Sunday, April 10, 2016

Specialty aircraft traffic expected over Franklin, Tennessee, this week

Franklin, Tenn. (WKRN) – Franklin residents can expect to see an increase in aircraft traffic this week.

According to the Franklin Police Department, an Air Combat USA event will take place on Tuesday and Wednesday.

The planes will perform simulated combat maneuvers between 3,000 and 6,000 feet above the south Franklin and Thompson’s Station area.

They’ll also take off and land at Nashville’s John C. Tune Airport.

Officials want to alert the public ahead of time to prevent any concern or calls to 911.

For more information about the event, click here.

Original article can be found here: http://wkrn.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N95118: Accident occurred April 10, 2016 near Bayport Aerodrome (23N), Long Island, Suffolk County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York
Textron Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Piper Aircraft Company; Vero Beach, Florida 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N95118 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Bayport, NY
Accident Number: ERA16LA152
Date & Time: 04/10/2016, 1907 EDT
Registration: N95118
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 10, 2016, at 1907 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N95118, sustained substantial damage shortly after takeoff from Bayport Aerodrome (23N), Bayport, New York. The private pilot and the passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and destined for Orange County Airport (MGJ), Montgomery, New York.

The pilot stated that the preflight inspection, engine run-up, and takeoff were normal. He said that when the airplane was about 300 ft mean sea level, he heard a "pop" and the engine sputtered before it completely stopped producing power. The pilot immediately checked the fuel selector valve, the magneto switch, the mixture control, and the carburetor heat, but they were all in their "proper positions." He then executed a forced landing to a road but collided with a set of power lines with the left wing. The airplane then impacted the ground and a postimpact fire ensued. The pilot estimated there were 37 gallons of fuel on board at the time he departed.

According to eyewitnesses, the airplane's engine back-fired twice before it stopped producing power on takeoff. They watched as it then made a sweeping right turn, before it struck trees and power lines. The airplane came to rest in the middle of an intersection in a residential area. A post-impact fire ensued, and neighbors and responding rescue personnel assisted the pilot and passenger's egress from the burning airplane. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the firewall, the fuselage, and the tail section.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed the flaps were in the fully retracted position. Flight control cable continuity was established from all major flight controls to the cockpit area. About 5-8 gallons of fuel were removed from the left-wing fuel tank and the right-wing fuel tank was breached.

The engine crankshaft could not be rotated due to impact damage. Cylinder compression and valve train continuity could not be confirmed. Rather, the cylinders and pistons were removed, and mechanical continuity of the engine was established. The magnetos were removed from the engine. The ignition leads were removed due to thermal damage. Each magneto was spun and produced spark at all towers. The spark plugs were removed and compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug Chart. Each plug exhibited normal wear.

The oil filler port sustained impact damage. A small amount of oil was drained from the oil suction screen area and some non-metallic debris was noted on the screen. The oil filter was removed and opened. The filter element was absent of debris.

The carburetor remained on the engine but sustained impact and thermal damage. The butterfly valve in the heat box was open, consistent with the carburetor-heat being turned off. The carburetor was disassembled, and a small amount of fuel was in the bowl. The fuel was negative for water. The fuel inlet screen was removed and absent of debris.

The engine-driven fuel pump was removed. When manually rotated, fuel was observed exiting the outlet of the pump and suction was confirmed at the inlet. A small amount of fuel was observed in the gascolator bowl and the screen was absent of debris. The electric fuel pump filter was removed. It was wet with fuel and absent of debris.

Examination of the fuel selector valve appeared to be set to the "left" tank, but the cover had been damaged and partially torn away from the valve during impact. The pilot said the valve was set to the right tank when he took off. When the selector handle was moved, it was loose and the detents for the left and right tanks could not be easily felt. Blue-colored staining was also observed around the valve, consistent with a fuel leak. The valve was then tested in place by blowing shop air through the main fuel line from the engine. Air blew freely through the system on both the left and right tank positions.

The fuel selector valve was removed and examined at the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington D.C. Numerous tool marks were observed on the valve cap consistent with it having been disassembled numerous times. The valve's internal components were removed and found to not be installed in the order outlined in the airplane's service manual. The valve's components were worn and the position-washer, which keeps the valve from rotating beyond the detents, was worn on both sides and appeared to have been inverted and reused. According to the airplane's service manual, the fuel selector valve was to be inspected every 400-hours. The inspection required the valve cap and the internal components to be removed and inspected, including the position washer for signs of extreme wear. If so, the washer should be replaced. A review of the airplane's maintenance logbook revealed that the last inspection of the fuel selector valve was made on June 22, 2013, at an airframe total time of 11,966.14 hours. At that time, only a new "O-ring" was replaced in the fuel selector valve.

