Saturday, October 23, 2021

Airbus A320-251N, N304FR: Incident occurred October 23, 2021 at Raleigh-Durham International Airport (KRDU), Wake County, North Carolina

Frontier Airlines

https://registry.faa.gov/N304FR

 



A Frontier Airlines flight from Norfolk, Virginia, to Orlando made an emergency landing at Raleigh-Durham International Airport Saturday evening after passengers and crew noticed fumes or an odor in the cabin, the airport said.

All 102 passengers and crew were evacuated safely, but one passenger was taken to WakeMed, RDU said in a statement. The passenger’s condition was not reported.

Frontier Flight 1159 contacted RDU and requested the emergency landing about 5:45 p.m., the airport said.

When the plane landed, RDU Fire Rescue responded along with units from Wake EMS, Raleigh Fire, Wake County Fire Service and Wake County HazMat.

The passengers and crew were evacuated from the plane onto the airfield.

The airport remained open during the incident, but the Terminal 2 ramp was closed until about 7:20 p.m.

The airport said about 16 arriving flights were delayed for at least an hour due to the Terminal 2 ramp closure. 

Jennifer F. de la Cruz, a spokesperson for Frontier Airlines, said the plane was en route to Orlando from Norfolk when it “experienced a fume/odor event.” “Out of an abundance of caution, the aircraft diverted to Raleigh-Durham and both passengers and crew exited the aircraft via evacuation slides,” de la Cruz said in a statement. “No injuries to passengers or crew have been reported.” 

There was no indication of a fire onboard the plane, de la Cruz added.

She said that all passengers had been safely moved to the airport terminal and that Frontier was making arrangements to get them to their final destinations

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, N1652H: Fatal accident occurred October 22, 2021 near Lowcountry Regional Airport (KRBW), Walterboro, Colleton County, South Carolina

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbia, South Carolina
Piper Aircraft Inc; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Aircraft Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Demelva Aviation LLC



Location: Walterboro, South Carolina
Accident Number: ERA22FA026
Date and  Time: October 22, 2021, 15:57 Local
Registration: N1652H
Aircraft: Piper PA-32R-300
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On October 22, 2021, about 1557 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-32R-300, N1652H, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Walterboro, South Carolina. The pilot was seriously injured, and the passenger was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The airplane departed Shannon Airport (EZF), Fredericksburg, Virginia, about 1256, destined for Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida. Prior to departure, the pilot topped-off the airplane’s fuel tanks (98 gallons total capacity) by adding 78.81 gallons of 100LL aviation gasoline.

The flight was uneventful, until about 2 hours and 53 minutes into the flight when the airplane was in cruise at 6,000 ft above mean sea level (msl) and the pilot advised air traffic control that he wanted to divert to Lowcountry Regional Airport (RBW), Walterboro, South Carolina for fuel, and then resume his instrument flight rules flight plan to TMB.

The air traffic controller cleared the pilot to fly direct to RBW. The pilot requested the visual approach to runway 23. The air traffic controller then instructed the pilot to maintain 1,600 ft msl, and subsequently instructed him to fly heading 190°. The airplane was approximately 9 miles north of RBW when it began to descend without a clearance. The pilot then declared an emergency due to a “lagging engine” to which the air traffic controller advised that RBW was at “one o’clock and seven miles,” and to “maintain present heading and altitude.” There was no further communication with the pilot. The airplane descended while in a left turn and was last observed by air traffic control at an altitude of 100 ft msl.

Witnesses reported an engine sound that they described as an all-terrain vehicle type engine. They observed a white airplane with green stripes in a left turn toward an open field next to their house. They then heard a loud “pop” from the airplane and the engine noise ceased.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane initially contacted an approximately 70-ft-tall pine tree. A 100-yard-long debris path on a magnetic heading of about 070° was observed through a forested area descending on an approximate 20° flight path angle.

