Saturday, June 9, 2018

Eclipse 500, N508JA, registered to Jet-Alliance / David Crowe LLC and operated by Memly Aviation: Accident occurred June 11, 2015 at Sacramento Executive Airport (KSAC), Sacramento County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N508JA

Location: Sacramento, CA
Accident Number: WPR15LA184
Date & Time: 06/11/2015, 1700 PDT
Registration: N508JA
Aircraft: ECLIPSE AVIATION CORP EA500
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On June 11, 2015, at 1700 Pacific daylight time, an Eclipse Aviation Corp EA500 jet, N508JA, experienced a collapsed landing gear while taxiing to the active runway for departure at Sacramento Executive Airport (SAC), Sacramento, California. The airline transport pilot, a commercial pilot, and two passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated by Memly Aviation as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 business flight. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that was preparing to depart at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The airplane was destined for San Francisco International Airport (SFO), San Francisco, California.

According to both pilots, the airplane was taxiing to the active runway when they heard a loud bang, and the airplane veered to the left. They contacted the tower asking if they had blown a tire. Tower personnel responded, and reported to the pilots that the airplane was leaking copious amounts of fuel onto the tarmac. The pilots shut down the airplane and evacuated the passengers. Upon further inspection of the airplane, the pilots reported that the left main landing gear trunnion had gone through the left wing.

According to the operator, the left main landing gear trunnion broke near the rear attachment point, which caused the landing gear to penetrate through the entire wing from bottom to top. The portion of the landing gear trunnion that failed, was housed behind a lower wing panel and would not have been visible to the flight crew.

The left main landing gear trunnion, part number M041-07H0101 serial number 0114, was original equipment and had accrued 1,275 hours and 1,492 cycles.

The left main landing gear assembly was shipped to the materials laboratory of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). Visual examination revealed that the landing gear fractured at the trunnion portion of the landing gear. The smaller separated piece showed a fatigue crack that emanated from the inner wall. The crack itself was from a machining mark. The area outside of the fracture face contained rough features consistent with an overstress separation. The deep machining mark was in a portion of the trunnion where the inner wall tapered inward, and was in a transition region where the wall thickness was increasing in thickness. The assembly contained a metal squeeze-out typical of forging/casting parts. The excess metal squeezed-out of the forged/casting products are moved by machining, which renders them a high stress area.

According to the manufacturer, the initiation of the fatigue crack from a step machined inner wall of the trunnion was outside of the design requirements. Eclipse Aerospace, and the landing gear manufacturer, Mecaer Aviation Group, inspected for the presence of the machined steps. The manufacturer indicated that they had a systemic manufacturing defect that potentially effected the entire fleet of EA500 aircraft. Eclipse Aerospace and Mecaer, issued a mandatory Service Bulletin to address the issue. A fleet wide inspection/landing gear trunnion repair/replacement program identified as of May 9, 2016, that 126 airplanes had been inspected, with trunnion repaired or replaced when warranted. All owners of the EA500 airplane have been notified of the issue. The airplane and landing gear manufacturers further addressed inventory landing gear; the trunnions were reworked/repaired/replaced as warranted prior to shipment to Eclipse Aerospace. Mecaer also communicated with the machine shop responsible for the defect and process changes were put in place to prevent the issue for the existing inventory of landing gear.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/15/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/03/2015
Flight Time:  

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 25, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/02/2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/17/2014
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 410 hours (Total, all aircraft), 118 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ECLIPSE AVIATION CORP
Registration: N508JA
Model/Series: EA500 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 000001
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/09/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Jet
Airframe Total Time: 1275 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: P&W CANADA
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PW610F-A
Registered Owner: JET-ALLIANCE/DAVID CROWE LLC
Rated Power: 950 lbs
Operator: Memly Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: Memly Aviation
Operator Designator Code: YM47

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SAC, 23 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 16°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots, 250°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.73 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Sacramento, CA (SAC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: SAN FRANCISCO, CA (SFO)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1700 PDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: SACRAMENTO EXECUTIVE (SAC)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 23 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.512500, -121.493333 (est)

Cessna 172L Skyhawk, ZS-PZT: Fatal accident occurred October 08, 2018 in Midrand, South Africa





NTSB Identification: WPR19WA004
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Monday, October 08, 2018 in Midrand, South Africa
Aircraft: Cessna 172, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 8, 2018, at 0920 coordinated universal time, a Cessna 172L airplane, registration ZS-PZT, sustained substantial damage after colliding with the ground during the landing approach at Grand Central Airport, Midrand, South Africa. The pilot and one person on the ground sustained fatal injuries.

The Civil Aviation Authority of South Africa, Accident & Incident Investigation Division (AIID) is investigating the accident. As the state of manufacture of the airplane, the NTSB has designated a US accredited representative to assist the AIID in its investigation.

All inquiries concerning this accident should be directed to:

South African Civil Aviation Authority
Accidents and Incidents Investigation Division
Private Bag X 73
Halfway House 1685
South Africa
Website: http://www.caa.co.za

Boeing 787-824, N26906, operated by United Airlines: Incident occurred October 10, 2014

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident.

