Friday, August 18, 2017

Incident occurred August 18, 2017 at Tulsa International Airport (KTUL), Oklahoma

TULSA, Okla. (KTUL) -- An executive jet landed safely Friday afternoon in Tulsa after preparations for an emergency landing.

According to airport dispatchers, the jet circled Tulsa International Airport without landing gear for several miles.

The plane landed safely a short time later and no injuries were reported.

Dispatchers couldn't say the size of the plane or how many were on board.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://ktul.com

Police to view Wiscasset Municipal Airport (KIWI) online

From left, new Airport Advisory Committee member Ervin Deck, Chairman Steve Williams and Police Chief Jeff Lange take part in the committee’s Aug. 16 meeting at Wiscasset Municipal Airport. 



If someone breaks the law at Wiscasset Municipal Airport, the Wiscasset Police Department may see a replay. A new security system has replaced one Airport Manager Frank Costa said was fried in a power surge. On Aug. 16, Costa and Police Chief Jeff Lange described the new one to the airport advisory committee.

Most of the airport’s cameras are on the system, and everything they pick up will be stored for 60 days, Costa said. He said police can use the system to monitor the airport from the station. The web-based system will help the town on insurance costs for the airport, Lange said.

Costa recalled an incident where someone trying to steal gas damaged an airport tenant’s vehicle. Costa said it wasn’t airport property, but he’d felt bad. “We had nothing, absolutely nothing. Now we’ve got a little something,” he said. “Even when we’re not here during the wintertime, (Lange) will be able to, either himself or his personnel, monitor the safety of this airport.”

Lange said if he’s investigating an incident, he can go on the computer at his desk, locate that time frame on the stored footage, and if it shows what happened, determine if a crime occurred. “Then we can prosecute from there,” he said.

The meeting was the first for new member Ervin Deck. He managed the airport before Costa.

Also Aug. 16, Costa agreed to waive any reimbursement for tenants’ displaced planes’ being housed in a town-owned hangar during the Texas Flying Legends Museum’s recent stay. There had been prior talks on the warbirds museum possibly reimbursing the town, but Committee Chairman Steve Williams told Costa, that was when it looked like the museum was staying several weeks. It stayed a week and bought thousands of dollars in fuel, Williams said.

“I don’t see any issue with it at all,” Costa said about not getting reimbursed for the hangar’s use. He thanked the museum for coming, adding, it could have stayed anywhere in the area and chose Wiscasset.

Original article ➤ http://www.wiscassetnewspaper.com

Pitts S-1S Special, N4714H: Accident occurred July 14, 2016 at Fayette County Airport (KFYE), Somerville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA260 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 14, 2016 in Somerville, TN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/17/2017
Aircraft: SORENSEN DANNY PITTS S1 S, registration: 
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a cross-country, personal flight in the experimental, amateur-built, tailwheel-equipped airplane. The pilot reported that, while slowing the airplane after a normal three-point landing in a calm wind, the airplane began swerving. The airplane then departed the right side of the runway and ground looped. 

Examination of the wreckage revealed that the left landing gear leg had separated. Metallurgical examination of the fractured landing gear leg surface revealed a small thumbnail-like fatigue region, followed by an overstress region. 

A previous owner had assembled the airplane from a kit about 32 years before the accident, and it had accumulated about 875 total hours of operation. The builder did not use the stock bungie landing gear that were included with the kit. Rather, to reduce drag, he designed and constructed his own round, tapered rod landing gear. It is likely that the homemade, custom-built landing gear leg could not support the same loading as the stock bungie landing gear, which resulted in fatigue over a period of time and the gear leg's subsequent failure.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the left landing gear leg due to fatigue, which resulted in a ground loop during landing. Contributing to the accident was the airplane builder's installation of a custom-built landing gear rather than the landing gear included with the airplane kit.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Memphis, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N4714H

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA260
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 14, 2016 in Somerville, TN
Aircraft: SORENSEN DANNY PITTS S1 S, registration: N4714H
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 14, 2016, about 1930 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Pitts S1-S, N4714H, was substantially damaged while landing at Fayette County Airport (FYE), Somerville, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Wolf River Airport (54M), Rossville, Tennessee, about 1845.

The pilot reported that after a normal three-point landing in a calm wind, the airplane began swerving as it slowed. The airplane then departed the right side of the runway and ground-looped, which resulted in substantial damage to the lower left wing.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left landing gear leg had separated and exhibited corrosion. The left landing gear leg was retained and forwarded to the National Transportation Safety Board Materials Laboratory for further examination. Metallurgical examination of the fracture surface revealed a small thumbnail like fatigue region followed by an overstress region.

The single-seat, bi-wing, fixed tailwheel airplane, serial number DS-1, was assembled from a kit in 1984 and issued an FAA experimental airworthiness certificate. Its most recent condition inspection was completed on April 23, 2016. At that time, the airframe had accumulated 865 total hours of operation. It had flown an additional 11 hours from the time of the last inspection, until the accident.

