Monday, August 15, 2016

Airline Industry Seeks Crackdown on ‘Rogue’ Battery Shipments

The world’s main airline trade groups and European and U.S. lithium battery makers are seeking tighter product-quality and sourcing enforcement, saying a ban on shipments in passenger airliners risks being extended to cargo carriers.

Governments need to enforce regulations more strictly against “rogue producers and exporters,” and impose stiffer penalties on companies that put shipments of improperly tested batteries on cargo aircraft, the International Air Transport Association, International Air Cargo Association and three manufacturers’ or shipping lobbies said Monday in a joint statement.

“We’ve had regulations in place for a long time, and they’re regularly strengthened but the frustration is the failure of some states to step in and enforce the regulations,” said Dave Brennan, an assistant director at IATA for cargo safety and standards, said by phone from the group’s Geneva headquarters. In some countries, manufacturing is outpacing overseers’ ability to check standards, while some nations’ aviation authorities lack the legal means to impose fines without going to court, he said.

Growth of worldwide shipments of lithium-ion batteries, which power devices such as smartphones, laptops and toys, is projected to average 20 percent annually for the next decade or so after reaching about $16 billion last year. Three freighter blazes have been linked to lithium battery shipments, including the crash of a Boeing Co. 747 freighter in Dubai in 2010 that killed two United Parcel Service pilots.

The United Nations’ air-industry regulator, the International Civil Aviation Organization, banned any shipments of rechargeable lithium batteries as cargo on passenger planes earlier this year, following a warning in mid-2015 by aircraft manufacturers Boeing Co. and Airbus Group SE. The interim prohibition is in force while ICAO works on a new lithium-battery package-performance standard, expected by 2018. Non-rechargeable versions were already banned in 2004.

While smaller incidents involving lithium ion batteries must be reported to civil aviation regulators, both in the country where the airline is registered, and in the country from which the shipment came, they’re not necessarily publicized, IATA’s Brennan said.

“Airlines don’t necessarily tell us: they tend to be fairly reluctant at sharing the information,”’ he said. “They don’t want anything out in the public arena suggesting they carry dangerous goods, even though the blame isn’t with the airline itself.”

Source: http://www.bloomberg.com

Baby Great Lakes, N110MD: Accident occurred September 03, 2016 in Mazama, Okanogan County, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


http://registry.faa.gov/N110MD


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA485
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 03, 2016 in Mazama, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: DORMAIER MONTE R BABY GREAT LAKES, registration: N110MD
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation Safety Inspector that responded to the accident site reported that the pilot of the experimental, amateur built, tailwheel landing gear-equipped bi-plane reported to the inspector, that during the takeoff roll the bi-plane drifted off the left side of the turf and gravel runway.

The pilot reported that after he had completed his engine run-up and all indications were normal, he lightly applied power and began his takeoff roll from a concrete pad at the approach end of the runway. He reported to the inspector that the bi-plane began to drift to the left and he did not feel as though he had rudder authority, so he added more power with the intent to increase the airflow over the rudder, but the torque from the added power exacerbated the loss of control. 

The bi-plane drifted further left, exited the runway, and struck a post that supported a satellite dish and subsequently struck a tree. The bi-plane sustained substantial damage to the four wings and the fuselage. The pilot reported to the inspector that in hindsight it would have been better to abort the takeoff.

The FAA Inspector reported that during the airplane examination he did not find any evidence of aircraft system or component failure prior to the impact. 

The NTSB Investigator-in-charge attempted to contact the pilot on multiple occasions to no avail. The pilot did not submit the NTSB Form 6120.1. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the takeoff roll, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Fatal accident occurred August 14, 2016 near Fort Atkinson Municipal Airport (61C), Jefferson County, Wisconsin

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13

Date: 14-AUG-16
Time: 14:42:00Z
Regis#: UNKNOWN
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Serious
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: FORT ATKINSON
State: Wisconsin

ULTRALIGHT, UNKNOWN REGISTRATION MAKE MODEL, CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, 1 MILE FROM FORT ATKINSON, WISCONSIN.






JEFFERSON — A 63-year-old Janesville man died after his ultralight aircraft lost power and crashed just after taking off from the Fort Atkinson Municipal Airport Sunday morning.

The 9:42 a.m. crash took place at W5797 Wendorf Lane in the Town of Jefferson, south of the airport.