Aviation Incident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Incident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N26906

Location: London, United Kingdom
Incident Number: ENG15IA037
Date & Time: 10/10/2014, 1300 UTC
Registration: N26906
Aircraft: BOEING 787-8
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Flight instrument malf/fail
Injuries: N/A
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

Analysis 

Based on crew reports and verified with images from the crew and the EAFR, the flight crew lost the use of three of the five head down displays following a lightning strike. The crew followed published procedures, however the procedures did not contain a checklist related to a partial loss of displays. After the crew elected to follow the "Loss of All Displays Checklist", none of the affected displays recovered to an operational state. The crew did land the aircraft successfully using the remaining displays available to the crew. All of the displays did recover normal operation after accomplishing a power cycle to the displays while the aircraft was on the ground. No procedures existed for a power reset of the displays to occur while in flight, which most likely would have resulted in a restoration of the displays.

Reviewing the design and display certification requirements, the displays passed their respective certification testing required by the FAA. Supplemental testing by the investigation also showed the displays operating satisfactorily at testing levels that were above levels specified in the original certification of the aircraft and system. However, when subjecting the displays to testing that was based on different standardized system level testing (typically associated with military aircraft) that was not required to be conducted for display unit or aircraft certification, the failure could be repeated. This failure was attributed to the display's response to a rapid transient radiated electric field. The electrical field analysis of the aircraft cockpit confirmed that similar electrical transients can be present during certain lightning strikes experienced by an aircraft. Although the displays passed the required certification testing required by the FAA, it was determined that certain environmental conditions exist that could cause adverse conditions of the display operation resulting in a loss of the display. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this incident to be:
A shutdown of the displays due to the inability to operate through a rapid transient radiated electric field brought on by a near field lightning strike. Contributing to the loss of displays for the remainder of the flight was the lack of guidance to the crew to perform a controlled power reset to the display. 

Findings

Aircraft
Central display - Failure (Cause)
Central display - Capability exceeded

Factual Information

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 10, 2014 about 1300 UTC, a N26906, Boeing 787-824 operated by United Airlines (UA) as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 121 international flight from London's Heathrow International Airport (LHR), United Kingdom, to Houston's International Airport (IAH), Houston, Texas, was struck by lightning and three of five primary display units went blank, a status message related to a power distribution channel was displayed, and the captain's forward windshield heat became inoperative. The standby instruments and the heads up displays (HUD) were unaffected by the event. The lightning strike occurred approximately six minutes after take-off during the climb portion of the flight.

There was no checklist for a partial loss of displays and the crew elected to use the checklist for "Loss of All Displays". The procedure did not recover use of any of the three failed displays. The crew accomplished the abnormal checklist for the window heat. The checklist did not restore the function of the window heat. The remaining two displays were reconfigured and the flight crew landed the airplane uneventfully at LHR. There were no injuries to the crew and passengers. After landing, LHR maintenance performed a lightning inspection and found external nonstructural damage in five locations along the nose which was addressed in accordance with structural repair manual (SRM) allowable damage criteria. A power reset to the aircraft per maintenance manual procedures was accomplished, and the displays and other affected systems returned to normal function. After a review by United maintenance personnel, the aircraft was approved for dispatch and continued the flight to IAH with no further faults noted.

INJURIES

No injuries to passengers or crew were reported.

DAMAGE TO AIRPLANE

An on-site examination of the aircraft was performed while on the ground at LHR and the aircraft display systems were restored using aircraft maintenance manual (AMM) procedures. An external inspection of the aircraft by UA maintenance personnel revealed possible lightning strike attachment points on the left hand side of the nose of the aircraft. Damage was noted around the captain's windshield (L1) in the area of the seals of the windscreen. A review of maintenance records revealed that approximately one month prior to the event, window seal damage was noted in the same area of the L1 windows and was previously repaired. An additional set of possible lightning attachment points were documented on the left wing in the area of the left outboard aileron. The damaged areas were inspected by UA maintenance.

The aircraft was approved for dispatch in accordance with structural repair manual (SRM) allowable damage criteria. The flight continued from LHR to IAH without any other incidents.

An additional aircraft examination was conducted in March 2015. The interior of the nose area of the forward equipment bay in the location of the lightning strike points was inspected. The left side cockpit windows were visually inspected for signs of delamination of damage from the cockpit. No notable signs of additional damage were seen in the area of the lightning strike points or on the left side cockpit windows. A display unit and forward instrument panel electrical ground bonding check was performed finding all grounds satisfactory.

