Monday, December 5, 2016

Piper PA28R-201 Arrow III, N36458: Accident occurred April 09, 2017 and Incident occurred December 05, 2016 at Oakland County International Airport (KPTK), Pontiac, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Charter Township, Michigan

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N36458

Location: Pontiac, MI
Accident Number: CEN17LA150
Date & Time: 04/09/2017, 1015 CDT
Registration: N36458
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-201
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On April 9, 2017, about 1015 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-201 airplane, N36458, experienced a landing gear collapse at the Oakland County International Airport (KPTK), Pontiac, Michigan. The pilot and passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to IXI LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan.

While conducting touch and go landings, the pilot landed the airplane for the third time when the right main landing gear and nose landing gear collapsed. The right wing was partially separated from the airplane resulting in substantial damage. Postaccident examination of the airplane by the responding Federal Aviation Administration inspector found an unused instrument lamp socket was improperly secured during recent maintenance allowing it to short the landing gear controls. The landing gear control circuit breaker was tripped, stopping the landing gear from transitioning to the down position and the landing gear indicators and warnings became inoperative. No other anomalies were found with the airplane. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 38, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/23/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 400 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N36458
Model/Series: PA 28R-201 201
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28R-7837279
Landing Gear Type:  Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:  2749 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: IO-360 SER
Registered Owner: IXI LLC
Rated Power: hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPTK, 976 ft msl
Observation Time: 0953 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 106°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 16000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 0°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 23000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots/ 16 knots, 200°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:  29.92 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Pontiac, MI (PTK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:  None
Destination: Pontiac, MI (PTK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport:  OAKLAND COUNTY INTL (PTK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 980 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27R
IFR Approach:  Unknown
Runway Length/Width: 5676 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.665556, -83.420556 (est)


December 05, 2016:  Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.



December 05, 2016:  Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.

Date:  05-DEC-16
Time:  20:32:00Z
Regis#:  N36458
Aircraft Make:  PIPER
Aircraft Model:  PA28R
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Minor
Activity:  Instruction
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  PONTIAC
State:  Michigan IXI LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N36458

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Great Lakes 


NTSB Identification: CEN17CA150
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 09, 2017 in Pontiac, MI
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-201, registration: N36458

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed. 

Date: 09-APR-17
Time: 15:14:00Z
Regis#: N36458
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PONTIAC
State: MICHIGAN

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA East Michigan FSDO-23

Aircraft on landing, nose gear collapsed.

Date: 05-DEC-16
Time: 20:32:00Z
Regis#: N36458
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28R
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PONTIAC
State: Michigan




A pilot of a small airplane is going to be okay after a rough landing at Oakland County International Airport on Monday.

Around 3:30 Monday afternoon, the single-engine plane came in for a rough landing. It had spent the previous two and half hours circling the airport.
  
According the airport, the plane's pilot was unable to get the landing gear locked down when they tried to initially land. The pilot aborted that landing attempt and then tried to remedy the problem while circling overhead.

SkyFox was near the airport and captured video of the plane landing. When it came in for the landing, the front landing gear collapsed and the plane skidded to a stop.

The pilot escaped the plane quickly and was not injured.


The plane is a 1978 Piper PA-28 Cherokee and is registered to IXI LLC. 


Story and video:  http://www.fox2detroit.com 




WATERFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. (WXYZ) - A small plane has made a daring emergency landing at the Oakland County International Airport.

The plane began having problems with its front landing gear shortly before noon.

After circling for hours, it finally came in a short time ago.

As it came in, you could see the pilot trying to keep the weight of the plane on the back landing gears.

As soon as the front wheel hit the ground, it folded underneath the aircraft.

Once the plane came to a stop, two people quickly hopped out, in case it caught fire.

Fortunately, everyone appears to be okay.

We're told the plane is part of a flight school that flies out of Oakland County Airport.