The pilot, Ronald Norton was alone in the plane, according to the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office. He died from injuries sustained in the crash early Monday morning at UW Hospital in Madison.

Sheriff’s office Capt. Jerry Haferman said Norton reportedly departed from the Fort Atkinson airport and was experiencing engine problems, so he attempted to glide the aircraft to a smooth field.

“Witnesses said they had seen the ultralight and it looks like one of the wings tipped downward and saw it fall to the ground,” Haferman said.

Town of Jefferson resident John Mansavage said he saw the incident from his home.

A former pilot himself, Mansavage regularly observes planes taking off from the airport flying over his home.

“There was no wind and, in fact, it was a perfect morning to be out in an airplane,” he said. “As it was taking off, it came right over the house. I looked up and I thought, ‘that thing is kind of low and loud.’ Suddenly there was a change in the sound of the engine.”

Mansavage said the engine was not sputtering, but actually appeared to have revved up.

The aircraft was out over the Rock River and banked, apparently intent on heading back toward the airport.

“It struck me as odd how quickly it lost altitude,” Man­savage said. “ It kind of went down like a brick.”

From his point of view, he said, the aircraft was not likely much higher than 500 feet.

Mansavage said the ultralight still was climbing from takeoff when the event happened and it engaged in the turn.

While he had no direct vantage point of the crash due to trees and it being across the river, he heard it.

“You can’t erase that sound hearing the impact,” Mansavage said. “I did not see it because of the trees, but I saw it go down. It takes few seconds to process what happened. That will kind of ruin your morning.”

Mansavage called 911 to alert emergency personnel to the incident.

When the aircraft crashed striking a tree, it caught on fire, about 50 feet from a nearby home on Wendorf Lane.

Haferman said Norton was able to extricate himself from the wreckage.

In addition to Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office dep­uties, Fort Atkinson Fire Department Rescue Squad, Ryan Brothers Ambulance Service and the Fort Memorial Hospital paramedic unit responded to the scene.

Fort Atkinson Fire Department Lt. Dion Brown said when firefighters arrived on scene, the aircraft was engulfed in flames.

“We set up a hose line to put that out,” he said.

Ryan Brothers and the paramedics were treating Norton.

Based on the assessment of his injuries, which included extensive burns, Med-Flight was contacted to respond directly to Fort Memorial Hospital and transfer Norton to UW Hospital in Madison where he died early Monday morning.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Bureau were contacted. At presstime, it had not been determined whether the FAA and NTSB would be responding to the investigation or if it would be handled by the sheriff’s office.

Source:   http://www.dailyunion.com






JEFFERSON COUNTY —  Jefferson County Sheriff’s officials say a pilot has died after his ultralight airplane crashed and caught fire on Sunday, August 14th. The victim has been identified as 63-year-old Ronald Norton of Janesville.

The crash occurred on CTH K, south of Fort Atkinson Municipal Airport around 9:40 a.m.

Authorities say Norton began experiencing engine problems after taking off from the Fort Atkinson Municipal Airport. Norton attempted to glide the ultralight to a smooth field, but was unable to and crashed to the ground. The ultralight then caught fire.

Officials say Norton was able to extricate himself from the ultralight. He was transported to the Fort Atkinson Hospital and then to UW Madison Hospital.

Norton died early Monday morning, August 15th.

The crash remains under investigation.

Source:   http://fox6now.com

Pilatus PC-12/45, Boutique Air, N512NG: Incident occurred August 14, 2016 in Salt Lake City, Utah

TARGARYEN LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N512NG

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

N512NG BOUTIQUE AIR FLIGHT BTQ905 PILATUS PC12 AIRCRAFT, ON LANDING, NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.

Date: 15-AUG-16
Time: 02:02:00Z
Regis#: N512NG
Aircraft Make: PILATUS
Aircraft Model: PC12
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: On Demand
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Flight Number: BTQ905
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: Utah

Cessna 150A, N7157X: Accident occurred August 15, 2016 in North Conway, Carroll County, New Hampshire

http://registry.faa.gov/N7157X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-65



NTSB Identification: GAA16CA432
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 15, 2016 in North Conway, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/22/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N7157X
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while en-route to his destination airport, he saw a "small area of rain" ahead. He further reported that he "circled around for a while" awaiting for the weather to clear, but during the circling he "ran out of fuel" and the engine lost power. Subsequently, the pilot landed in a corn field and the airplane nosed over.

