Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Cessna 150M, N9492U: Fatal accident occurred September 09, 2019 in Whitehall, Muskegon County, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N9492U

Location: WHITEHALL, MI
Accident Number: CEN19LA308
Date & Time: 09/09/2019, 1140 EDT
Registration: N9492U
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 9, 2019, about 1140 eastern daylight time (EDT), a Cessna C-150 airplane, N9492U, impacted a water tower in Whitehall, Michigan. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by the impact and a post crash fire. The airplane was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported at the accident site at the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from Fremont Municipal Airport (FFX), Fremont, Michigan, about 1115.

According to local law enforcement officials, witnesses observed the airplane flying straight and level prior to impact with a 180 ft tall municipal water tower. The witnesses also reported the engine appeared to be operating normally at a high power setting when the impact occurred.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N9492U
Model/Series: 150 M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Fremont, MI (FFX)
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.405556, -86.335556 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

James Joseph Laird 

Laird, James 11/20/1939 - 9/9/2019
Twin Lake 

James Laird, age 79, passed away unexpectedly doing what he loved to do on September 9th, 2019. He was born in Muskegon, MI on November 20, 1939 to Galen & Henrietta (Fortenbacher) Laird. He married the former Carol Schultz and then married Janice Mabrey Wisniewski. Mr. Laird had been owner/operator at Laird Heating and Cooling. 

James liked flying planes, model trains & his dog, Dutch. 

SURVIVORS 
Wife, Janice; Sons, Jeff (Deb) Laird of Blue Lake & Brian (Patti) Laird of Whitehall; step- daughters, Lynn Lindsey & Staci Boike; grandsons, Kyle Laird, Dustin Laird, Matt (Jenna) Laird, Devon (Matt) Cowles & Austin Boike; great grandchildren; sisters-in-law, Marge Laird & Rosemary Laird; nephew, Bob Laird & other nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; brothers, William & Robert; sister, Mary Margaret & step son, Steve. 

SERVICE 
According to Jim's wishes there will be no services. 
Please visit www.clockfuneralhome.com to leave a memory.





A private plane struck the Whitehall water tower near the intersection of Warner St. and Sophia St. at 11:42 a.m. Monday, September 9th, killing the pilot.

By later Monday the name of the deceased pilot was released. He was James Joseph Laird, age 79 of Twin Lake.

Family members were at the crash site while remains of the plane were removed.

A son, Brian Laird, said his dad had flown for many years, and he kept his airplane at the Fremont airport. "We're in the dark about what happened," he said.

The crash occurred across the road from the main Whitehall District Schools campus which includes the middle school, the football stadium and community center with pre-school. Also next to the water tower are the school baseball and softball fields.

The plane burst into flames upon impact, according to witnesses.

The plane wreckage was mostly contained within the boundary fence surrounding the water tower. The wheels were found on Sophia Street and smaller parts were scattered in nearby yards and grassy areas.

A small dent and scorch mark can be seen on the water tower where it was struck.

Whitehall schools immediately alerted parents about the incident and that their children were safe. However, it is believed some children on the football field and preschool playground witnessed the crash.

Whitehall Police Chief Roger Squiers said all public safety departments in the area responded to the scene, and a White Lake Fire Authority member was first on the scene.

Squiers said the flames were quickly extinguished.

White Lake Fire Authority Chief Gregory Holman said WLFA, Montague Fire and Blue Lake Twp were dispatched to the scene at 11:42 a.m. "Montague and Blue Lake are on automatic aid for a scenario like that," Holman explained.

The chief said the WLFA initiated the fire attack and Montague was quickly on the scene to supply WLFA's mini-pumper.

Dalton Township and Norton Shores fire departments reached out to provide command assistance.

Because the fire was extinguished quickly, Holman said Blue Lake was moved to the WLFA Station One to provide coverage while WLFA was on the airplane crash scene. Blue Lake was released at 3 p.m., and had responded to calls during that time.

Holman said Norton Shores was helpful because it deals with air traffic control at the Muskegon County Airport and has resources.