Examination of the airplane revealed that both wings and the right stabilator had separated from their mounting locations during the impact sequence with the trees. There was no evidence of pre-impact fire, and all damage was consistent with tree and terrain impact.

The fuselage was mostly consumed by a post-impact fire. The landing gear was in the down position, and the landing gear “dump” lever was stowed. The throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were in the full forward positions. The fuel selector valve was in the right fuel tank position. The wing flaps were up (0°). The left wing outboard and inboard fuel tanks were breached. The right wing outboard fuel tank was breached, but still contained residual fuel, and the right inboard fuel tank had separated from the wing. Both the left and right fuel filler caps remained attached.

Examination of the aluminum 3-bladed constant-speed propeller revealed that the propeller remained attached to the propeller flange, and no rotational deformation was present on the impact damaged spinner. Impact damage was noted to the propeller hub and all three blades. There was no leading-edge damage or chord-wise abrasions noted on the propeller blades.

Examination of the engine revealed that the engine remained attached to its mount which had partially separated from the fuselage. Both the engine and its mount exhibited impact and thermal damage. The exhaust system was impact damaged but remained attached to its respective cylinder attach points. No internal obstructions or deformations were noted in the exhaust system. The single drive, dual magneto, and the engine driven fuel pump were destroyed by fire. The engine crankshaft was rotated. Thumb compression and suction were attained, and crankshaft and camshaft continuity to the rear gears was observed. Oil was observed within the sump and the oil pump suction screen was clear of debris. One tooth was found to have fractured on the oil pump drive gear and its driving idler gear exhibited abrasions on several consecutive teeth. The fractured gear tooth was retrieved from the oil sump. The oil pump could not be rotated by hand.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N1652H
Model/Series: PA-32R-300 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRBW,102 ft msl 
Observation Time: 15:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C /17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3900 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 260°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Fredericksburg, VA (EZF)
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.0425,-80.598217

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.

Col. Deane E. Thomey


A U.S. Air Force pilot who is based in Horsham is reportedly fighting for his life after his plane went down in South Carolina last week, a crash that is said to have taken the life of his 24-year-old daughter.

Colonel Deane Thomey, commander of the 111th Attack Wing and Biddle Air National Guard Base in Horsham, had been flying a private plane from Virginia to Florida when his plane experienced engine problems, subsequently causing it to crash into the woods.

Thomey is currently being treated in the intensive care unit of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, according to the 111th Attack Wing, which said Thomey was piloting a privately-owned Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance at the time of the incident.

"Please keep the Thomey family in your thoughts and prayers," Col. Rebecca Gray, 111th Attack Wing Vice Commander, said in a statement. "Together we will support one another, Col. Thomey's wife and his daughters through this difficult time."

The crash claimed the life of Thomey's daughter, Madeline.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the cause of the crash.

Thomey, an Arkansas native, took command at the 111th Attack Wing this past April after he spent time as the director of the Air National Guard Director's Action Group at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, according to the 111th.

He attended pilot training at Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, graduating in November 1996.





WALTERBORO, South Carolina -  Investigators are working to piece together what led to a deadly plane crash in Colleton County Friday afternoon.

The National Transportation Safety Board and other agencies were at the scene Saturday as they work on the initial phase of the investigation. While a preliminary report will be posted on the NTSB’s website in seven to 10 days, the full investigation could take one to two years.

NTSB air safety investigator Todd Gunther said the Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance was flying from Fredericksburg, Virginia, to Tamiami, Florida, when it crashed about 250 yards from Round O Road near Walterboro.

At 6,000 feet, the pilot declared an emergency for an engine problem. The pilot tried to land at the Lowcountry Regional Airport in Walterboro and ended up hitting trees three miles northeast of the airport.

An initial examination of the accident site showed the airplane struck trees and then traveled for about 75 yards before coming to rest. It then caught on fire, Gunther said.