The FAA inspector that examined the wreckage further stated that a previous owner built the airplane and did not use the stock bungie landing gear that was included with the kit. Rather, to reduce drag, he designed and constructed his own round tapered rod landing gear.

SkyWest Airlines on behalf of Delta Air Lines, Canadair CRJ-200 N455CA: Incident occurred August 18, 2017 at Capital Region International Airport (KLAN), Lansing, Michigan

Delta Air Lines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N455CA





LANSING, Mich. (WLNS) – Hearing that you’re heading for an emergency landing can make even the most seasoned airline passenger’s panic.

But that’s exactly what happened to a flight that’s fate seemed like it was up in the air this afternoon.

46 passengers along with three crew members were aboard a SkyWest Delta flight when the plane suddenly had to make that emergency landing.

It’s important to note that the plane did land safely and no one was injured.

The plane, a Delta Airlines connector took off from Detroit and was supposed to land in Kalamazoo but airline officials say it was a mechanical glitch that caused the indicator light for landing gear to not work properly…which is the reason why the plane landed at the Capital Region International Airport here in Lansing.

Police and fire officials from multiple agencies including Lansing Police, the Lansing Fire Department as well as Lansing Township responded immediately to the runway.

Again, the plane landed safely and no one was hurt.

As soon as the plane was secure, a full inspection was done of the air craft.

Lansing airport officials say while situations like this don’t happen often, emergency crews are extensively trained and always prepared.

“Well here at the Capital Region International Airport we do multiple training sessions with our partners from the region and that went into activation today, we really were able to reach out to our local response teams and they were here in being able to address the situation and be prepared to handle whatever situation could come from this aircraft coming into Lansing,” said Nicole Noll-Williams; Director of Marketing and Passenger Development at the Capital Region International Airport.

A spokesperson from SkyWest Airlines released a statement earlier explaining what happened…

She says “mechanics will inspect the aircraft and we are working to help customers resume their travels on another aircraft to Kalamazoo as quickly as possible.”

It was within a few hours passengers started boarding that other flight to take them to Kalamazoo, but as you might imagine a couple of passengers decided to use ground transportation as well.

UPDATE: A representative from SkyWest Airlines released the following statement:

“SkyWest flight 4896, operating as Delta Connection from Detroit, Michigan to Kalamazoo diverted to Lansing due to a mechanical indication. The flight landed safely and customers deplaned normally at the gate. Mechanics will inspect the aircraft and we are working to help customers resume their travels on another aircraft to Kalamazoo as quickly as possible.” 

LANSING, Mich. (WLNS) – There was a scare at the Capital Region International Airport this afternoon. Officials tell us the plane was having problems with a sensor that tells the pilot if the landing gear is working properly.

However we can confirm now that the plane has landed safely.



Original article can be found here ➤ http://wlns.com

DEWITT TWP. - A SkyWest flight from Detroit to Kalamazoo landed safely after diverting to Capital Region International Airport because of a mechanical issue.

Nicole Noll-Williams, director of marketing and passenger development for the airport, said an indicator light had gone off in relation to the plane’s landing gear.

A total of 46 passengers and three crew members safely exited the plane after its arrival in Lansing, according to a statement from the SkyWest Airlines.

SkyWest said it was arranging for another aircraft to carry passengers to Kalamazoo, although passengers apparently were given the option to use ground transportation. 

Mechanics were inspecting the cause of the issue, the airline said. 

The crew were operating as a Delta Connection flight between Detroit and Kalamazoo. Flight 4896 departed from Detroit Metro Airport at 4:23 p.m. bound for Kalamazoo/Battle Creek International Airport, according to the airport's website.

Crews from the Lansing Fire Department were dispatched to the airport as a precaution. Lansing Township Fire also sent an ambulance, Noll-Williams said.

Original article ➤ http://www.lansingstatejournal.com

DEWITT TOWNSHIP, Mich. (WILX) UPDATE 7:04PM

SkyWest Airlines released the following statement to wilx.com about the emergency landing.

"SkyWest flight 4896, operating as Delta Connection from Detroit, Michigan to Kalamazoo diverted to Lansing due to a mechanical indication. The flight landed safely and all 46 customers deplaned normally at the gate. Mechanics will inspect the aircraft and we are working to help customers resume their travels on another aircraft to Kalamazoo as quickly as possible."

A Delta SkyWest flight from Detroit Metro Airport to Kalamazoo/Battle Creek International Airport had to make an emergency landing at Capital Region International airport Friday evening. Capital Region staff tells wilx.com an emergency light came on warning the flight crew of a problem with the landing gear. The plane landed safely. There is no word of injuries at this time. 