Story and video:   http://www.wxyz.com

Velocity XL RG, N84KJ: Accident occurred December 04, 2016 at Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), Sonoma County, California -and- Incident occurred July 23, 2016 at Grant Municipal Airport (KGGF), Perkins County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alameda, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N84KJ

Location: Petaluma, CA
Accident Number: WPR17LA032
Date & Time: 12/04/2016, 1525 PST
Registration: N84KJ
Aircraft: HOSKINS LONNIE F VELOCITY XL RG
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 4, 2016, about 1525 Pacific standard time, an experimental Velocity XL/RG airplane, N84KJ, was substantially damaged after it contacted the runway with the landing gear retracted at Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), Petaluma, California. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from O69 at 1455.

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to practice maneuvers required to obtain a commercial pilot certificate. Upon his return to O69, the pilot entered the downwind leg for runway 29, extended the landing gear, and prior to base leg, reduced the power to idle. He also observed a Cessna airplane on final. To keep an adequate separation between the two airplanes, the pilot announced that he would perform S turns. After he had executed two S turns, the pilot realized he was low and slow, so he retracted the landing gear to improve the glide distance. He initially intended to do a go-around, but decided to land after the Cessna exited the runway. As he attempted to extend his landing gear, he observed that the landing gear down position-indicator light did not illuminate. The pilot pushed the gear reset button and subsequently pulled back on the control stick, which resulted in an inadvertent stall 10 to 20 ft above the runway.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the landing gear handle was in the UP position.

A witness observed the accident airplane on final approach, about one-third of the way down the runway with the landing gear retracted and at a low airspeed. He immediately started flashing lights in his vehicle to get the pilot's attention. The airplane touched down, bounced back into the air, settled on its belly and slid about 100 ft to a stop.

A mechanic who recovered the airplane reported that the landing gear handle was in the UP position, and that he overheard the pilot say that he was distracted on final approach. Maintenance personnel on scene noticed the gear was partially out of the well before they started to lift the aircraft during the recovery process.

In the section titled "RECOMMENDATION" in the NTSB Pilot/Operator Report, form 6120.1, the pilot stated that the decision to proceed with the landing proved to be inadequate and that he should have performed a go around instead.

The pilot completed necessary repairs on the airplane that included fiberglass repair to the belly and the landing gear system. The nose gear actuator and strut were replaced. The landing gear was then functionally tested and there were no malfunctions.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 66, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/09/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/19/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HOSKINS LONNIE F
Registration: N84KJ
Model/Series: VELOCITY XL RG NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 051
Landing Gear Type: Retractable -
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/20/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 500 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CMI
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-550
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 310
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDVO, 2 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2255 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 141°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Petaluma, CA (O69)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Petaluma, CA (O69)
Type of Clearance: None  
Departure Time: 1455 PST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: PETALUMA MUNI (O69)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 89 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 29
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3602 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Simulated Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  38.232500, -122.633889 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA032
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 04, 2016 in Petaluma, CA
Aircraft: HOSKINS LONNIE F VELOCITY XL RG, registration: N84KJ
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 4, 2016, about 1525 Pacific standard time, an experimental Velocity XL/RG, N84KJ, landed gear-up at Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), Petaluma, California. The pilot, the sole occupant, sustained minor injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from O69 at 1455.

The pilot reported that during the landing sequence, he extended the landing gear; however, the airplane impacted the runway surface with the landing gear in the gear-up position. Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the landing gear handle was in the "up" position.


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

July 23, 2016: Experimental Velocity XL RG landed gear up.

Date: 23-JUL-16

Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N84KJ
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: GRANT
State: Nebraska

Cessna 500 Citation I, Yatish Air LLC, N332SE: Accident occurred December 04, 2016 at Gunnison-Crested Butte Regional Airport (KGUC), Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Yatish Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N332SE