Norton Shores and Central Dispatch helped contact outside agencies like the Federal Aviation Administration for an investigation, and the Medical Examiner to official declare the pilot deceased.

The WLFA chief said that once the fire was extinguished their efforts turned to blocking out outside traffic and preserving the scene by marking location of debris.

Firefighters also helped remove the body from the wreckage for the Medical Examiner.

Law enforcement at the scene were the Whitehall and Montague city police, Muskegon County Sheriff's Department and the Michigan State Police.

Emergency Medical Services were provided by Pro-Med and White Lake Ambulance Authority.

The Muskegon County Emergency Services also provided support.

The local McDonalds restaurant sent over cheeseburgers and French Fries for first responders who were at the crash scene.

"It was a unified incident command," the fire chief said. "It was a very great joint effort from law enforcement, EMS, fire and even Whitehall DPW becasue it involved the water tower. It was an unfortunate event, but very successful because it demonstrated the cooperation between all our agencies."

Holman said Central Dispatch played a key role by sending out resources while also handling many calls reporting the crash.

“In the initial assessment there was one male passenger in the plane.,” reported Squiers in mid-afternoon.

He said the single engine plane originated from the Fremont Airport and the pilot lived east of Whitehall.

The plane was headed from the northeast in a southwesterly direction, the chief explained.

He said witnesses indicated the plane showed a level flight with no veering and no signs of engine problems.

“We don’t know where the pilot was going or what his intentions were,” Squiers added.

Jeremy Watts, one of the eyewitnesses to the crash, works at a home across Sophia Street from the 500,000 gallon, 180 foot tall water tower.

“I was standing in the yard at 820 Sophia Street and was walking back (to the house) when I looked overhead and saw the plane.”

Watts said the plane engine was loud because it was flying so low. “It hit the water tower straight on. I immediately called 911. It (plane) went straight down and there was black smoke where it hit. I ran up to the fence but didn’t see much.

“It’s the craziest thing I have seen in my life. There was so much black smoke and fire.”

Immediately after the crash smoke could be seen from the crash site for several blocks to the west.

City of Whitehall Department of Public Works Director Brian Armstrong and City Manager Scott Huebler were at the scene.

Huebler said Armstrong was working on arranging for engineers to check the integrity of the water tower.

“In the meantime we are taking it out of service,” added Huebler who said DPW personnel will be draining the water tower until it is inspected.

“We have a second water tower so we don’t need it for normal operations,” Huebler said. “We won’t have to restrict water usage.”

The city manager said they have contacted the schools to tell officials that Warner Street, from Alice Street to Slocum Street will be off limits for buses for at least a day.

Original article ➤ https://www.shorelinemedia.net





WHITEHALL, Michigan (WOOD) — Authorities say a 79-year-old pilot is dead after his plane crashed into Whitehall’s water tower and caught fire.

Crews were called to the scene in the area of Warner and Sophia streets near Whitehall District Schools’ athletic fields around 11:42 a.m. Monday.

Firefighters arrived to find heavy smoke and flames coming from the wreckage. Crews put out the fire and determined the pilot of the single-engine plane had died.

Whitehall Police Chief Roger Squires identified the pilot as James Joseph Laird of Twin Lake. Laird took off from Fremont’s municipal airport about 45 minutes before the crash, according to authorities.

Investigators say it’s unclear what caused his plane to crash. They say Laird’s flight path didn’t change and there is no indication of engine problems based on the plane’s speed.

Online Federal Aviation Administration records show that Laird’s certification to fly expired in 2000, News 8 found.

School administrative staff told News 8 that there were no students and staff on the ground in that area when the crashed happened. Authorities confirmed no one else was injured in the incident.

The city has isolated the water tower from its system and shut it off until inspectors can evaluate the tower’s structure and water.

Investigators say the wreckage will remain at the scene for a few hours until the Federal Aviation Administration arrives.