Three displays, the left inboard, left outboard and right outboard displays blanked during the event. The aircraft health monitoring system (AHM) noted faults related to the three display units, the left forward window heat system and the secondary power distribution system related to the left forward window heat system. After the flight's return to LHR, United maintenance performed an aircraft inspection and aircraft power reset per aircraft maintenance manual procedures and the displays and window heat system resumed normal functionality.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The event airplane, a Boeing 787-824, serial number 34829, was manufactured and delivered to the operator in October, 2012 and had accumulated 6,582 hours and 996 cycles. The left inboard and outboard displays were delivered new with the aircraft. The right outboard display was installed in the aircraft in December 2012 to replace a unit that was removed due to erroneous display switching without crew input. None of the affected display units had been returned to the display manufacturer since the time of delivery of the aircraft.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The crew reported the aircraft was flying through a "moderate non-CB (Cumulonimbus) rain shower" with cloud tops of 10,000 ft. at the time of the lightning strike.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

The aircraft was equipped with an Enhanced Airborne Flight Recorder (EAFR). The data from the EAFR was successfully retrieved and sent to NTSB for analysis.

TEST AND RESEARCH

Aircraft Level Grounding/Bonding Test

In March 2015, a grounding/bonding test was performed on the event aircraft. Bonding checks were performed on the head down displays and the P300 and P400 electrical panels. The bonding measurements were consistent with bonding measurements from an exemplar aircraft. A visual inspection was also conducted and confirmed that the grounding straps between the forward instrument panel and the bulkhead on both the captain's and first officer's side were attached and secured.

Component Level Testing

The left and right inboard and outboard display units (DU), Secondary Power Distribution Unit (SPDU) microprocessor card, Graphics Generator Module (GGM) and Window Heat Protection Unit (WHPU) were removed from the event aircraft for additional testing and inspections. The details of the testing and inspections can be found in the NTSB Systems Group Chairman's Factual Report contained in the public docket for this incident.

Additional fault history data was recovered from the non-volatile memory on the Secondary Power Distribution Unit (SPDU) microprocessor card, Graphics Generator Module (GGM) and the four removed display units (DU). A review of the DU fault history data showed that the display units that blanked all recorded a "LCD Supply Voltage Fault" at the approximate time of the lightning strike as reported by the crew.

The right inboard and outboard units were subjected to the manufacturer's acceptance test procedures (ATP) and return to service (RTS) test procedures. Both units passed both the ATP and RTS test procedures. The left outboard unit was selected to be used for additional testing and the left inboard unit was quarantined as a control unit.

Exemplar Unit Testing

Testing on an exemplar display unit was performed by the component manufacturer. The exemplar unit was equivalent to the event units except for the display software. The software in the exemplar display was modified to add additional internal fault reporting output, but was otherwise equivalent to the event units.

The testing consisted of both radiated field and cable coupling tests, in both grounded and floating conditions (when applicable) for the display. The different test conditions the exemplar display was subjected to and all the test levels exceeded or were outside of 787 display specifications. During the exemplar unit testing, the display did not have any adverse effects or fault messages logged that were directly related to the effects or messages seen during the event.

Near Strike Lightning Testing

Additional testing was identified that addressed radiated electric fields that are coupled directly into the equipment. The purpose of the testing was to evaluate the susceptibility of a 787 DU when exposed to a high intensity electric field radiated inside the cockpit generated by a nearby lightning strike. The testing did not look at magnetic field effects. The testing was based on standardized system level testing as described in MIL-STD-464C and was not required to be conducted for display unit or aircraft certification.

The testing was conducted at the aircraft manufacturer's lightning laboratory. Testing was conducted on both an exemplar DU and the event airplane's left outboard DU. Nine near lightning strikes were performed on the exemplar unit with one strike resulting in a blanking event on the display. A review of the NVM fault data for the display showed a "Grayscale voltage fault" was logged by the unit.

The left outboard unit from the event aircraft was tested. Four near lightning, two in a near vertical (approximately 19° from vertical) orientation and two in a horizontal orientation were performed. Blanking of the display was observed in one of the vertical and both of the horizontal tests. Each test that resulted in blanking resulted in a "LCD Supply Voltage Fault" logged by the display unit.

Flat Plate Testing

Based on the results from the near strike lightning testing, additional testing using a flat plate to create a transient electric field across the display surface was performed at the display manufacturer. The testing that was performed was not required to be conducted for display unit or aircraft certification. The testing was performed on the exemplar display and the left inboard, right onboard and outboard display units. A charge would be applied to the flat plate placed on a Lexan sheet resting on the display unit. Once the appropriate charge level was achieved the plate was rapidly discharged and the display behavior was observed. All four units, experience blanking at different applied voltages and recorded both "Grayscale voltage fault" and "LCD Supply Voltage Fault" during the blanking events.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Electrical Field Analysis

Based on the results from both the near strike lightning testing and the flat plate testing, the Boeing Company conducted an analysis of the electrical fields present in the cockpit during a lightning event.

The analysis used three current waveforms ("A", "D" and "H"), from ARP 5412 revision B, which are the same waveforms used during certification testing and analysis of flight deck equipment.

The analysis confirmed that under some dynamic lightning conditions, the spark gap device installed in the Window Heat Protection Unit will fire. The firing of this spark gap device affected the transient electrical field characteristics. Comparing the display blanking electrical field thresholds seen during the near strike lightning and flat plate testing, the electrical field analysis results showed that, based on the lower blanking thresholds demonstrated during the near strike lightning testing and the flat plate testing, the lightning model results exceeded the lower bound estimate of the display blanking threshold during every case where a "fast" spark gap fired or a waveform "H" was applied. The upper blanking threshold was never exceeded.

