Sunday, September 23, 2012

Cessna 150G, N8465J: Accident occurred September 21, 2012 in Corinth, Mississippi

http://registry.faa.gov/N8465J

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA574
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 21, 2012 in Corinth, MS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 150G, registration: N8465J
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, after about 2 hours of uneventful flight, a loud noise came from the engine compartment, the engine cowling shook violently, and the engine experienced a total loss of power. During the subsequent descent, the pilot attempted to restart the engine. The propeller continued to windmill, but the engine did not restart. The pilot selected a field for a forced landing, and during the landing roll, the landing gear became entangled with the crop. The airplane then nosed over and came to rest inverted, and the pilot and his wife egressed with minor injuries.

Examination of the engine revealed that the crankshaft gear bolt locking tab washer and the alignment dowel for the gear mounting flange were fractured due to fatigue. This allowed the gear to rotate on the crankshaft. The fatigue resulted from improper torque application on the crankshaft gear bolt during overhaul, which had been completed 26 years and 643 total airplane flight hours before the accident. In service bulletins and service instructions, the engine manufacturer warned that improper installation of the crankshaft gear may result in "complete engine stoppage" and recommended that engines be overhauled after 12 years in service, even if the engine had not accumulated the manufacturer-specified 2,000-hour time-between-overhaul during that period.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The improper torque application on the crankshaft gear bolt by maintenance personnel during an engine overhaul, which resulted in the fatigue failure of the locking tab washer and gear alignment dowel and subsequent engine stoppage. Contributing to the accident was the operator’s exceedence of the engine overhaul calendar year limits recommended by the engine manufacturer.

On September 21, 2012, about 1515 central daylight time, a Cessna 150G, N8465J, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power in cruise flight near Corinth, Mississippi. The certificated commercial pilot and a passenger received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot/owner, the purpose of the flight was to return the airplane to his home in Oregon after he purchased it in Georgia. After receiving 2 hours of dual instruction in the airplane, the pilot and his wife departed Paulding Northwest Atlanta Airport (PUJ) and leveled the airplane in cruise flight at 4,500 feet. After approximately 2 hours of flight, with "everything perfect," a loud report came from the engine compartment, the engine cowling shook violently, and the engine experienced a total loss of power.

During the subsequent descent, the pilot attempted to restart the engine. The propeller continued to windmill, but the engine did not restart. The pilot selected a soy bean field for a forced landing, and during the landing roll, the landing gear became entangled with the crop. The airplane then nosed over and came to rest inverted, and the pilot and his wife egressed with minor injuries.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. He reported 960 total hours of flight experience, of which 60 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.
The airplane was manufactured in 1967, and a review of the maintenance records by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) maintenance inspector revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed April 12, 2012, at 3,968 total aircraft hours. A major overhaul on the engine was completed November 12, 1986, and the engine was installed in the airplane July 22, 1988. The engine had accrued 643 total hours since that date, and 5 hours since the annual inspection.

On October 17, the engine was examined by an FAA inspector. The examination revealed that the crankshaft gear bolt locking tab washer and the alignment dowel for the gear mounting flange were fractured. The gear bolt and its associated components were examined in the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, DC. The examination revealed that the locking tab and the alignment dowel displayed fracture surfaces consistent with fatigue. The bolt, the gear, and the gear mounting flange all displayed evidence of working and impact marks consistent with movement between the parts, indicative of insufficient clamping or pressure force at installation.

According to Lycoming Service Bulletin 475C, "Damage to the crankshaft gear and the counterbored recess in the rear of the crankshaft, as well as badly worn or broken gear alignment dowels are the result of improper assembly techniques or the reuse of worn or damaged parts during reassembly. Since a failure of the gear or the gear attaching parts would result in complete engine stoppage, the proper inspection and reassembly of these parts is very important."

According to Lycoming Service Instruction 1009AU, the recommended time between overhaul for the O-320 series engines was 2,000 hours. It further stated, "…all engines that do not accumulate the hourly period of time between overhauls specified in this publication are recommended to be overhauled in the twelfth year."


NTSB Identification: ERA12LA574 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 21, 2012 in Corinth, MS
Aircraft: CESSNA 150G, registration: N8465J
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 21, 2012, about 1515 central daylight time, a Cessna 150G, N8465J, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power in cruise flight near Corinth, Mississippi. The certificated commercial pilot and a passenger received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.


According to the pilot/owner, the purpose of the flight was to return the airplane to his home in Oregon after he purchased it in Georgia. After receiving 2 hours of dual instruction in the airplane, the pilot and his wife departed Paulding Northwest Atlanta Airport (PUJ) and leveled the airplane in cruise flight at 4,500 feet. After approximately 2 hours of flight, with "everything perfect," a loud report came from the engine compartment, the engine cowling shook violently, and the engine experienced a total loss of power.

During the subsequent descent, the pilot attempted to restart the engine. The propeller continued to windmill, but the engine did not restart. The pilot selected a soy bean field for a forced landing, and during the landing roll, the landing gear became entangled with the crop. The airplane then nosed over and came to rest inverted, and the pilot and his wife egressed with minor injuries.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. He reported 960 total hours of flight experience, of which 60 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.
The airplane was manufactured in 1967, and a review of the maintenance records by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) maintenance inspector revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed April 12, 2012, at 3,968 total aircraft hours. A major overhaul on the engine was completed November 12, 1986, and the engine was installed in the airplane July 22, 1988. The engine had accrued 643 total hours since that date, and 5 hours since the annual inspection.

On October 17, the engine was examined by an FAA inspector. The examination revealed that the crankshaft gear bolt locking tab washer and the alignment dowel for the gear mounting flange were fractured. The gear bolt and its associated components were examined in the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, DC. The examination revealed that the locking tab and the alignment dowel displayed fracture surfaces consistent with fatigue. The bolt, the gear, and the gear mounting flange all displayed evidence of working and impact marks consistent with movement between the parts, indicative of insufficient clamping or pressure force at installation.

According to Lycoming Service Bulletin 475C, "Damage to the crankshaft gear and the counterbored recess in the rear of the crankshaft, as well as badly worn or broken gear alignment dowels are the result of improper assembly techniques or the reuse of worn or damaged parts during reassembly. Since a failure of the gear or the gear attaching parts would result in complete engine stoppage, the proper inspection and reassembly of these parts is very important."