Story and video ➤ https://www.woodtv.com

Phoenix Air U-15, N443RM: Incident occurred September 09, 2019 at Minden-Tahoe Airport (KMEV), Douglas County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno

Motor glider experienced a prop strike.

https://registry.faa.gov/N443RM

Date: 09-SEP-19
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N443RM
Aircraft Make: PHOENIX
Aircraft Model: U15
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MINDEN
State: NEVADA

Super Glasair II, N400MC: Accident occurred September 09, 2019 near Reno/Stead Airport (KRTS), Washoe County, Nevada

Havoc Air Racing


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N400MC

Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR19LA261
Date & Time: 09/09/2019, 1620 PDT
Registration: N400MC
Aircraft: Stoddard Hamilton GLASAIR II
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 9, 2019, about 1620 Pacific daylight time, a Havoc Air Racing LLC Super GT 111 Airplane, N400MC, experienced an electrical failure while maneuvering near the Reno/Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The commercial pilot sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by Havoc Air Racing LLC, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from RTS at about 1525.

The pilot reported that after finishing qualification laps, he pulled off the course for a cool down. As he prepared the airplane for landing, he attempted to lower the landing gear but the left main gear indicator light in the cockpit indicated the gear was unsafe. The pilot attempted to troubleshoot the problem, however, the gear never lowered. During this troubleshooting, the pilot also noticed that electrical bus 1 was no longer charging; shortly thereafter the airplane experienced an electrical failure and the engine quit. The pilot conducted a belly landing onto the runway and a post landing fire ensued.

The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.


Havoc Air Racing


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Stoddard Hamilton
Registration: N400MC
Model/Series: GLASAIR II RG
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: Havoc Air Racing LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRTS, 5050 ft msl
Observation Time: 1615 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / -4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots / , 230°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 39.667500, -119.872500 (est)

Bombardier CRJ-900LR (CL-600-2D24), N569NN: Incident occurred September 09, 2019 at Piedmont Triad International Airport (KGSO), Greensboro, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro

Aircraft struck a bird on departure.

PSA Airlines on behalf of American Airlines

https://registry.faa.gov/N569NN

Date: 09-SEP-19
Time: 11:11:00Z
Regis#: N569NN
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CL600 2D24
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: JIA5384
City: GREENSBORO
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Cessna 140, N73000: Fatal accident occurred September 08, 2019 near Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N73000

Clint James VanderWey

Location: Lakeview, SD
Accident Number: CEN19FA307
Date & Time: 09/08/2019, 2000 CDT
Registration: N73000
Aircraft: Cessna 140
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

On September 8, 2019, about 2000 central daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped Cessna 140 airplane, N73000, impacted terrain in a remote rolling prairie on the Rosebud Indian Reservation (RIR) near Lakeview, South Dakota. The student pilot and the passenger both sustained fatal injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the student pilot under the provision of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the student pilot's private airstrip near Lakeview.

According to first responders who spoke with family members, the purpose of the flight was for the student pilot and his son to fly around the local area for aerial observation of various large water towers stationed on farms on the RIR. The student pilot would fly the airplane low, over the water towers, and look down into the water towers to determine the water level. He would then report the water level back to the farmers.

The student pilot's airstrip, which was about 65 ft wide and 1,850 long, consisted of grass and dirt. The airstrip was about 5.5 miles southwest of Lakeview on private property. The airstrip was oriented about 350° and about 170°, runway 35-17 respectively.

After not hearing from the student pilot and his son for several hours, concerned family members contacted first responders. The wreckage was discovered about 0800 by first responders on September 9, 2019. The accident site, located on private property, was about 825 ft to the northwest of the airstrip threshold for landing on runway 17.

The NTSB investigator-in-charge and an air safety investigator from Textron Aviation (the type certificate holder for the Cessna 140) responded to the accident site on September 10, 2019. The investigative team members documented the accident site and the wreckage. The airplane came to rest on a heading of 24° and at an elevation of 2,910 ft above mean sea level. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wing structures, the fuselage, and the empennage as shown below in figure 1 and figure 2. All components of the airframe and the engine were located at the accident site. The two wing fuel tanks were breached from the accident sequence and the onboard fuel level at the time of the impact was undetermined.


Figure 1 – View of the wreckage looking to the south. The pilot's private airstrip is in the upper right corner of the photograph near the trees.

