Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport (KROA) executives resign after internal investigation


ROANOKE, Virginia – Two executives at the Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport have resigned after they were placed on administrative leave pending an investigation last year.

Officials with the airport confirmed Tuesday evening that executive director Timothy Bradshaw and director of planning and engineering Richard Osbourne both resigned.

As 10 News reported back in November, Bradshaw and Osborne were on administrative leave pending an investigation. 

Airport officials said the internal investigation was regarding a procedural matter, but did not release further details to the public about it.

Bradshaw has been with the airport since 2014.

Orange County Supervisors Reverse Charter Jet Service Ban, But Company’s Fate at John Wayne Airport (KSNA) Remains Unclear



After county attempts to ban it, a charter jet company’s unique arrangement to fly passengers out of a noncommercial aircraft facility at John Wayne Airport is safe — for now.

Orange County Supervisors on Tuesday struck down a provision of their new agreements with airport hangar operators — approved in September — that would have banned the commuter jet company, JSX, from flying customers out of them. 

The new agreement with the company operating the facility JSX is housed in, ACI Jet, meant JSX could no longer tout a business model of faster flight service — free of long check-in delays — separate from the other, often crowded airline terminals. 

The supervisors’ decision came after a federal judge overturned the JSX ban, and that ruling came after JSX filed a federal lawsuit against the county alleging it was kicking the charter jet service out of the airport in bad faith. 

Still, with this win for JSX, it’s unclear if ACI Jet wants to continue hosting the company out of its facility, one of a few at the airport, known as “General Aviation facilities,” which are reserved for small propeller planes and noncommercial aircraft.

The uncertainty comes out of previous statements by ACI Jet CEO William Borgsmiller casting doubt on whether the company might continue to lease space to JSX, and out of nearby communities’ opposition to general aviation facilities hosting commercial airlines. 

In a Tuesday email to residents, Newport Beach officials — who led calls to limit the amount of space and service to private jets and airlines at the general aviation facilities — didn’t appear to be worried by supervisors’ Tuesday decision to allow JSX to lease space from ACI Jet.

In fact, officials in their email said they have “no reason to believe the FBOs (hangar operators like ACI Jet) have plans to change their business models and schedule commercial flights from their facilities.”

ACI Jet’s decision to boot JSX came in part because county officials made it a term of their renewed agreement with the company to lease the general aviation facility. 

But Borgsmiller in a past hearing in JSX’s federal lawsuit case testified it was “one of many factors that influenced that business decision.”

Still, U.S. District Court Judge Josephine L. Staton in her ruling — which at one point appears to cite video evidence of Borgsmiller speaking with fellow executives at his company — found “it was the county’s decision, not ACI Jet’s, to include the restrictive term in the 35-year fixed base operator (“FBO”) lease between ACI Jet and the county.”

For now, JSX can continue operating on its current business model, which allows screened passengers to bypass the usual Transit Security Administration (TSA) checkpoints that have become custom to flyers. 

JSX has refused to disclose the details of its own security process, which it maintains is federally authorized, calling them “security sensitive.”

Ohio State University Airport (KOSU) has been tax exempt since 1943. That could change


The state's high court is considering whether the Ohio State University Airport should continue to be exempt from property taxes, given the changing nature of operations at the Northwest Side facility.

A Worthington man filed suit to force OSU to pay taxes on parts of the property not directly dedicated to student learning, rather than legally forgoing those payments as it has for decades. OSU counters that the airport is an integral part of more than two dozen degree programs and research and other educational activities and meets state law requirements for the exemption.

Justices heard oral arguments in the case Wednesday; a final decision is expected in coming months.

Plaintiff: Airport more than educational 

The nearly 326-acre Don Scott Field has been owned by the university since 1942 and exempt from property taxes since ’43.

Worthington resident John O’Keeffe filed a formal complaint in 2016 about the latter, saying the airport’s role has evolved over the decades, from a private facility that solely benefited OSU’s flight education program to a public airport today. A substantial portion of the property is used by private individuals and corporations.

Keeffe’s suit also noted that, under Federal Aviation Administration grant regulations, no income produced on by the airport property can be used to directly support the general expenses of the university. Those funds, instead, go toward the maintenance and operations at the airport.

That point prompted a question of Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor Wednesday: “Well, if the university doesn’t have to expend funds and those funds can be diverted for other operations of the university, and there’s a benefit to the university community, in other words the students, why is that not sufficient?" 

Attorney Sandra Dickinson, representing O’Keeffe, responded that much of the property is no longer directly supports the university's educational activities.