According to Lycoming Service Instruction 1009AU, the recommended time between overhaul for the O-320 series engines was 2,000 hours. It further stated, "…all engines that do not accumulate the hourly period of time between overhauls specified in this publication are recommended to be overhauled in the twelfth year."



IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 8465J        Make/Model: C150      Description: 150, A150, Commuter, Aerobat
  Date: 09/21/2012     Time: 2115

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: CORINTH   State: MS   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD AND FLIPPED OVER, NEAR CORINTH, MS

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: JACKSON, MS  (SW31)                   Entry date: 09/24/2012 







 
A couple walks away virtually unscathed after a plane crash in Alcorn County Friday afternoon. (Wayne Hereford, WTVA)


ALCORN COUNTY, Miss. (WTVA) -- An Oregon couple walks away virtually unscathed after their plane crashed in Alcorn County Friday afternoon. 

 Authorities say the Cessna 150 went down in a soybean field located in the Hinkle community.

The pilot, 63-year-old Ron Noland, and his wife Cindy were flying from Atlanta to Memphis when he told authorities the engine quit.

The crash remains under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board.

http://www.wtva.com
 


ALCORN COUNTY, Miss. - Federal Aviation officials are investigating a plane crash in Alcorn County, Mississippi. 

 Officials with the Pisgah Community Volunteer Fire Department told 7 Eyewitness News they responded to the scene of the crash around 4:30 p.m. Friday.

They said a small plane began to have engine trouble as it was heading toward Memphis.

The pilot tried to make an emergency landing, but the plane flipped and landed upside down in a soybean field near County Road 518 near Rienzi, Mississippi.

Fortunately, no one was injured.

Officials have not released the names of the pilot and passenger.

7 Eyewitness News was told a representative with the Federal Aviation Administration was on the scene of the crash Saturday afternoon, and is making plans to bring the plane to a local airport by Monday.

Plane Hits Hawk During Takeoff, Returns To Port Columbus International Airport (KCMH), Columbus, Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio --  A Delta flight crew turned a plane bound for New York around when their aircraft hit a bird shortly after takeoff from Port Columbus International Airport Sunday.

Port Columbus officials tell NBC4 that no one was injured on the plane.

The flight crew followed protocol and turned the plane around to transfer the 30 passengers to a new plane, according to officials.

The flight was heading to JFK International Airport in New York

Officials say the nose gear area of the plane came in contact with a red-tailed hawk shortly after the noon takeoff.

Airport spokesman David Whittaker said that the plane involved with the collision sustained minimal or no damage in the contact with the bird which he described as “glancing.”

The red-tailed hawk typically weighs from two to four pounds and has a wing span averaging 40 inches.
 

http://www2.nbc4i.com

Payback is tough for former Federal Aviation Administration employee

Tom Singer joined the Federal Aviation Administration as an aerospace engineer in 2009. After a productive year writing safety regulations, he moved back to Florida and took a job with a private company.
 

Then he became Federal Debtor #2012390768A.

Singer, 32, did not borrow any money from the government, skip child-support payments or violate a law that would have his wages garnished. He was swallowed by the maw of federal bureaucracy when the FAA mistakenly sent him two paychecks after he left the government.

Almost four years later, he hasn’t crawled out.

Singer resigned in October 2009 from the FAA’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation, where he worked on safety regulations for the commercial space industry. He and his wife moved back to Orlando, their home town.

Meanwhile, in Washington, an FAA clerk who was on vacation during the Christmas holidays in 2009 had failed to remove Singer from the government payroll. He eventually was taken out of the system in early 2010, but not before the FAA erroneously issued him two bi-weekly paychecks in December 2009. 


When the first paycheck landed by direct deposit in his account at USAA Federal Savings Bank, Singer mistook the money for the accrued vacation leave he was expecting. After the FAA wrote him a letter explaining that he received a paycheck in error, he reimbursed the government his net pay of $2,059.49.

The problems started with the second paycheck....

See full article:  http://www.washingtonpost.com

Navion-A, N4418K: Accident occurred September 23, 2012 in Lompoc, California

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA434
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 23, 2012 in Lompoc, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2014
Aircraft: NAVION NAVION, registration: N4418K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After the airplane took off and turned downwind, the engine began to lose power. The pilot activated the boost pump, but this was followed by a total loss of engine power. The pilot then elected to return to the departure runway, but after he realized that he had insufficient altitude to reach the runway, he chose to land in an open field. Following touchdown, the airplane sustained substantial damage to the aft fuselage after sliding about 80 feet before coming to rest upright. A postaccident examination of the carburetor, boost pump, and relief valve revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Although the airplane was operating in a regime where it may be susceptible to serious carburetor icing at cruise power, the engine was operating at higher power setting, and there was no evidence that carburetor icing played a role in the accident. The reason for the loss of engine could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A total loss of engine power after takeoff for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On September 23, 2012, about 0935 Pacific daylight time, a Navion-A airplane, N4418K, sustained substantial damage following a forced landing due to a loss of engine power shortly after takeoff from the Lompoc Airport (LPC), Lompoc, California. The certified commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The personal cross-country flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The reported destination was the Lodi Airport (1O3), Lodi, California.

In a statement submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that after taking off and while entering a left downwind leg at 1,200 feet, the engine began to lose power; after turning the boost pump on there was a total loss of power. The pilot stated that he then turned back toward the departure runway, turned the hydraulic power on and lowered the landing gear; the landing gear was retracted when the pilot realized he was too far from the runway to make a safe landing. The pilot opined that he maneuvered over power lines, turned about 30 degrees to the right and flew through the lowest gap in the approaching trees. The airplane landed in a soft dirt field and slid about 80 feet before coming to rest in an upright position. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the aft fuselage.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector reported that during his initial inspection of the engine the fuel pressure measured at the carburetor was 5 pounds per square inch (psi). The inspector further reported that after testing the fuel pressure several times the pressure increased to 10 psi, and that during a bench test of the relief valve, pressure at the relief valve was confirmed to be 10.5 psi; the engine requires a minimum pressure of 9 to 15 psi under normal conditions.