Figure 2 – View of the wreckage looking to the north.

An examination revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airframe and engine. A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed no evidence of any uncorrected mechanical discrepancies with the airframe and engine. The wreckage was recovered from the accident site by family members on September 11, 2019.

While the airplane was conducting a low-level aerial observation flight, the airplane was not equipped with a stall warning system or angle of attack indicator system, nor was it required to be.

A review of the Federal Aviation Administration electronic airmen registry for the student pilot, revealed that he held a student pilot certificate. The limitation listed on the student pilot certificate states, "carrying passengers is prohibited." 14 CFR Part 61.89 discusses the limitations for student pilots and states that a student pilot may not act as a pilot in command of an aircraft that is carrying a passenger.

The two-seat capacity airplane, serial number 10205, was manufactured in 1946. The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors C-85-12 engine, serial number 23455-6-12. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N73000
Model/Series: 140 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KVTN, 2590 ft msl
Observation Time: 0052 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 50°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2200 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lakeview, SD (None)
Destination: Lakeview, SD (None)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.039444, -100.805556 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Michael J. Hodges 
Investigator In Charge (IIC)
National Transportation Safety Board


Jedediah, “Jed”, Nathaniel VanderWey, 16, passed away on Sunday, September 8, 2019. His last moments were spent with his father flying. Jed was born August 22, 2019 in Valentine, Nebraska to Clint and Jennifer VanderWey.

Jed attended Zion Lutheran School through seventh grade and then went to Valentine Community Schools. He was a sophomore at Valentine High School. Jed participated in wrestling and excelled in cross-country and track.

This summer, Jed was employed by Danielski Harvesting. He worked his way from Oklahoma to Nebraska, and enjoyed a summer of “freedom”.

Hobbies included motor cross, spending time with friends, hiking, climbing, snowboarding, wakeboarding, singing, and fishing. Jed also enjoyed driving fast with Grandma Bonnie, hunting with Grandpa Jack, talking with his mom, hanging out with his sister, and flying with his dad. Jed loved dogs and rock music from the 70s. He was extremely patriotic. Adventure was important; more so than his homework.
Jed aspired to followed in his father’s footsteps and become a farmer.

Jed was a member of Zion Lutheran Church and attended Lakeview Christian Reformed Church.

Survivors include mother Jennifer VanderWey; sister Shyla Stearns; Grandparents Jack and Bonnie VanderWey, Sherri Britton, Wayne and Dona Rundback; uncles Jason VanderWey, Justin Loeffler, Cody Rundback; Aunt Kelly Loeffler: cousins Nigel and Shaun VanderWey, Isabelle and Hayden Loeffler, Roper and Stetson Rundback; Great Grandparents Joy Steel and Carl Rundback.

Father, Clint, passed away with Jed.

Preceded in death by brother James VanderWey, great grandparents Lloyd and Marjorie Tryon, Urban and Gladys VanderWey, Wes Steel, Barbara Rundback and Jo Gaites.

A memorial has been established to the Valentine Badger Booster Club.

Funeral services will be held at 2:00 pm on Monday September 16, 2019 at the Valentine United Methodist Church.

https://www.holmesfh.com



Clint James VanderWey, 39, passed away on Sunday, September 8, 2019. His last moments were spent flying his airplane with his son. Clint was born October 12, 1979 in Valentine, Nebraska to Jack and Bonnie VanderWey.

Clint attended Lakeview Elementary School, and in 1998, he graduated from Cody –Kilgore Unified Schools. Clint earned an associate degree in Business Administration in May 2000.

Clint starting working at the age of 10 in the hay field. At 14, he worked two summers on the Spike Box Ranch building buffalo fence. At the age of 16, Clint began working for Danielski Farms until 2009, when he began manufacturing his inventions. He continued to work with Danielskis’ until his last days.

In 2007, Clint and Justin Loeffler, started their business L&V Innovations. Together, they invented, the Pivot Rx. In 2009, Clint built a prototype for the Pivot Flusher, which is still a success today.