Lightning Certification

According to the Boeing Model 787-8 Type Certificate Data Sheet (TCDS), the 787-8 airplane was granted transport category approval on August 26, 2011. The applicable certification basis was the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 25 Airworthiness Standards, through Amendment 25-119 and amendments 25-120, 25-124, 25-125 and 25-128 with some exceptions and special conditions (SC) as noted in the 787-8 TCDS.

The particular regulation regarding lightning is found in 14 CFR 25.1316 (Amendment 25-80) and states:

"§ 25.1316 System lightning protection.

(a) For functions whose failure would contribute to or cause a condition that would prevent the continued safe flight and landing of the airplane, each electrical and electronic system that performs these functions must be designed and installed to ensure that the operation and operational capabilities of the systems to perform these functions are not adversely affected when the airplane is exposed to lightning.

(b) For functions whose failure would contribute to or cause a condition that would reduce the capability of the airplane or the ability of the flightcrew to cope with adverse operating conditions, each electrical and electronic system that performs these functions must be designed and installed to ensure that these functions can be recovered in a timely manner after the airplane is exposed to lightning.

(c) Compliance with the lightning protection criteria prescribed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section must be shown for exposure to a severe lightning environment. The applicant must design for and verify that aircraft electrical/electronic systems are protected against the effects of lightning by:

(1) Determining the lightning strike zones for the airplane;

(2) Establishing the external lightning environment for the zones;

(3) Establishing the internal environment;

(4) Identifying all the electrical and electronic systems that are subject to the requirements of this section, and their locations on or within the airplane;

(5) Establishing the susceptibility of the systems to the internal and external lightning environment;

(6) Designing protection; and

(7) Verifying that the protection is adequate.

[Doc. No. 25912, 59 FR 22116, Apr. 28, 1994]"

The FAA also provided an Advisory Circular (AC) that outlines a means of compliance, but not the only means, by which a manufacturer can show compliance with the regulations, AC 20-136A "Protection of Aircraft Electrical/Electronic Systems Against the Indirect Effects of Lightning."

The current industry standard for lightning tests do not include test conditions simulating a rapid transient radiated electric field.

Actions Taken Since Event

After the event, the aircraft manufacturer notified the fleet operators of the event and subsequent loss of displays. The manufacturer has implemented a software change to the 787-10 aircraft, which will start with the first production aircraft's entry into service (estimated 2018). The software change will automatically reset a display unit if the unit blanks due to certain internal fault conditions. For current and retrofit 787-8 and 787-9 models, the manufacturer has evaluated an equivalent software change, based on the 787-10, and the expected implementation for the changes is in 2019. 

History of Flight

Initial climb

Other weather encounter
Flight instrument malf/fail (Defining event)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BOEING
Registration: N26906
Model/Series: 787-8 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2012
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 34829
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/08/2014, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:
Airframe Total Time: 6582 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner:  UNITED AIRLINES INC
Rated Power:
Operator: UNITED AIRLINES INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Flag carrier (121)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots, 220°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: London, FN (EGLL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: HOUSTON, TX (IAH)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1357 BST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Heathrow International Airport (EGLL)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 83 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: Unknown
Runway Length/Width:  
VFR Approach/Landing: Unknown

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: N/A
Latitude, Longitude:  51.477500, -0.461389 (est)

Chadron Municipal Airport (KCDR) poised for the future

Land near the runway at Chadron Municipal Airport was graded recently to meet standards. The work is part of continual upgrading at the facility including resurfacing of runways and planned installation of a landing system this spring.


Chadron Municipal Airport is poised for a future which might include scheduled intra-state airline service, regional airport authorities and more jet traffic.

Chadron City Council recently approved a partially-grant funded $85,000 resurfacing and remarking project on the runways. The Federal Aviation Administration has authorized installation of a high-tech instrument landing system and the area would be one of the prime targets for location of intrastate airline service if the state becomes involved.

Meeting at the airport last week, members of the Nebraska Futures, Inc., recommended establishment of regional airport authorities to help fund the expenses of airport operations like Chadron, which is currently borne entirely by city taxpayers.

The Nebraska Futures recommendations also included formation of a Nebraska Airline Authority which has advanced to second round of debate in the Unicameral.

A priority bill sponsored by Sen. Sandy Scofield of Chadron would create the authority to help the state plan for a future which might include intra-state air service from more remote regions connecting with the state’s population centers.

“Planning for future air service in Nebraska not only helps us avoid further loss of transportation services, but can create opportunities for every Nebraska citizen to travel easily and quickly around the state,” said Sen. Scofield.

The bill creates the authority and orders it to conduct a market and needs analysis of existing air service and make recommendations for a funding mechanism for development of an intra-state commercial airline.

The Chadron airport will be getting its instrument landing system installed later this year and it should be operational by next spring, according to City Manager Carl Dierks.