Original article can be found here ➤http://www.wilx.com

Ellington Airport (KEFD), Houston, Texas: Aircraft to help scientists chase eclipse

Amir Caspi, Southwest Research Institute senior research scientist, talks about the NASA WB-57F jet that will used for research during the eclipse shown at Ellington Airport Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, in Houston. 



Two former weather reconnaissance planes at Ellington Airport have waited seven years to record something they've never spied before. They aim to help capture 7 ½ minutes of video as the moon creeps across the face of the sun to create a total eclipse visible across a long swath of the United States.

The planes will take off from Ellington with powerful telescopes and use the rare window of darkness to make observations of the sun's corona and its nearest planetary neighbor, Mercury, that would be impossible in normal daylight. Scientists hope those observations could ultimately help shed light on a host of mysteries, including big-picture questions about the sun's inner workings and more practical applications such as predicting space weather created by the sun that can damage satellites and knock out power grids.

"I'm a little anxious ... to make sure that everything goes well and that we get the data that we need," said Amir Caspi, principal investigator of the project and a senior research scientist in Southwest Research Institute's Colorado office.

Scientists have spent about a year preparing for the eclipse mission. Using NASA's WB-57 aircraft for astronomical research, however, has been about seven years in the making. This is the first time they will be used for astronomy.

"What we're hoping for is that this not only gets us really amazing data for this particular mission," Caspi said, "but also essentially showcases the potential of this platform for future astronomical missions. So hopefully we'll be able to do this, and things like this, again many times."

The NASA planes will take off from Ellington Airport around 10 a.m. Monday and fly west of St. Louis, where they'll pick up the projected eclipse path and aim their telescopes at Mercury.




The dirt on Mercury 

The brilliance of the sun makes Mercury difficult to observe during the day. And viewing along the horizon at dusk or dawn presents challenges because, compared with looking straight up into the sky, scientists have to look through more of the Earth's atmosphere. That can distort images.

Caspi said scientists don't fully know what materials make up the top few centimeters of Mercury's soil or how compact it is. A heat map comparing the portion of the planet facing the sun with the portion rotated away from the sun, which is about 1,000 degrees colder, could help determine the surface composition as different materials heat up and cool down at different speeds.

Understanding the soil could give scientists a better idea of how rocky planets like Mercury and Mars form. The mission led by San Antonio-based Southwest Research Institute will use infrared telescopes in an attempt to make the first-ever thermal images of Mercury's surface, Caspi said.

"We don't exactly know what we're going to see or if we're going to be successful at it," he said, "because it's the first time that we will have tried it."

The planes will fly along the projected total eclipse path at about 450 miles per hour as they collect data on Mercury.

The umbra, or dark inner shadow of the moon where observers see the total solar eclipse, will travel from Oregon to South Carolina at varying speeds. It will be going about 1,450 miles per hour when it catches up to the planes, Caspi said.

At this point of total darkness, telescopes with a green filter will focus on the sun's corona.




The space weather forecast

Caspi said there's much to glean from studying the sun's corona.

"Partly it's because we're nerds and we like to learn about physics and astronomy," he said.

Studying the sun could ultimately help scientists learn about other stars and, thus, about whether planets orbiting those stars could sustain life.

On the more practical side, he said the sun drives space weather. Coronal mass ejections, where the sun throws off billions of tons of material, can damage satellites, disrupt GPS service or knock out power grids.




"To better understand the source and cause of these space weather hazards, we need to understand how the corona works," Caspi said. "And that will help us hopefully predict when these hazards might occur, especially at the dangerous level, and eventually therefore put preparation programs in place."

Scientists hope to answer two main questions: Why the corona is millions of degrees hotter than the sun's surface and why magnetic structures in the corona don't get tangled into a big knot.

For the first question, he said scientists know that energy is being transferred to the corona, making it hot. But scientists don't know how the energy is being transferred. The normal methods of heat transfer - radiation, convection or conduction - don't work effectively because the corona is too thin.

So scientists have two theories about how heat travels there: wave heating and nanoflares.

Wave heating involves the corona's magnetic structures, which can be seen as loops, arcades and fans. It theorizes that waves are carrying energy along these magnetic structures to the corona. That energy would heat up the corona.

Nanoflares, on the other hand, are like miniature solar flares. Scientists say these small yet powerful explosions could be happening all the time in the corona.

To detect which method is heating the corona, Caspi said scientists will look for moving sequences of brightening and dimming, resembling ripples in a pond. If these sequences are moving away from the sun, then wave heating could be occurring. If these sequences are moving toward the sun, that could indicate nanoflares.

It's likely that scientists will detect a combination of the two, he said.

As for the tangling of the corona's magnetic structure, Caspi said these structures are rooted in the constantly moving surface of the sun. So in theory, they should be twisted into something resembling bed head. But they don't appear to get tangled, and scientists would like some insight into why.