A review of the airplane and engine maintenance manuals revealed the last annual inspection was completed on November 9, 2015. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accrued a total of 12,064.24 hours and the engine had accrued about 2,020 hours.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He reported a total of 85 hours, of which, 25 hours were in the same make/model airplane as the accident airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on April 30, 2012.

Toxicological testing of the pilot's initial blood draw taken upon his admission to the hospital and tested by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, identified 0.0123 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), the primary inactive metabolite of THC, the main psychoactive component in marijuana. However, no THC was identified. This finding is consistent with the pilot having used marijuana at some point preceding the accident but was no longer being impaired by its effects when the accident occurred.

At 1856, weather at Long Island McArthur Airport (ISP), New York, New York, about 3 miles west of the accident site, was reported as wind from 180 degrees at 12 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 15,000 ft, broken clouds at 26,000 ft, temperature 43° F, dewpoint 25° F, and an altimeter setting of 30.30 inHg.

The carburetor icing probability chart from the FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB): CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, June 30, 2009, shows a probability of icing at cruise/glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/30/2012
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/17/2016
Flight Time:  85 hours (Total, all aircraft), 25 hours (Total, this make and model), 27 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N95118
Model/Series: PA 28-140 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-25812
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/09/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 31 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 12064.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ISP, 41 ft msl
Observation Time: 1856 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 224°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 15000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / -4°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / * ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots, 180°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.3 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):  
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Bayport, NY (23N)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Montgomery, NY (MGJ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1907 EDT
Type of Airspace: Unknown

Airport Information

Airport: Bayport Aerodrome (23N)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 41 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2740 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  40.752778, -73.053611

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA152
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 10, 2016 in Bayport, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N95118
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 10, 2016, at 1907 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N95118, sustained substantial damage shortly after takeoff from Bayport Aerodrome (23N), Bayport, New York. The private pilot and the passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was registered to a private individual. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was originating as the time of the accident and destined for Orange County Airport (MGJ), Montgomery, New York.

According to eyewitnesses, the airplane's engine lost power on takeoff. They then watched as it made a sweeping right turn, "stalled," and struck trees and power lines. The airplane came to rest in the middle of an intersection in a residential area. A post-impact fire ensued, and neighbors and responding rescue personnel assisted the pilot and passenger's egress from the burning airplane. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the firewall, fuselage and tail section.


The airplane and engine were recovered and retained for further examination.





BAYPORT, N.Y. — Two people were injured when a small plane crashed in the middle of a Suffolk County residential street Sunday evening.

Suffolk County Police say around 7 p.m., a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee crashed in the middle of Third Avenue and Second Street in Bayport. The crash happened not far from the Bayport Aerodrome.

Bayport Fire Chief Robert Fleming said two men were in the plane at the time of the crash.

A video posted to Twitter shows a crowd forming around the plane that went up in flames.

Both men were conscious when EMS arrived on the scene.

One of the men was airlifted and the other taken by ground transportation to Stony Brook University Hospital.

A resident in the area, who is also a pilot, said the pilot did the best he could to avoid hitting any homes.

The FAA is assisting in the investigation.

The NTSB will determine the cause of the crash.

Story and video:  http://pix11.com








BAYPORT, Long Island (WABC) -- A small plane that was heading back to Bayport Aerodrome crashed on a street in Bayport.

Two people were taken to the hospital.

There is no word on their injuries.

The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee was going south when it lost power and was heading back to the landing strip and then the plane clipped a PSE&G light pole, and then crashed in the middle of the road.

Original article can be found here: http://abc7ny.com






FOX 5 NY (WNYW-TV) - A small plane crashed onto a Long Island street Sunday night.

The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee slammed into 3rd Avenue in Bayport.

These planes are capable of carrying up to 4 people. 

A video posted to Twitter features an eye witness account of the fiery crash. 

Authorities have not yet determined why the plane crashed or how many were on board.