OSU: Entire airport is a 'learning laboratory'

The state tax commissioner and the Ohio Board of Tax Appeals earlier upheld the exemption, noting that the airport’s operations support the university, as a “learning laboratory” for students, with direct and indirect benefits to OSU’s educational mission.

Attorney Hilary Houston, representing the university, said the airport falls under OSU’s engineering college and is used for educational and research purposes — a learning laboratory that supports more than 30 degree programs. The facility also operates at a loss, with the university financially subsidizing operations.

“The airport is operated and managed by Ohio State students, faculty and staff, and it’s used specifically for courses like airport management, planning and design, aeronautical, mechanical and civil engineering, architecture, industrial design and finance, just to name a few,” Houston said.

Justice Sharon L. Kennedy asked about an OSU map that designated areas at the airport used by students and those used by private companies, including runways for private use only to allow the landing of larger aircraft.

But attorney Kimberly Allison, representing the state tax commissioner, said the property has to be taken as a whole, not pieced out by use for tax purposes.

“The entire system is a learning laboratory,” she said. “Students come to Ohio State, they can take these programs and they can get the experience … with the control tower and the multiple runways — experiences that they can’t get anywhere else. They clearly operationally relate to the operation of the university.”

Airline owes Hancock County-Bar Harbor Airport (KBHB) almost $14,000



TRENTON, Maine — Hancock County intends to explore collection efforts against Silver Airways, which hasn’t paid the Hancock County-Bar Harbor Airport for services rendered since June of 2020. Silver Airways offered daily nonstop service between Bar Harbor and Boston for the past two summer seasons. However, the airline’s contract with the U.S. Department of Transportation to provide service at the Trenton airport expired October 14, Airport Manager Leroy Muise said. Cape Air took over the contract on October 15.

Muise said the airport has not received payments from Silver Airways for the months of July, August, September and October. The total due is $13,697. That figure stems from fees for passenger enplanement, aircraft landing, rental space on the electronic road sign and ground service equipment rental, Muise said. The overdue payment came up at the January 5 meeting of the Hancock County Commissioners.

Muise told the board he would try again to reach the airline’s chief executive officer. “I think we should reach out to legal, see what their recommendation is,” said County Administrator Scott Adkins. Commissioner Paul Paradis motioned to authorize Muise and Adkins to research collections from Silver, which was supported by commissioners Bill Clark and John Wombacher. Silver Airways did not respond to requests for comment.

Former Desert Aire Airport (M94) commissioner receives award

Former Desert Aire Regional Airport commissioner Karl Gruber displays his Wright Brothers Master Pilot award.


DESERT AIRE, Washington — Former Desert Aire Regional Airport Commissioner Karl Gruber was awarded the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award.

According to the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration), the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award is only given to those who have been an aviation pilot for a minimum of 50 years, making it one of the most prestigious awards the FAA offers.

Gruber got his first airplane, a Taylorcraft, when he was 19 years old.

“When I first started to fly and got certified in 1965, you could fly for $10 an hour with an instructor,” Gruber said. “I got my entire private pilot certificate for about $400. You can spend that on one lesson today.”

With that first airplane, Gruber would fly into Canada to go camping and fishing.

After getting an industrial engineering degree at the University of Washington, Gruber began flying commercially for Renton Aviation. He flew the route into Rivers Inlet Resort, in British Columbia, which was known for its lack of weather reporting.

“What you see is what you get, and it was usually the worst weather,” Gruber said.

The year before Gruber took over the route, two other airplanes crashed, but those didn’t bother Gruber.

“I thought I was really cool and invincible,” Gruber said. “I was young.”

Next, Gruber turned to instructing for the Seattle Flight Service. At that time, commercial flight lessons were part of the GI Bill.

“I logged 2,000 hours in a little over a year,” Gruber said. “Then the GI Bill stopped. Not a single student walked in the door. Everyone got fired.”

That setback didn’t stop Gruber from finding new ways to continue flying. He partnered with a friend to purchase an airplane they used to fly associate buyers for the Bon Marche. He did this for 20 years.

“We flew them virtually everywhere,” Gruber said.

From there, Gruber began flying billionaire businessmen and celebrities internationally in “$50 million airplanes.”

“I flew all sorts of celebrities,” Gruber said. “I still can’t say who and where I flew because I signed confidentiality agreements.”

Around 2011, Gruber and his wife moved to Desert Aire, where he served as an airport commissioner from 2014-2019. During his time as commissioner, the airport received a $1 million grant for the repaving of the runway, an accomplishment he credits to former commissioner Cliff Naser.