Under the supervision of a FAA aviation safety inspector, the carburetor and boost pump were examined at the facilities of KPS Airmotive, Santa Clarita, California. The results of the examination revealed no anomalies with either component that would have precluded normal operation. (Refer to the KPS Airmotive report, which is appended to this report.)

Maintenance records revealed that both magnetos and the airplane's boost pump were overhauled on June 21, 2012.

At 0935, the LPC weather reporting facility, located about 3 nautical miles north of the accident site, reported wind 260 degree at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 400 feet, temperature 15 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 11 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.99 inches of mercury.

The reason for the reported total loss of engine power was undetermined.


http://registry.faa.gov/N4418K

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA434 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 23, 2012 in Lompoc, CA
Aircraft: NAVION NAVION, registration: N4418K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 23, 2012, about 0935 Pacific daylight time, a Navion-A airplane, N4418K, sustained substantial damage following a forced landing due to a loss of engine power near the Lompoc Airport (LPC), Lompoc, California. The certified commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The personal cross-country flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The reported destination was the Lodi Airport (103), Lodi, California.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that he had just taken off and was on a downwind departure when the engine lost power and quit. The pilot stated that he then set up for a landing to an off-airport field, shut the fuel off, and raised the landing gear prior to landing . The airplane came to rest in an upright position, with substantial damage to the aft fuselage.

The airplane was recovered to a secured facility for further examination.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 4418K        Make/Model: NAVI      Description: NA-4 NAVION 
  Date: 09/23/2012     Time: 1645

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: LOMPOC   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR LOMPOC, CA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: VAN NUYS, CA  (WP01)                  Entry date: 09/24/2012 
Contributed
 A single-engine plane made an emergency landing Sunday morning near the Lompoc Airport. The pilot was not injured.

A private plane made an emergency landing short of the Lompoc Airport about 10 a.m. Sunday, but the pilot wasn’t injured. 

Lompoc Fire Department responded and found a single-engine aircraft that had made an emergency landing in a field just east of Highway 1, directly across from the Lompoc Airport, Battalion Chief Mark Clayton said.

The pilot, Dylan Abbott, was uninjured and was the only person aboard the plane at the time, according to Clayton.

“He was very fortunate,” Clayton said.

No fire or fuel spill resulted from the incident, according to Clayton.

Authorities reported the incident to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

According to the FAA’s online records, the four-seat Navion A aircraft was manufactured in 1948 and is registered to a Gilroy man.


http://santamariatimes.com


http://www.ksby.com


The Lompoc Fire Department and Lompoc Police Department responded to a report of a plane that had gone down near the city's airport on Sunday morning.

They say a single-engine plane made an emergency landing around 10 a.m. in a field across from the airport, and east of Highway 1.

Officials say the pilot was flying alone and was not injured.

There were no reports of injuries to anyone on the ground, and the plane did not catch on fire or spill any fuel.

The FAA and NTSB were both notified of the incident.

Day 1: Air India Dreamliner’s dream run begins with AC failure

The first day’s commercial flight of Air India’s Boeing 787 Dreamliner ran into trouble after a ‘minor’ problem was detected in the plane’s air conditioning system.
 

While, readying to operate on the Delhi-Bangalore route, immediately after the push back (when the plane is detached from the aerobridge and doors are closed) at the Delhi airport, pilots complained that the aircraft’s air conditioning was not functioning and asked engineers to rectify it.

An Air India official, while confirming the incident, said that there was a “minor” flaw in AC. “Some problems were detected in the airplane’s AC that was rectified and the plane left at 6.35 PM, over two hours later than the scheduled 4.30 PM,” the official said without specifying the problems.

The flight to Bangalore was the third flight taken by the brand new airplane, which had during the day flown to Chennai and returned.

Air India, which took the delivery of the second plane today, started the commercial operations today and is operating it in the Delhi-Chennai and Delhi Bangalore sectors.

The Dreamliner’s first commercial flight, between Delhi and Chennai, had taken off as scheduled at 7:10 AM from the Delhi airport with 116 passengers on board.

http://www.indianexpress.com

Speed appeal Wings, wheels draw 4000: 'There was always something happening'

 
JOHN BISSET/ Fairfax Media 
Gavin Wills of Omarama puts a Piper Cub through its paces on the lake at the Wings over water show, held at Lake Ruataniwha near Twizel on Saturday. 


After a 10-year absence, a fine day brought more than 4000 people out for the Wings over Water show at Lake Ruataniwha on Saturday. 

 That means the event probably raised around $20,000 for the Twizel Medical Centre building fund.

Airshow spokesman James Leslie said that because the event had not been held for 10 years it had been hard to gauge its appeal, but calm and sunny conditions combined with an array of wings and wheels had proved to be a successful combination.

"There was a lot going on," Mr Leslie said of both the show programme and the variety of groups and organisations that set up displays at the site.

"There was always something happening."

More than 20 aircraft from as far away as Rangiora and Dunedin took part.

It was also a huge weekend for the Pukaki Airport with 53 aircraft parked there on Saturday, creating a record for the largest number of aircraft there at one time, Mr Leslie said.

Some things were out of the organisers' control - like the gearbox that failed on the huge GP Hydroplane.

Those at the site early in the morning saw the hydroplane in action before the gearbox failed during practice.

The craft was to have raced a helicopter.

Thoughts of reviving the show were first mentioned 18 months ago.


Read more:   http://www.stuff.co.nz

VIDEO: Antonov An-2 in the Czech Republic

Video: Cessna 172 Skyhawk in the Czech Republic

Phoenix East Aviation: Daytona Beach flight school marks 40th year

Instructor Basel Al-Shahrour checks the prop as he does a preflight inspection on a Diamond DA-42 Twin Star before a flight Wednesday with student Philippe Frauchiger on the Phoenix East Aviation flightline. 
News-Journal/DAVID TUCKER




By Fatima Hussein 

BUSINESS WRITER

DAYTONA BEACH— Phoenix East Aviation, a flight school based at Daytona Beach International Airport, recently celebrated its 40th anniversary of training pilots in international aviation.

