Thursday, December 26, 2019

Low Altitude Operation/Event: Bell 206, N8052G; accident occurred August 18, 2018 in Battle Mountain, Lander County, Nevada

View of thermal damaged helicopter.
Federal Aviation Administration


Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N8052G



Location: Battle Mountain, NV
Accident Number: GAA18CA512
Date & Time: 08/18/2018, 1345 PDT
Registration: N8052G
Aircraft: Bell 206
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

The helicopter pilot reported that while climbing out of a canyon at 30 knots indicated airspeed, about 50 ft above the ground, he felt a "hard vibration" in the cyclic and collective controls. He then saw that the airspeed gauge was reading zero knots and he felt the helicopter was being pushed down. The torque indicator rose to 120% without any cyclic and collective control input. He applied right cyclic, lowered the collective, applied right pedal to counter the torque, and turned the helicopter downslope and into the wind. He applied forward cyclic to better match the downslope of the terrain and raised collective, but the helicopter impacted terrain. The skids impacted the ground first followed by the main rotor blades. The helicopter rotated 180ยบ to the right before coming to rest downhill, on its right side. Shortly after, a post impact fire ensued.

The helicopter was destroyed during the postimpact fire.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that the winds were gusting up to 30 knots in the canyon, "changing direction every minute or so." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 43, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/06/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 4060 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1500 hours (Total, this make and model), 3975 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N8052G
Model/Series: 206 B
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1989
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 4050
Landing Gear Type: High Skid
Seats: 5
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3350 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls Royce
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 250-C20R
Registered Owner: El Aero Services Llc
Rated Power: hp
Operator: El Aero Services Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBAM, 4532 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2056 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 192°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  6 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / -5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Haze; No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Battle Mountain, NV (BAM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Battle Mountain, NV (BAM)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1312 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.785833, -116.843333 (est)

Loss of Control on Ground: Piper PA-18-150, N3872Z; accident occurred August 18, 2018 - Stony River, Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N3872Z


Location: Stony River, AK

Accident Number: GAA18CA497
Date & Time: 08/18/2018, 1408 AKD
Registration: N3872Z
Aircraft: Piper PA18
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll on a remote, unimproved airstrip, the airplane nosed over.

The pilot reported that the airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder and lift struts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

As requested, the pilot did not submit the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report Form 6120.1. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/01/2018
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N3872Z
Model/Series: PA18 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1961
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 18-7657
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SLQ, 177 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2302 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 255°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4800 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 61.790000, -156.588056 (est)

Pilatus PC-12/45, N642SF: Incident occurred December 24, 2019 near Koliganek Airport (PAJZ), Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft made forced gear up landing on frozen lake.

Coastal Recovery LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N642SF

Date: 24-DEC-19
Time: 23:45:00Z
Regis#: N642SF
Aircraft Make: PILATUS
Aircraft Model: PC12
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KOLIGANEK
State: ALASKA

A plane carrying Medevac Alaska crew members made an emergency landing on a frozen lake in a remote part of Southwest Alaska on Christmas Eve, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

The single-engine plane transported a patient on a chartered medical flight from Anchorage to the Nushagak River village of New Stuyahok on Tuesday afternoon, NTSB Alaska chief Clint Johnson said. The plane left New Stuyahok around 2:30 p.m. and the pilot reported engine failure about 15 minutes later, Johnson said.

The Pilatus PC-12 plane made an emergency landing on a frozen lake about 8 miles east of Koliganek, north of New Stuyahok, according to Johnson. The pilot and two Medevac Alaska crew members were not injured. Johnson did not identify the company that was operating the plane Thursday afternoon.

The frozen lake was in a remote area, Johnson said. A good Samaritan helicopter from Dillingham, about 70 miles away, picked up the three people from the lake and Johnson said they were back in Anchorage by 11:30 p.m.

Johnson said the NTSB is working with the plane’s operator to determine the extent of damage and investigate what caused the emergency landing.

On Nov. 29, two Medevac Alaska crew members and a Security Aviation pilot were killed in a crash on the Kenai Peninsula. Two companies had earlier turned down the flight on the day of the crash due to weather concerns.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com


No injuries are reported following a second crash of a flight involving Medevac Alaska in less than a month.

Tuesday's crash took place near Koliganek.

National Transportation Safety Board Alaska Chief Clint Johnson said it happened while on the flight back to Anchorage. 

The pilot and two crew members dropped off a patient at New Stuyahok when the aircraft lost power.

"[The pilot] was unable to get the engine re-started, declared an emergency with Anchorage Center, tried to get into Koliganek," Johnson said. "Unfortunately was not able to make it, made an emergency landing onto a frozen lake bed, gear up, and that's where the airplane ended up."

Johnson said a good Samaritan in a helicopter from Dillingham rescued the plane's occupants, who had no serious injuries.

