Thursday, January 09, 2020

Controlled Flight into Terrain: Cessna 182H Skylane, N8338S; fatal accident occurred October 12, 2017 near Las Cruces International Airport (KLRU), Las Cruces, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

Photo of damage brush and ground scar

Airplane’s Propeller

Main Wreckage

Engine

Propeller Blade

Propeller (all blades visible)

Airspeed Indicator

Turn Indicator

Tachometer

Altimeter

Attitude Directional Indicator scoring

Vacuum Pump Case

Wreckage Diagram

Map of Accident Referencing the Airport 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 
 
Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N8338S

Location: Las Cruces, NM
Accident Number: CEN18FA009
Date & Time: 10/12/2017, 2015 MDT
Registration: N8338S
Aircraft: CESSNA 182H 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On October 12, 2017, about 2015 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182H airplane, N8338S, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain near Las Cruces, New Mexico. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Aero Newton Inc. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed Las Cruces International Airport (LRU), Las Cruces, New Mexico, at an undetermined time.

Radar data captured the airplane flying over Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, along Highway I-25 toward Las Cruces. Once near the airport, the airplane maneuvered north of LRU and descended to about 200 ft above ground level (agl), turned left toward the airport, and climbed to about 500 ft agl. The airplane then overflew LRU before turning north. Shortly thereafter, the airplane entered a descending right turn over unpopulated terrain and radar contact was lost.

The wreckage was discovered on a small mesa by first responders who were dispatched following reports of a fire. 


Morris Douglas Newton Jr.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial; Flight Engineer
Age: 77, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/20/2017
Occupational Pilot:Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 32700 hours (Total, all aircraft)


David Glenn Hancock

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/12/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Personal logbooks were not located for either pilot, and recency of flight experience could not be determined.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N8338S
Model/Series: 182H H
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:1965 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18256438
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/08/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2507.15 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470-R
Registered Owner: AERO NEWTON INC
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: AERO NEWTON INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The airplane's maintenance logbook recorded a 100-hour inspection completed on August 8, 2017, at a total airframe time of 2,507.15 hrs and 886.91 hrs since engine overhaul. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLRU, 4456 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2015 MST
Direction from Accident Site: 181°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Las Cruces, NM (LRU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Las Cruces, NM (LRU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  MDT
Type of Airspace:
A review of lunar astronomical information revealed that the moon did not rise until after midnight on the night of the accident.

Airport Information

Airport: LAS CRUCES INTL (LRU)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 4456 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: Unknown
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Unknown 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 32.336944, -106.916389 

The airplane impacted unpopulated, desert terrain about 3 miles from the airport at an elevation of about 4,425 ft mean sea level (msl).

The wreckage path was about 275 ft long and was oriented on a 215° magnetic heading. Portions of the left wingtip and damaged desert brush were found in the area leading up to the initial impact point. A shallow divot showed signatures consistent with the airplane skidding several feet along the desert floor after impact. The main wreckage was found about 225 ft from the initial impact point; the wreckage comprised the fuselage, wings, and empennage. A post-impact fire consumed most of the fuselage and inboard sections of the wings.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit to the elevator, elevator trim, and rudder. The left aileron drive cable was continuous to the left aileron. The carry-through cable was continuous from the left aileron to the right aileron. The right aileron drive cable was broken near the right forward door post and exhibited features of overload separation. Most of the fuel system was consumed by the postimpact fire; the fuel strainer screen was intact and no contamination was observed. The cockpit instrumentation was largely impact and fire damaged. The airspeed indicator displayed 180 mph (about 158 knots), the tachometer displayed about 2,300 rpm, and the altimeter read 8,075 ft with 30.07 inches displayed in the Kollsman window. Impact and fire damage precluded functional testing of the altimeter.