School officials say Phoenix East's anniversary is telling of the institution's ability to adapt to and help innovate the ever-changing aviation industry.

The anniversary celebration took place Aug. 25 at Riverside Pavilion in Port Orange.

Ghassan Reslan, the flight school's chief executive officer, is a former international airline pilot.

"We are celebrating this significant anniversary with all our students from all over the world," he said. "We are one of the few U.S. academies that is truly international with students from all over the globe."

Phoenix East Aviation provides pilot training and specialization in professional flight instruction. The school has 275 students and employs 73 workers.

The flight school occupies a 12,000-square-feet facility at 561 Pearl Harbor Drive. The school also has roughly three acres of ramp space at the airport.

Phoenix East was founded in Lawrence, Mass., in 1972, by Nino Ciancetta, a senior pilot with U.S. Air (now known as U.S. Airways).

In the first years of Phoenix East Aviation, Ciancetta was regional vice president of the Airline Pilots Association, sporadically from 1969 through 1973.

He retired from U.S. Airways with over 31 years and 40,000 flight hours of service.

Ciancetta later moved Phoenix East Aviation to Daytona Beach in 1984 for more favorable flying weather, according to Pat Cobleigh, the flight school's director of marketing.

Ciancetta passed away in 2006 at age 80.

Cobleigh said Phoenix East's anniversary is a "confirmation of the quality of training, management and financial stability of Phoenix East Aviation."

She added that Phoenix East is one of the first flight schools to use Apple iPads as part its curriculum.

Phoenix East Aviation is nationally accredited through the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training and is approved by the Florida Department of Education as a certified vocational rehabilitation school.

The school is qualified to offer Veteran Benefits under the G.I. Bill. Phoenix East is authorized by the federal government to offer F-1, M-1 and J-1 visas for foreign students.

These Visas permit foreign students and instructors to enter the U.S. to attend and teach at government-approved schools.

Stephen Cooke, director of business development at Daytona Beach International Airport, said of Phoenix East: "They are a major aviation academy in the area—they do a great job."

He added, "We hope they will be here to celebrate their 80th anniversary."
 

Story:   http://www.news-journalonline.com

Fresh Saudi pilots regain trust of national flag carrier

TAIF — After more than three years of struggle, fresh Saudi pilots have started regaining the trust of the country’s flag carrier.

Youngsters holding Commercial Pilot Licenses (CPL) had been denied employment amid new hiring rules issued by Saudi Arabian Airlines incorporating high scores in TOEFL and a maximum age restriction of 27.

Saudia has now decided to employ pilots who succeed in the exam set by Prince Sultan Aviation Academy in Jeddah. A major barrier has been the conversion of the foreign license to its Saudi equivalent, issued by the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA).

Khalid Huladar was among the very first pilots who were able to convert the CPL. “It is a brave decision by Saudia. I appreciate it,” he said.

"Converting my CPL was a great experience, because I found myself back on track flying brand new DA-42NG and DA-40NG aircraft with an expert flight instructor. Moreover, it was an honor to be one of the first students recommended for GACA check-ride. Now, I will apply to Saudi Arabian Airlines."

Capt. Vince Peccarino heads the training at Saudi Arabian Flight Academy (SAFA) in Riyadh. He has devoted his life for aviation with thousands of flying hours under his belt as a flight instructor.

“We have had students converting their CPL who were very well prepared and they took 3-4 flights and were ready, while others needed 30-40 hours. Quality of their previous training impacts significantly. GACA is following FAA practical test standards, rules and procedures," Capt. Vince told Saudi Gazette.

“What I have noticed with people who have obtained their licenses from certain countries is that training has been very lacking,” says Capt. Vince.

“GACA has serious reservations with regard to accepting these licenses. Saudi Airlines will not entertain them and that is why conversion is inevitable. Once they come to SAFA, they realize how severely handicapped they are. There are students with 300 hours of CPL, yet unable to fly in a straight line," he said.

Capt. Vince cited the example of India, which faces a shortage of commercial pilots despite having 7,000 jobless CPL holders who obtained their licenses from various parts of the world. “Getting the pilot license is not the end of the road, it is where the journey begins. Then you go to an airline and start training. There is a big gap from just acquiring a CPL to becoming an airline pilot,” he said.

Capt. Vince has trained in countries such as the US, the UK, Italy, France and Germany. He says Saudi Arabia is "brand new with respect to general aviation ... but certainly the quality is going to be comparable with anywhere else in the world”.

Capt. Vince believes that flight training in Saudi Arabia will expand and more and more flying schools will emerge. “In the next five years we will produce a number of commercial pilots and instructors and some may opt for own school openings. ... It would be nice to get young guys coming from zero hours to become flight instructors, and pass on the knowledge," said the veteran trainer.

He said the job prospects in the industry were excellent. "According to a Boeing study, in the Middle East 32,700 pilots will be in demand in the next 20 years. We will essentially have to produce 32 commercial pilots weekly, just to meet regional demands. It has a bright future, if you ever want to become a commercial pilot in this region, now it is the time."

Speaking about the trainees, he says, “I have high expectations of my students. I expect strict discipline. I expect them to fly within a set altitude and a set heading. Everything needs to be done properly and this makes training very hard in the beginning. Certainly Saudi Arabia is going to be on the map as a good training country.”

Capt. Vince thinks the main challenge students in Saudi Arabia face is the English language. "When training abroad, it becomes even harder. In my view, it will be easier to remain in Saudi Arabia and obtain quality training while no compromise is made with GACA regulations," he said.

While Saudi men expect to be incentivized for flying, women in Saudi Arabia hold an opposite passion, and are willing to pay themselves for pilot training.

Noorah Hassan is one of the Saudi women passionate about flying. “I have always wanted to be a pilot," she says. “This has been my dream since I was a child; I hope one day it will come true. I wouldn’t mind even being a co-pilot as long as I fly. Perhaps one day I will be able to do that in Saudi Arabia, or may be in some other country.”

Meagan Quinlan, a European female pilot living in Riyadh, says, “Restrictions here in KSA do not permit women to fly. This needs to be reevaluated because 8 percent of the world’s pilots are female, and Saudi women should have the opportunity to participate in such a rewarding career.”