Dierks said he had heard that the system which Chadron will be getting was previously in use at O’Hare Airport in Chicago.

The runway resurfacing and remarking effort is a required part of the ILS installation.

Recent installation of a jet fuel tank at the aiport has paid off in new business for Chadron, according to airport manager Les Mittleider. He said hundreds of gallons of jet fuel have already been sold and the airport, which is out of heavy traffic areas, makes an attractive refueling stop for cross country aircraft.

Dirt work being conducted at the airport is part of an effort to meet federal height standards around the runways, according to Dierks. Land near the main runway was one and a half feet too high and city crews have been grading the area down to meet standards.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://rapidcityjournal.com

Piper PA-44 Seminole, N21161: Accident occurred June 09, 2018 and Incident occurred November 08, 2014 in Daytona Beach, Volusia County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N21161

Location: Daytona Beach, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA164
Date & Time: 06/09/2018, 1500 EDT
Registration: N21161
Aircraft: PIPER PA 44
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On June 9, 2018, about 1500 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-44-180, N21161, was substantially damaged after impacting terrain while on approach to Daytona Beach International Airport (DAB), Daytona Beach, Florida. The flight instructor and private pilot receiving instruction sustained minor injuries. No flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight that was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

The flight instructor stated they received a local instrument clearance and were on the RNAV RWY 16 approach when they encountered rain around the final approach fix. The rain increased in intensity as they continued the approach. Shortly after passing the final approach fix they received a low altitude alert from air traffic control. The flight instructor added full power and attempted to climb; however, the airplane continued to lose altitude while "still indicating 90 knots throughout descent and impact."

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the airplane where it came to rest, about 4 miles north of DAB , inverted in a retention pond. The airplane had impacted houses and both wings outboard of the engines were separated.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear equipped airplane was manufactured in 1978. It was powered by two Lycoming O-360, 180-horsepower engines.

The pilot held a commercial pilot and flight instructor certificates with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land airplanes, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first-class airman medical certificate was issued on November 11, 2017, with no limitations.

The private pilot receiving instruction held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land airplanes, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first-class airman medical certificate was issued on July 11, 2017, with no limitations.

At 1453, the weather conditions reported at DAB included, wind from 300° at 14 knots gusting to 19 knots, visibility 9 statute miles, thunderstorms, scattered cumulonimbus clouds at 2,500 ft, broken ceilings at 4,100 ft and 7,500 ft, temperature 27°C, dew point 22°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.09 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N21161
Model/Series: PA 44 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: ATC USA, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDAB, 41 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots / 19 knots, 300°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4100 ft agl
Visibility: 9 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: PALM COAST, FL (FIN)
Destination: Daytona Beach, FL (DAB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  29.239167, -81.078889

November 08, 2014
Ormond Beach, Florida

PRELIM INFO FROM FAA OPS: ORMOND BEACH, FL/UAS INCIDENT/1000E/DAYTON BEACH APCH ADVISED N21161, Piper PA-44 Seminole, AT 1,600 FEET 10 W OMN VOR REPORTED A UAS WITHIN 600-700 FEET. NO CONFLICTS REPORTED. PILOT REPORTED UAS HAD A OPERATING TRANSPONDER. VOLUSIA COUNTY SHERIFF NOTIFIED.

11/8/14 10:00 Ormond Beach, Florida
prelim info from faa ops: ormond beach, fl/uas incident/1000e/dayton beach apch advised N21161, Piper PA-44 Seminole, at 1,600 feet 10 w omn vor reported a uas within 600-700 feet. no conflicts reported. pilot reported uas had a operating transponder. volusia county sheriff notified.



DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Officials from Daytona Beach Fire Department said a small plane crashed into a retention pond behind a Daytona Beach neighborhood on Saturday.

The plane crashed around 3 p.m. by the 100 block of Campanello Court, officials said.

Officials said there were two people on board the plane when it went down during a heavy thunderstorm. They were able to get out of the aircraft on their own and make their way to the side of the pond.

The two people were alert and talking while Daytona Beach firefighters were assessing them, officials said. Daytona Beach police said they were both suffered non-life-threatening injuries and were taken to Halifax Health Medical Center.

There was a student pilot and flight instructor on the plane, police said. It is unclear who was piloting the aircraft.

Officials said the plane hit two houses before crashing into the pond. One of the houses has minor damage while the other has more extensive damage, with a large hole in the roof.

No one inside either of the houses was injured, police said.

The Red Cross was called to assist the homeowners in the event they needed to vacate the home temporarily, officials said.

The plane landed upside down in the pond and will be removed by the National Transportation Safety Board, which will take over the crash investigation, police said.

A statement from the Federal Aviation Administration said the plane is a Piper PA-44 Seminole. 

Story and video ➤  https://www.clickorlando.com



Two people were injured Saturday afternoon after a plane crashed into a Daytona Beach neighborhood, firefighters said.

The crash happened about 3 p.m. on the 100 block of Campanello Court — near LPGA Boulevard and North Clyde Morris Boulevard.

The plane hit two houses before crashing into a retention pond, said Sasha Staton, a spokeswoman for the Daytona Beach Fire Department.