Due to health issues his wife was having associated with the pesticides, herbicides and smoke in the Columbia Basin, Gruber moved away in 2019.

“I don’t have my house or my hangar,” Gruber said. “But my heart is still there.”

Gruber currently lives near Port Townsend and is involved in an airplane club. He also continues to do some instructing.

“My one claim to fame in 55 years is that I’ve never drawn blood or bent metal,” Gruber said. “I’ve never had any infractions from the FAA.”

Gruber received the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award in December of 2020 after friends, who had already received the award, urged him to apply.

“You have to request it,” Gruber said.

The award application must include three letters of recommendation and a biography of what the pilot has done during their 50 years of flying.

“Once you send it to the FAA, they investigate you,” Gruber said. “It takes about a month. They make sure you have no infractions.”

Landing Gear Not Configured: Beech 95-B55 (T42A) Baron, N1621W; accident occurred August 21, 2020 at Athens Municipal Airport (F44), Texas




Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Athens, Texas
Accident Number: CEN20CA363
Date & Time: August 21, 2020, 19:45 Local
Registration: N1621W
Aircraft: Beech 55 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The airline transport pilot and private pilot rated passenger departed on a local, personal flight. The pilot reported that he failed to extend the landing gear before landing. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage ribs and stringers. He said that the landing gear warning did not sound through the headsets, so the sound was faint and that the gear warning sounded like the stall warning, which was “confusing.” The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to extend the landing gear during the approach and landing.

Findings

Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Pilot
Aircraft Gear extension and retract sys - Not used/operated

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-flare/touchdown Landing gear not configured (Defining event)
Landing Abnormal runway contact

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport
Age: 66,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider 
Restraint Used: Lap only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane multi-engine; Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: February 11, 2020
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: February 11, 2020
Flight Time: (Estimated) 25400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0.8 hours (Total, this make and model), 18750 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 27 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Pilot-rated passenger Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 59,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Airship
Restraint Used: Lap only
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane multi-engine 
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Unknown 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: April 23, 2020
Flight Time: (Estimated) 297 hours (Total, all aircraft), 25 hours (Total, this make and model), 224 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 44 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 19 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N1621W
Model/Series: 55 95B55 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1972 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: TC-1455
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle 
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: November 15, 2019 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6000 Hrs at time of accident 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed Engine Model/Series: IO-470
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 285 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: F44,441 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 19:35 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.88 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Athens, TX
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Destination: Athens, TX
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Athens Municipal Airport F44
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 444 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3988 ft / 60 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 32.199375,-95.850013(est)

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Cessna R182 Skylane RG, N639RR; accident occurred August 24, 2020 in Crowley, Acadia Parish, Louisiana


 






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Crowley, Louisiana 
Accident Number: CEN20LA361
Date & Time: August 24, 2020, 09:35 Local 
Registration: N639RR
Aircraft: Cessna R182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Aerial observation

Analysis

About 30 minutes into the aerial observation flight, the engine began "popping" and running rough. The pilot was unable to maintain sufficient engine RPMs and elected to return to the departure airport for a precautionary landing. Based on the airplane's location relative to the runway orientation, the pilot performed a downwind landing. During the approach, the airplane was "a little high and fast;" however, the pilot was committed to the landing due to the reduced engine performance. The airplane touched down, overran the end of the turf runway impacted a ditch and came to rest upright. Both wings and the fuselage sustained substantial damage. Postaccident examination of the engine revealed the No. 4 engine cylinder exhaust valve was stuck which resulted in a bent push rod and partial loss of engine power. Due to damage to the operator's facility and the airplane from hurricane activity, further examination of the engine was not conducted and the reason for the stuck valve was not
determined.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The failure of the No. 4 cylinder exhaust valve that resulted in a partial loss of engine power.  Based on available evidence, the reason for the failed valve was not determined.

Findings

Aircraft Recip eng cyl section - Failure

Factual Information

On August 24, 2020, about 0935 central daylight time, a Cessna R182 airplane, N639RR, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Crowley, Louisiana. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation flight.

According to the pilot, the preflight engine run-up and takeoff were normal. About 30 minutes into the aerial observation flight, the engine began "popping" and running rough. The pilot was unable to maintain sufficient engine RPMs and elected to return to the departure airport for a precautionary landing. Based on the airplane's location relative to the runway orientation, the pilot performed a downwind landing. During the approach, the airplane was "a little high and fast;" however, the pilot was committed to the landing due to the reduced engine performance. The airplane touched down, overran the end of the turf runway, impacted a ditch and came to rest upright.