A number of Saudi females are already training in various parts of the world. “Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return,” said one of them.

http://www.saudigazette.com.sa

Cleveland, Tennessee: Completion of Jetport runway delayed

 Rain and three consecutive days of concrete plant breakdowns slowed progress and delayed completion of the runway at Cleveland Regional Jetport another week.

Ronnie Fitzgerald, PDC Consultants, estimated the runway would be finished Sept. 18, “and here it is three days later and I’ve got you half a runway. We ended up with three consecutive days of concrete plant breakdowns and now the rain, so we have slipped. … You should have your runway by the end of next week.”

Fitzgerald made the appraisal Friday morning to the Cleveland Municipal Airport Authority during its regularly scheduled meeting.

CMAA Vice Chairman Lou Patten reported the revised completion date of the terminal building is Dec. 12, but the contractor is working toward an earlier date by working Saturday and Sunday. Weather and other work on the apron hindered access to terminal building.

“It’s going to be delayed some from the original date,” said CMAA Chairman Lou Patten. “We’re pushing them and they were working Saturday. I think they are trying to get moving along as well. Some of their reasons for delay were legitimate but some of them we’ve questioned.”

Chairman Lynn DeVault stated the contractors were on a very tight schedule from the beginning and “anyone who was reasonable might have assumed we would have rain.”

“But, I think we’re all moving in the right direction and we’re going to have an outstanding terminal building,” Patten said.

J&J Construction, Chattanooga, bid $2.412 million to construct the 8,000-square-foot building. The job was divided into three categories: site preparation, security and the terminal building. Site preparation and security are funded through grants. The terminal building, which came in at slightly less than $1.9 million, is funded by the state and the city up to $700,000 each. The airport authority is responsible for raising about $500,000. The board contracted Bill Allen to help raise the remainder through private donations.

Prospective donors have the opportunity to tour the terminal Wednesday.

“Hopefully they’ll get excited when they see the actual construction on the runway, apron and the terminal building,” Patten said.

So far, First Tennessee Bank has committed to $40,000; SkyRidge Medical Center, $30,000; Olin Corporation, $40,000; and Pioneer Credit and Cleveland/Bradley Chamber of Commerce have each pledged $50,000.

Lynn DeVault retained leadership of the airport authority after she was unanimously elected as chair for another year. Patten and Verrill Norwood will continue in their roles as vice chair and secretary-treasurer. The Cleveland City Council recently reappointed Norwood to another five-year term to expire in September 2017.

The scope of work includes the 5,500-foot by 100-foot runway, a full parallel taxiway 35 feet in width and an apron area 317 feet by 982 feet wide. The pavement will consist of approximately 122,000 cubic yards of concrete and 32,000 tons of crushed aggregate for the 5-inch base. Hinkle Contracting Co., Paris, Ky., won the Phase III contract with a bid of $7.055 million.

Cleveland Regional Jetport is located at 251 Dry Valley Road.

Read more: Cleveland Daily Banner - Completion of Jetport runway delayed


Arik Resumes Operations Today

THE Secretary to the Federal Government, Anyim Pius Anyim yesterday waded into the imbroglio between the  Ministry of Aviation, the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA), the Federal Airports Authority of Nigeria (NCAA), the Nigerian Airspace Management Agency (NAMA) and Arik Air over allegations and counter allegations bordering on huge debts amounting to N18 billion owed the agencies by the carrier.

In a meeting attended by the Minister of Aviation, Stella Oduah Ogiewonyi, the two chairmen of the Aviation Committees of the National Assembly, the Director General of the NCAA, Dr. Harold Demuren and the management of Arik, led by its managing Director, Chris Ndulue, the Federal Government scribe appealed to the parties involved in the imbroglio that had led to the grounding of the carrier’s entire domestic operations to eschew every provocation that may have arisen as a result of this unfortunate misunderstanding.

He equally charged them to cease all the exchange of accusations and allegations, adding that they are vitiated and so of no consequence.

The amicable resolution of the face-off was however silent on whether or not Arik should pay the huge debts owed the various aviation agencies, just as Ndulue denied ever saying that the Minister requested for five per cent equity in the carrier.

According to Anyim, “We use this opportunity to appeal to both parties to eschew every provocation that may have arisen as a result of this unfortunate misunderstanding. Accordingly, all the exchange of accusations and allegations are vitiated and so of no consequence. On behalf of the Ministry of Aviation and the Management of Arik air, we apologise to all travellers for the inconveniencies this unfortunate misunderstanding may have caused them’’.

“We are pleased to announce that Arik Air can now resume operations’’, he added.

Speaking to reporters in Lagos at a press briefing yesterday, Ndulue said having resolved the issues, he announced that the airline would resume operations today, just as he admitted that what the airline owe FAAN was N1, 623, 193, 653.38 and not N7, 140, 733, 942.71 quoted by the agency.

Asked if he still maintained the allegation by the airline that the Minister requested for five per equity in the carrier, Ndulue said he never said so.

His words, “We did not say that the minister ask for five per cent equity in the company. It is in the air. Well, I can’t take care of that”.

Minister had described as spurious and wicked allegations from Arik that the agencies and unions picketed the firm because the minister demanded a five percent equity holding in the airline.

According to the spokesman for the minister, Joe Obi, “The first impulse is to totally ignore this groundless falsehood. Except that it will send the wrong signals to the general public.


 http://www.guardiannewsngr.com

Landing on his feet may have saved skydiver after mid-air collision: Dr Nick Foster from the Air Ambulance Service describes how his team helped two men who collided when skydiving

One man has died and another is in a serious condition after they collided while skydiving, the ambulance service said. 

 Emergency services went to Sibson, near Peterborough, shortly after 3.30pm on Saturday, the East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST) said.

Despite EEAST and air ambulance crews working hard together to try to save one of the men's life, he was pronounced dead at the scene, a spokeswoman said.

Another man, in his late 20s, suffered serious spine and leg injuries and was flown to Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, where he arrived in a serious but stable condition.

Cambridgeshire Police said that the man who died was in his early 50s. The other man is in his 20s.


 A skydiver has died and another is in a serious condition after a mid-air collision near Peterborough, it has emerged.