On November 27, 1999, Clint married his best friend and soul mate, Jennifer Rundback. With this matrimony, Clint gained his daughter, Shyla. On October 28, 2001, Jenny and Clint welcomed the birth of their first son, James Dylan VanderWey. Sadly, on February 14, 2002, James passed away. On August 22, 2003, Clint and Jenny were blessed with the birth of their second son, Jedediah Nathaniel VanderWey.

Clint lived life fully. He liked hunting and fishing with his father as a child. His grandpa, Urban, taught him the family passion of flying, which Clint passed on to his son. Clint enjoyed wakeboarding, water skiing, scuba diving, and boating. He was practically born in the water. Other hobbies included bowling, organic farming, and golfing with his wife. He loved experimenting and creating. His latest interest was perfecting chili rellenos. Clint was a life-long learner, teaching himself through text books and the internet how to do everything he took an interest in.

Clint was a caring man who patiently and kindly taught his children and other youth the things he loved. For the past two summers, he mentored Jeremiah Smith in farming.

Clint was a member of Zion Lutheran Church and attended Lakeview Christian Reformed Church.

Surviors include Jenny VanderWey (wife); Shyla Stearns (daughter); Jack and Bonnie VanderWey (parents); Jason VanderWey (brother); Sherri Britton (mother-in-law); Wayne (father-in-law) and Dona Rundback; Kelly (sister-in-law) and Justin Loeffler; Cody Rundback (brother-in-law); nephews Nigel and Shaun VanderWey, Hayden Loeffler, Roper and Stetson Rundback, and niece Isabelle Loeffler.

Son, Jedediah, passed away with Clint.

Preceded in death by son James VanderWey, grandparents Lloyd and Marjorie Tryon, Urban and Gladys VanderWey.

A memorial has been established to the Cody-Kilgore Ag Program.

Funeral services will be held at 2:00 pm on Monday September 16, 2019 at the Valentine United Methodist Church.

https://www.holmesfh.com

Late Sunday night of September 8th, Todd County Search and Rescue were called in to the rural Lakeview area with the report of a missing son and father. 

Clint VanderWey and his son, Jed, left the farm around 6:00 p.m. in Clint’s Cessna 140 to check pivots. The last time family heard from the father and son was around 8:00 p.m., close to sundown. Now a worried family was forced to call for help, said a family spokesman.

Todd County Search and Rescue arrived in the area around 10:00 p.m., but due to the weather and lack of sunlight, a search and rescue plane could not get off the ground to look for Clint and Jed. A foot and vehicle search continued. The Federal Aviation Administration was called in as well.

September 9, early Monday morning, the Search and Rescue, Todd County Sheriff’s Department, Rosebud Sioux Tribe Emergency Preparedness Program, Rosebud Volunteer Fire Department, Rosebud Sioux Tribe Law Enforcement, Game Fish and Parks, family and neighbors continued the search. 

Clint and Jed VanderWey were found not too far from their family farm, with two confirmed fatalities. Clint’s Cessna 140 plane went down less than a football field away from the farm. According to Mike Hodges with the National Transportation Safety Board out of Denver, Colo., who is the lead agency in what will be an ongoing investigation, the reason the plane crashed is unknown at this time. 

National Transportation Safety Board, Federal Aviation Administration and plane manufacturer Textron Aviation are working hand in hand with the Todd County Sheriff on site to assess the situation and investigate the plane crash thoroughly. 

A preliminary report will be published on the National Transportation Safety Board’s website within seven days; however, with these cases it takes one to two years for a final report. All three agencies investigate a variety of things when a plane goes down: the maintenance of the aircraft, the pilot’s training, weather conditions and Air traffic Control Services.

Clint VanderWey was born and raised in the Lakeview, S.D., area, just 15 miles southeast of St. Francis. He and his wife were local farmers who owned Lakeview Irrigation as well as L & V Innovations. 

Jed VanderWey, a sophomore at Valentine High School, was a cross country and track star. Jed is a young man who will be greatly missed by his peers and community.

Updated information: Visitation will be held Sunday, September 15, 2019, 10:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m., at Holmes Funeral Home, Valentine, Neb.