The firewall sustained substantial damage. 

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper fuel management, which resulted in fuel exhaustion, a total loss of engine power, a forced landing, and nose over.

CONWAY — The owner of the Cessna 150 airplane that plopped down in a North Conway cornfield Monday morning said he had rented out the plane to a pilot who crashed it because he ran out of gas.

The owner, Florian Corriveau, 73, of Whitefield, was busy Tuesday at the site trying to remove the plane.

No one was injured during the emergency landing following a loss of engine power, according to a statement from the Federal Aviation Administration, which is conducting an investigation of the crash.

The plane landed at 10:35 a.m. in the cornfield behind Dunkin' Donuts north of Echo Acres Road, according to neighbors who heard the plane flying low and the FAA, which did not release the pilot's name.

The plane is a single-engine fixed-wing model that was manufactured in 1961.

On Tuesday afternoon, Corriveau provided few details while disassembling the plane, which was going to be loaded onto a trailer for its trip back to Whitefield.

"I'm going to try and get this out of here before the rain starts up," said Corriveau, explaining he didn't have much time to chat.

About a dozen people were at the field, including federal and state investigators; North Conway Fire Chief Pat Preece; a friend of Corriveau's, David Presby of Whitefield; and several staff members of a company he owns, Presby Environmental, who were helping Corriveau remove the plane.

Presby said a few other people just showed up and offered to help.

An online search shows that Corriveau is president of a company called Roll-In-Aero based out of Whitefield. Online paperwork with the New Hampshire Secretary of State's Office says the company does flight instruction, fuel sales, charter flights and aerial photography. The company was formed in 1990.

Corriveau declined to give the name of the pilot who had rented the plane to him but did say the pilot had run out of gas.

No one was reported injured in the crash, which flipped the plane over on its roof, and Corriveau said he believes the pilot is doing fine.

However, he said he wasn't sure if the airplane was salvageable and would find out more once it was taken apart.

Corriveau said he's been flying since 1960.

Investigators at the scene wouldn't comment and referred the reporter to the FAA's public relations office, which had no new information to offer at press time.

Presby said he was there to help his friend Corriveau get the plane out of the field. He said they were in the process of taking the wings off the plane and would put the main body of the plane on one trailer, the wings on another trailer, and then haul it away and reassemble it elsewhere.

Presby said he was confident the plane could be fixed. He has helped recover six or seven airplanes in his life.

"It's not all that badly damaged," he said. "I've seen a whole lot worse."

He said the plane weighs less than 1,000 pounds and could be loaded onto a standard trailer.

The plane was upside-down when they arrived but he and his crew were able to pick up the plane by hand and roll it over.

"It looks big, but it's really light," he said.

Presby said there wasn't much fluid leakage because the plane was out of gas.

He said he and his crew were helping his old friend gratis since Corriveau has been a good friend for 15 years. 

"He said, 'I got a problem,' and I said 'I'll go help you,' and here I am," said Presby.

Presby believes the pilot was coming back from Pennsylvania. 

David Cullinan, manager of Eastern Slopes Regional Airport in Fryeburg, Maine, said the pilot had practiced take offs and landings at the airport on Monday but added that the pilot didn't get out of the plane in Fryeburg.

Cullinan said "fuel exhaustion" is not unheard of. He said that can be caused by an undetected fuel leak or complacency. He said airplane fuel evaporates quickly.

"It happens," he said.

Source:   http://www.conwaydailysun.com

NORTH CONWAY — Rescue crews are on scene of plane crash that happened at 10:35 a.m. Monday.

There were no injuries reported after the Cessna 150 airplane landed in a field near North Conway.

The FAA is investigating the crash. The aircraft is registered as a fixed wing, single-engine aircraft owned by Florian J. Corriveau, of Whitefield.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board records, the plane crashed before in 1969 when the pilot overshot a runway in Rochester. The pilot is not named in that incident but the report does give the pilot's age as 19 at that time.

Source:  http://www.nh1.com

NORTH CONWAY - A Cessna 150A registered to a North Country man lost power and crash landed about 10:35 a.m. Monday in a field off West Side Road.

Jim Peters of the Federal Aviation Administration said his agency is investigating. He said the plane is registered to Florian J. Corriveau of Whitefield.