The 53-year-old from London crashed into another skydiver about 50 feet above the ground in Sibson, near Peterborough, collapsing both men's parachutes.

He was pronounced dead at the scene. The other skydiver, a 28-year-old from France, was left with severe injuries and airlifted to hospital.

An air ambulance from emergency medical charity Magpas was sent to the scene, but paramedics were unable to save the more seriously injured man.

A spokeswoman for Magpas, which dispatched its Helimedix team with the air ambulance, said: "Sadly, despite all the best efforts of the Helimedix, including advanced level care and attempted resuscitation, a man was pronounced dead at the scene.

"Our thoughts are with his family and friends at this time."

The second man suffered severe spinal and lower leg injuries and was sedated and anesthetized, before being flown to Addenbrooke's Hospital, where he was said to be in a stable condition.


The incident, which took place on Saturday afternoon, has been reported to the British Parachute Association

Read more here:    http://www.bbc.co.uk

http://news.sky.com

The Southwest Way: 5 reasons people prefer flying with the airline - Des Moines International Airport (KDSM ), Iowa

Don Smithey heard a constant refrain from people he met: “When will we get Southwest?”

“Even my dentist asked,” the airport director said. “Everywhere I went, that was the main question.”

Now he can look his dentist in the eye and tell him exactly when Southwest is coming. Smithey said he needs help from the public to keep the airline here.

“It’s not going to happen just on the strength of my personality,” he joked. “They want rear ends in those seats.”

Here are some reasons people are excited to see Southwest’s first flight take off at 6:55 a.m. next Sunday from the Des Moines International Airport.

SOUTHWEST EFFECT

When Southwest arrives, low fares quickly follow. That leads to an increase in passengers.

BAGS FLY FREE

The first two bags checked in are free. The third one is $50. Most airlines charge from $20 to $40 for the first two bags and up to $150 on the third bag, according to a website that monitors those 
numbers, airlinebagfees.com.

NO FEES FOR CHANGING FLIGHTS

Jeff Carpenter of Clive said he has already booked two flights with Southwest in Des Moines even though they were $30 more expensive than competitors, because potential changes could end up costing him more. “If I have to change the flight, most other airlines have a big change penalty,” he said.

FAMILY TREATMENT AS A BASIC SERVICE

“When we go into markets, people respond to being treated fairly and being treated like family,” said Linda Macey, Southwest manager of airport affairs. “We don’t try to nickel-and-dime our customers. When we sell tickets, we sell a basic service.”

Carpenter sees that. “They just seem to treat people fairly, and their employees have the ability to do things to help any situation,” he said. “They still have delays and cancellations, but there is just the basic level of treatment that exists there that is far and above other airlines.”

IN-FLIGHT FUN

Carpenter said he can recall flights when a flight attendant broke into a jingle, adding to the fun, relaxed atmosphere.

http://www.desmoinesregister.com

Worker killed after crashing truck into parked jet at San Francisco International Airport (KSFO), California

A worker killed at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday morning died in a collision between a truck and a parked airplane, according to reports

 U Zaw Aung, 60, of Daly City, was pronounced dead at the scene, according to the San Francisco Appeal online newspaper.

Aung was driving a service truck which somehow crashed into a parked private aircraft on the north side of the airport at 5:30 a.m. Saturday, according to airport officials.

The crash is still under investigation.


MILLBRAE, Calif. —  A worker was killed after crashing a truck into a private jet at the San Francisco International Airport early Saturday morning.

The incident occurred at 5 a.m. Saturday as man driving a cafeteria truck drove into a jet that was parked on a service road, according to police.

The jet sheared off the top the top of truck, decapitating the driver, police said.

The cause of the crash is currently being investigated. 


MILLBRAE, Calif. —   A worker at San Francisco International Airport was killed early Saturday morning in a vehicle collision with a aircraft, according to an airport duty manager.

The crash involving a car and  a jet occurred at the airport around 5:30 a.m. Saturday, the airport duty manager said.

The worker, a man who worked for airline services company PrimeFlight, was killed in the collision.

No one from PrimeFlight was available for comment Sunday morning, and no further details were immediately available.

Russian editor fired over Putin stunt snub



A Russian editor has been sacked for refusing to cover president Vladimir Putin's latest wildlife stunt. 

 The president recently took to the air in an ultralight aircraft, followed by rare Siberian cranes, in an attempt to teach them migration routes.

The Kremlin suggested that one of the country's biggest magazines, science journal Around the World, cover the exploit.

But editor Masha Gessen, a respected journalist who also authored a Putin biography, turned down the offer.

"I wanted a story on the crane repopulation project without Vladimir Putin as part of the story," she told Correspondent's Report.

"So that's what I told first my immediate boss, who called the owner of the magazine.

"The owner of the magazine called me and said, 'send somebody'. I said no, and I was fired on the spot."

While the decision cost Gessen her job, it also led to a face-to-face meeting with Mr Putin.

"All I did was tweet about it, and I immediately got a flurry of media calls. I told the story," she said.

"One hungover morning, I got a phone call while riding in the back of a cab, from a man who introduced himself as Vladimir Putin.
 
"And he said that he heard that I'd been fired, that he realized that he'd unwittingly served as the reason for the firing, and that he wanted to discuss this with me."

A week later, Gessen was in the Kremlin with Mr Putin.

"He asked me if I wanted to explain why I decided not to send a reporter, and I said I did want to explain," she said.

"And I said, 'Vladimir Vladimirovich, I completely agree with everything you've said about the importance of drawing attention to these issues, but when you personally participate in something, it has a way of turning into a travesty'."

'Losing touch'

The Russian president has tranquilised and tagged a tiger and a polar bear. He has driven a Formula One race car and piloted a fire-fighting jet.

He has also miraculously emerged with ancient artefacts at an archaeological site, after only a few minutes diving underwater.

Gessen says he seems oblivious to the growing ridicule the photo-ops inspire.

"I don't think he's aware of the reaction they're getting. I think that he watches his own television," she said.

"That's the problem with being a dictator is you lose touch with reality, because people will only show you things that you want to see."

Gessen was not out of work for long. She has already been hired to head the Russian service of the US government-funded Radio Liberty.

It is a safe bet those who want coverage of Mr Putin's future conservation adventures should listen elsewhere.