The pilot reported the airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

Postaccident examination of the engine by the operator revealed the No. 4 engine cylinder exhaust valve was stuck which resulted in a bent push rod and partial loss of engine power. Following the accident, hurricane activity damaged the operator's facility and the accident airplane, and further examination of the engine was unable to be conducted.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial 
Age: 31,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: July 30, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: November 21, 2018
Flight Time: 1129 hours (Total, all aircraft), 692 hours (Total, this make and model), 1036 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 223 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 70 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N639RR
Model/Series: R182 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: R18200245
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: August 4, 2020 100 hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 35 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 9316.6 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-540-J3C5D
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 235 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: IYA,16 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 09:35 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 120°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1600 ft AGL
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 40° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Crowley, LA (LS09)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Crowley, LA (LS09)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 08:50 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: AJ Patrol Airport LS09
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 16 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18 IFR 
Approach: None Runway
Length/Width: 2400 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop; Precautionary landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 30.138889,-92.333335(est)











WARRANTY:  There is no warranty, express or implied for the information provided herein or the condition, useability, workability, operability or marketability of the aircraft salvage.  All times are approximate and the logbooks and aircraft should be inspected by each bidder BEFORE BIDDING.  Failure of the bidder to view the salvage or wreckage, or confirm any information provided is NOT grounds for a claim or withdrawal of bid after bid closing date.) 
                      
HOURS estimated from logbooks or other information - not guaranteed or warranted

AIRCRAFT:   1978 Cessna 182RG N639RR, sn: R18200245

Last log entry is a 100 Hour Inspection on 08/04/20 at 9282.0 AFTT, 4947.0 Tach 

ENGINE:  Lycoming 0-540-J3C5D, s/n: L L-18613-40A

Times on 08/04/20 per log – TTE 11,533.4; STOH 140.9; SMOH 4454.7           

PROPELLER:   McCauley B2D34C214-B, s/n: 042432.  2012 OH

EQUIPMENT:  
King 155
King 165
King KR87
King 76A
King 24
Cessna S-tec 300 Autopilot
Intercom Telex 4
ARC 832                                                           

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  On 8/24/20, the pilot overshot the runway and attempted a go-around but didn’t have enough power.  The aircraft overran the runway, across a road, and ended up in a ditch.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:   Private field at AJ Patrol Airport, Crowley, LA.

REMARKS:   

Insurer reserves the right to reject any and all bids. 

Salvage is as is/where is. 

The posting information is the best to our knowledge. 

An inspection of the salvage is highly recommended. 

LOGS ARE NOT GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATE OR COMPLETE.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com

Brunner-Winkle Bird CK, N933V: Accident occurred September 09, 2020 at Enterprise Municipal Airport (8S4), Wallowa County, Oregon

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise


Location: Enterprise, OR 
Accident Number: WPR20CA309
Date & Time: September 9, 2020, 19:00 Local 
Registration: N933V
Aircraft: Bird CK
Injuries: N/A
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bird 
Registration: N933V
Model/Series: CK
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: Aircraft Fire:
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:
Total Injuries: N/A 
Latitude, Longitude: 45.424999,-117.264999 (est)

Ultramagic N-500, N500UM: Accident occurred September 18, 2020 in Peoria, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Randy Long Companies LLC 


Location: Peoria, AZ 
Accident Number: WPR20LA333
Date & Time: September 18, 2020, 09:00 Local 
Registration: N500UM
Aircraft: Ultramagic N500 
Injuries: 2 Serious, 18 None
Flight Conducted
Under: Part 91: General aviation - Aerial observation

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Ultramagic
Registration: N500UM
Model/Series: N500
Aircraft Category: Balloon
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: 2 Serious, 17 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 18 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.797271,112.240896 (est)

Mooney M20F Executive, N7798M: Accident occurred October 02, 2020 at Centennial Airport (KAPA), Denver, Colorado

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado   

 Accident Number: CEN21LA009
Date & Time: October 2, 2020, 10:39 Local
Registration: N7798M
Aircraft: Mooney M20F 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal
  
Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information
  
Aircraft Make: Mooney 
Registration: N7798M
Model/Series: M20F NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:
  
Meteorological Information and Flight Plan
  
Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Denver, CO
Destination: Denver, CO
  
Wreckage and Impact Information
  
Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.58,-104.85 (est)