Original article can be found here: http://www.fox5ny.com

Pilot Scott Clifford, 34, was trying to head back to the aerodrome possibly due to engine failure. Clifford has two broken legs and a head injury and is now in the hospital in serious condition. Passenger Mike Rolm, 65, suffered non life-threatening head injuries.

Cessna 750 Citation X, XOJET, N719XJ : Incident occurred April 10, 2016 at Oakland International Airport (KOAK), California

XOJET INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N719XJ

Date: 10-APR-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N719XJ
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 750
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oakland FSDO-27
City: OAKLAND
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLLOUT, THE NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, OAKLAND, CA



OAKLAND (CBS SF) — No one was hurt when the nose gear of a plane collapsed at the Oakland Airport Sunday, airport officials confirmed.

The plane carrying two people made a normal approach, and the landing gear collapsed sometime after the plane landed safely, Airport Spokesperson Keonnis Taylor said.

The Oakland Fire Department responded to the scene, but no one was injured.

The Cessna 750 Citation X plane is owned by XOJET Inc, which is based in Brisbane.

Original article can be found here:   http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/

Tailgaters Gather in Daniel Village to Watch Private Planes Depart Every Masters Sunday



Augusta, Ga. (WJBF)- The roads have obviously been busy during Masters Week, but the sky has been as well.

And some Augustans are enjoying seeing the traffic in the air rather than the roads.

People tailgate at Daniel Village to watch private planes take off as the Tournament wraps up on Sunday, and many make a day of it every year.

“We’re just coming out here to watch the planes take off,” said spectator Michelle Epps. “We have for the last few years.”

Every day of Masters Week, around 100 private planes make Daniel Field their home base, but many leave before the tournament ends.

“This group we hear that they would much rather be at home watching the final rounds on television because you can’t get to the eighteenth green with all the people around,” said Becky Shealy, the interim airport manager at Daniel Field.

Some locals like to watch the mass exodus of small planes front and center from their cars parked at Daniel Village.

“The beauty about it is the variety of planes because normally you don’t get to see 20 or 30 planes take off in one day,” Epps said.

A crowd gathers to tailgate as the day progresses and more and more planes take flight.

“Usually there’s people outside on the grass out there and they’ll have blankets. They’ll have picnics out here,” Epps said. “Just having fun.”

One local business in Daniel Village is even extending its hours to catch the potential customers hanging out in the parking lot.

“People all throughout the week have been camped out in the parking lot, just tailgating and stuff so it’s really exciting,” said Summerville Scoops employee Rachel Keegan.

Many time-old traditions surround the Masters, but one tradition known perhaps only to locals is watching planes zooming over and out of Augusta as the business of Masters Week winds down.

“We laugh and say this is Augusta’s second air show,” said Shealy. “It’s family fun, it doesn’t cost you anything, and it really is something to see.”

Story and video:  http://wjbf.com

Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV) sign needed on Waldo Road

The lack of a large sign on Waldo Road at the new entrance to the Gainesville Regional Airport is still being noted by motorists.

Steve Kirn emailed The Sun about the absence recently, suggesting that at least one of those green signs with the image of an airplane be placed there. Such a sign is on Waldo approaching 39th Avenue leading to the original airport entrance, which is still in use.

“The new entrance has a nice — though small, and set back from the main road — sign on the east side of the road, but no other indication that that is the ‘new’ entrance,” Kirn said. “I suggest another, closer, ‘airplane’ sign to direct drivers to the new entrance — in both north- and southbound directions.”

Kirn is not the first person to write about the issue. Bill Burger did last June.

At that time, airport spokeswoman Laura Aguiar said that permitting from various agencies was needed and that the design of a new, large sign was underway with University of Florida art and design students joining in.

Now, however, a new issue has arisen. A request for a proposal has been issued for companies interested in building a new hotel by the airport, either close to Waldo Road or next to the terminal.

“There is a developer with some interest in building adjacent to our terminal. If plans work out, that hotel brand has to go on the sign, so we are not going to spend $50,000 to $60,000 on a sign when changes would be forthcoming,” Aguiar said. “The (request for proposal) closes May 6 and we expect to know whether we have serious interest. We think we do. We could have interest from more than one.”

So, it doesn’t appear as if a Waldo Road airport sign will appear anytime soon.

Meanwhile, Albert Caracausa had a recent request.

“Please advise the responsible authorities that the dotted lines that guide cars making a left turn onto Southwest 20th Avenue from 62nd Boulevard should be repainted. The original lines have been completely worn off,” he said in an email. “This turn is particularly dangerous at night because visibility is poor and one can inadvertently turn into the oncoming westbound traffic on 20th Avenue.”