No injuries were reported and the scene has been cordoned off. Not even the media is being allowed to approach, according to a representative of the Conway Police Department.

The fixed-wing, single-engine Cessna is 45 years old, according to FAA records.

Source:   http://www.unionleader.com

Eurocopter AS-350B-2, Air Methods Corp, N125LN: Incident occurred August 14, 2016 in Marietta, Cobb County, Georgia

AIR METHODS CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N125LN

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

Date: 14-AUG-16
Time: 23:47:00Z
Regis#: N125LN
Aircraft Make: EUROCOPTER
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MARIETTA
State: Georgia

N125LN EUROCOPTER AS 350 ROTORCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN THE GRASS AREA OFF THE RUNWAY, MARIETTA, GEORGIA.

Bellanca 7ECA, Wild River Flying Club Inc., N50437: Accident occurred August 14, 2016 in Lino Lakes, Anoka County, Minnesota

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA324
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 14, 2016 in Lino Lakes, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7ECA, registration: N50437
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot and flight instructor were performing a recurrent training flight in the tailwheel-equipped airplane. Both pilots reported that the takeoff roll and acceleration on the 1,900-ft grass runway seemed normal. As the airplane approached the predetermined decision point, they decided to continue the takeoff. The airplane became airborne near the end of the runway, and the wheels contacted vegetation past the departure end. The airplane slowed, settled into a marshy area, and came to rest inverted. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane and engine revealed no mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Review of the airplane's performance data indicated that, under the conditions present at the time of the accident, the airplane’s ground run would be about 546 ft, and the distance to clear a 50-ft obstacle would be about 1,192 ft. However, review of carburetor icing probability charts indicated the potential for moderate icing at cruise power, and serious icing at descent power. The flight instructor reported that, during the takeoff roll, the carburetor heat was off. Thus, it is likely that carburetor ice accumulated during taxi and run-up before the takeoff, which resulted in a loss of engine power and reduced takeoff performance.  

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power due to the formation of carburetor ice, which resulted in reduced climb capability and impact with vegetation and terrain during takeoff.

WILD RIVER FLYING CLUB INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N50437

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA324
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 14, 2016 in Lino Lakes, MN
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7ECA, registration: N50437
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 14, 2016, about 1420 central daylight time, a Bellanca 7ECA, N50437, collided with swampy terrain and nosed over during takeoff at Surfside Airport (MN24), Lino Lakes, Minnesota. The two pilots aboard were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by Wild River Flying Club, Saint Croix Falls, Wisconsin, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident, and was destined for Osceola (KOEO), Wisconsin.

According to the pilots, the takeoff roll seemed normal. The airplane's wheels brushed the bushes at the departure end of the runway. Unable to climb, the airplane landed in a marshy area off the end of the runway and nosed over.

Cessna 180, N180SB: Incident occurred August 14, 2016 in Healdsburg, Sonoma County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N180SB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oakland FSDO-27


Date: 14-AUG-16

Time: 03:30:00Z
Regis#: N180SB
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 180
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HEALDSBURG
State: California

DURING AN ATTEMPT TO HAND CRANK THE PROPELLER, THE ENGINE STARTED AND MOVED ACROSS THE RAMP.


AIRCRAFT LANDED WITH CHUTE DEPLOYED. 

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP.

Cessna 172K Skyhawk, N78242: Accident occurred August 14, 2016 at Elton Hensley Memorial Airport (KFTT), Callaway County, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N78242


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA St. Louis FSDO-62


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA473 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 14, 2016 in Fulton, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N78242
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the initial touchdown he “got a bad bounce.” On the third bounce the nose wheel “gave way and the propeller impacted the ground.” 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3B (2016). This handbook discusses porpoising and states in part:

In a bounced landing that is improperly recovered, the airplane comes in nose first initiating a series of motions that imitate the jumps and dives of a porpoise. The problem is improper airplane attitude at touchdown, sometimes caused by inattention, not knowing where the ground is, miss-trimming or forcing the airplane onto the runway.

Ground effect decreases elevator control effectiveness and increases the effort required to raise the nose. Not enough elevator or stabilator trim can result in a nose low contact with the runway and a porpoise develops.

Porpoising can also be caused by improper airspeed control. Usually, if an approach is too fast, the airplane floats and the pilot tries to force it on the runway when the airplane still wants to fly. A gust of wind, a bump in the runway, or even a slight tug on the control wheel will send the air plane aloft again. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper landing flare and subsequent improper recovery from a bounced landing, which resulted in the airplane porpoising. 