Resolve Aviation handled the flight.

No one from the company or Medevac Alaska would comment on the crash.

Three people died in the November 29th crash that involved a flight from Security Aviation. It flew a crew from the Medevac Alaska team to Seward from Anchorage when it went down near Cooper Landing.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktva.com

Nose Over: Kitfox Super Sport, N26LD; accident occurred August 09, 2018 in Hunter, Greene County, New York

View of damaged rudder. 
Federal Aviation Administration


Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albany, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N26LD



Location: Hunter, NY
Accident Number: GAA18CA515
Date & Time: 08/09/2018, 1910 EDT
Registration: N26LD
Aircraft: DELL LAWRENCE Kitfox
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector reported that the pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane made a precautionary landing on an open field because of low fuel. During the landing roll, the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder.

After multiple attempts, the pilot did not submit the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report Form 6120.1.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: DELL LAWRENCE
Registration: N26LD
Model/Series: Kitfox Super Sport
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Other; Experimental
Serial Number: KA08184136
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-200 Series
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KALB, 292 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 33 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2251 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 38°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 21000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 290°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Jamestown, NY (JHW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hudson, NY (1B1)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.316667, -74.266667 (est)

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N9646Q: Incident occurred December 21, 2019 in Rush City, Chisago County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aircraft lost engine power and was forced to land in trees.

Hawk Aviation Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N9646Q

Date: 21-DEC-19
Time: 18:45:00Z
Regis#: N9646Q
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
City: RUSH CITY
State: MINNESOTA

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Cessna 150M, N45586; accident occurred July 21, 2018 at Paine Field / Snohomish County Airport (KPAE) Everett, Washington



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N45586




View of damaged engine truss and mount.
Federal Aviation Administration


Location: Everett, WA
Accident Number: GAA18CA519
Date & Time: 07/21/2018, 1855 PDT
Registration: N45586
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot reported that, during final approach, the engine sputtered then had a total loss of power. The airplane landed short of the runway on the threshold, and the nose landing gear collapsed.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine truss and mount.

A postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness inspection did not show any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction or abnormalities. A photograph provided by the inspector, shows no damage to the propeller, which is consistent with the engine not producing power at the time of impact. He added that fuel was present in the tanks and that the gascolator screen was found clear of debris, and he suspected carburetor ice was responsible for the loss of engine power.

The automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was 310° at 7 knots, 7 statute miles, temperature 72°F, dew point 48°F. The airplane landed on runway 34R.

According to the Carburetor Icing Probability Chart (refer to docket) and based on the temperature and dew point about the time of the accident, the conditions were favorable for serious carburetor icing at decent power setting.

After multiple attempts, the pilot did not submit the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report Form 6120.1.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 26, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/27/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 255 hours (Total, all aircraft), 151 hours (Total, this make and model)


View of propeller and damaged nose landing gear.
Federal Aviation Administration

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N45586
Model/Series: 150 M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: 15076982
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1601 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-200 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPAE, 606 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 47°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 310°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Everett, WA (PAE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Everett, WA (PAE)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1600 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: SNOHOMISH COUNTY (PAINE FLD) (PAE)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 607 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3004 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 47.906944, -122.281667 (est)

Cessna 172F, N5406R: Accident occurred December 18, 2019 at Cincinnati West Airport (I67), Harrison, Hamilton County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N5406R


Location: Harrison, OH
Accident Number: CEN20LA043
Date & Time: 12/18/2019, 1910 EST
Registration: N5406R 
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On December 18, 2019, about 1910 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N5406R, impacted trees and a fence during a forced landing following a loss of engine power at the Cincinnati West Airport (I67), Harrison, Ohio. The pilot and flight instructor were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the flight instructor as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from I67 about 1730.

The flight instructor and pilot were conducting instrument training at the time of the accident. The pilot had initiated a missed approach following a practice instrument approach to runway 19 at I67. During the climb out, the flight instructor simulated an engine failure. The pilot responded by entering a power-off approach to runway 1. About 200 ft above ground level, the flight instructor advanced the throttle in order to clear the engine; however, the engine had stopped producing power. The flight instructor took control of the airplane from the pilot at that time. The airplane struck trees during the approach before landing safely on the runway. After inspecting the airplane on the runway and observing no damage to the landing gear or propeller, the flight instructor started the engine and taxied to the hangar.