Seating is limited 

Observations from the WB-57s during the total eclipse will be used to create a 7½-minute video. Viewers on the ground in that area will only get 2 minutes and 40 seconds of total darkness.

The planes will be separated by about 70 miles, meaning there will be 10 or 20 seconds with both planes in the total eclipse, and their footage will be stitched together to create the 7½ minutes. After the total eclipse passes both planes, they will spend another half hour observing Mercury before returning to Ellington.

The entire trip is expected to take 5½ to six hours.

"It's an exciting project," said Charles Mallini, program manager for NASA's WB-57s. "It's a good opportunity. We had the aircraft, the sensors, so it was a perfect match."

The cameras and telescopes were initially developed after the Space Shuttle Columbia accident. Birmingham, Ala.-based Southern Research developed the technology to better observe shuttle launches.




Southern Research has since upgraded the instruments so they could be used for astronomical science during Monday's mission. The test on Monday is being funded by a NASA grant, and Mallini said it could inspire other scientists to use the WB-57s for astronomical research.

And since the planes have just two seats - one for the pilot and one for the telescope operator - Caspi and his team will have to watch the solar eclipse from a screen at Ellington. Video from the mission will be livestreamed to the ground.

"This is my first total solar eclipse, and I get to watch it on a video monitor," Caspi said. "It's the sacrifice for science."

Original article  ➤ http://www.houstonchronicle.com

Buzz overhead leads Border Patrol to make San Diego's first drone drug-smuggling arrest

A dozen packages of meth, weighing just over 13 pounds, were flown into the U.S. from Mexico by drone on Aug. 8, federal authorities said. (Courtesy U.S. Customs and Border Protection)



The buzz of a motor overhead at nearly 11:30 p.m. was the tip-off.

A remote control-operated drone flew over the border fence from Mexico, heading for San Ysidro while a Border Patrol agent listened and watched. He radioed ahead to other agents to be on the lookout for the small aircraft.

Ten minutes later, federal authorities had what they say is their first confirmed San Diego case of drug smuggling by drone.

Late on the night of Aug. 8, agents arrested a man carrying a bag full of heroin — more than 13 pounds valued at an estimated $46,000. They found the drone stashed under a bush near Servando Avenue and Valentine Street, authorities said Friday.

“This is a new method we’re seeing,” Border Patrol supervising Agent Mark Endicott said.

“We’ve had some success on the ground when it comes to (catching) smugglers of humans and controlled substances. So transnational organizations are looking for other ways to get their product into the country.”

After his arrest in San Ysidro last week, Jose Edwin Rivera, 25, told investigators he had smuggled drugs by drone into the U.S. from Mexico five or six times since March, according to a criminal complaint filed in San Diego federal court on Aug. 9. He said he usually turned the drugs over to a man at a San Ysidro gas station, pocketing $1,000 on delivery.

The complaint said Rivera told a Border Patrol agent and a Homeland Security Investigations agent that he normally would communicate with contacts in Mexico for instructions after retrieving the drone and drugs. He said he expected to do so on Aug. 8, but was interrupted by his arrest.

Rivera remains in jail on a charge of importing a controlled substance. He has pleaded not guilty.

While the drone smuggling arrest is a first in San Diego County, a 2015 case in Imperial County was the first in the Southwest region involving an unmanned aerial vehicle. Two men pleaded guilty to flying 30 pounds of marijuana over the border to Calexico.

Endicott said there have been seven known drone incursions into the U.S. across San Diego and Imperial counties. Five were last year. The two this year include this month’s incident. In the six prior cases, he said, agents either lost sight of the drone or it flew back to Mexico.

Lauren Mack, spokeswoman for Homeland Security Investigations in San Diego, said a few years ago a methamphetamine-laden drone was launched in Tijuana but never made it across the border before Mexican authorities stopped it.

“That was a sign they were going to possibly use drones in this area,” Mack said.

She said a special air unit of HSI works smuggling cases involving planes, ultralight aircraft and drones.

“The goal would be to work as quickly as we could to identify the organization behind the smuggling,” Mack said.

Acting U.S. Attorney Alana Robinson said law enforcement has known about drug-smuggling drones for a number of years.

Their advantage to the smugglers is that they can operate the devices from Mexico, out of reach of U.S. prosecutors. Drawbacks, Robinson said, are that drones are noisy and have a limited carrying capacity.

“The concern though is as technology improves, particularly in the area of how quiet a drone can be and the life of the battery,” Robinson said. “That can be more of an issue.”

She said a drone that can carry a dozen pounds or more “is, on the scale of things, on the small side” compared to drug loads found in airplanes, semi-truck trailers and cars.

“It’s a concern,” Endicott added. “I wouldn’t call it an epidemic. We want to eliminate the threat before it becomes one.”

