether the airplane had run out of fuel.


Original article ➤ https://www.greenvilleonline.com




Daniel P. Boggs, Investigator In Charge

Two men were killed Wednesday after a plane crashed into an Orange County lake, according to Maitland police.

The victims were identified Thursday as Stanley Rampey, 67, and Raymond Dodd, 79. Both were from Seneca, South Carolina, investigators said.

Neighbors said they watched as the plane went down around 11 a.m. into Lake Maitland.

The FAA said the Cessna 182 left the Orlando Executive Airport headed for Massey Ranch Airpark in New Smyrna Beach. Police said both of the men on board, identified as Stanley Rampey, 67, and Raymond Dodd, 79, were both from Seneca, South Carolina.

Because of the bad weather Wednesday afternoon, the search was briefly called off. It was nine hours after witnesses reported the crash that the plane was finally pulled from the water.

Fisher Omans, of Oviedo, was on the lake at the time the plane went down.

"It looked like the pilot made a maneuver and hooked a U-turn to come towards the lake, and when he began to turn towards the lake, he hit the top of the trees, kind of dusted the trees," Omans said.

Cellphone video shows crews searching the lake before finding the wreckage in the early afternoon.

"We deployed some dive teams, as well, to search for the vessel and possibly any occupants of the vessel," said Lt. Louis Grindle, with the Maitland Police Department.

The pilot reported problems with his fuel soon after takeoff.  

Witnesses said they could hear the plane sputtering before it crashed.  

Lake Maitland is about 25 feet deep in some places, according to residents who live there.  

“You're talking about a large body of water. A plane has gone down. The recovery of the occupants is the most important, making sure there's no dangers like fuel," Grindle said.

This is the second plane to crash in the Maitland area in the last month.  

A small plane landed on the off-ramp to I-4 on May 17. No one was injured in that incident.  

Story and video ➤ https://www.wftv.com

Cessna 180A, N180JM: Incident occurred June 12, 2019 at Driggs-Reed Memorial Airport (KDIJ), Teton County, Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City

Aircraft nosed over and struck prop on landing.

N180JM LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N180JM

Date: 12-JUN-19
Time: 18:22:00Z
Regis#: N180JM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 180A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DRIGGS
State: IDAHO

Unregistered QuickSilver Sport 2S: Fatal accident occurred June 12, 2019 in Henderson, Louisiana

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Henderson, LA
Accident Number: CEN19FA164
Date & Time: 06/12/2019, 1050 CDT
Registration: UNREG
Aircraft: QUICKSILVER Sport 2S
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 12, 2019, about 1050 central daylight time, an unregistered QuickSilver Sport 2S light sport airplane, collided with trees and terrain near Henderson, Louisiana. The sport pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned by a private individual and had an expired Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) registration. The flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal local area flight that departed a private airstrip near Cecilia, Louisiana, at 1032.

According to data downloaded from a handheld GPS device recovered at the accident site, at 1032:33, the airplane departed a private airstrip located about 1 mile southwest of Cecilia, Louisiana. After the takeoff to the southeast, the airplane entered a climbing left turn to east-northeast and flew over downtown Cecilia, Louisiana, about 400 ft mean sea level (msl). The airplane then continued northeast until 1036:35 when it entered a left turn to west while maintaining a cruise altitude and ground speed of about 450 ft msl and 55 mph, respectively. The airplane then landed at Juneau Landing Strip, a private airstrip located 2.5 miles southeast of Arnaudville, Louisiana. After the touch-and-go landing toward the northwest, the airplane entered a climbing right turn toward east. The airplane climbed to maximum altitude of 888 ft msl while maintaining an east course and an average ground speed of about 55 mph. At 1048:31, the airplane entered a left turn toward north and began a shallow descent. The final GPS data point was recorded at 1049:34 about 0.48 miles south of the accident site. At that point the airplane was still flying north and had descended to and decelerated to 778 ft msl and 42 mph ground speed, respectively.

There were no eyewitnesses to the final flight path to the accident site.

According to FAA records, the 49-year-old pilot held a sport pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot did not pilot possess a FAA aviation medical certificate; however, regulations only required the pilot to have a valid driver's license to operate the light sport airplane. According to local law enforcement, the pilot had a valid Louisiana driver's license. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. A pilot logbook was not located during the investigation.

According to FAA records, the 38-year-old passenger held an expired student pilot certificate. The student pilot certificate had expired on October 31, 2012. The passenger did not pilot possess a FAA aviation medical certificate. According to local law enforcement, the passenger had a valid Louisiana driver's license. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. A pilot logbook was not located during the investigation.