Consider it done — the passing on of the observations, anyway. No telling when the lines will be repainted, though.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.gainesville.com

Polish Plane Crash Anniversary Beset by Questions, Discontent: Some top officials suspect crash was an assassination arranged by Moscow

The Wall Street Journal
By Martin M. Sobczyk
April 10, 2016 10:45 a.m. ET

WARSAW—Poland marked the sixth anniversary of the airplane crash that killed President Lech Kaczynski and 95 others in Russia on Sunday, in state ceremonies organized for the first time by Mr. Kaczynski’s political base, whose top officials have called the accident an attempt to assassinate the anti-Kremlin leader.

The late president’s twin brother, Jaroslaw Kaczynski, laid a wreath in front of the Presidential Palace in the historic center of Warsaw. Six years earlier, tens of thousands of people gathered there after the Polish government’s Russian-made Tu-154 airplane crashed on approach to a provincial airport in western Russia killing 96 people.

A number of plaques were unveiled on Sunday that the governing camp said were only able to be installed in front of official buildings now that political opponents had been sidelined.

The surviving Mr. Kaczynski leads the socially conservative Law and Justice party that has governed Poland since November. The party’s candidate, Andrzej Duda, won the presidency in May last year.

The crash of the presidential jet in Smolensk, Russia, has led to deep divisions in Poland, with Mr. Kaczynski’s party accusing the previous government of negligence in preparations for the flight.

Mr. Kaczynski’s political opponents, as well as official reports in Poland and Russia, have blamed pilot error for the crash in thick fog, less than a mile short of the runway of the dilapidated Smolensk airport.

Mr. Kaczynski’s party has disputed those findings. It says investigations in Poland and Russia overlooked evidence, including the possibility that the airport’s instrument landing system was off and that the plane might have disintegrated midair.

On Sunday, Mr. Duda, a former aide to the late president, laid flowers at the Wawel Royal Castle in Krakow, where the remains of Mr. Kaczynski and his wife, Maria, are interred.

“Time heals emotions and changes them but the emotions are vivid,” Mr. Duda said after emerging from the burial chambers of Wawel Cathedral. “It was a shock to all of us and emotions persist.”

The crash of the government jet plunged Poland into deep mourning, initially uniting the nation before becoming one of the most divisive issues in recent years. The previous centrist administration of the Civic Platform party has largely concurred with the findings in Moscow, which pointed to pilot error, while the current governing camp has, for years, insisted other possible reasons for the crash were ignored.

Poland’s current government has referred to the late Mr. Kaczynski as “a fallen president,” suggesting he was killed in battle rather than in an accident.

President Kaczynski was a staunch critic of Russia’s President Vladimir Putin who rallied crowds in Tbilisi in 2008 during Russia’s war with Georgia. Mr. Kaczynski said at the time Russia had designs on “Georgia today, Ukraine tomorrow, the Baltic States the day after tomorrow, and perhaps later my country.”

Some, including Poland’s Defense Minister Antoni Macierewicz, have openly talked about the crash as part of a push by Russia to regain its superpower status.

“What happened near Smolensk was aimed at depriving Poland of its leadership,” Mr. Macierewicz said in March.

“Russia’s military, political and economic expansion, which has long been said to have replaced tanks with gas and oil pipelines, is being accompanied by a long-developed and practiced rule of state terrorism,” he said.

Russia’s government spokesman said the Polish defense minister’s remarks were “unfounded and biased.”

Mr. Macierewicz this year created a team to look into the 2010 airplane crash again.

The late president and his entourage were on their way to commemorate the Katyn Massacre of 1940, executions by the Soviet secret police of about 22,000 Polish army officers during World War II on orders of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com

NTSB Identification: ENG10RA025
Accident occurred Saturday, April 10, 2010 in Smolensk, Russia
Aircraft: TUPOLEV TU154, registration:
Injuries: 89 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On April 10, 2010, about 0656 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), a Tupolev Tu-154M, Tail Number 101, operated by the Polish Air Force as flight PLF101, crashed during approach to the Military Aerodrom Smolensk "Severnyi", Russia. All 89 passengers and 7 flightcrew were killed, including the President of Poland. The airplane was destroyed by impact and postcrash fire.