“It was during a really bad storm with heavy rain and high wind,” she said.

There were two passengers on the plane. Both were alert and conscious and taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

Staton said one of the houses hit had minor damage while the other had “pretty severe damage.” Nobody on the ground was injured.

Original article ➤  http://www.orlandosentinel.com



DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - A small plane hit the roof of a Daytona Beach home before crashing into a nearby retention pond Saturday afternoon, city officials said.

Daytona Beach police and firefighters are investigating the crash, which occurred around 3 p.m., along the 100 block of Campanello Ct.

Officials said two people were on board the flight at the time of the crash. Both were transported to a nearby hospital with minor injuries, firefighters said. 

Authorities did not identify who was in the plane. 

Police described the two as a student pilot and flight instructor, but authorities had not yet to determined who was piloting at the time of the crash.

Police did not say who owns the plane or the flight school the two on board were with. 

On the way down, the plane hit two homes, clipping one but taking a large chunk of the roof out of the other, leaving a large hole, firefighters said. 

No one inside the home was injured, firefighters said. 

The WFTV weather radar showed storms in the area of Daytona Beach at the time of the crash. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wftv.com




DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) - The Daytona Beach Fire Department said two people were on board a plane when it crashed into a retention pond Saturday afternoon.

It happened on Campanello Court, near LPGA Boulevard and North Nova road.

Fire officials say two houses were clipped by the plane before it crashed.

They say one house was severely damaged.

The Daytona Beach Fire Department tweeted that both people in the plane were taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

Officials have not said whether anyone on the ground was hurt.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox35orlando.com

Robinson R44, N529DW, registered to and operated by MF Helicopters LLC: Fatal accident occurred June 09, 2018 in Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

Jonathan D. Bahr
May 27, 1991 - June 9, 2018

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N529DW

Location: Oshkosh, WI
Accident Number: CEN18FA215
Date & Time: 06/09/2018, 1225 CDT
Registration: N529DW
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On June 9, 2018, at 1229 central daylight time, a Robinson R44 helicopter, N529DW, collided with cables during an initial climb after taking off from a field in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot was fatally injured. The helicopter was substantially damaged. The helicopter was registered to and operated by MF Helicopters LLC as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 aerial photography flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed for the local flight. The helicopter was en route to Wittman Field (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

The helicopter was engaged in aerial photography operations for the Four Horseman Poker Run on Lake Winnebago. The helicopter was operating from a field next to the Dockside Tavern on the Fox River, about ½ mile southeast of the accident site. The pilot and a photographer were airborne for about 1 hour 30 minutes flying to the west at low altitudes over a series of lakes and rivers while photographing the boats. The pilot returned to the departure field and the photographer exited the helicopter. The pilot then took off to the south with the intent of flying to OSH to refuel. At some point the pilot turned and began flying to the northwest along the river. Shortly after the turn, the helicopter contacted a static line and a fiber optic line which were the top two lines of a five-line array that crossed over the Fox River. The helicopter subsequently impacted the river and sank. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON HELICOPTER
Registration: N529DW
Model/Series: R44 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: MF HELICOPTERS LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OSH, 808 ft msl
Observation Time: 1153 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 80°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Oshkosh, WI
Destination: Oshkosh, WI (OSH) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 44.017222, -88.549444 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

OSHKOSH/ FOND DU LAC, Wis. The photographer who got off a helicopter right before it crashed in Oshkosh tells Action 2 News he was shaken by the death.

“My phone started ringing like crazy with people asking if I was ok or what the story was,” he said.

Action 2 News was on the scene Saturday night as crews pulled that aircraft out of the water. The pilot of that helicopter, 27-year-old Jonathan Bahr of Platteville died in the crash.

Bahr was hired to fly photographers over Lake Winnebago during the Four Horsemen Poker Run. The helicopter crashed into power lines Saturday afternoon and sunk into the Fox River in downtown Oshkosh.

Witnesses said Saturday they saw two people in that helicopter, a pilot and a photographer leaning out of the aircraft taking pictures. That photographer was Pete Boden, and it turns out he was dropped off minutes before the helicopter crashed.

"We had finished about half the event and at that point decided to get fuel, the pilot dropped me back off and probably five minutes later some guy came up and says a helicopter just crashed,” said Boden.

Boden says he didn't see anything out of the ordinary that day, adding he does this almost every weekend in the summer time.

"I didn't know the pilot very well, I had just met him that day, but my time flying with him was a good experience. I've flown with a lot of pilots and I was very comfortable with his abilities and everything,” Boden says.

After hearing about the accident, Boden was in shock.

"I’m sort of in disbelief but at the same time it's like whoa, you know, it's just isn't my time to go yet,” Boden adds.

The helicopter crash caused law enforcement to stop boat traffic on the Fox River in Oshkosh for hours.

One of Wisconsin's longest running community fishing tournaments, 'Walleye Weekend,' was affected by the helicopter crash. Tournament directors say they had to send a team up to Oshkosh so anglers could get checked in and have their fish weighed.