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA473
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 14, 2016 in Fulton, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N78242
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the initial touchdown he "got a bad bounce". On the third bounce the nose wheel "gave way and the propeller impacted the ground".

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3B (2016). This handbook discusses porpoising and states in part:

In a bounced landing that is improperly recovered, the airplane comes in nose first initiating a series of motions that imitate the jumps and dives of a porpoise. The problem is improper airplane attitude at touchdown, sometimes caused by inattention, not knowing where the ground is, miss-trimming or forcing the airplane onto the runway.

Ground effect decreases elevator control effectiveness and increases the effort required to raise the nose. Not enough elevator or stabilator trim can result in a nose low contact with the runway and a porpoise develops.

Porpoising can also be caused by improper airspeed control. Usually, if an approach is too fast, the airplane floats and the pilot tries to force it on the runway when the airplane still wants to fly. A gust of wind, a bump in the runway, or even a slight tug on the control wheel will send the airplane aloft again.

Cessna C182RG, N2696C: Incident occurred August 14, 2016 -and- accident occurred February 04, 2012 Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (KCOS), Colorado

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
PETERSON AFB AERO CLUB

http://registry.faa.gov/N2696C

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

Date: 14-AUG-16
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N2696C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: COLORADO SPRINGS
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO

NTSB Identification: CEN12CA157 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 04, 2012 in Colorado Springs, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/02/2012
Aircraft: CESSNA R182, registration: N2696C
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was conducting a series of practice accuracy landings in preparation for a checkride. He reported that he inadvertently forgot to extend the landing gear. He added that he did not remember hearing the landing gear warning horn just before touchdown because he had allowed himself to become fixated on maneuvering the aircraft to the precise landing point. The airplane touched down on the runway surface with the landing gear retracted, which caused substantial damage to the fuselage structure. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions with the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot did not extend the landing gear before landing.


The Air Force and federal investigators are probing a Saturday incident that closed a runway at the Colorado Springs Airport.

Officials say a single-engine Cessna hit the runway with its landing gear retracted and skidded to a stop. The pilot, who sources said may have forgotten to deploy the gear, was unhurt. The pilot, who officials did not name, was the only person aboard the plane, said John McGinely, airport spokesman.

The plane was heavily damaged.

Firefighters were called the runway just after 2:20 p.m. as the plane, a Cessna Skylane, skidded over the concrete. The plane’s propeller slammed into runway, and the belly of the aircraft dragged sparks. The plane, though, did not catch fire.

The incident happened on a runway that wasn’t being used by commercial planes, so flights at the airport were not delayed. The runways at the airport are shared with neighboring Peterson Air Force Base.

The pilot had rented the Cessna from the Peterson Air Force Base Aero Club, McGinely said. In a news release, Peterson Air Force Base said the pilot landed with “an abnormal landing gear configuration on the airport’s runway 35-Right.”

“The 21st Space Wing’s Safety Office is conducting an investigation in concert with National Transportation Safety Board requirements,” the Air Force said.

The plane was hauled to a hangar, where investigators will examine it for evidence of what caused the belly-landing.

Peterson’s Aero Club is a recreation program run by the base that offers low-cost flight opportunities to military members and retirees. The Cessna that made the belly-landing and several like it are in frequent use at the airport as part of the program.

Piper PA-34-200T, Eli Air Center Inc., N8166U (and) Cessna 500 Citation 1, Strong Tower Services LLC Trustee, N70SW: Accident occurred August 13, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida

N8166U Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N8166U Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

N70SW  Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N70SW Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Eli Air Center Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N8166U

Strong Tower Services LLC Trustee: http://registry.faa.gov/N70SW


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA454A  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 34, registration: N8166U
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA454B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 500, registration: N70SW
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.


NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the parked airplane reported that he and his co-pilot had just re-entered the airplane and were having a conversation when he felt the airplane shake and heard a loud noise. He further reported that he looked out of the right window and saw an aircraft with its propeller hitting the right wing. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot of the other airplane reported that, after engine start and before taxi for takeoff, he was looking at his navigation communications and did not notice the airplane rolling forward. The airplane rolled forward and collided with the airplane in front of it. The pilot further reported that he was unaware of the airplane's forward movement and that the thought that the hand brake was fully engaged. The airplane sustained minor damage.