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA047 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 04, 2016 in Gunnison, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA Citation 500, registration: N332SE
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot of the jet reported that he initially requested that 100 lbs of fuel be added to both fuel tanks. During the subsequent preflight inspection, the pilot decided that more fuel was needed, so he requested that the airplane’s fuel tanks be topped off with fuel. However, he did not confirm the fuel levels or check the fuel gauges before takeoff. He departed on the flight and did not check the fuel gauges until about 1 hour after takeoff. He stated that, at that time, the fuel gauges were showing about 900-1,000 lbs of fuel per side, and he realized that the fuel tanks had not been topped off as requested. He reduced engine power to conserve fuel and to increase the airplane’s flight endurance while he continued to his destination. When the fuel gauges showed about 400-500 lbs of fuel per side, the low fuel lights for both wing fuel tanks illuminated. The pilot reported to air traffic control that the airplane was low on fuel and diverted the flight to the nearest airport. The pilot reported that the airplane was high and fast on the visual approach for landing. He misjudged the height above the ground and later stated that the airplane “landed very hard.” The airplane’s left main landing gear and nose gear collapsed and the airplane veered off the runway, resulting in substantial damage to the left wing. The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to fly a stabilized approach and his inadequate landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s failure to ensure that the airplane was properly serviced with fuel before departing on the flight.  

On December 4, 2016, about 1853 mountain standard time, a Cessna Citation 500, N332SE, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing and runway excursion at the Gunnison-Crested Butte Airport (GUC), Gunnison, Colorado. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and the flight was on an instrument flight plan. The flight departed the San Jose International Airport (SJC), San Jose, California, about 1616 and Pueblo, Colorado, was the destination.

The pilot reported that he originally requested that the fixed base operator (FBO) at SJC put 100 gallons of jet fuel in each wing fuel tank. Later during his preflight, the pilot decided that more fuel was needed, so he went back into the FBO and requested that the airplane's fuel tanks be topped off with fuel. The pilot was still in the FBO when he saw the lineman fuel the airplane from the fuel truck. He paid for the fuel without looking at the receipt and then proceeded out to the airplane. The pilot reported that he did not recheck the fuel gauges before departing SJC. 

The pilot reported that he departed on the flight, but it was not until about an hour after takeoff that he checked the fuel gauges. He stated that the fuel gauges were showing about 900 to 1,000 lbs of fuel per side, and he realized that the fuel tanks had not been topped off with fuel. He reduced the throttles to conserve fuel and to increase the airplane's flight endurance while he continued the flight to Pueblo, Colorado. 

The pilot reported that when the fuel gauges showed about 400 to 500 lbs of fuel per side, the low fuel lights for both wing fuel tanks illuminated. About 1840, the pilot reported to air traffic control (ATC) that the airplane was low on fuel and asked to land at the nearest airport. ATC provided radar vectors to GUC and initially cleared the flight for the ILS runway 6 approach. During the approach, the pilot reported that he had the runway in sight and ATC cleared the flight for a visual approach. 

The pilot reported that the airplane was high and fast on the approach. At 500 ft above ground level, the airspeed was about 120 knots. He misjudged the runway and the height above the ground and he stated, "I landed very hard on runway 24." During touchdown, the airplane bounced and then impacted the runway. The airplane's left main landing gear and nose gear collapsed and the airplane veered off the runway, resulting in substantial damage to the left wing. The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

At 1856, the surface weather observation at GUC was: wind 340 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 10 miles; sky condition few clouds at 7,500 ft; temperature -8 degrees C; dew point -13 degrees C; altimeter 30.08 inches of mercury. 

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA047 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 04, 2016 in Gunnison, CO
Aircraft: CESSNA Citation 500, registration: N332SE
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 4, 2016, about 1853 mountain standard time, a Cessna Citation 500, N332SE, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing and runway excursion at the Gunnison-Crested Butte Airport (GUC), Gunnison, Colorado. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and the flight was on an instrument flight plan. The flight departed the San Jose International Airport (SJC), San Jose, California, about 1616 and Pueblo, Colorado, was the destination.

The pilot reported that he originally requested that the fixed base operator (FBO) at SJC put 100 gallons of jet fuel in each wing fuel tank. Later during his preflight, the pilot decided that more fuel was needed, so he went back into the FBO and requested that the airplane's fuel tanks be topped off with fuel. The pilot was still in the FBO when he saw the lineman fuel the airplane from the fuel truck. He paid for the fuel without looking at the receipt and then proceeded out to the airplane. The pilot reported that he did not recheck the fuel gauges before departing SJC. 