An examination of the runway environment by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors indicated that the airplane struck trees and a 3-ft high wire fence about 400 ft short of the runway 1 displaced threshold. A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the outboard portion of the left wing.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5406R
Model/Series: 172 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: I67, 584 ft msl
Observation Time: 1915 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -5°C / -10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.37 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Harrison, OH (I67)
Destination: Harrison, OH (I67)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.259167, -84.774444 (est)

Abnormal Runway Contact: Cessna 152, N4962L; accident occurred June 30, 2018 at McClellan Airfield (KMCC), Sacramento, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N4962L

Location: Sacramento, CA
Accident Number: GAA18CA500
Date & Time: 06/30/2018, 1000 PDT
Registration: N4962L
Aircraft: Cessna 152
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

The solo student pilot reported that, during landing, on short final, he saw a helicopter on the runway and initiated a go around. During the go-around, the helicopter took off and he believed that it was "heading directly for [the airplane]", which "made [him] very anxious". The helicopter departed without further incident and the airplane re-entered the traffic pattern to land. During his second attempt to land, immediately after touchdown, the airplane's nose landing gear touched down hard and the airplane bounced "3 to 4 times.". When the airplane touchdown again, the nosewheel tire blew.

The flight instructor added that, while watching from the fuel farm, the student pilot did not flare the airplane.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mount and truss.

The FAA inspector reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 25, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/15/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 25 hours (Total, all aircraft), 25 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N4962L
Model/Series: 152 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1980
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: 15284246
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1669 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-235 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMCC, 77 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1715 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:151° 
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 10°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Sacramento, CA (MCC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sacramento, CA (MCC)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:  PDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: McCLELLAN AIRFIELD (MCC)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 76 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10599 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.667778, -121.400556 (est)

Bell 407, N663SF: Fatal accident occurred December 25, 2019 at Headland Municipal Airport (0J6), Henry County, Alabama

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama
Rolls Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana
Bell Helicopter; Montreal, Quebec

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N663SF

Location: Headland, AL
Accident Number: ERA20FA056
Date & Time: 12/25/2019, 1713 CST
Registration: N663SF
Aircraft: Bell 407
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Medical Emergency) 

On December 25, 2019, about 1713 central standard time, a single-engine, turbine-powered Bell 407 helicopter, N663SF, sustained substantial damage when it collided with terrain while attempting to land at the Headland Municipal Airport (0J6), Headland, Alabama. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the flight nurse and paramedic were not injured. The helicopter was operated by Viking, LLC, doing business as Survival Flight, Inc, as a medical emergency flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. A company visual flight rules flight plan was filed, and visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed 0J6 about 1654.

The flight nurse, who was seated in the aft right seat, stated that they had initially responded to an accident in Bonifay, Florida. The flight was cancelled en route, and they were returning to base. The flight nurse said the return flight was normal, and the helicopter was "working beautifully." The pilot approached the helipad slightly faster than normal. As it neared the helipad, the helicopter made an abrupt "roll" to the left. The pilot did not say anything and did not correct for the roll. The helicopter impacted terrain and it "battered" around on the ground before coming to a stop on its left side. The flight nurse said that he and the flight paramedic unbuckled their restraints, exited the helicopter from the aft right door, and immediately tended to the pilot. The flight nurse said his first instinct was that the pilot had some sort of cardiac event. Using his flashlight, he could see that the pilot's face was blue, he was not breathing, and was unresponsive. The engine was still running, so another pilot (who witnessed and responded to the accident) did an emergency shutdown, and all three of them pulled the pilot out of the helicopter from the windshield and immediately initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

The flight paramedic, who was seated in the aft left seat, said that about 2 minutes before landing, the pilot asked him and the flight nurse if they were "secure" for landing, and he said he was. The flight nurse said the helicopter was approaching the helipad "a little fast." When it was about 10-15 ft above the ground the helicopter rolled 45° to the left. The flight nurse said, "It felt as if no correction was made and [the helicopter] continued to the ground. I could hear rotors striking the ground." When the helicopter stopped moving, he and the flight nurse exited the helicopter via the aft right door. The engine was still running so it was shut down. The pilot, who was unconscious and not breathing, was pulled from the helicopter and immediately administered CPR.

A witness, who was also a helicopter pilot, said he had just left the operator's hangar in his truck and had pulled onto an adjacent road when he first saw the helicopter making a "shallow approach" to the helipad. He turned his attention away for a moment, but when he looked back, the helicopter had impacted the ground and he could see "flying debris and water from the nearby pond." The witness turned around, drove to the crash site, parked, and called 911. He then observed the flight nurse and paramedic exiting the helicopter. The engine was still running, and the main rotor head was still turning. The witness crawled in the helicopter and observed that the pilot was unresponsive and laying over the controls. The witness had one of the crew members move the pilot so he could perform an emergency shutdown of the engine. The pilot's seatbelt was then unbuckled, and all three pulled the pilot from the wreckage via the windshield. CPR was initiated until an ambulance arrived.

The helicopter impacted level, soft grass, about 120 ft west-northwest of the helipad. It came to rest on its left side on a heading of about 103° in about 3 to 6-inches of standing water from recent rainfall. There was not postimpact fire. Flight and engine control continuity were established for the engine, main rotor and tail rotor system, by manual manipulation of the anti-torque pedals, collective and cyclic in the cockpit. No mechanical issues were observed that would have precluded normal operation at the time of impact.