The engine remained partially attached to the fuselage via the control cables. The top spark plugs were removed and appeared worn out-normal (when compared to the Champion Aviation Check-a-Plug Chart). The valve covers were removed and no damage was observed to the valve springs and rocker arms. The lower forward portion of the crankcase sustained impact damage that prevented manually rotating the engine crankshaft to verify continuity and compression. The three-bladed Hartzell propeller was found separated from the engine. The crushed spinner was removed from the hub. The blades were identified as A, B, and C for documentation purposes. Blade A was bent aft near the hub and displayed leading edge damage and diagonal chordwise scoring on the cambered side of the blade. Blade B was twisted and exhibited S-bending, and leading edge gouges with chordwise scratches. Blade C was also twisted and exhibited S-bending and chordwise scratches.

The vacuum pump and attitude indicator were removed and examined. Examination of the dry vane carbon components revealed impact damage along with rotational scoring around the circumference of both the carbon components and the vacuum pump case. The gyro of the attitude indicator was also examined. The attitude indicator case had crushed into the gyro and was removed. Rotational scoring was observed on the interior of the gyro casing. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Office of the Medical Investigator, Albuquerque, New Mexico, conducted autopsies on both pilots. The cause of death for both pilots was blunt force trauma.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Forensic Sciences Laboratory performed toxicology testing on specimens from both pilots with negative results for all tested-for substances.

Cessna 182C Skylane, N8749T: Fatal accident occurred November 11, 2019 in Metaline Falls, Pend Oreille County, Washington


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N8749T


Location: Metaline, WA
Accident Number: WPR20LA028
Date & Time: 11/11/2019, 1126 PST
Registration: N8749T
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries:1 Fatal 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 11, 2019, at 1126 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 182, N8749T, was reported overdue/missing near Metaline Falls, Washington. The pilot was fatally injured and recovered from Sullivan Lake on November 16, 2019; the airplane presumably impacted the water and subsequently submerged. The wreckage has not been located. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provision of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Colville Municipal Airport (63S), Colville, Washington.

On November 11, at 1905, the Federal Aviation Administration issued an alert notice (ALNOT) for the missing airplane; the ALNOT was cancelled on November 16 at 1634. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N8749T
Model/Series:182 C 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Coleman Terry L
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K65S, 2333 ft msl
Observation Time: 1050 PST
Distance from Accident Site: 40 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C / -11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 100°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.52 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Unknown
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 48.807222, -117.291944 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Bell 407, N79LP: Fatal accident occurred December 07, 2019 in the Gulf of Mexico

Figure 1 – Main wreckage location and flight track

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Rolls-Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana
Bell Helicopter; Hurst, Texas
Panther Helicopters; Belle Chasse, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N79LP

Location: GM
Accident Number: CEN20FA035
Date & Time: 12/07/2019, 0917 CST
Registration: N79LP
Aircraft: Bell 407
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled

On December 7, 2019, at 0917 central standard time, a Bell 407 helicopter, N79LP, went missing in the Gulf of Mexico about 25 nautical miles southeast of Grand Isle, Louisiana. The commercial rated pilot is still missing and the passenger was fatally injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Panther Helicopters Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area and the flight operated on a company visual flight rules (VFR) fight plan. The flight had departed from oil platform WD109 and was en route to oil platform WD73.

In a statement provided by the operator, the helicopter had departed oil platform SP77A about 0834 and was en route to WD73, located about 17 nautical miles northwest. The pilot was to conduct pollution control inspections while en route to the destination platform. At 0853 the helicopter landed at WD109 to add additional fuel but found out that the fuel nozzle was broken and was unable to receive any fuel. At 0910 the helicopter departed WD109 with a reported 1 hour and 20 minutes of fuel, 2 persons onboard and estimated time en route of 20 minutes. The operator was actively tracking the helicopter via Sky Connect Tracker Systems.

Recorded ADS-B data revealed the helicopter's flight track at 0912:50 about 1.5 miles west-northwest of WD109 at 700 ft mean sea level (msl) and 115 knots groundspeed. The helicopter continued generally northwest for about 10.5 miles and gradually descended to 375 ft msl. At 0918:10, the helicopter was headed 292° at 114 knots and 375 ft msl. The final recorded data at 0918:18 showed that the helicopter made a left course deviation to 270°, descended to 150 ft msl, and slowed to 72 knots. Figure 1 shows the applicable platforms, flight track, and main wreckage location.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), at 0915 the pilot contacted WD73 and reported that he was 10 minutes away. At 1011, when the helicopter did not land at WD73, the platform personnel reported them overdue. The company called the FAA and United States Coast Guard (USCG) to report the helicopter overdue and an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued at 1121.