The pilot reported that he departed on the flight, but it was not until about an hour after takeoff that he checked the fuel gauges. He stated that the fuel gauges were showing about 900 to 1,000 lbs of fuel per side, and he realized that the fuel tanks had not been topped off with fuel. He reduced the throttles to conserve fuel and to increase the airplane's flight endurance while he continued the flight to Pueblo, Colorado. 

The pilot reported that when the fuel gauges showed about 400 to 500 lbs of fuel per side, the low fuel lights for both wing fuel tanks illuminated. About 1840, the pilot reported to air traffic control (ATC) that the airplane was low on fuel and asked to land at the nearest airport. ATC provided radar vectors to GUC and initially cleared the flight for the ILS runway 6 approach. During the approach, the pilot reported that he had the runway in sight and ATC cleared the flight for a visual approach. 

The pilot reported that the airplane was high and fast on the approach. At 500 ft above ground level, the airspeed was about 120 knots. He misjudged the runway and the height above the ground and he stated, "I landed very hard on runway 24." During touchdown, the airplane bounced and then impacted the runway. The airplane's left main landing gear and nose gear collapsed and the airplane veered off the runway, resulting in substantial damage to the left wing. The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

At 1856, the surface weather observation at GUC was: wind 340 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 10 miles; sky condition few clouds at 7,500 ft; temperature -8 degrees C; dew point -13 degrees C; altimeter 30.08 inches of mercury. 

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA047
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 04, 2016 in Gunnison, CO
Aircraft: CESSNA Citation 500, registration: N332SE
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 4, 2016, about 1855 mountain standard time, a Cessna Citation 500, N332SE, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing and runway excursion at the Gunnison-Crested Butte Airport (GUC), Gunnison, Colorado. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and the flight was on an instrument flight plan. The flight departed the San Jose International Airport (SJC), San Jose, California, at an unknown time and Pueblo, Colorado, was the destination.

The pilot reported to air traffic control (ATC) that the airplane was low on fuel. ATC provided radar vectors to GUC and the airplane was cleared for the GPS-B RWY 24 approach. During the approach, the pilot reported that he had the runway in sight and ATC cleared the flight for a visual approach. During touchdown, the airplane's left main landing gear and nose gear collapsed and the airplane veered off the runway, resulting in substantial damage to the left wing.

At 1856, the surface weather observation at GUC was: wind 340 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 10 miles; sky condition few clouds at 7,500 ft; temperature -8 degrees C; dew point -13 degrees C; altimeter 30.08 inches of mercury.

Arion Lightning LS-1, N218D: Accident occurred December 03, 2016 in Goshen, Elkhart County, Indiana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA South Bend FSDO-17

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N218D

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA048
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, December 03, 2016 in Goshen, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: ARION AIRCRAFT LLC LIGHTNING LS-1, registration: N218D
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The sport pilot reported that, before departing on a cross-country flight, he contacted the flight service station for a weather briefing for his flight route. He then conducted a preflight inspection of the airplane, started it to allow it to warm up, and ran the carburetor heat before departing. The climb to cruise at 2,000 ft was normal. The pilot reported that, about 10 miles from the departure airport, the engine started to run "rough" and that he applied carburetor heat. When this did not have any effect on engine performance, he decided to return to the departure airport. He added that, during the return, the engine "power was very poor" and that the airplane was losing altitude rapidly. The pilot spotted a clear field nearby and performed a soft-field landing approach. Upon landing, the gear dug into the soft plowed field. The airplane continued forward on its belly, which resulted in substantial damage. The weather conditions were conducive to the accumulation of serious icing at any power setting. Although the pilot reported that he used carburetor heat, it is likely that the ice had already accumulated to the degree that the carburetor heat was insufficient to melt the ice and restore full engine power. An examination of the airplane and engine did not reveal any preimpact anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power due to carburetor icing and the subsequent forced landing on a rough/soft field.