The two-seat light sport airplane, serial number 0145, manufactured in 2004, was a high-wing monoplane constructed of aluminum tubes covered with fabric. The airplane was powered by a 65-horsepower, two-cylinder, two-stroke, Rotax 582 reciprocating engine, serial number 6025379. The engine provided thrust through a fixed-pitch, three-blade, carbon-composite, Warp Drive propeller. The airplane was equipped with fixed-tricycle landing gear and had a maximum gross weight of 1,000 pounds. The airplane was equipped with a 10-gallon main fuel tank and a 6-gallon auxiliary fuel tank. The fuel in the auxiliary tank was transferred to the main tank via an electric pump. The airplane used automobile gas premixed with two-cycle engine oil. The FAA issued the light sport airplane a special airworthiness certificate and registration in November 2007. The FAA registration expired on January 31, 2015, and the airplane's registration number (N7551V) was subsequently removed from the FAA registry database on January 9, 2018. The airplane owner did not possess any airplane maintenance documentation, nor did the airplane have a current condition inspection. The current owner purchased the airplane on May 27, 2014. The airplane owner provided a list of flights with associated hour meter readings. The airplane use log indicated that the airplane had 342 hours since new when the current owner purchased the airplane. Based on the airplane use log, a new zero-time hour meter was installed at an unknown date after the owner had purchased the airplane. The airplane's hour meter indicated 100.0 hours at the accident site. Based on available documentation, the airplane had accumulated 442 hours since new at the time of the accident.

According to the airplane manufacturer's specifications, the maximum level speed at sea level was 68 mph, the expected cruise speed at 75% engine power was 59 mph, the expected cruise speed at 65% engine power was 55 mph, the landing approach speed was 49 mph, and the power-off aerodynamic stall speed was 38 mph.

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at Lafayette Regional Airport (LFT) about 17 miles southwest of the accident site. At 1053, about 3 minutes after the accident, the LFT automated surface observing system reported a calm wind, 10 miles surface visibility, a clear sky, temperature 25°C, dew point 17°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury.

The accident site was on a level dirt road located alongside a levee. The ground elevation at the accident site was 17 ft msl. The initial point-of-impact was with the top of a tree line located about 50 ft from the accident site. The top of the tree line about 65 ft above ground level. The damage to the airplane was consistent with it impacting the ground in a nose-down pitch attitude on a north heading. The airplane subsequently came to rest inverted on a 320° magnetic heading. The main wreckage consisted of the entire airplane. There was tree debris conjoined with the inboard right-wing leading edge, right wing strut, and the cockpit. All major structural components and flight controls were identified at the accident site. Flight control continuity to the ailerons and rudder was confirmed at the accident site. Elevator control tube continuity was confirmed through an overstress separation located at aft pivot point. The observed damage to the elevator push/pull tube assembly was consistent with impact related damage. The main fuel tank did not contain any fuel, and the auxiliary fuel tank contained about 1 gallon of fuel.

First responders reported that there was fuel leaking from the fuel tanks with the airplane inverted, and that they placed the fuel shutoff to the OFF position. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was in the OFF position. Both electronic ignition switches were in the ON position. The airplane was equipped with a ballistic recovery parachute. The parachute activation handle was in the stowed position with the safety pin installed. The ballistic rocket and parachute had deployed upon impact. The engine had separated from its engine mounts. The engine did not exhibit any crankcase or cylinder fractures, nor was there any evidence of oil leaks on the exterior engine components. The sparkplugs exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. Both carburetors had separated from their respective induction tubes. Both carburetor bowls contained residual fuel. No contamination was observed in the carburetor bowls or their fuel screens. Both induction tubes contained sandy soil deposits, consistent with dirt ingestion upon impact. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on both cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The rotary induction valve was undamaged. The ignition system provided spark at all four spark plugs when the electric starter motor was used to rotate the crankshaft. The cylinder wall, piston dome, and piston skirt exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. The propeller reduction gear box was disassembled, and no anomalies were observed with the gearing or clutch assembly. The propeller hub remained attached to the reduction gearbox. The carbon-composite propeller exhibited blade damage consistent with rotation at impact. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: QUICKSILVER
Registration: UNREG
Model/Series: Sport 2S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:Yes 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LFT, 42 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Cecilia, LA (PVT)
Destination: Cecilia, LA (PVT)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  30.402222, -91.809444

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Kirk Wayne Bellard
May 22, 1970 - June 12, 2019

Breaux Bridge - A Funeral Service will be held at 2:00 pm on Monday, June 17, 2019, at Pellerin Funeral Home in Breaux Bridge for Kirk Wayne Bellard, 49, who passed away on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. 

The family requests that visiting hours be observed at the funeral home from 12 noon until 9:00 pm on Sunday and continue on Monday at 8:00 am until 2:00 pm. 

A rosary will be prayed at 6:00 pm on Sunday. 

Deacon Ken Soignier will officiate at the Funeral Service. Interment will follow at St. Joseph Cemetery in Cecilia. 

Kirk was employed as a paramedic with Acadian Ambulance for over 25 years. He enjoyed flying his plane and practicing mixed martial arts. Kirk had a Black Belt and his friends would often call him, "Mr. Miyagi." He loved playing with his two dogs, Cookie and Daisy. Kirk loved spending time with his family and cherished every moment spent with them. He will be deeply missed by his family and friends. 