Funeral services will be held Monday, September 16, 2:00 p.m., at the United Methodist Church, Valentine.

In lieu of plants and flowers, the family has requested memorials be sent in care of the family for the Cody/Kigore School Shop class.

Arrangements by Holmes Funeral Home in Valentine, Nebraska.

Original article ➤ https://bennettcountyboostersd.com

Jedediah Nathaniel VanderWey 

CROOKSTON, Nebraska (KNOP) - A father and son killed were killed in plane crash north of Valentine in South Dakota on Sunday, September 8th.

Officials say they do not have a cause of the crash yet, and they do not know exactly when the Cessna 140 went down in the rolling prairie between St. Francis, South Dakota and North of Crookston, Nebraska.

39-year old Clint and his son, 16-year old Jed Vanderwey of north of Crookston died in the crash. The National Transportation Safety Board is looking for answers. 

Investigator Mike Hodges saying that preliminary findings will be posted in 5-7 days on the NTSB website, but it will take 1-3 years before a final report can be made.

The Vanderway family farms near the border of South Dakota and Nebraska.

Wayne Rundback was Clint Vanderwey's father-in-law and Jed's grandfather.

Rundback says Clint Vanderwey would fly to monitor his irrigation service.

Rundback says the two left in the plane Sunday evening, and a search-and-rescue mission began around 10 p.m.

Jed VanderWey had just started school as a sophomore. 

KVSH Radio reports Valentine Community School made counselors available.

Funeral services will be held Monday at United Methodist Church in Valentine.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.knopnews2.com

Loss of Control in Flight: Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N737NJ; accident occurred September 07, 2019 near Mekoryuk Airport (PAMY), Nunivak Island, Alaska

View of inverted airplane with damaged left wing. 


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N737NJ


Location: Mekoryuk, AK
Accident Number: GAA19CA529
Date & Time: 09/07/2019, 2015 AKD
Registration: N737NJ
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during takeoff on a beach, the airplane lifted off the ground to about 10 ft but he "felt something holding [him] down." He lowered the nose to build up the airspeed, attempted to climb again, but was unable to climb due to a downdraft. He was unable to abort the takeoff due to increased airspeed and reduced landing area prior to a 50 ft bank. He decided to "pull up and go over that 50 to 60 ft bank." The airplane continued about three-quarters of a mile, aerodynamically stalled, and the empennage impacted terrain. The airplane continued about 30 ft, struck a "big clump of dirt," and nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that the wind was variable at 27 knots, gusting to 36 knots.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 27, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/15/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/02/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 665.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 370.95 hours (Total, this make and model), 665.3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 136.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 31.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 9.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N737NJ
Model/Series: 172 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1977
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17269543
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/29/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3744.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A4M
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAMY, 45 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 33 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0356 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 326°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 900 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 23 knots / 28 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 230°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain
Departure Point: Bethel, AK (BET)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Bethel, AK (BET)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1800 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 59.935278, -165.576944 (est)

Two brothers were unharmed after their plane crashed on Nunivak Island on September 7th. The brothers live in Bethel, and were leaving the island in a private plane loaded with just-harvested muskox meat.

The four-seater aircraft crashed shortly after taking off near Cape Corwin, about 50 miles south of the community of Mekoryuk. At that time the Mekoryuk airport recorded light rain and fog, with less than 3 miles of visibility and wind gusts up to 36 miles per hour.

The brothers contacted Alaska State Troopers at 8:22 p.m. on September 7th through an inReach satellite equipped with GPS. They reported no injuries and said that they had enough survival gear to make it through the night until help arrived. Because the hunters were unharmed and had the proper equipment, troopers made contact with the Anchorage Rescue Coordinator Center but did not deploy military aircraft to the scene, according to Trooper Scott Corino.

The brothers waited out the night, and chartered a flight with God’s Country Aviation in Bethel to bring them home the next day. They returned safely to Bethel around 1 p.m. the next day, on Sunday, September 8th.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.alaskapublic.org

Maule M-4-220C, N51207: Incident occurred September 06, 2019 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft made an emergency landing on a highway.

https://registry.faa.gov/N51207

Date: 07-SEP-19
Time: 03:43:00Z
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M4
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA




There was an unusual sight on the Glenn Highway as a small plane landed near the Eklutna exit around 8 p.m. Friday. 