Original article ➤ http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

Diamond DA20-C1 Katana, Falcon Aviation Academy LLC, N85WP (and) Beechcraft F33A Bonanza, N6027K: Fatal accident occurred September 07, 2016 at West Georgia Regional Airport (KCTJ), Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia

Taylor Nicole Stone
~

Lt Col William L. "Bill" Lindsey
~



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

N6027K - Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

N85WP - Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

William L. Lindsey: http://registry.faa.gov/N6027K

Falcon Aviation Academy LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N85WP




NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312A 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: BEECH F33, registration: N6027K
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA20, registration: N85WP
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 7, 2016, at 1048 eastern daylight time, a Beech F33A, N6027K, and a Diamond Aircraft Industries DA20-C1, N85WP, collided in midair on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern to runway 35 at West Georgia Regional Airport (CTJ), Carrollton, Georgia. The Beech was substantially damaged, and the private pilot was fatally injured. The Diamond was destroyed, and the flight instructor and the student pilot were fatally injured. The Beech was registered to and operated by the private pilot. The Diamond was registered to and operated by Falcon Aviation Academy LLC. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91; the Beech pilot was conducting a personal flight, and the Diamond pilots were conducting an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for either flight. The Beech departed from Fulton County Airport (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia, about 0915, and the Diamond departed from Newnan Coweta County Airport (CCO), Newnan, Georgia, about 1000.

According to personnel from Falcon Aviation Academy, the pilots of the Diamond were practicing traffic pattern operations and landings at CTJ. The Diamond entered the traffic pattern, followed a few minutes later by N263CF and then by N169PS, both Falcon Aviation Academy DA20s. The flight instructor and student pilot on board N263CF saw the Beech on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern. Moments later, the flight instructor and student pilot on board N169PS entered the traffic pattern from the east. They looked down and to the left, in the direction of the final approach path for runway 35, and saw two airplanes collide. The instructors and the students on board both trailing DA20s reported that they did not hear the Beech pilot broadcasting his intentions on the CTJ common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) but they heard the accident Diamond making position calls in the traffic pattern before the collision, with the last call being made on the final approach.

Another flight instructor employed by Falcon Aviation Academy reported that he was familiar with the Beech pilot and his airplane. He had just completed a flight at CCO and heard the Beech pilot broadcasting traffic pattern calls for CTJ about the time of the accident; however, the Beech pilot was broadcasting over the CCO CTAF of 122.7 MHz. The flight instructor reported that the Beech pilot was not in the traffic pattern at CCO at the time of the transmissions.

Radar data provided by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control personnel indicated that the Beech pilot entered an extended left downwind for CTJ from the north, above and behind the accident Diamond, which was on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern. The ground speed of the Beech was about 50 knots greater than the ground speed of the Diamond. The last radar returns were on the downwind leg, about 2,000 ft above mean sea level, or about 850 ft above the ground. The locations of the last radar returns showed the airplanes approaching the base leg for runway 35.

The Diamond was not equipped with GPS data recording capability. A portable GPS receiver recovered from the Beech recorded the accident flight. The recording indicated that the Beech was established on the downwind leg for runway 35, about 2,500 ft GPS altitude and 150 knots groundspeed. The CTJ airport elevation was 1,164 ft. The Beech descended toward the base leg, turning base about 2,200 ft and 122 knots. The Beech turned onto final about 1,450 ft and 79 knots. The last recorded data point was at 1048:00, with the Beech at 1,201 ft and 76 knots, about 607 ft south of the runway 35 threshold.



PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The Beech Pilot

The pilot of the Beech, age 79, held an FAA private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate with a restriction to have glasses available for near vision. He reported 2,500 total hours of flying experience on his FAA third-class medical certificate application that was dated October 5, 2015. His personal pilot logbook was not located.

According to the owner's representative (insurance adjuster), the Beech pilot reported that he completed a Beechcraft Pilot Proficiency Program on October 30, 2015, at Blairsville, Georgia. This was confirmed verbally and accepted as a current flight review by the insurance company.

The Diamond Flight Instructor

The flight instructor in the Diamond, age 24, held an FAA commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multi-engine land, airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. She held an FAA flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine, and she held an FAA first-class medical certificate with a restriction to wear glasses. She was seated in the right cockpit seat. She reported 600 total hours of flying experience on her FAA first-class medical certificate application that was dated March 16, 2016. A review of her pilot logbook revealed about 850 hours total time, including 721 hours in single-engine airplanes and 366 hours as a flight instructor.