A passenger on board the aircraft was killed, while the pilot was seriously injured and taken to the hospital.

Colleton County Coroner Richard Harvey identified the victim Saturday night as 24-year-old Madeline Thomey of Alexandria, Virginia. The pilot’s name has not been released.

Gunther said all pieces of the aircraft are currently in that debris field. The NTSB is working with the Colleton County Sheriff’s Office, the county coroner, the Federal Aviation Administration, the engine manufacturer and the aircraft manufacturer, as well as other state and local entities.

“What’s going to happen over the next few days is we’re going to be bringing in team members both for the structure of the airplane to take a look at it and the engine,” Gunther said. “Additionally, we’ll be looking at the meteorology, the weather conditions that surrounded the accident, as well as the physiology of the pilot.”

Investigators will be looking at other systems on the aircraft such as the electrical system and the fuel system to see if there was anything that may have contributed to or caused the accident.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the victims of this tragic accident,” Gunther said.






Cessna 207, N207JP: Accident occurred October 22, 2021 at Vinalhaven Airport (ME55), Knox County, Maine

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft crashed during takeoff for unknown reasons. 

Waters Aero-Marine Inc


Date: 22-OCT-21
Time: 21:05:00Z
Regis#: N207JP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 207
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: VINALHAVEN
State: MAINE



VINALHAVEN, Maine  — At approximately 5 p.m., Friday, October 22, 2021, a Cessna 207 airplane transporting a medical patient and a Vinalhaven EMT from Vinalhaven to the Knox Regional Airport in Owls Head, crashed when attempting to take off.

Vinalhaven Fire/EMS personnel and a Knox County Sheriff’s deputy happened to still be at the air strip after assisting with the transfer of the patient from the ambulance to the aircraft. They were able to then get to the downed plane, and along with the help of bystanders, quickly assist the two passengers and pilot to safety, according to Vinalhaven EMA, in a news release.

Additional Fire/EMS personnel were requested and arrived shortly thereafter. The fire personnel were able to secure the scene and minimize any leaks from the plane’s fuel tank.

EMS personnel assessed the pilot and the Vinalhaven EMT involved in the crash, who were then released with minor injuries. Penobscot Island Air transported an additional medic from South Thomaston Ambulance to assist at the scene.

By 7 p.m., Penobscot Air was able to transport the original patient and the medic to Knox County Regional Airport, where they were then transported the rest of the way to a hospital.

An investigation into the cause of the crash is ongoing and no other details about the crash are available currently.

Vinalhaven Fire Chief, Marc Candage, on scene from the original EMS call, was able to react immediately.

“We are grateful that the patient, our crew member, and the pilot are okay following this accident,” Candage said. “At the end of the day, responding crew and bystanders acted quickly, we treated those involved, and we were able to see our patient get transported to definitive care.”

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N754KP: Accident occurred October 22, 2021 at Juneau International Airport (JNU), Alaska

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Kalinin Partners LLC

Location: Juneau, Alaska 
Accident Number: ANC22LA003
Date and Time: October 22, 2021, 08:50 Local 
Registration: N754KP
Aircraft: Cessna 208B Injuries: 6 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi and commuter - Scheduled

On October 22, 2021, about 0850 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 208 Caravan, N754KP sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident at the Juneau Airport, Juneau, Alaska. The pilot and five passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 scheduled passenger flight.

The pilot reported that, she completed a preflight inspection before taxiing from parking, making both left and right turns, to the active runway for departure. She then completed the before takeoff checks which included a flight control check and was cleared for takeoff on runway 8 from C intersection. Once on the runway, she increased engine power and the airplane began to accelerate down the centerline of the runway. Around rotational speed, the aircraft veered abruptly to the right. In an effort to correct for the veer she applied left pedal, but the pedal travel felt limited, and the airplane continued to the right toward a float pond that parallels the runway. Believing the distance to the float pond was not adequate to safely stop, she continued the takeoff, and once airborne maneuvered the airplane toward the runway for an emergency landing. Once the pilot determined that a safe landing could be made, she pulled the firewall shutoff, fuel shutoff and moved the master switch to the off position. During the emergency landing the right main landing gear and nose wheel collapsed, and the airplane sustained damage to both wings.