There were three people on board the Maule M-4 including the pilot, according to one of the passengers. The passenger said the group took off from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson and was planning to go up the Knik Arm when the plane's engine failed. 

The pilot landed on the inbound side of the Glenn Highway. Anchorage police were on scene and said there were no injuries. 

The pilot planned to take the plane apart in order to move it off the highway.

Story and video ➤ https://www.ktva.com



A Maule M-4-220C plane made an emergency landing Friday evening in the southbound lanes of the Glenn Highway near the Palmer Hay Flats just north of Eklutna.

An Anchorage Police Department dispatcher said no injuries were reported.

Several police cars were on the scene where the blue-and-white plane sat parked alongside the highway at around 8:30 p.m., but there were no lane closures or traffic delays.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com

Mooney M20E, N2699W: Incident occurred September 06, 2019 at Zamperini Field Airport (KTOA), Los Angeles County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach

Aircraft had a prop strike on landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N2699W

Date: 06-SEP-19
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N2699W
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20E
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TORRANCE
State: CALIFORNIA

Loss of Control in Flight: SIAI Marchetti SM-1019, N16XC; accident occurred September 07, 2019 in Lakeport, Lake County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N16XC

Location: Lakeport, CA
Accident Number: GAA19CA528
Date & Time: 09/07/2019, 1600 PDT
Registration: N16XC 
Aircraft: SIAI-MARCHETTI SM 1019
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the float-equipped airplane reported that, while taking off from a lake, the airplane accelerated, became airborne, and about 40 ft above the water, he retracted the flaps. The airplane pitched down and the left wing dropped. He attempted to correct to no avail and the airplane impacted the water.

The pilot reported that he believed P factor caused the left roll because the airplane was aerodynamically stalling and would not correct, despite his attempts.

The pilot reported that he had accrued 5 hours in the airplane make and model, 2 hours of which occurred in the preceding 30 days.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, empennage and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that, it was a very windy, gusty day, and the wind varied in direction. An airport's automated weather observation station, located 15 miles west, reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 300° at 14 knots, gusting to 20 knots. The airplane was departing to the south.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/12/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/09/2019
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 7777 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5 hours (Total, this make and model), 7777 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 64 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 27 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SIAI-MARCHETTI
Registration: N16XC
Model/Series: SM 1019
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 045
Landing Gear Type: Amphibian
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/03/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 1639.05 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Allison
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 250-B15G
Registered Owner: Pacific Coast Air Museum
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KUKI, 626 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2256 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 291°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 14 knots / 20 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 300°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Lakeport, CA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1554 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G  

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 39.039444, -122.907778 (est)




LAKEPORT — Saturday morning at the Natural High property in Lakeport began quietly with seaplanes of all makes parked in the field, until the wind picked up in the afternoon, causing a seaplane to crash into the lake.

The pilot of a SIAI Marchetti had departed from the event. As the plane rose to upwards of 100 feet off the water, a gust of wind came over the trees lining the bank, creating a wind shear sending the plane crashing into the lake, breaking the plane in two, crushing the windshield, shearing off the propeller and destroying the left wing.

The pilot and a passenger were rescued and an ambulance took them to the hospital. Deputy B. Bosse of the Lake County Sheriff Department’s marine patrol, who came to oversee the crash, said the unidentified pilot was “lucky that he and his passenger only had cuts and bruises.”

A crowd raced to help as the seaplane was hauled out of the water by a truck owned and driven by Gregg Hierolzer. In the field of Natural High, onlookers surveyed the mangled seaplane. Only the pontoons seemed to be in good shape.



Splash In event

Sponsored by the Lake County Chamber of Commerce, the Splash In is in its 40th year and accidents are not unheard of. Steve Hamilton, who helped haul out the SIAI Marchetti, said he crashed his seaplane two years ago, but it’s not always the pilot’s fault. “It’s often a swift change in the weather.”