The Diamond Student Pilot

The student pilot in the Diamond, age 20, held an FAA student pilot certificate. He held an FAA second-class medical certificate with no restrictions. He was seated in the left cockpit seat. He enrolled in the ab initio training program at Falcon Aviation Academy on August 4, 2016, and had logged about 22 hours of flight time.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

Beech

The off-white- and blue/gold-colored Beech F33A was a single-engine, low-wing airplane with a conventional tail. A review of the airplane's maintenance and airworthiness records revealed that an enhanced Whelen light-emitting diode (LED) wingtip position and anti-collision light system, model OR6502GE/OR6502RE, and a Whelen LED tail position and anti-collision light system, model OR5002V, were installed on the airplane per FAA Supplemental Type Certificate, dated November 10, 2014. The airplane was equipped with landing and taxi lights. The airplane was not equipped with a traffic advisory system (TAS), traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS), or automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) equipment or displays. The Beech's avionics suite included a King KX 155 VHF communication/navigation transceiver and a Garmin GNS 530 GPS/communication/navigation all-in-one unit.

According to information provided by the owner's representative, the Beech's most recent annual inspection was completed on or about July 13, 2016. At the time of the inspection, the airframe had accumulated about 4,549 total hours of operation.

Diamond

The white- and blue-colored Diamond DA20 was a single-engine, low-wing airplane with a T-tail configuration. It was equipped with wingtip-mounted anti-collision strobe lights and navigation position lights, and a landing and taxi light. The airplane was not equipped with a TAS, TCAS, ADS-B equipment or displays. The Diamond's avionics suite included an iCOM AC-A200 VHF air band transceiver and a Garmin GNS 430 GPS/communication/navigation all-in-one unit.

The Diamond's most recent annual inspection was completed on August 9, 2016. At the time of the inspection, the airframe had accumulated about 1,990 total hours of operation.


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The CTJ 1055 weather observation included wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 8,500 ft, temperature 30°C, dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting 30.30 inches of mercury.


AIRPORT INFORMATION

CTJ was a public, non-towered, uncontrolled airport with a single runway, designated 17/35. The runway was 5,503 ft long and 100 ft wide. The published traffic pattern direction for runway 35 was to the left. Falcon Aviation Academy personnel reported that their pilots frequently used CTJ for training purposes.

The CTAF/UNICOM frequency for CTJ at the time of the accident was 122.975 MHz. CTAF communications were not recorded. The airport manager reported that the CTJ CTAF frequency was changed from 122.7 MHz to 122.975 MHz in 2011.



WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

General

The main wreckage of both airplanes came to rest in a grass field, about 408 ft south of the approach end of runway 35, on the extended centerline of the runway. The Diamond came to rest in an upright position. The Beech came to rest inverted and on top of the Diamond wreckage. The wreckage debris field was about 350 ft long and about 80 ft wide, oriented on a heading of 350º. All major structural components of both airplanes were accounted for within the wreckage debris field.

Beech

The wreckage of the Beech was generally intact; the wings and empennage remained attached to the fuselage. Flight control cable continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the flight control surfaces. The ailerons, elevator, and rudder remained attached in their respective positions on the wings, horizontal stabilizer, and rudder. Blue-colored paint transfer marks were found on the lower surface of the right wing, near wing station 108. Impact damage with paint transfer was found on the top of the fuselage around station 131.

The nose gear separated from the airplane during the impact sequence. White paint transfer markings were observed on the nose gear tire. The left and right main landing gear were found in the extended positions. White paint transfer markings were observed on the left, main gear tire. The wing flaps were extended 20º.

The master and avionics switches were found in the "on" positions. The strobe light switch was found in the "on" position. The taxi light switch was found in the "on" position, and the landing light was found in the "off" position; however, both switches had impact damage. The position of the navigation light switch could not be determined because of impact damage.

The engine remained attached to the firewall. External examination of the engine did not reveal physical evidence of a mechanical malfunction or anomaly. The propeller assembly separated from the engine at the crankshaft/propeller flange junction. The fracture surfaces exhibited features consistent with overload. The propeller blades remained attached to the hub and displayed chordwise scratches, blade twisting, leading edge gouging, and surface polishing.

A laminated card titled "LOCAL AREA FREQ" and dated April 27, 2009, was found in the Beech's cockpit. The card, which listed the frequencies for multiple airports in the area, listed the frequency for the CTAF at CTJ as 122.7 MHz.

Diamond

The Diamond came to rest upright, under the wreckage of the Beech. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the elevator and rudder to the cockpit controls. Aileron control continuity was confirmed from the right aileron to the cockpit controls. The left wing separated from the fuselage during the impact sequence. The left aileron control tubes had multiple fractures that exhibited overload signatures. The empennage separated from the fuselage about 14 inches forward of the vertical stabilizer root leading edge.

Blue paint transfer marks were observed on the leading edge of the Diamond's right wing. The marks were about 8 inches long and 12 inches from the wing root. The Diamond's landing, taxi, strobe, and position light switches were impact-damaged, and their preimpact positions could not be determined.