Neither pilot reported any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplanes that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to ensure that the brake was fully engaged and his subsequent failure to notice that his airplane was rolling forward, which resulted in it hitting another airplane.

**This report was modified on December 22, 2016. Please see the docket for this accident to view the original report.**

The pilot of the parked airplane reported that he and his co-pilot had just re-entered the airplane and were having a conversation when he felt the airplane shake and heard a loud noise. He further reported that he looked out of the right window and saw an aircraft with its propeller hitting the right wing. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot of the other airplane reported that, after engine start and before taxi for takeoff, he was looking at his navigation communications and did not notice the airplane rolling forward. The airplane rolled forward and collided with the airplane in front of it. The pilot further reported that he was unaware of the airplane's forward movement and that the thought that the hand brake was fully engaged. The airplane sustained minor damage.

Neither pilot reported any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplanes that would have precluded normal operation.

United Airbus A320-200, N431UA: Incident occurred August 13, 2016 in Denver, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N431UA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

Date: 13-AUG-16
Time: 12:22:00Z
Regis#: N431UA
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: UAL-United Airlines
Flight Number: UAL1618
City: DENVER
State: Colorado

N431UA UNITED AIRLINES FLIGHT UAL1618 AIRBUS A320 AIRCRAFT ON DEPARTURE, BIRDS WERE INGESTED INTO THE NUMBER ONE ENGINE, AIRCRAFT RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, DENVER, COLORADO.

Piper J3C-65, N24878: Incident occurred August 13, 2016 in Willmar, Kandiyohi County, Minnesota

http://registry.faa.gov/N24878

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15

Date: 13-AUG-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N24878
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: J3C
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
City: WILLMAR
State: Minnesota

AIRCRAFT DURING HAND-PROPPING, SPUN AROUND AND PROPELLER STRUCK THE GROUND, WILLMAR, MINNESOTA.

CarbonCub CCK-1865, N625EX: Accident occurred August 12, 2016 at Todds Strip Airport (5AK5), Wasilla, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA059 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 12, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/26/2017
Aircraft: WIGHT CARBON CUB CCK-1865, registration: N625EX
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight in the experimental amateur-built, tailwheel-equipped airplane. The pilot reported that, while landing on a turf and gravel airstrip, the airplane veered sharply left as the tailwheel touched down. Despite applying full right rudder and brake controls, the pilot was unable to correct the airplane’s track, and the right wing and horizontal stabilizer impacted the ground. The pilot stated that, after the airplane stopped, he was unable to straighten the tailwheel with the rudder control inputs because the tailwheel was bent. 

Postaccident metallurgical examination of the tailwheel suspension system revealed fractures within the welds of the assembly and a fatigue fracture at the bolt hole for mounting the tailwheel. The crack fracture surfaces exhibited orange and dark red corrosion, suggesting that the cracks were preexisting, and the fracture surfaces were consistent with overstress. The assembly also exhibited general twisting deformation, primarily as the result of deformation in the pivot bracket.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the tailwheel suspension assembly during landing due to preexisting fatigue fractures in the suspension system, which resulted in a loss of directional control.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N625EX

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA059
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 12, 2016 in Wasilla, AK
Aircraft: WIGHT CARBON CUB CCK-1865, registration: N625EX
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 12, 2016, about 1800 Alaska daylight time, a tundra tire-equipped, amateur-built, experimental, Wight (Cub Crafters) Carbon Cub CCK-1865 airplane, N625EX, sustained substantial damage while landing on runway 7 at Todds Strip Airport, a private airstrip situated near Wasilla, Alaska. The airline transport pilot and one passenger onboard were uninjured. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident for the flight that originated from Summit Airport, Summit, Alaska, about 1630, and was destined to Todds Strip Airport.

The pilot reported that his flight to the Todds Strip Airport, a 1,500-feet-long by 60-feet-wide turf and gravel-covered airstrip was uneventful. He added that while landing, during touchdown in a wheel landing configuration, the airplane veered sharply to the left as the tailwheel touched down. The pilot said he applied a "full deflection" of the right rudder and right brake controls in an attempt to correct the veer, but the airplane continued to veer left. The right wing and right horizontal stabilizer subsequently struck the ground, sustaining substantial damage. 