See full article:  http://www.abc.net.au

Press Release - Help Wanted in Aviation Industry! Sessions to Explain Training and Careers Available

For Immediate Release
Contact Lara Kaufmann
864-634-1380
LaraLKaufmann@gmail.com

Help Wanted in Aviation Industry!
Sessions to Explain Training and Careers Available.

This Saturday, September 29th a general overview of "Training and Careers in the Aerospace and Aviation Industry" will be held at 12:30 and "How to Become a Pilot" at 2:30 at the Southeast Aviation Expo, which will be held at the Greenville Downtown Airport in South Carolina.  

 “Aviation Industry news stories frequently contain passages like ‘Half of the Boeing work force will be eligible to retire in five to seven years’; 800 to 1000 Air Traffic Controllers will be needed in the next 10 years; ‘Boeing has predicted over 600,000 new Aircraft Maintenance Technicians will be needed between now and 2031’.  These are just a few examples of the tremendous need our industry has for workers,” stated Joe Frasher, Airport Director of the Greenville Downtown Airport.
 
“Everyone knows that people need jobs, especially in these economic times.  There just seems to be a disconnect between what fields people are choosing to enter and train for, and what jobs are really out there that need filling”, Frasher noted.  

There are many career options in the aviation and aerospace industry.  Engineers, attorneys and physicians specialize in this field.  Aircraft Maintenance Techs who build or repair all types of aircraft, Air Traffic Controllers, Pilots, Flight Instructors, Safety Inspectors, Meteorologists and Sky Marshals all can be found in this field.  “These are good paying jobs with advancement opportunities!”, Frasher added.

The "Careers and Training in the Aviation and Aerospace Industries" session will be conducted by Jason P. Premo, co-owner and CEO of ADEX Machining Technologies, a manufacturer of precision machined exotic metal-alloy components for the aerospace, defense and energy industries.  Premo will share his knowledge of the industries manufacturing and engineering growth, career opportunities with high wages and the shortage of skilled workers.  Handouts that cover many more career and training options will be available at this session.

Jason Premo received a Bachelor’s degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and is a Foundation Board member for the Greenville Technical College, past Chair for the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) for Greenville – Spartanburg and serves on the boards of three early stage start-up companies.  


The "How to Become A Pilot" session will be conducted by Airwolf Aviation Services, a South Carolina based flight school.
Event attendees interested in training and career opportunities can also speak with representatives from several aviation training schools like USAeroTech, LLC which has a one-year accelerated aircraft maintenance training program; Liberty University School of Aeronautics, which has a wide array of aviation degree options.  As well as other flight schools like Airwolf Aviation Services and Mint Air.  CTS International will be available to discuss their employee placements within very large aircraft manufacturing companies.

The 2012 Southeast Aviation Expo will be held on September 28 and 29 at the Greenville Downtown Airport, which is located at 100 Tower Dr., Greenville, SC 29607.   Many educational sessions will be held throughout the two day event.  A listing of all the sessions can be found at www.scaaonline.com.  More information can be found by visiting: http://www.greenvilledowntownairport.com/SEAE.html and http://www.scaaonline.com/content/southeast-aviation-expo


The Southeast Aviation Expo will showcase the latest aviation products and have over 14 static aircraft displayed. It is open to the public with a $5 admission charge with children and students with ids being free.  

So far… Cessna, Cirrus, Michelin Aircraft Tires, ADEX Machining Technologies, AeroCab, Louis Berger Services Inc., James A. Gardner Company, Mint Air, Flight Design USA, Baldwin Safety & Compliance, Motley Rice LLC, Advocate Consulting, Aircare Aviation Services & Support, Hope Aviation Insurance, Just Aircraft, Greenville Downtown Airport, Sebring US Sport Aviation Expo, Lycoming, Aviation Tax Consultants, LLC.,  US AeroTech - Professional Aircraft Maintenance Training, Liberty University, PF Flyers, Runway Cafe, Special Services Corporation, Trade-A-Plane, Eclipse Aerospace, Precision Hose Technologies, Inc.,  CTS International, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Daher-Socata, Champion Aerospace, Skytech, Tempest, Stevens Aviation, LandRover Carolinas, Premier Aircraft Sales, Diamond Aircraft, SWT Aviation Inc., Cubcrafters, Airwolf Aviation Services, 4 Paws Aviation, DTC Duats, Applied Technical Services, Inc., Camden/Donaldson/Greenville Jet Centers, Fractrade, Civil Air Patrol, Pilots N Paws,  Eastern Aviation Fuel - Shell Aviation, Eagle Aviation, SCAA, SC Aeronautics Commission, SC Aviation Safety Council, The FAA Flight Standards Districts Office, BMW Performance Driving School, Drumm Health Services, Davis & Floyd and Angel Flight have registered to exhibit this year!

Trade-A-Plane, a top national publication that is geared towards pilots is a show sponsor again this year.  SCTAC will sponsor the event and provide the exhibitors with lunch and the Greenville Downtown Airport is hosting an exhibitor reception.
ADEX Machining Technologies, LLC is a supplier of high precision machined prototypes and production components for the Aerospace, Defense, and Energy-Power Generation industries.  For more information, please visit www.adexmt.com or contact Jason P. Premo, CEO at 864.416.3112  or Jason@adexmt.com 

Airwolf Aviation Services is a flight training school with several locations in South Carolina.  For more information, please visit http://www.flyairwolf.com or contact Michele Rash at tampa19fl@gmail.com or 864-224-7440.

SCAA's mission is to actively promote and encourage aviation and airport development to meet air transportation needs and assist the state in achieving economic development goals.  For more information about the event visit www.scaaonline.com, call 1 (877) FLY-SCAA (359- 7222) or email Katie@associationsplus.com.

The Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU) is the busiest general aviation airport in South Carolina and is a self-sufficient entity with financial strength that doesn't rely on local taxpayers for funding. GMU is home to Greenville Jet Center, the largest Fixed Base Operation (FBO) in S.C., as well as more than 25 other aviation-related businesses creating 453 jobs that annually contribute more than $35.2 million to the Upstate economy. For more information about GMU please visit http://www.greenvilledowntownairport.com or contact Joe Frasher at864-242-4777 or joe@greenvilledowntownairport.com

###

National Transportation Safety Board Report: Aviation crashes are on the rise

The National Transportation Safety Board reports nearly 500 lives were lost in aviation crashes last year. In light of a recent local helicopter crash, Fox 34 looked into the safety measures of taking the sky.
David Guertsloh, 59, walked away from a hard landing Tuesday at Slaton Municipal Airport.