Clear Lake is not unfamiliar to seaplanes. According to military websites, during WWII, Clear Lake was used as an outlying seaplane base for Alameda Naval Air Station. It was also used when seaplanes couldn’t land in San Francisco Bay due to unsafe landing conditions.

Melissa Fulton, Lake County Chamber of Commerce CEO, said that approximately 22 seaplanes were scheduled to fly in and a crowd of 800 to 900 was anticipated at Saturday’s event.

Scott Herring, 54, from Georgetown, Calif., near Auburn, flew his 2015 Carbon Cub to the Splash In. “I’ve been flying since I was 16.” He laughed and said, “I have seven airplanes, which is why I’m not married.” The yellow-shirted ramp staff, made up of seventh and 10th graders, helped park his plane by rolling it into place. “This is a great treat,” Herring said, “to come to this event.”

Viet Nam vet, Lee Cook, 72, flew as an air crewman during the war. This is his 18th year volunteering for Splash In. This year he’s the ramp boss, who makes sure the landing and take-off of each plane is safe. Cook spoke about the low cloudy weather. “The low clouds are great for these airplanes. They don’t have air conditioning and the pilots like it overcast because there’s so much heat inside the airplane. Vision is good, also, without the glare of the sun.” Cook pointed to the far side of the field where a blue tent sat. “The Sea Scouts,” he said, “are used for security. They stayed overnight in that tent. They’re used to boats not planes, but they’re learning.”

The planes rolled into the lake from the temporary ramp and took off in the water with the dark humps of Mount Konocti in the distance.

Local pilot Damon Trimble, came to talk with other pilots and to look at the seaplanes. “I’ve got a Mooney, a single-engined aircraft, not a seaplane.” He was especially interested in the small Icon amphibious light-sport aircraft. It has no pontoons, but a specially designed hull, and doesn’t need a pilot’s license to fly it, he said.

Tom Beattie, piloted the Icon that Trimble was looking at, from Vacaville. It was his first time at the Lakeport Splash In, although he has piloted a lot of demos for Icon Aircraft, and at other Splash Ins. He personally owns a land plane, a Piper Archer. “The weather here,” he said, “is great. Calm, cool and the clouds aid in depth perception, which is perfect for seaplanes.” Beattie, 64, said he’s been flying for 46 years.

“It’s always fun to have these smaller events in Lake County,” said David Velazquez who also attended the Taste of Lake County event. “The Splash In is so unique and the seaplanes come from all over.” He looked at the Light Sport built by Capt. Ray Shipway of Cloverdale who was helping direct people over a portable microphone. Shipway told Velazquez that to fly his Light Sport, a pilot’s license is needed because it’s a two-seater. As a retired captain for the Merchant Marine, Shipway said, “I’ve been doing this for 15 years and we really appreciate how the city has taken care of the field.”

District 4 Supervisor for Lake County, Tina Scott and her husband Douglas, showed up as she always does for Lake County events. Eager to support the county, she said, “What a great way to showcase Lake County; from the air and the water.”

An Iraq Marine veteran, David Vogel flew from Santa Rosa just for this Splash In. “I like air events. I’ve been here five times,” he said while watching the competitions of several seaplanes.

Two competitions took place after Ryan Contioso handed a giant inner tube painted bright orange on one side to the owner of the boat Carol Ann, who volunteered to anchor the inner tube off shore. It was a target for water bomb drops – half-filled water bottles flagged with ribbons for easy retrieval. The closest drop to the inner tube would win. The second competition was a Spot Landing, in which the pilot was to land as close to the inner tube as possible.

Alberto Rossi won the Water Bomb Drop in his beige 172 Cessna. Roger Stevens won the Spot Landing in his yellow Super Cub.

Byron Hernandez, 32, an Air Force Reserve pilot who flies a 757 for United Airlines, flew his amphibious Cessna 206 from San Rafael. “This is a great place to meet other seaplane pilots and expose seaplane flying to the community. All it takes is showing one kid the inside of an airplane for them to catch the bug. That’s what happened to me at 8-years-old.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.record-bee.com