The USCG recovered several pieces of small debris from the accident helicopter. The pieces include a cargo door, a compressed air bottle, and seat cushions. The debris was found near platform ST41 about 25 miles west of the main wreckage location.

The weather in the area was reported by the operator as wind from 050 at 10 knots, broken clouds at 1,700 ft, no precipitation, and visibility 5 miles in haze. The WD73 worker reported the clouds were 800 to 1,000 ft and 7 to 10 miles visibility with a gray sky.

A search near the last ADS-B point was conducted on December 14. The side scan sonar hooked onto the left skid tube of the helicopter during the scan process. The sonar boat pulled the skid tube up to the boat and transferred it to the recovery company. Pieces of helicopter debris were visible on the sonar images so divers were sent down to tie buoys to the wreckage and mark the location for a future recovery. Due to adverse weather in the Gulf of Mexico, the recovery was postponed until December 20, 2019. The main wreckage location was about 350 ft southwest of the last ADS-B point and was on the sea floor about 190 ft deep.

On December 16, 2019, a shrimp trawler unintentionally caught the helicopter in its nets and dragged the wreckage about 3 miles. When the wreckage was noticed the trawler stopped and the wreckage eventually broke loose and sunk back to the sea floor. The main wreckage was located again by a dive boat company and recovered for examination.

An initial examination of the wreckage revealed that a majority of the helicopter had been recovered and was significantly fragmented. However, still missing are the vertical and horizontal stabilizer, an outboard portion of one of the main rotor blades, and a majority of the tailboom.

The wreckage has been retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N79LP
Model/Series: 407 No Series
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Panther Helicopters Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 800 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: WD109, GM
Destination: WD73, GM

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 28.919167, -89.653333 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Mooney M20C, N5557Q: Fatal accident occurred December 08, 2019 in Flower Pot, Yavapai County, Arizona



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona 
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

https://registry.faa.gov/N5557Q


Location: Flower Pot, AZ
Accident Number:CEN20FA034 
Date & Time: 12/08/2019, 1300 MST
Registration: N5557Q
Aircraft: Mooney M20C
Injuries:1 Fatal 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 8, 2019, about 1300 mountain standard time, a Mooney model M20C airplane, N5557Q impacted terrain about 2 nm southwest of Flower Pot, Arizona. The pilot was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postimpact fire. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Marginal visual meteorological conditions with potential instrument conditions and mountain obscuration prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Flagstaff Pulliam Airport (FLG), Flagstaff, Arizona, at an unconfirmed time, and was destined for the Deer Valley Airport (DVT), Phoenix, Arizona.

The accident site was discovered by a rancher on the morning of December 13, 2019. There were no witnesses to the impact, but witnesses that saw the airplane on December 8, 2019 came forward once they discovered that the airplane had crashed. The witnesses were driving in a car southbound on Interstate 17 near Munds Park, Arizona, when an orange and white low-wing airplane flew over their car at low altitude. The witnesses reported that the weather conditions at that time consisted of a low ceiling but with good visibility below the clouds. The witnesses provided 3 pictures of the airplane that they had taken from their car. The pictures showed the airplane traveling in the same direction as the car close to the ground. The witnesses said they watched the airplane and it appeared to be following the road. The pictures also showed low clouds with obscuration of mountain peaks in the background of the image. The witnesses reported that about 20 minutes after taking the pictures, when they were about where the airplane was reported to have crashed, the visibility had reduced to about ¼ mile and the clouds were right on the ground. Subsequent to the witness report, preliminary radar track data for an aircraft traveling along interstate 17 on December 8, 2019 was found.

The airplane impacted the ground about 1 mile east of interstate 17 on a heading of about 60 degrees. The main wreckage came to rest about 320 ft from the initial impact point.