"A 2004 Robinson helicopter was attempting to land on a skid," Corporal John Gonzalez with the Texas Department of Public Safety said. "He failed to negotiate and lost control of the chopper. It went over onto its side, the propellers caught, and burst into flames."

Veteran pilot with Hub City Aviation Louie Hilliard said even the most seasoned pilots can encounter unexpected emergencies, and experience is only part of the equation.

"Certainly somebody who has more experience has the advantage of that experience and additional knowledge that can help prevent those accidents," Hilliard said, "but still, things can and do go wrong from time to time."

Hilliard is an instructor for all levels of training, and while he said planes and helicopters are different, one thing does not change.

"Safety is a part of every lesson."

He said mishaps are usually caused by a chain of events, and he and his team try to teach trainees how to isolate problems.

"Maybe they took off when the conditions weren't right, or were above their abilities," Hilliard said. "Perhaps they should have chosen a different runway. So there is a lot of decision making that goes into accident prevention."

According to the NTSB, 2011 saw a record number of aviation accidents in the U.S.

http://www.myfoxlubbock.com

Plane with 400 kilos of marijuana crashes into Ford Ranger pick-up

A light aircraft loaded with around 400 kilos of marihuana collided with a pick-up truck after landing in a field close to the El Bobadal in Santiago del Estero province, some 170 kilometres from the province capital.

The pilot of the plane, a Paraguayan native, was immediately arrested after crashing the aircraft into the truck when he had apparently tried to land in a farm names San Miguel, situated close to the border with neighbouring province Tucumán.

The unusual incident took place to the surprise of the farm workers in the area, after the plane landed and then collided into the Ford Ranger pick-up, which was parked in the field, the only vehicle in the area.

http://www.buenosairesherald.com

Fake Italian pilot traveled in cockpit, police say

 
The unemployed 32-year-old man posed as a pilot and joined cabin crew in a plane cockpit. He has been arrested by Italian police


ROME (Reuters) – A man who posed as an airline pilot and travelled in the cockpit of at least one plane was arrested in Turin Airport using forged identity cards and wearing a pilot’s uniform, Italian police said on Saturday.

The 32-year-old, whose real name was not released, allegedly created a fake identity as a Lufthansa pilot named “Andrea Sirlo,” complete with a Facebook page that included fake flight attendant friends.

Police said they were alerted several months ago after “Sirlo” introduced himself as a captain to a Civil Aviation lieutenant, who became suspicious because he seemed too young for the job.

The national military police tracked down the suspect from photos on his Facebook profile, in which he is shown posing in uniform and sunglasses in front of airplanes.

He was arrested in the check-in area of Turin Airport on Friday.

Police said “Sirlo” had travelled for free on at least one flight as a “third pilot” sitting in the cockpit. They were investigating whether he had flown as an imposter at other times.

Lufthansa declined to comment on whether one of their flights had been involved and said it was a matter for the police.

At a press conference, police displayed a white shirt with epaulettes and a black double-breasted jacket with pilot stripes sewn on the cuffs. They said they also seized fake resumes, airline badges and an airport staff parking permit.

Turin Airport said in a statement it had not issued any permits in the name of the person involved.

A profile on a website where users can track their flights shows “Pilot Andrea Sirlo” flying from Munich Airport to Turin on October 23, 2011. (http://myflightbook.com/logbook/public/ViewPublicFlight.aspx?id=111466)

Munich Airport did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The case recalls the 2002 film “Catch Me If You Can,” in which Leonardo DiCaprio played Frank Abagnale, a real-life con man who is said to have flown more than 1,600,000 kilometres (1 million miles) as a fake Pan American pilot in the 1960s.

‘Sirlo’ is the name of a flight corridor over Turin.

Source:  http://thestar.com.my

A man who posed as a pilot and joined cabin crew in a plane cockpit has been arrested, Italian police said today.

The unemployed 32-year-old man, whose real identity was not released, created a fake profile for himself on Facebook and called himself Andrea Sirlo, even posting pictures of himself wearing a uniform and Aviator sunglasses.

To complete the illusion he made up fake identity cards and even sent himself imaginary comments from dozens of fake cabin crew friends who expressed their 'delight' at being rostered with him on flights.

Air Tractor Inc: Made in Texas

 

The Export-Import bank of the United States has authorized credit insurance to support the export of Air Tractor Inc. of nearly $900,000 worth of American-made crop-spraying aircraft to a biofuel and soybean grower in Brazil.

The bank-supported export sale is the 20th of about 40 similar deals expected to benefit Air Tractor this year.

Air Tractor has been manufacturing agricultural aircraft from its plant in Olney for 50 years: first the Snow, then the Thrush, and since 1972, the Air Tractor. These airplanes have led the evolution of modern agricultural aviation.

The company employs 270 people. Since 1972, the Air Tractor line has sold about 2,800 aircraft to buyers in six continents.

Over the past 17 years, Air Tractor has utilized Export-Import bank's medium-term insurance to export an estimated $70 million worth of its aircraft primarily to small private sector buyers in Argentina and Brazil.

"We're glad to see Air Tractor, a small business in Texas, winning this sale to Brazil, which is one of our nine key markets," Export-Import Bank President Fred Hochberg said in a statement. "This export transaction continues the long relationship we have had with Air Tractor that helped them dramatically grow their foreign sales while supporting American jobs."

Taua Biodiesel, whose headquarters are in Nova Mutum, Brazil, bought model AT-502B, a single-engine turbo prop aircraft outfitted with a 500-gallon hopper that can be used both to extinguish fires and spray crops. The aircraft is specifically adapted to operational conditions in Brazil's state of Mato Grosso.

The Taua group produces biodiesel fuel, vegetable oil and soybean meal on 40,000 acres, with plans of expansion.


Source:  http://www.reporternews.com