"It was a very tragic accident, something that was completely unexpected so we just did our best to make sure that the fish were taken care of, the anglers were taken care of and their weights could be contributed to the whole weekend," said Michelle Kilburn, Competitive Angling Senior Manager for Mercury Marine.

The news of the crash had quickly spread throughout the tournament.

"I heard was there was a crash and it hit power lines and some were stuck up in Oshkosh," said Linda Wittnebel a competitor from Mayville, WI.

"I heard about the helicopter crash from the EMT up on the point there and it's a pretty horrible thing that happened, never wish for anything like that to happen, and it's pretty scary," said Tim Faris, an angler from Hastings, NE.

The ongoing helicopter crash investigation has been turned over to the FAA and NTSB.

Story and video ➤  http://www.wbay.com

Jonathan D. Bahr, 27, of Platteville, died on Saturday, June 9, 2018, from injuries sustained in a helicopter accident. A Mass of Christian Burial will be at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, June 16, 2018 at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Kieler. Father Bernard Rott will officiate. Burial will be at the church cemetery, where military rites will be accorded. Friends may call from 4:00 – 8:00 p.m. on Friday, June 15, 2018 at the Immaculate Conception Parish Center or from 9:30 a.m. until the time of service on Saturday, where there will be a parish rosary at 10:00 a.m. The Melby Funeral Home & Crematory of Platteville is serving the family. Memorials may be made to the Jonathan D. Bahr Memorial Fund. Online condolences may be made at www.melbyfh.com.

Jonathan was born on May 27, 1991 in Platteville, Wisconsin, son of Glen R. and Lori Erschen-Bahr.

Jonathan graduated from Platteville High School in 2010. During that time he earned the rank of Eagle Scout by completing a swinging bench project for Wisconsin Badger Camp, a summer camp for people with disabilities, that is still enjoyed today by campers and visitors alike.

After graduation, Jonathan joined the Army, becoming an Airborne Ranger with the 3rd Batallion 75th Ranger Regiment at Ft. Benning Georgia with whom he did a tour of duty in Afghanistan.

Upon leaving the military, Jonathan attended Embry-Riddle, Aeronautical University in Prescott, Arizona. He can be found listed on the Dean’s List for Academic Achievement during several of his semesters there and had earned his Certified Flight Instructor I rating, and only had his CFI II rating left to complete his Aeronautical Science degree. In his time at ERAU, Jonathan was Club President of the Blacksheep Rugby Team, a sport which he loved very much.

Jonathan loved flying helicopters, but above that, he loved everyone around him, and loved life, which he lived to the fullest. He took every opportunity he had to come home and spend time with family and friends. He also loved camping, cooking out, and coasting down rivers with his buddies. He loved playing games, especially Risk and Monopoly. He often kept in touch with his cousins and brothers through online games.

Jonathan is survived by his parents, Glen R. Bahr & Lori Erschen-Bahr; his three siblings, Loren G. Bahr, Benjamin R. Bahr, and Elissa (David) Granger; his grandparents, Helen J. Bahr, and John & Janet Erschen; and aunts, uncles, and cousins. He is preceded by his grandfather, Wayne Al Bahr, and by his uncle, David Erschen, from whom he received his middle name. Jonathan’s kind heart & special humor touched the lives of everyone around him, and he will be greatly missed.


OSHKOSH, Wis. - Authorities have released the name of a Wisconsin pilot killed when a helicopter hit power lines and plunged into the Fox River.


The Winnebago County Sheriff's Office on Sunday identified the victim as 27-year-old Jonathan Bahr of Platteville. He was alone in the Robinson R44 helicopter when it went down Saturday in Oshkosh, 94 miles (151 kilometers) north of Milwaukee.

Lt. Steve Brewer says Bahr was hired to take photographers over Lake Winnebago during a power-boat event.

Shannon Radtke, coordinator for the Four Horsemen Poker Run, an annual charitable event, says her group hired Bahr. Radtke says the pilot was refueling and on his way back from the airport when the crash happened.

The crash severed high-tension power lines that fell into the river, delaying rescue efforts for about two hours.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.channel3000.com



OSHKOSH, Wis. (WBAY) - The Winnebago County Sheriff's Office has identified the man who died in the helicopter crash on Saturday.

Officials say the man is 27-year-old Jonathan D. Bahr from Platteville, Wisconsin.

During the course of the crash, the helicopter hit a power line, causing a live wire to break and go into the water. The crash happened at about 12:30 p.m. near the Wisconsin Street bridge.

Boat traffic along the Fox River was shut down for about nine hours while the helicopter was removed from the river and the power lines repaired.

Wisconsin Public Service communications representative, Matthew Cullen said WPS customers did not experience an outage.

"WPS facilities (power lines, utility poles, etc.) were not involved or damaged during Saturday's incident in Oshkosh. Additionally, WPS customers did not experience an outage as a result of that incident. Our crews are continuing to assist the American Transmission Company (ATC), as the electric facilities involved in Saturday’s incident are owned and operated by them," said Cullen.

The investigation has been turned over to the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration.