On December 3, 2016, about 0851 eastern standard time, an Arion Aircraft LLC, Lightning LS-1 airplane, N218D, impacted soft terrain during a forced landing following an inflight loss of engine power near Goshen, Indiana. The pilot and his passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial fuselage damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which did not operate on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Goshen Municipal Airport (GSH), near Goshen, Indiana, about 0840 and was destined for the Ankeny Regional Airport (IKV), near Ankeny, Iowa.

According to the pilot, he contacted the flight service station for a weather briefing along his route of flight to IKV. He conducted a preflight inspection of the airplane. About 0825, the pilot loaded the airplane and started it to allow it to warm up. About 0830, the airplane was taxied to runway 27. The pilot performed flight checks that allowed the operating temperatures to continue to warm and he "ran the carburetor heat again just prior to departing." About 0835, he departed from the runway on a 270 heading. The climb to cruise at 2,000 feet was normal and he subsequently transitioned to cruise. About 9 to 10 nautical miles from GSH the engine started to run "rough" and the pilot applied carburetor heat. This did not improve engine performance, so he decided to return to GSH where he started to line up for a downwind for runway 27. The engine continued to sputter with carburetor heat applied. Engine "power was very poor" and the airplane was losing altitude rapidly. The pilot then thought that the airplane may be able to make runway 9. He subsequently realized the airplane was too low for that approach and with little power, the airplane would not be able to make the field where it would end up in the trees or fence short of runway 9. The pilot spotted a clear field that he could turn into and have an up wind landing. He called common traffic advisory frequency at GSH about 0852 and announce a mayday call that indicated where the airplane was landing. The pilot performed a soft field landing approach and slowed as much as possible heading back on 270 heading. He knew that the fields were recently tilled and would be very soft and muddy due to recent rains. The pilot attempted to fly just above the surface as long as possible and keeping the nose up. On landing the gear dug into the very soft plowed field and the airplane continued forward on its belly. The pilot indicated that it was a very short amount of time from when he "called in and actually landed the plane."

At 0853, the recorded weather at GSH was: Wind 260 degrees at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition overcast clouds at 2,800 feet; temperature 1 degree C; dew point -3 degrees C; altimeter 30.33 inches of mercury.

The temperature and dew point spread were plotted on a carburetor icing probability chart. Their intersection was within the serious icing at any power setting envelope.

A Federal Aviation Administration Inspector conducted an on-scene investigation of the accident airplane. He established flight control continuity existed. He observed that the fuel filters, one for each tank, were mounted in the aircraft cabin under the seats. The filters appeared clean and contained a liquid consistent with 100 low lead aviation gasoline. Some engine components sustained impact damage and the engine could not be test run. However, no preimpact anomalies were detected.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA048
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, December 03, 2016 in Goshen, IN
Aircraft: ARION AIRCRAFT LLC LIGHTNING LS-1, registration: N218D
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 3, 2016, about 0851 eastern standard time, an Arion Aircraft LLC, Lightning LS-1 airplane, N218D, impacted soft terrain during a forced landing following an inflight loss of engine power near Goshen, Indiana. The pilot and his passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial fuselage damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which did not operate on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Goshen Municipal Airport (GSH), near Goshen, Indiana, about 0840 and was destined for the Ankeny Regional Airport (IKV), near Ankeny, Iowa.

According to the pilot, he contacted the flight service station for a weather briefing along his route of flight to IKV. He conducted a preflight inspection of the airplane. About 0825, the pilot loaded the airplane and started it to allow it to warm up. About 0830, the airplane was taxied to runway 27. The pilot performed flight checks that allowed the operating temperatures to continue to warm and he "ran the carburetor heat again just prior to departing." About 0835, he departed from the runway on a 270 heading. The climb to cruise at 2,000 feet was normal and he subsequently transitioned to cruise. About 9 to 10 nautical miles from GSH the engine started to run "rough" and the pilot applied carburetor heat. This did not improve engine performance, so he decided to return to GSH where he started to line up for a downwind for runway 27. The engine continued to sputter with carburetor heat applied. Engine "power was very poor" and the airplane was losing altitude rapidly. The pilot then thought that the airplane may be able to make runway 9. He subsequently realized the airplane was too low for that approach and with little power, the airplane would not be able to make the field where it would end up in the trees or fence short of runway 9. The pilot spotted a clear field that he could turn into and have an up wind landing. He called common traffic advisory frequency at GSH about 0852 and announce a mayday call that indicated where the airplane was landing. The pilot performed a soft field landing approach and slowed as much as possible heading back on 270 heading. He knew that the fields were recently tilled and would be very soft and muddy due to recent rains. The pilot attempted to fly just above the surface as long as possible and keeping the nose up. On landing the gear dug into the very soft plowed field and the airplane continued forward on its belly. The pilot indicated that it was a very short amount of time from when he "called in and actually landed the plane."