Following the accident, the governments of the Russian Federation and the Republic of Poland concluded a bilateral agreement that the regional international independent safety investigation organization, the Interstate Aviation Committee (IAC), would conduct the investigation. Although the airplane was operated as a "state" aircraft, by the mutual agreement, the investigation was conducted following the guidance provided in ICAO Annex 13 Standards and Recommended Practices. As the United States was state of design and manufacture for the TAWS and FMS units, the NTSB was requested to support the investigation activity. 

For more information on the accident investigation, contact MAK at mak@mak.ru

Incident occurred April 10, 2016 at Key West International Airport (KEYW), Monroe County, Florida

A bird put a bump in the flight plan of an American Airlines' jet bound for Virginia from Key West after the two collided, causing the plane to lose power in an engine and return to where it started.

The Embraer 175 jet, carrying 67 crew and passengers on Flight 4680, returned safely to Key West International Airport Sunday afternoon shortly after its 1:50 p.m. takeoff, according to Cammy Clark, a spokeswoman with the Monroe County Board of County Commissioners.

“The flight crew did a great job of flying the aircraft safely back to the airport,” said Donald DeGraw, director of Key West International Airport in a statement. “The airport’s fire department and mutual aid were called out, ready to respond, but fortunately they were not needed.”

The passengers, who were headed to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Virginia, will be rebooked on other flights, Clark said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.miamiherald.com

Mooney M20K 231, Mooney LLC, N96398: Fatal accident occurred April 09, 2016 at Ocala International Airport (KOCF), Marion County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Analysis 

The commercial pilot and one passenger were departing on runway 36 when the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power about 200 ft above the runway. The pilot announced over the control tower frequency that the engine had lost power and that he intended to land the airplane on runway 26, which was located at the end of and perpendicular to the takeoff runway. According to the passenger and witnesses, the airplane completed a left turn to align with runway 26 before the wings rocked, and it rolled into a 90° left bank and collided with terrain. The passenger and witness observations were consistent with the pilot failing to maintain sufficient airspeed, which resulted in the airplane's wing exceeding its critical angle of attack and an aerodynamic stall.

Data downloaded from a panel-mounted engine monitoring system revealed parameters consistent with engine idle, run-up, taxi, and full takeoff power application. A sudden decrease in engine rpm and manifold pressure from takeoff power was preceded by a rapid decrease in fuel flow. Examination of the wreckage revealed that both the left and right wing fuel tanks contained fuel and that the fuel selector handle was between the "Left Tank" and "Off" placard positions. The engine was placed in a test cell where it started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously without interruption.

Computerized axial tomography imagery revealed that the fuel selector valve was positioned between the "Left Tank" and "Right Tank" detent positions and that all three valve ports were open to each other. The difference between the handle's position according to the placard and its actual position indicated that the placard had been displaced relative to the handle, which likely occurred during the impact. Bench flow testing of the fuel selector valve and dynamic engine run testing revealed that the valve would supply adequate fuel for normal engine in the as-found intermediate position.

The computerized axial tomography imagery, engine data, and testing of the engine and the fuel selector valve revealed no evidence of preimpact anomalies and demonstrated that the system components still functioned as designed after the accident. The fuel flow interruption and the loss of engine power shortly after takeoff were likely due to the pilot inadvertently placing the fuel selector in the "Off" position, which likely occurred when he completed the step in the Before Takeoff checklist that called for the fuel selector to be placed on the fullest tank. It is possible that the pilot inadvertently moved the fuel selector from the "Left Tank" position to the "Off" position instead of moving it from the "Right Tank" position to the "Left Tank" position. After the power loss, the pilot likely moved the fuel selector from "Off" to its intermediate as-found position in an attempt to restore engine power. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The pilot's failure to maintain sufficient airspeed following a loss of engine power, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and an aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's inadvertent placement of the fuel selector in the "Off" position before takeoff, which resulted in fuel starvation and a total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Fuel - Fluid management (Factor)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Incorrect action selection - Pilot (Factor)

Ross Anthony Grand (natural pilot, captain) died on April 9th, 2016 the only way that seemed fitting by doing exactly what he loved most; flying.  


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Mooney LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N96398

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA150 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 09, 2016 in Ocala, FL
Aircraft: MOONEY M20K, registration: N96398
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 9, 2016, about 0850 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20K, N96398, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power after takeoff from Ocala International Airport (OCF), Ocala, Florida. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the passenger was seriously injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which had an intended destination of Lakeland Regional Airport, Lakeland, Florida.