Cessna 172 Skyhawk, N5910A: Accident occurred October 24, 2020 in Geuda Springs, Kansas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Location: Geuda Springs, KS
Accident Number: CEN21LA029
Date & Time: October 24, 2020, 17:30 Local
Registration: N5910A
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N5910A
Model/Series: 172 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: WLD,1160 ft msl 
Observation Time: 17:15 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C /30°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Benton, KS (1K1)
Destination: Winfield, KS (WLD)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 31.0451,-97.2163 (est)

Cirrus SR20, N720TX: Accident occurred November 05, 2020 at Fort Worth Alliance Airport (KAFW), Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas 

PSA Finance LLC


Location: Fort Worth, TX
Accident Number: CEN21LA108
Date & Time: November 5, 2020, 22:33 Local 
Registration: N720TX
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On November 5, 2020, at 2233 central standard time, a Cirrus SR20 airplane, N720TX, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Fort Worth, Texas. The flight instructor and pilot receiving instruction were not injured. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight.

According to information obtained by the Federal Aviation Administration, the nose wheel landing gear collapsed during touch and go landings at Fort Worth Alliance Airport (AFW), Fort Worth, Texas, to runway 16R. The airplane was towed from the runway. An examination of the airplane by FAA inspectors found the nose landing gear had fractured. Damage to the area was found to be substantial.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N720TX
Model/Series: SR20 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: AFW,685 ft msl
Observation Time: 22:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C /14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 110°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Addison, TX (ADS)
Destination: Fort Worth, TX

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.985303,-97.318095

Piper PA-32R-301, N35718: Accident occurred January 12, 2021 at Paul C. Miller–Sparta Airport (8D4), Kent County, Michigan

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan


Location: Sparta, MI
Accident Number: CEN21LA112
Date & Time: January 12, 2021, 17:00 Local 
Registration: N35718
Aircraft: Piper PA-32R-301 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On January 12, 2021, about 1700 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-32R-301, N35718, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at the Paul C. Miller Airport (8D4), Sparta, Michigan.

The pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported striking a snowbank short of the runway following a GPS approach. The airframe accumulated about 1/2" of ice during the descent in instrument meteorological conditions. There were no malfunctions associated with the airplane before the accident.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the airplane touched down about 18 ft short of the runway and encountered a small snowbank near the end of the runway. The landing gear collapsed, and the airplane skidded down the runway before coming to rest near the 1,000 ft. touchdown markings.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N35718
Model/Series: PA-32R-301
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGRR, 794 ft msl
Observation Time: 16:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C /-3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 190°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 900 ft AGL
Visibility: 4 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Washington Court House, OH (I23)
Destination: Sparta, MI

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 43.13002,-85.67238

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N19886: Incident occurred January 12, 2021 near Chino Airport, (KCNO) San Bernardino County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aircraft struck a bird and after landing damage was found to the right wing tip. 

Silver Express Company 


Date: 12-JAN-21
Time: 19:35:00Z
Regis#: N19886
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: CHINO
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-12, N2569M: Accident occurred November 23, 2020 in Gilliam, Caddo Parish, Louisiana



This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana 


Location: Gilliam, LA 
Accident Number: CEN21LA087
Date & Time: November 23, 2020, 19:00 Local 
Registration: N2569M
Aircraft: Piper PA-12 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N2569M
Model/Series: PA12 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.823539,-93.84502 (est)

CADDO PARISH, Louisiana  (KSLA) — A pilot is spending the night in a hotel after flipping his Piper PA-12 aircraft in an ArkLaTex cornfield.

The Piper PA-12 was headed from Virginia Beach, Virginia to California when it ran into some fog and rain over Northwest Louisiana about 6 p.m. Sunday, the Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office reports.

So the pilot tried to get the Piper PA-12 to the last airport he had seen, authorities say.

Instead, he attempted to put the plane down on a road near Louisiana Highway 3049 between Gilliam and Belcher. 

The aircraft ran into a cornfield and flipped.

No injuries were reported.

And there was minor damage to the plane.



BELCHER, Louisiana  -- A Piper PA-12 crashed in a corn field on Sunday evening after the pilot accidentally missed the road where he was going to land, according to the Caddo Parish Sheriff's Office.

The plane was found upside down, right off of state Highway 3049 and Cedar Bluff Road.

Caddo deputies said the plane took off near Virginia Beach and was headed to California. 

Deputies said the pilot was transporting the plane to its owner in California.

Caddo Parish sheriff's Cpl. Nathan Wesson said the pilot flew through some heavy fog and rain and he landed in a corn field on private property.

The pilot was not injured in the crash.