He is survived by his loving wife, Jessica Wiltz Bellard; sons, Anthony Wayne Bellard and Joshua Jude Johnson and fiancĂ©e, Kyla Smith; daughter, Janey Lynn Johnson; father, Aaron Anthony Bellard and wife Rosemary; mother, Shirley Ann Meyer; grandchildren, Rylee Bellard and Allen-Francis Johnson; brother, Donald Frederick Johnson; and sister, Susan Elizabeth Granger. 

He was preceded in death by his stepfather, Charles Meyer. 

Pallbearers will be Aaron Anthony Bellard, Joshua Jude Johnson, Anthony Wayne Bellard, Donald Frederick Johnson, Devin DeRonde, Dirk Hebert, and Pete Broussard. 

Honorary pallbearer will be Allen Gray. 

Pellerin Funeral Home, 211 Berard St. Breaux Bridge, LA 70517 is in charge of arrangements. 


To view on-line obituary, sign guestbook and view video tribute, go to www.pellerinfuneralhome.com 

Marcus Daniel Guidry
May 19, 1981 - June 12, 2019

Cecilia - A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10:00 am on Tuesday, June 18, 2019, at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Cecilia for Marcus Daniel Guidry, 38, who passed away on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. 

The family requests that visiting hours be observed at the funeral home from 11:00 am until 9:00 pm on Monday and continue on Tuesday at 7:00 am until 9:45 am. 

A rosary will be prayed at 7:00 pm on Monday by Monsignor Jeff DeBlanc. The readers will be Ryan Broussard and Mary Johnson. 

The Reverend Monsignor Jeff DeBlanc will officiate at the Funeral Mass. The Concelebrant will be Reverend Greg Cormier. Readers will be Ryan Broussard, Mary Johnson and Neal Guidry. Gift Bearers will be Mary-Madeline, Sadie Cecile and Amelia Ruth Guidry. 

Interment will follow at St. Joseph Cemetery in Cecilia. 

Marcus honorably served his country in the United States Air Force. Marcus was known as a true and devoted family man; a loving husband, father, son, brother, and friend - a man who lived for his family and their happiness. His most enjoyed and treasured adventure in life was holding season tickets to Disney World and having everything pre-planned in his notebook for each time they visited Disney. He was an avid sports fan who loved watching the Saints, LSU, and the Houston Astros. Marcus enjoyed flying, attending all sporting activities with his children, and spending time with his family and friends. He will be remembered for his unconditional love he had for his family, his kindness towards his friends, being a very knowledgeable person, and a “Mr. Fix It!” of almost anything. He will be deeply missed by his family and friends. 

He is survived by his loving wife of 20 years, Amanda Wagnon Guidry of Cecilia; his beloved children, Thomas Daniel Guidry, Mary-Madeline Guidry, Sadie Cecile Guidry, and Amelia Ruth Guidry, all of Cecilia; his parents, Robert Earl and Katie Ann Guidry of Henderson; brother, Nicholas Andrew Guidry and wife Kristy of Cecilia; sister, Danielle Faye Broussard and husband Jamie of Henderson; maternal grandparents, Norman "Boy" and Cecile Robin of Henderson; and his godchildren, Joshua, Christian and Noah Wagnon, Adalyn and Aubrey Guidry, and Carson McGaha. He was always referred to as “Nanc-Nanc” by Ryan Broussard. 

He was preceded in death by his paternal grandparents, Orel Guidry, Jr. and Verna Begnaud Guidry. 

Pallbearers will be Nicholas Guidry, Chris Clark, Cody Melancon, Neal Guidry, Christian Wagnon, and his godfather, Danny Robin. 

Honorary pallbearers will be Jamie Broussard, Dax Gary, Derrick Robin, Joshua Wagnon, and Ricky Pack. 

Pellerin Funeral Home of Cecilia, 2238 Bushville Hwy., Cecilia, LA 70521 is in charge of arrangements. 


To view on-line obituary, sign guestbook and view video tribute, go to www.pellerinfuneralhome.com 










Two Acadiana men are dead after the Quicksilver Sport 2S ultralight aircraft they were flying in crashed on a levee Wednesday.

St. Landry Parish Sheriff Bobby Guidroz confirmed the pilot, 49-year-old Kirk Bellard, and passenger, 38-year-old Marcus D. Guidry, both of Breaux Bridge, were killed in the crash. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford said they were the only two people in the aircraft at the time of the crash.

Lunsford said the Quicksilver Sport 2S crashed on a levee of the Atchafalaya Basin, near the St. Landry-St. Martin line, around 12:15 p.m. under unknown circumstances.

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The plane crashed on Spillway Road north of Henderson. The plane was lying in the middle of the gravel road on the St. Landry side of the parish line.

A white hearse collected Bellard and Guidry’s bodies from the scene around 3 p.m. Wednesday.

FAA investigators were at the accident site Wednesday, and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified. The NTSB will be the lead agency in the investigation, Lunsford said.

NTSB media relations officer Keith Holloway said an agent was traveling from Chicago to investigate the crash and was expected to arrive Thursday.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.theadvocate.com