Lightweight pieces of the Diamond were found on a northerly path, beginning 340 ft south of the main wreckage. One of the most southerly pieces of wreckage debris was the right half of the Diamond's elevator. Closer examination revealed black transfer markings on the upper surface of the elevator that were consistent in color and tread pattern with the right main landing gear tire of the Beech. Examination of the Diamond's horizontal stabilizer revealed similar transfer markings on its upper surface. The other small pieces of debris located south of the main wreckage were identified as sections of the Diamond's canopy and wing root/fuselage skin.



MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Beech Pilot

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation Division of Forensic Sciences performed an autopsy of the Beech pilot and the cause of death was blunt trauma of the head and chest, and the manner of death was accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing and identified doxazosin and losartan in the pilot's blood, and doxazosin, dextromethorphan, and its metabolite dextrorphan in urine. Doxazosin and losartan are blood pressure medications also named Cardura and Cozaar, respectively. The pilot reported the use of doxazosin and losartan to the FAA during his most recent FAA third-class physical. Dextromethorphan is an over-the-counter cough suppressant available in a number of products.

The Diamond Flight Instructor

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation Division of Forensic Sciences performed an autopsy of the Diamond flight instructor and the cause of death was blunt head trauma, and the manner of death was accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing of the flight instructor. The specimens tested negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and a wide range of drugs, including major drugs of abuse.

The Diamond Student Pilot

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation Division of Forensic Sciences performed an autopsy of the Diamond student pilot and the cause of death was blunt trauma of the head and torso, and the manner of death was accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing of the student pilot. The specimens tested negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and a wide range of drugs, including major drugs of abuse.


TESTS AND RESEARCH

The King KX 155 VHF transceiver and the Garmin GNS 530 all-in-one unit from the Beech were sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory to determine the frequencies in use at the time of the accident. The examination revealed that the KX 155 communication frequencies were set to 118.17 MHz (active) and 126.22 MHz (standby). The GNS 530 communication frequencies were set to 122.7 MHz (active) and 124.050 MHz (standby). The waypoint communications information page for CTJ was accessed during the examination even though the installed GNS 530 aviation database expired as of November 12, 2015. The CTAF/UNICOM on the displayed page showed the correct frequency of 122.975 MHz.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

FAA Rules, Regulations, and Guidance to Pilots

Title 14 CFR 91.113 addresses aircraft right-of-way rules and states, in part, the following:

(b) General. When weather conditions permit, regardless of whether an operation is conducted under instrument flight rules or visual flight rules, vigilance shall be maintained by each person operating an aircraft so as to see and avoid other aircraft. When a rule of this section gives another aircraft the right-of-way, the pilot shall give way to that aircraft and may not pass over, under, or ahead of it unless well clear.

(f) Overtaking. Each aircraft that is being overtaken has the right-of-way and each pilot of an overtaking aircraft shall alter course to the right to pass well clear.

(g) Landing. Aircraft, while on final approach to land or while landing, have the right-of-way over other aircraft in flight or operating on the surface, except that they shall not take advantage of this rule to force an aircraft off the runway surface which has already landed and is attempting to make way for an aircraft on final approach. When two or more aircraft are approaching an airport to landing, the aircraft at the lower altitude has the right-of-way, but it shall not take advantage of this rule to cut in front of another which is on final approach to land or to overtake that aircraft.

The FAA's Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), dated December 10, 2015, paragraph 5-5-8, includes pilot procedures for see-and-avoid while in flight and states, "When meteorological conditions permit, regardless of type of flight plan or whether or not under control of a radar facility, the pilot is responsible to see and avoid other traffic, terrain, or obstacles."

The AIM, paragraph 4-1-9, also describes operations to/from airports without an operating control tower and the use of a CTAF and states, in part, the following:

a. Airport Operations Without Operating Control Tower

1. There is no substitute for alertness while in the vicinity of an airport. It is essential that pilots be alert and look for other traffic and exchange traffic information when approaching or departing an airport without an operating control tower…To achieve the greatest degree of safety, it is essential that all radio-equipped aircraft transmit/receive on a common frequency identified for the purpose of airport advisories.

b. Communicating on a Common Frequency

The key to communicating at an airport without an operating control tower is selection of the correct common frequency…A CTAF is a frequency designated for the purpose of carrying out airport advisory practices while operating to or from an airport without an operating control tower.

The AIM describes the recommended communication procedures regarding departure aircraft on the CTAF and states, "Pilots of inbound traffic should monitor and communicate as appropriate on the designated CTAF from 10 miles to landing. Pilots of departing aircraft should monitor/communicate on the appropriate frequency from start-up, during taxi, and until 10 miles from the airport unless the CFRs or local procedures require otherwise."

The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-24A), section 13, addresses scanning procedures for visually acquiring traffic:

The pilot can contribute to collision avoidance by being alert and scanning for other aircraft. This is particularly important in the vicinity of an airport.