After the airplane stopped, the pilot unsuccessfully attempted to turn the airplane to the right using rudder, brake, and engine power. The pilot stated that he was unable to straighten the tail wheel with the rudder control inputs because the tail wheel was bent. The pilot reported that the airplane had a total time in service of 96 hours. The airplane tailwheel spring had been replaced with a coil spring assembly that was not part of the original airplane kit manufacturer's assembly, which was a leaf spring. The coil spring was an Alaskan Bushwheels T3 Heavy Duty tailwheel suspension system with a reported total time in service of 30 hours. 

Alaskan Bushwheels T3 Heavy Duty tailwheel suspension system underwent a post-accident metallurgical examination by the National Transportation Safety Board Materials Laboratory. The examination revealed that the underside of the flange used to mount the suspension to the airframe exhibited compression deformation under the faying surfaces of the bolt head washer.

Cracks were observed in weld deposits and at the edge of the bolt hole for mounting the tail wheel. The crack fracture surfaces exhibited orange and dark red corrosion product. The dark red coloration of the corrosion deposits suggested that these cracks were pre-existing to the accident. After removal of the corrosion product, the fracture surfaces were examined with a 5X to 50X stereo-zoom microscope. The fractographic features were consistent with overstress fracture.

The crack emanating from the edge of the bolt hole was examined. After removal of superficial orange-colored corrosion product, the fracture surface of the bolt hole crack was examined with a 5X to 50X stereo-zoom microscope. The fracture initiated and propagated due to fatigue before transitioning to overstress.

The edges of the main side plates of the suspension assembly exhibited deformation and impact wear scars. The location of the scars on the side plates is consistent with contact with the airplane's tail wheel steering arms.

The pivot bracket exhibited permanent deformation and edge cracking in the region of the welded-in-place bushing as indicated in the close views. A though-thickness crack on the right side was opened for examination of the fracture surface. After removal of orange-colored corrosion product, the fracture surface of the crack was examined with a 5X to 50X stereo-zoom microscope. The fractographic features were consistent with overstress fracture.

A weld along the radiused bend in the pivot bracket exhibited a partial thickness crack in the base metal adjacent to the toe of the weld.

The suspension assembly exhibited general twisting deformation, primarily as the result of deformation in the pivot bracket.

Consolidated Vultee BT-13A, N53331: Accident occurred August 12, 2016 in Joseph, Wallowa County, Oregon

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board  - Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N53331

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boise FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA429
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 13, 2016 in Joseph, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: CONSOLIDATED VULTEE BT13, registration: N53331
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll he lost directional control, which resulted in a ground loop to the left, a runway excursion, both main landing gear collapse, and substantial damage to the airplane's left aileron and elevator.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion and damage to the left aileron and elevator.

Jetblue Airbus A320-200, N632JB: Incident occurred August 11, 2016 in Rapid City, South Dakota

It sounds like a flight from hell. 

JetBlue Airways Flight 429 from Boston to Sacramento last Aug. 11 took off at 6 p.m. on a Thursday for what should have been a six-and-a-half hour trip. Instead, the plane hit violent turbulence that forced an emergency landing in Rapid City, S.D., and sent 24 passengers and three crew members to a local hospital for treatment.

“All of a sudden, the plane just dropped,” passenger Christopher De Vries told The Bee at the time. “It dropped fast enough so that things just flew up in the air.

“I just saw laptops, candy and soda splashing onto the ceiling.”

Now, the incident is the subject of two lawsuits in federal court in Sacramento, the most recent filed Wednesday on behalf of two passengers who say they suffered neck and other injuries that require medical treatment to this day.

The latest lawsuit, filed by Michelle Hill, a Sacramento County resident, and Ariel Epstein Pollack, a Yolo County woman, alleges that the JetBlue crew “disregarded the threat of a major thunderstorm over South Dakota.”

“JetBlue then flew Flight 429 directly into that thunderstorm,” the lawsuit claims. “During this time, JetBlue chose not to advise its Flight 429 passengers to stay seated with seatbelts fastened.

“As a consequence, the thunderstorm’s sudden and severe turbulence threw passengers repeatedly about the cabin and into the ceiling. Many passengers and crew were unrestrained.”

Michelle Hill was one of those, the lawsuit says. Hill was returning from the restroom and had sat down but not yet strapped on her seatbelt when the plane hit turbulence and “she flew up and hit her head on the ceiling,” the lawsuit says.