During the investigation it was discovered that the pilot had purchased the airplane on December 4, 2018. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N5557Q
Model/Series: M20C No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SEZ, 4830 ft msl
Observation Time: 1955 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1800 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Flagstaff, AZ (FLG)
Destination: Phoenix, AZ (DVT)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 34.479444, -111.989167

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Cessna 208B Super Cargomaster, N4602B: Fatal accident occurred December 09, 2019 near Victoria Regional Airport (KVCT), Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Martinaire Aviation; Addison, Texas
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Ottawa, Ontario

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N4602B


Location: Victoria, TX
Accident Number: CEN20FA032
Date & Time: 12/09/2019, 2017 CST
Registration: N4602B
Aircraft: Cessna 208
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled

On December 9, 2019, about 2017 central standard time, a Cessna 208B airplane, N4602B, impacted terrain during initial climb near Victoria, Texas. The airline transport pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Martinaire Aviation LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a cargo flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the instrument rules (IFR) flight, which departed about 2004 from Victoria Regional Airport (VCT), Victoria, Texas, with an intended destination of George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH), Houston, Texas.
After departing VCT from Runway 13L, air traffic control (ATC) directed the pilot to climb and maintain 3,000 ft mean sea level (msl). After climbing through 1,900 ft msl, the airplane began a series of fifteen course reversals, which continued throughout the remainder of the flight. The course reversals alternated between right and left turns, each with more than 90 degrees of heading change. ATC queried the pilot several times concerning the airplane's erratic course. At 2008 and 2011, the pilot stated that he had "some instrument problem" and after a suggestion by ATC, the pilot agreed to return to VCT. As the airplane continued to make turns, a rapid descent occurred, and radar contact was lost.

The airplane impacted a rural area at a near vertical attitude, with the propeller hub buried about 5 ft deep into clay soil. The airplane was highly fragmented, with remnants of the fuel tank and engine tubing located 225 ft from the main wreckage. All primary and secondary flight controls were accounted for. The airplane was retained for further examination.




Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N4602B
Model/Series: 208 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Martinaire Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KVCT, 115 ft msl
Observation Time: 2034 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4800 ft agl
Visibility:  6 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Victoria, TX (VCT)
Destination: Houston, TX (IAH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 28.852500, -96.918611 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee Cruiser, N601FL: Fatal accident occurred December 21, 2019 in Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Indiana


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana
Piper; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N601FL


Location: Evansville, IN
Accident Number: CEN20FA038
Date & Time: 12/21/2019, 1514 CDT
Registration: N601FL
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On December 21, 2019, at 1514 central standard time, a Piper PA-28-140 airplane, N601FL, impacted terrain near Evansville, Indiana, while on landing approach. The private pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to N601FL LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local cross-country, visual flight rules (VFR) flight that departed Evansville Municipal Airport (EVV), Indiana, at 1413.

The pilot departed EVV on a local cross-country flight to conduct practice approaches at Crawford County Airport (RSV), Indiana, before returning to EVV. The pilot requested to return to EVV about 10 miles short of reaching RSV. The flight was subsequently cleared to land on runway 18 at EVV. According to EVV Tower personnel, the pilot did not report any difficulties with the airplane prior to the accident. Witnesses observed the airplane enter a right descending turn before impacting a field about 2 miles north of the approach end of runway 18. One witness reported the airplane's engine was running as it passed over him before beginning the descending turn to the west.

The initial impact was made with the right wingtip in a nearly 90 degree right bank, as identified by the green beacon lens at the initial impact point and the location of impact marks made by the main landing gear. The propeller was separated from the crankshaft propeller flange and located in the debris field. One blade exhibited leading edge polishing and aft bending. The other blade exhibited forward bending about mid span. The six propeller retention bolts were sheared at the propeller flange and several bolts exhibited torsional bending. The wreckage was recovered for additional examination. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration:N601FL 
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEVV
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Evansville, IN (EVV)
Destination: Evansville, IN (EVV)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 38.095833, -87.540556 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Bell 407, N663SF: Fatal accident occurred December 25, 2019 at Headland Municipal Airport (0J6), Henry County, Alabama



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama
Rolls Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana
Bell Helicopter; Montreal, Quebec