A passenger seated in the right front seat reported that his seat was moved aft, his feet were on the floor near the control pedestal with his knees pointed toward the passenger door, so as not to interfere with any of the flight control movements.

A postaccident examination of the nosewheel steering system, brake system and flight control system revealed no mechanical anomalies or irregularities that would have precluded normal operation. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N754KP
Model/Series: 208B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter air carrier (135), On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code: P9KA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAJN,24 ft msl 
Observation Time: 08:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C /5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 300 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 28.98 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Juneau, AK 
Destination: Skagway, AK

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 5 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 None
Latitude, Longitude: 58.355395,-134.58326

Alaska Seaplanes -

Accident at Juneau Airport – No Injuries. 

Flight 501 to Skagway – all 5 passengers and pilot are in good health.

Alaska Seaplanes is confirming that Flight 501 from Juneau to Skagway had an accident upon takeoff this morning at approximately 8:43 am at the Juneau International Airport. All 5 passengers and the pilot (total 6 occupants) were uninjured and have been examined by Capital City Fire and Rescue. The aircraft involved was a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, tail number N754KP. It is one of four wheeled Grand Caravans in Alaska Seaplanes’ fleet.

The specifics of the incident are still under investigation, and Alaska Seaplanes will be working with National Transportation Safety Board investigators to determine the potential cause of the accident.

Alaska Seaplanes has cancelled the rest of its flights for today as it investigates this accident further. Normal service is scheduled to begin again tomorrow.



Flights across Southeast Alaska have been diverted or delayed after a small commercial plane crashed shortly after takeoff on Friday morning at Juneau’s airport.

The National Transportation Safety Board’s Alaska chief Clint Johnson says the aircraft involved was a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan operated by Alaska Seaplanes.

“It’s an Alaska Seaplanes Cessna 208,” Johnson said shortly after the accident. “Six souls on board. They’re reporting minor injuries at this point right now, but things are very, very fluid, and it’s unfolding as we speak right now.”

Alaska Seaplanes representative Andy Kline said Friday afternoon no one was injured aboard flight 501, which took off shortly after 8:15 a.m. It was bound for Skagway and then Haines.

“We talked to all five passengers and the pilot, and they’ve all been checked out by Capital City Fire and Rescue by the medical professionals there. So no injuries reported and everyone’s in good spirits,” he said.

Kline says it’s too early to say what caused the trouble in the air.

“We know that there was an incident, and the plane ended up back on the runway kind of on its belly and turned around in the opposite direction, so there was a definite bit of, you know, got a little bit in the air and then got spun around. We don’t really know much more than that,” he said.

He says all Alaska Seaplanes flights will be grounded Friday.

“We’ll be working with the National Transportation Safety Board to put together an investigation of it and figure out exactly what happened,” Kline said. “We go through protocols of investigating and looking at the mechanics of the plane, talking to our pilot, talking to our mechanics and looking at what might have happened or what possibly failed or what could have possibly gone wrong on the flight.”

Kline says the airline expects flights to resume by Saturday and is making arrangements to get passengers home safely. Meanwhile, the Alaska Airlines website shows scheduled flights have been diverted or delayed while Juneau’s runway is cleared to reopen.






An Alaska Seaplanes plane headed for Skagway crashed Friday morning during an attempted takeoff from the Juneau Airport. 

The Cessna 208B Grand Caravan carried five passengers and the pilot on flight 501 to Skagway. Everyone on board was able to exit the aircraft and there were no reports of severe injuries. All involved were examined by Capitol Fire and Rescue.