Ariel Pollack had her seatbelt on and was sleeping at the time, but when the turbulence hit “she flew out of her seat and slammed back down with a great force.”

“Only after the aircraft had flown into the severe weather did flight attendants announce to the passengers to be seated and fasten seatbelts,” the lawsuit says.

Lawyers for Hill and Pollack did not immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday, but the lawsuit describes both passengers as suffering severe injuries.

Hill “could not move her neck and was in shock from the trauma,” the suit says, and continues to suffer from head and neck pain, mental stress and nightmares and has been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder.

Pollack had undergone spinal fusion surgery six months prior to the flight and, after hitting the turbulence, had such pain that “her lower and mid back felt like it was on fire,” the lawsuit says.

JetBlue declined to comment, saying in an email that “we do not comment on pending litigation.”

But the airline has disputed similar claims in a suit filed a month after the incident. In that suit, JetBlue says in court papers that it adheres to Federal Aviation Administration safety guidelines and that the airline will argue at trial that the “alleged injuries” were not caused by the airline “but were caused by the comparative fault of the plaintiff(s).”

The first lawsuit was filed on behalf of passenger Xuan Thi Phan, a Sacramento County woman who was injured when she got up to go to the restroom, according to that lawsuit.

Phan’s lawsuit says the seatbelt sign was not on when she stood up and that when the plane hit the turbulence she fell, then was tossed up into the air and slammed into the ceiling, then fell again.

“As she was thrown downward, she again struck her head and shoulder,” her lawsuit says. “A door of the overhead bin broke ... loose and hit (Phan) on the head.”

Phan’s injuries continue to cause her pain, dizziness, memory problems and difficulty concentrating, her suit says.

Both lawsuits were filed by Elk Grove attorney Glenn Guenard. The Phan lawsuit also lists the Seattle law firm of Friedman Rubin, which advertises on its website that its efforts “representing plane crash victims, commercial airline passengers, pilots, flight attendants and helicopter crash victims has been nationally recognized.”

“It has resulted in obtaining millions of dollars in compensation for injured clients,” the site says.

The firm’s website apparently got under JetBlue’s corporate skin in the Phan lawsuit, with the company’s attorneys complaining that Friedman Rubin is using the lawsuit “as a marketing tool” to attract more clients.

JetBlue complained in court papers that “the day after filing the lawsuit,” Friedman Rubin posted a notice saying it was leading the litigation against JetBlue and “if you were injured on a flight, anywhere in the United States, contact Friedman Rubin and tell us your story.”

“This is an abuse of litigation and discovery and it should not be tolerated by the court,” JetBlue’s attorneys argued in court papers objecting to efforts to add Hill and Pollack to the Phan suit.

Friedman Rubin answered by noting JetBlue’s “vehement opposition” and wrote that Hill and Pollack would later file their own lawsuit.

That came Wednesday, with the two passengers saying in their suit that JetBlue did not provide up-to-date weather information to the crew, did not warn passengers of the massive thunderstorm ahead and flew “the aircraft straight into it.”

A preliminary report on the incident filed by the National Transportation Safety Board on Dec. 8 found that the flight “encountered turbulence in cruise flight...while maneuvering to avoid convective weather.”

“As a result of the turbulence, three flight attendants and 24 passengers received minor injuries,” the NTSB reported. “The remaining 124 passengers and crew were not injured.

“The airplane received minor damage.”


http://www.sacbee.com

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident. 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota

Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N632JB

NTSB Identification: DCA16IA215
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of JetBlue Airways
Incident occurred Thursday, August 11, 2016 in Wood, SD
Aircraft: AIRBUS A320 232, registration: N632JB
Injuries: 27 Minor, 124 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On August 11, 2016, about 2009 central daylight time, JetBlue Airways flight 429, an Airbus A320, N632JB, encountered turbulence in cruise flight at FL320 while maneuvering to avoid convective weather. As a result of the turbulence, three flight attendants and 24 passengers received minor injuries. The remaining 124 passengers and crew were not injured. The airplane received minor damage. The flight crew declared an emergency and diverted to Rapid City Regional Airport (RAP), Rapid City, South Dakota. The regularly scheduled passenger flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 from Logan International Airport (BOS), Boston, Massachusetts, to Sacramento International Airport (SMF), Sacramento, California.