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N663SF

Location: Headland, AL
Accident Number: ERA20FA056
Date & Time: 12/25/2019, 1713 CST
Registration: N663SF
Aircraft: Bell 407
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Medical Emergency) 

On December 25, 2019, about 1713 central standard time, a single-engine, turbine-powered Bell 407 helicopter, N663SF, sustained substantial damage when it collided with terrain while attempting to land at the Headland Municipal Airport (0J6), Headland, Alabama. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the flight nurse and paramedic were not injured. The helicopter was operated by Viking, LLC, doing business as Survival Flight, Inc, as a medical emergency flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. A company visual flight rules flight plan was filed, and visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed 0J6 about 1654.

The flight nurse, who was seated in the aft right seat, stated that they had initially responded to an accident in Bonifay, Florida. The flight was cancelled en route, and they were returning to base. The flight nurse said the return flight was normal, and the helicopter was "working beautifully." The pilot approached the helipad slightly faster than normal. As it neared the helipad, the helicopter made an abrupt "roll" to the left. The pilot did not say anything and did not correct for the roll. The helicopter impacted terrain and it "battered" around on the ground before coming to a stop on its left side. The flight nurse said that he and the flight paramedic unbuckled their restraints, exited the helicopter from the aft right door, and immediately tended to the pilot. The flight nurse said his first instinct was that the pilot had some sort of cardiac event. Using his flashlight, he could see that the pilot's face was blue, he was not breathing, and was unresponsive. The engine was still running, so another pilot (who witnessed and responded to the accident) did an emergency shutdown, and all three of them pulled the pilot out of the helicopter from the windshield and immediately initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

The flight paramedic, who was seated in the aft left seat, said that about 2 minutes before landing, the pilot asked him and the flight nurse if they were "secure" for landing, and he said he was. The flight nurse said the helicopter was approaching the helipad "a little fast." When it was about 10-15 ft above the ground the helicopter rolled 45° to the left. The flight nurse said, "It felt as if no correction was made and [the helicopter] continued to the ground. I could hear rotors striking the ground." When the helicopter stopped moving, he and the flight nurse exited the helicopter via the aft right door. The engine was still running so it was shut down. The pilot, who was unconscious and not breathing, was pulled from the helicopter and immediately administered CPR.

A witness, who was also a helicopter pilot, said he had just left the operator's hangar in his truck and had pulled onto an adjacent road when he first saw the helicopter making a "shallow approach" to the helipad. He turned his attention away for a moment, but when he looked back, the helicopter had impacted the ground and he could see "flying debris and water from the nearby pond." The witness turned around, drove to the crash site, parked, and called 911. He then observed the flight nurse and paramedic exiting the helicopter. The engine was still running, and the main rotor head was still turning. The witness crawled in the helicopter and observed that the pilot was unresponsive and laying over the controls. The witness had one of the crew members move the pilot so he could perform an emergency shutdown of the engine. The pilot's seatbelt was then unbuckled, and all three pulled the pilot from the wreckage via the windshield. CPR was initiated until an ambulance arrived.

The helicopter impacted level, soft grass, about 120 ft west-northwest of the helipad. It came to rest on its left side on a heading of about 103° in about 3 to 6-inches of standing water from recent rainfall. There was not postimpact fire. Flight and engine control continuity were established for the engine, main rotor and tail rotor system, by manual manipulation of the anti-torque pedals, collective and cyclic in the cockpit. No mechanical issues were observed that would have precluded normal operation at the time of impact.

The pilot, age 61, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane; a commercial pilot certificate with a ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument helicopter. He also held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for rotorcraft-helicopter. The pilot's last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical was issued on April 1, 2019. According to the operator, the pilot had accrued a total of 9,455 flight hours; of which, 9,303 hours were in helicopters.

Weather reported at 0J6 at 1753 was reported as wind from 090 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles, and clear skies. The temperature was 16° C, the dewpoint was 8° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.09 inches Hg.



Rotorcraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N663SF
Model/Series: 407 No Series
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Viking Aviation, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: Survival Flight, LLC
Operator Designator Code: 2VKA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: K0J6, 358 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: Headland, AL (0J6)
Destination: Headland, AL (0J6) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.364167, -85.312500 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Mooney M20S Eagle, N602TF: Fatal accident occurred December 31, 2019 at Johnson County Executive Airport (KOJC), Olathe, Kansas



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Mooney; Kerrville, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N602TF 

Location: OLATHE, KS
Accident Number: CEN20FA049
Date & Time: 12/31/2019, 1606 CST
Registration: N602TF
Aircraft: Mooney M20S
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 



On December 31, 2019, about 1606 central standard time, a Mooney M20S airplane, N602TF, impacted terrain during takeoff from runway 18 at the Johnson County Executive Airport (OJC), near Olathe, Kansas. A post-impact ground fire occurred. The private pilot and passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was destroyed during the ground fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating from OJC at the time of the accident and was destined for the North Little Rock Municipal Airport, North Little Rock, Arkansas.

According to initial information given to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a witness reported that he witnessed a Mooney, N602TF, crash at OJC. He said that a couple from Little Rock, Arkansas flew up to view a new Piper airplane that was for sale. The witness stepped out to watch them take off back and return to their home base. On initial roll out, nothing out of the ordinary was noticed. During power-up all sounded and looked normal. However, the airplane rotated at a much slower speed than would be expected and immediately started to climb at a very sharp departure angle. As it gained altitude its airspeed bled off to the point that the left wing stalled causing the plane to nose over in that direction and continue its trajectory straight into the ground just east of the runway. Engine power was "on" through the entire flight with no odd sounds to be noted.

Review of video near the accident site was consistent with the witness statement. The airplane did not exhibit any fire or smoke inflight in the video. A ground fire was observed after impact. First responders subsequently extinguished the fire.

The 48-year-old pilot held a FAA private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument ratings. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate dated May 28, 2019, with no limitations. On the application for that medical certificate, the pilot reported he had accumulated 180 hours of total flight time and 0 hours in the prior six months.

N602TF, a 2000-model Mooney M20S, was a single-engine, four-place, retractable tricycle landing gear airplane with serial number 30-0043. A review of FAA records showed the pilot and a co-owner purchased the airplane on November 26, 2019. The airplane did not receive any fueling services at OJC.

At 1553, the recorded weather at OJC was: Wind 270° at 10 kts gusting to 16 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 6° C; dew point -8° C; altimeter 29.99 inches of mercury.

The wreckage came to rest about 171° and about 2,550 ft from the departure threshold of runway 18. Major components of the airplane wire identified at the accident site. The top of the fuselage was consumed by fire between the instrument panel to just forward of the empennage. The lower section of the fuselage was discolored, deformed, and melted. The engine compartment exhibited aft migration of the engine against the firewall. The propeller was imbedded in terrain and when recovered, it exhibited "S" shaped bending and leading edge nicks. The empennage and fuselage aft of the cabin was bent laterally toward the left wing about 30°. The leading edge of the right wing exhibited aft crushing. The leading edge of the left wing exhibited discoloration, melting, and deformation. The position of the left main landing could not be determined due to the left wing's thermal damage. The right main landing gear was found partially extended. Flight control continuity from all the flight control surfaces to the cabin area was traced. The ignition key switch was selecting the BOTH position. The mixture, propeller, and throttle control knobs were in their forward position. Examination of the engine compartment confirmed control continuity of the mixture, propeller, and throttle control from their engine accessories to their respective cockpit controls. The airplane instrument panel was damaged by impact forces and thermal damage. The airplane's JP Instrument EDM 800 unit exhibited impact and thermal damage.

The Johnson County Coroner was asked to arrange an autopsy on the pilot and to have toxicological samples taken.

The engine is being retained for a disassembly examination and the EDM 800 unit will be shipped to the National Transportation Safety Board Vehicle Recorder Laboratory to see if it contains any data in reference to the accident flight.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N602TF
Model/Series: M20S No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOJC, 1070 ft msl
Observation Time: 1553 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / -8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / 16 knots, 270°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: OLATHE, KS (OJC)
Destination: North Little Rock, AR (ORK)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 38.846111, -94.736111 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.