Officials say several boaters tried to help any victims in the crash, but were unsuccessful.

Action 2 News was there as crews pulled the helicopter from the river just after 7 p.m. Saturday.

One witness said he saw two people in the helicopter taking pictures from above. Another tells Action 2 News that people from a nearby boat jumped into the water to help when it crashed and that it looked like a scene from a movie.

The DNR is on scene, along with the Winnebago County Sheriff's Office, Oshkosh Fire Department and Wisconsin Public Service. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.wbay.com



OSHKOSH -- One person is dead after a helicopter hit power lines and crashed into the Fox River in Oshkosh Saturday afternoon, June 9. It took hours to recover the body because crews couldn't immediately get in the water.

"It was horrifying to watch," said Brody Snood, witness.

It's not the kind of afternoon Brody Snood ever expected; as he stood watching boats pass on the water, his focus quickly turned to the sky.

"I just heard a really big boom and a splash and after that it was gone," said Snood.

The helicopter crashed into the river around 12:30 p.m.

"I was blank-minded. I was like 'Oh my God, someone just died,'" said Snood.

The active power line snapped from the tall pole and into the water as well.

"It was like a movie scene," Snood said.

Investigators say they were initially hindered by the live wires. Utility crews worked to turn off power so search teams could head into the water.

People stood watching along the riverbank as divers scoped out the area. Hours later, they pulled the wreckage from the water and one body.

"We know that there was one person for sure. So we recovered one person," said Lara Vendola-Messer, Winnebago County Sheriff's Office.

A sad ending to a day witnesses will never forget.

"I don't even know how to explain it because I'm just at a loss for words," said Snood.

The investigation is ongoing. It is now in the hands of the NTSB and FAA.

Story and video ➤ http://fox6now.com






Members of the Winnebago County Sheriff's Department dive team search the Fox River in Oshkosh, Wis., on Saturday, June 9, 2018 where a helicopter crashed.



OSHKOSH, Wis. — A helicopter went down in the Fox River in Oshkosh Saturday afternoon, the Winnebago County Sheriff's Office said.

The helicopter, a Robinson R44, hit a power line on its way into the water which is making the search and response more treacherous, the Sheriff's Office said.

It happened near the Wisconsin Street Bridge at about 12:30 p.m. 

The power was turned off by the Wisconsin Public Service as of 4 p.m. Winnebago County Sheriff's Office said they were putting in divers soon in the water and will be helping the power company reset/restring the power lines across the river.


Assistant Fire Chief John Ziemer, with the city of Oshkosh Fire Department, said fire crews searched the surface of the water to find any debris or people in the helicopter. They did not find anything and stopped the search, due to the high voltage power lines.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wisn.com





OSHKOSH – An idyllic summer day turned tragic when a helicopter hit electrical power lines, crashed and sank in the Fox River about 12:30 p.m. near Mahoney's Restaurant and Bar in Oshkosh.

Winnebago County Sheriff's Capt. Lara Vendola-Messer said search efforts were made treacherous by high voltage power lines in the water. Divers had to suspend the search to await specialty equipment being brought in by Wisconsin Public Service.

"Other than it is a helicopter, we don't know where it came from or anything else at this point," she said in an afternoon press conference.

Oshkosh Fire Dept. Assistant Chief John Ziemer said boats did a surface search but did not find anyone in the water. The helicopter was not visible in the river, but witnesses say the crash near the city's downtown was just west of the Jackson Street Bridge.

Ziemer said the sheriff's dive team would commence an underwater search as soon as they get the go ahead 

Winnebago County Sheriff's Office and Oshkosh police boats were scouring the river Saturday afternoon, using hooks to drag for debris. Rescue personnel from Omro and Menasha were also on scene. 

Bystanders gathered Saturday afternoon along the riverwalk near the restaurant and police cleared the perimeter to move people away from possibly dangerous electrical wires. 

Gary Lemiesz, of Oshkosh, said he watched as a dark green helicopter flew east over the river, then turned back and flew west. The helicopter hit the wires and part of the propeller broke off, he said.

“It hit hard and sunk,” Lemiesz said.

He said several private boats converged to search the area, but nothing could be seen.

Randy Mayer lives right on the river and was standing on his dock as the helicopter flew over.

“I didn’t see it crash, but I took a video of the helicopter as it flew straight south over the water,” he said.

The crash occurred on a busy weekend in the city. Increased boat traffic for the Lake Winnebago Four Horsemen Poker Run in Oshkosh had to be rerouted from the area. The event is an annual, high-performance poker run benefiting local charities. 

All boat traffic on the river was halted after the crash.

An announcement was made at Walleye Weekend in Fond du Lac that some participants in the national Mercury Marine Family Fishing Tournament would have to have their catches weighed in Oshkosh, instead of Fond du Lac, due to the crash and their inability to get back to Fond du Lac through the Winnebago system's upper lakes. 

This is the second helicopter crash in Wisconsin this year. Three people died in April when a medical helicopter crashed near Hazelhurst.

Story and video ➤ https://www.thenorthwestern.com