At 0853, the recorded weather at GSH was: Wind 260 degrees at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition overcast clouds at 2,800 feet; temperature 1 degree C; dew point -3 degrees C; altimeter 30.33 inches of mercury.

The temperature and dew point spread were plotted on a carburetor icing probability chart. Their intersection was within the serious icing at any power setting envelope.

A Federal Aviation Administration Inspector conducted an on-scene investigation of the accident airplane. He established flight control continuity existed. He observed that the fuel filters, one for each tank, were mounted in the aircraft cabin under the seats. The filters appeared clean and contained a liquid consistent with 100 low lead aviation gasoline. Some engine components sustained impact damage and the engine could not be test run. However, no preimpact anomalies were detected.

Rans S-19, N812X: Incident occurred June 28, 2017 and incident occurred December 04, 2016 at Marshfield Municipal Airport (KGHG), Plymouth County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

http://registry.faa.gov/N812X

Aircraft landed and ground looped.

Date: 28-JUN-17
Time: 13:00:00Z
Regis#: N812X
Aircraft Make: RANS
Aircraft Model: S19
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MARSHFIELD
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aircraft landed and ground looped.

Date: 04-DEC-16

Time: 15:15:00Z
Regis#: N812X
Aircraft Make: RANS
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MARSHFIELD
State: Massachusetts

Beech A45, N8056E: Incident occurred December 04, 2016 in Middletown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N8056E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Harrisburg FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, MIDDLETOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 

Date: 04-DEC-16
Time: 15:31:00Z
Regis#: N8056E
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 45
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MIDDLETOWN
State: Pennsylvania










Piaggio P-149D, Carolina Warbird Services LLC, N149LT: Incident occurred December 03, 2016 in Rock Hill, York County, South Carolina

CAROLINA WARBIRD SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N149LT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT PROPELLER STRUCK A RUNWAY LIGHT, ROCK HILL, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Date: 03-DEC-16
Time: 14:35:00Z
Regis#: N149LT
Aircraft Make: PIAGGIO
Aircraft Model: P149
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: ROCK HILL
State: South Carolina

Mooney M20F Executive, N6737N: Accident occurred December 04, 2016 in Yankton, South Dakota

http://registry.faa.gov/N6737N

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Rapid City FSDO-27

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, YANKTON, SOUTH DAKOTA 

Date: 04-DEC-16
Time: 19:10:00Z
Regis#: N6737N
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20F
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: YANKTON
State: South Dakota

Cessna 182A Skylane, Jump Planes Etc LLC, N3917D: Incident occurred December 03, 2016 in Morgantown, West Virginia

JUMP PLANES ETC LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3917D

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Charleston FSDO-09

AIRCRAFT WHILE PARKING, STRUCK A FENCE, MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA 

Date: 03-DEC-16
Time: 19:49:00Z
Regis#: N3917D
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: MORGANTOWN
State: West Virginia

Boeing 737-700, Southwest Airlines, N290WN: Incident occurred December 04, 2016 at Memphis International Airport (KMEM), Tennessee

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES CO: http://registry.faa.gov/N290WN 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Memphis FSDO-21

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES FLIGHT SWA486 BOEING 737 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ON DEPARTURE, SUSTAINED BIRDSTRIKE DAMAGE, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, NO INJURIES, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE. 

Date: 05-DEC-16
Time: 01:40:00Z
Regis#: SWA486
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: SWA-Southwest Airlines
Flight Number: SWA486
City: MEMPHIS
State: Tennessee