The See-and-Avoid Concept

The FAA issued AC 90-48D, "Pilots' Role in Collision Avoidance," in April, 2016 to alert all pilots "…to the potential hazards of midair collisions and near midair collisions (NMAC), and to emphasize those basic problem areas related to the human causal factors where improvements in pilot education, operating practices, procedures, and improved scanning techniques are needed to reduce midair conflicts."

AC 90-48D stated that each person operating an aircraft, regardless of whether the operation was conducted under IFR or VFR, shall maintain a vigilant lookout for other aircraft at all times. Regarding visual scanning, the AC specifically stated that "Pilots should remain constantly alert to all traffic movement within their field of vision, as well as periodically scanning the entire visual field outside of their aircraft to ensure detection of conflicting traffic.". AC 90-48D also described several specific methods that pilots could use to visually acquire other traffic.





















NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: BEECH F33, registration: N6027K
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA20, registration: N85WP
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 7, 2016, at 1047 eastern daylight time, a Beech F33A, N6027K, and a Diamond Aircraft Industries DA20-C1, N85WP, collided in midair on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern to runway 35 at West Georgia Regional Airport (CTJ), Carrollton, Georgia. The Beech was substantially damaged and the private pilot was fatally injured. The Diamond was destroyed and the flight instructor and one student pilot were fatally injured. The Beech was registered to and operated by the private pilot. The Diamond was registered to and operated by Falcon Aviation Academy LLC. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91; the Beech pilot was conducting a personal flight to CTJ and the Diamond pilots were conducting a local, instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for the Beech or the Diamond. The Beech departed from Fulton County Airport (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia about 1020, and the Diamond departed from Newnan Coweta County Airport (CCO), Newnan, Georgia about 1000.

According to personnel from Falcon Aviation Academy, the pilots of the Diamond were practicing traffic pattern operations and landings at CTJ. The Diamond was the first airplane to enter the traffic pattern, followed a few minutes later by N263CF and then by N169PS, both Falcon Academy DA20s. The flight instructor and student pilot on board N263CF observed a Beech Bonanza on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern; however, the Beech pilot did not appear to be broadcasting his intentions on the CTJ common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF). Moments later, the flight instructor and student pilot on board N169PS entered the traffic pattern from the east. They looked down and to the left, in the direction of the final approach path for runway 35, and observed two airplanes merge, then collide. They also did not hear the pilot of the Beech broadcasting his intentions on the CTAF. All pilots on board both trailing DA20s heard the flight instructor on board the accident Diamond making her position calls in the traffic pattern prior to the collision, the last call being made on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern.

Initial radar data provided by air traffic control indicated that the pilot of Beech entered an extended downwind from the north, above and directly behind the Diamond, which was also on downwind leg of the traffic pattern. The ground speed of the Beech was about 50 knots greater than the Diamond. The last radar returns, were about 2,000 feet above mean sea level, or about 850 feet above the ground. The locations of the last radar returns were in an area on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, approaching the base leg of the traffic pattern for runway 35.

Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that both airplanes remained physically attached after the collision until ground impact. The main wreckage of both airplanes came to rest about 408 feet south of the approach end of runway 35, and on the extended centerline of the runway. The wreckage of the Beech was inverted and on top of the Diamond wreckage. Lightweight pieces of the Diamond were found on a northerly path, beginning 340 feet south of the main wreckage. All major structural components of both airplanes were accounted for within the wreckage path boundary. One of the most southerly pieces of wreckage debris was the right half of the Diamond's elevator. Closer examination revealed black transfer markings on the upper surface that were consistent in color and tread pattern with the right main landing gear tire of the Beech. Examination of the Diamond's horizontal stabilizer revealed similar transfer markings on its upper surface. The other small pieces of debris located south of the main wreckage were identified as sections of the Diamond's canopy and wing root/fuselage skin.

The pilot of the Beech, age 79, held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He held a FAA third class medical certificate with a restriction to have glasses available for near vision. He reported 2,500 total hours of flying experience on his medical certificate application that was dated October 5, 2015.

The flight instructor in the Diamond, age 24, held a FAA commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land, airplane single engine land, and instrument airplane. She was seated in the right cockpit seat. She held a FAA flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single engine. She reported 600 total hours of flying experience on her FAA first class medical certificate application that was dated March 16, 2016.

The student pilot in the Diamond, age 20, held a FAA student pilot certificate. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate with no restrictions. He was seated in the left cockpit seat. He enrolled in the ab initio training program at Falcon Aircraft Academy on August 4, 2016, and had logged about 20 hours of flight time.

CTJ was a public, non-towered airport with a single runway, designated 17/35. The runway was 5,503 feet long and 100 feet wide. The published traffic pattern direction for runway 35 was to the left. Falcon Aviation Academy personnel reported that their pilots frequently used CTJ for training purposes. CTAF communications were not recorded.

The wreckage of both airplanes was retained by the NTSB for further examination.