The pilot, age 61, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane; a commercial pilot certificate with a ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument helicopter. He also held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for rotorcraft-helicopter. The pilot's last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical was issued on April 1, 2019. According to the operator, the pilot had accrued a total of 9,455 flight hours; of which, 9,303 hours were in helicopters.

Weather reported at 0J6 at 1753 was reported as wind from 090 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles, and clear skies. The temperature was 16° C, the dewpoint was 8° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.09 inches Hg.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N663SF
Model/Series: 407 No Series
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Viking Aviation, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: Survival Flight, LLC
Operator Designator Code: 2VKA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: K0J6, 358 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: Headland, AL (0J6)
Destination: Headland, AL (0J6) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.364167, -85.312500 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 



Doug Davis 
October 20, 1958 - December 25, 2019

Douglas Keith Davis, 61, of Dothan, Alabama, died December 25th, 2019. He was born October 20, 1958 in Atlanta, Georgia, to the late Oliver E. and Faye V. Davis. He is survived by his beloved wife Leni, son Glenn A. Davis (Tracy Buchanan), daughter Kim Trinidad, granddaughter Franchesca Cruz, sister Melinda Davis Keisling, nieces Anna-Davis and Grace Keisling, and much-loved dogs Apache and Sugar.

Doug left home at the age of 18-years-old to pursue his dreams of flying and traveling the world. He received his bachelor’s degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, was active in the Boy Scouts, liked riding his Harley, enjoyed skydiving, touched many lives, and saved many lives. When Doug wasn’t flying, he dedicated his life to raising his son, Glenn. Doug’s love and commitment to Glenn helped him achieve Eagle Scout status through many hours of outdoor pursuits and volunteer service work together.

Doug served honorably in the U.S. Army and retired as an Apache instructor but continued his career flying EMS. He then flew overseas as a contractor where he continued to serve the country in combat. He most recently came back to Fort Rucker as an instructor again where he gave his students his best in order to help make them into their own personal best pilots. He left instructing to fly EMS where he could continue his heartfelt mission of saving lives. He was certified in over nine helicopters excluding variations of some. His love of flying was only superseded by his love of his family.

Unfortunately, on Christmas Day Doug was completing an EMS flight when he informed the nurse and paramedic on final approach to the base to tighten their seatbelts. However, a medical complication was imminent. The medical crew did their best to save his life but his time here was complete.

A memorial service to celebrate his life will be held on Saturday, January 4, 2020 at 3:00pm at Sunset Funeral Home Chapel. The family will receive visitors from 1pm – 3pm prior to services.

In lieu of flowers memorial donations may be made to any notable veteran charity. The family of Douglas Keith Davis sincerely thanks all for their kind tributes to our beloved Doug. A special thanks to the crew of Survival Flight for their heroic efforts to try to save him during his final moments. Many thanks to those that knew Doug and could appreciate his gift for flying, commitment to protecting others, zeal for life, and his wicked sense of humor that turned any situation into laughter.




Survival Flight 15

Late on Christmas, one of our pilots, Doug Davis, tragically passed away after experiencing a sudden heart attack while returning from a cancelled flight, according to preliminary information from the Henry County Coroner. 

While there weren’t any patients on board, Doug heroically brought the helicopter completely back to base and nearly landed it normally, the helicopter rolling onto its side at the last second.

Because of what Doug was able to do, our two other crew members on board the helicopter suffered no injuries and they began lifesaving efforts on the pilot almost immediately. 

Sadly, Doug was later pronounced dead at the hospital. 

We have no doubt that Doug saved the lives of our two crewmembers and perhaps others with his final act.

We’ve spoken with Doug’s wife and conveyed our utmost sadness and our deepest thanks. 

As a company, we’ll help Doug's wife with everything we can as she and her family deal with this unexpected tragedy. 

The safety of each one of our employees is and will always be our company’s top concern. 

We’re saddened by this tragic loss on Christmas but are thankful for the brave efforts of our pilot who surely saved lives last tonight.

Survival Flight 15




Headland, Alabama (WTVY)-- The pilot of a ambulance helicopter that crashed Christmas afternoon has died.

61-year old Douglas Davis suffered an apparent heart attack while landing the air ambulance at the Headland Municipal Airport. 

Henry County Coroner Derek Wright said an autopsy will be performed but he believes Davis most likely suffered a heart attack.

The crew of three had been on a call in the Florida panhandle and was returning to the Headland Airport where Survival Flight 15 is based.

The helicopter landed upside down a short distance from the designated landing area.

The crash happened about 5:00 Wednesday afternoon.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wtvy.com