Andy Kline, Alaska Seaplanes marketing manager, said the plane, which took off at 8:43 a.m., had difficulty gaining altitude and when it touched again, one wheel was not on the runway, causing the plane to spin around in the direction it had come from.

According to a press release, Seaplanes has cancelled all flights today, but plans to resume their schedule on Saturday. Flights to Skagway are weather dependent, according to Kline, who referenced a storm predicted for the area this weekend.

The Juneau airport runway was closed temporarily, disrupting other flights into and out of the airport, including Alaska Airlines confirmed an Alaska Airlines spokesperson.

The 208B is one of four Grand Caravans in the fleet. It has a larger under area for mail and cargo.

As of Friday  afternoon the plane is back in the Seaplanes hanger and the airline is cooperating with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)  Alaska regional agents.

“The plane is in one piece, but it is severely damaged,” said Kline.

Kline said that working with NTSB to ascertain the cause of the mishap means looking at everything, including weighing any offloaded cargo. A slow process.

Kline said that there was some mail on the plane that was headed to Skagway and there is a chance that some mail was impacted or possibly damaged..

The Skagway post office referred media requests to the marketing manager in Anchorage for comment. 

Kline says flights to Skagway, and hopefully mail delivery,  will resume Saturday, “weather permitting.” 

“It’s our job to get the mail delivered.  We have it in our possession,” he said.

With the event “we are reminded that we are such a linchpin to these communities.  Our priority is our passengers and getting mail and cargo delivered,” said Kline.



Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N7371P: Accident occurred October 23, 2021 in Sligo, Clarion County, Pennsylvania

JSNTG INC

https://registry.faa.gov/N7371P



SLIGO, Pennsylvania  – Crews are on the scene of a plane crash in the Sligo area.

The crash happened around 9:59 a.m. Saturday in the area of 3717 Huckleberry Ridge Road.

Sources say a single-engine plane crashed into a privately owned field for unknown reasons.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the crash, according to Clarion County 9-1-1.

Clarion-based State Police, Southern Clarion County Ambulance and fire departments from Sligo, Rimersburg, Callensburg, Clarion, and Perry Township were dispatched to the scene.

The crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, an independent federal agency that investigates civilian transportation accidents.

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N1188L: Incident occurred October 23, 2021 near Francis S. Gabreski Airport (KFOK), Suffolk County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York 

Aircraft crashed short of the runway. 

Convolo LLC


Date: 23-OCT-21
Time: 17:34:00Z
Regis#: N1188L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: WESTHAMPTON
State: NEW YORK




In an attempt to make an emergency landing at Gabreski Airport in Westhampton Beach, a 75-year-old pilot crashed his small plane into some shrubs on County Road 104 in East Quogue on Saturday afternoon after experiencing engine failure.

The pilot, a New York City resident who was unharmed, had taken off from East Hampton Airport and was traveling west before his crash landing.

Southampton Town Patrol Units and Detectives initially responded to the scene, along with New York State Police, which is now handling the investigation.





A small plane overshot the runway at Gabreski Airport and ended up in some shrubs near County Road 104 and Lewis Road, according to the Suffolk County Department of Fire, Rescue and Emergency Services.

Authorities say there were no injuries involved with the incident. 

According to Southampton police:

"The pilot took off from Easthampton Airport and was travelling west. The pilot experienced engine failure and was attempting to make an emergency landing at Gabreski Airport, but was unable to make the runway crashing in to some shrubs. The pilot, a male, 75 from NYC was unharmed."

Piper PA-28-140, N98241: Accident occurred October 06, 2021 in Albany, Linn County, Oregon

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

LH Investments Inc 


Location: Albany, Oregon
Accident Number: WPR22LA009
Date and Time: October 6, 2021, 17:30 Local 
Registration: N98241
Aircraft: Piper PA-28-140 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N98241
Model/Series: PA-28-140 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 44.637815,-123.05944 (est)