Information from the OCF air traffic control tower revealed that the airplane was cleared for takeoff and began its takeoff roll from runway 36 with about 7,000 ft of runway available. About 1 minute after the airplane was cleared for takeoff, the pilot announced, "I'm losing my engine… I'm going down on [runway] 26." Runway 26 was located at the end of and perpendicular to the takeoff runway.

The OCF ground controller (GC) was receiving a clearance by telephone when he overheard the pilot's radio call. He estimated that the airplane was north of the tower about 200 to 300 ft above the runway before it turned west. According to the GC, "The wings rocked a little in the turn, but when he lined up with the runway [26] he looked clean. He still looked high, like he might touchdown past midfield and go off the departure end. He looked stable, but then he turned left. The more he turned the steeper the turn got, and then when the wingtip hit the ground the airplane was 90 degrees."

The passenger was interviewed the day after the accident. She stated that she was not a pilot but had flown in the airplane several times. After landing at OCF the day before the accident, the pilot requested a fuel service of 10 gallons per wing, and they then spent the night with family. On the morning of the accident, they boarded the airplane for a flight to the Sun-n-Fun fly-in event. According to the passenger, engine start, taxi, run-up, acceleration, takeoff, and initial climb from runway 36 were "normal."

The passenger said she heard a sudden noise "like a click," and the engine stopped producing power. The pilot announced the loss of power and his plan for the forced landing over the radio. The airplane was north of both runways, and the left turn westbound was "steady" until the airplane was about over runway 26. The wings began "rocking," and the turn continued to the left until the bank angle was 90° and the left wing struck the ground.

An airport employee said that his attention was drawn to the airplane by a "sputter-cough" sound. Demonstrating what he observed with a model of an airplane, he described a straight-ahead descent, followed by a left turn over runway 26, two "dips" that resembled a porpoising motion, and then a sharp, 90° left turn to ground contact.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, rotorcraft-helicopter, and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on February 7, 2014. He reported 1,670 total hours of flight experience on that date.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1981. The maintenance records were not recovered, but a copy of the airplane's most recent annual inspection showed that it was performed on June 10, 2015, at 2,435.2 total aircraft hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Weather reported at the time of the accident included wind from 010° at 9 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 14°C, dew point 3°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest on the flat, grass surface of the airport infield, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented 212° and was about 300 ft long. The airplane came to rest upright. The engine and its mount were separated from the airframe but remained attached by cables and wires. The propeller was separated and located 45 ft down the wreckage path from the first ground scar.

The firewall, instrument panel, and center console were crushed aft in compression and canted about 45° to the airplane's left. The windshield was destroyed, and the cabin roof was torn spanwise from the door opening to about mid-cabin. The inboard sections of both wings were intact and remained attached to the fuselage. The left wing outboard of the flap was separated by impact. The leading edge of the right wing was crushed aft in compression. Both wing fuel tanks contained fuel.

Control continuity could not be immediately established due to impact damage and the airplane's resting position. As the wreckage was sectioned for recovery, control continuity was established from the cockpit through impact breaks and saw cuts to the flight control surfaces.

The fuel selector handle was found between the "Left Tank" and the "Off" placard positions. Crushed airplane structure surrounded the selector handle and preserved its position at the time of impact.

The engine was rotated by hand through the vacuum pump drive pad. Continuity was established from the accessory section to the valvetrain and powertrain. Compression was confirmed using the thumb method. The turbocharger impeller moved freely when rotated.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Medical Examiner for District 5, Leesburg, Florida, performed the autopsy on the pilot and determined the cause of death was blunt chest trauma. The FAA Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot; the testing was negative for alcohol and drugs.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Engine-Monitoring Instrument Data Download

The airplane was equipped with an Electronics International CGR-30P, panel-mounted instrument that monitored and recorded up to 66 parameters related to engine operations. The device was downloaded in the NTSB Recorders Laboratory.

The data began at 0741:04, at a point consistent with the engine at idle at device power-up, and the parameters continued through what was consistent with taxi, run-up, and eventually takeoff power application at 0751:04. At 0751:28, there was a rapid decrease in fuel flow, and, at 0751:42, there was a decrease in engine rpm and manifold pressure. Subsequently, manifold pressure and rpm stabilized around 14 inches and 1,300, respectively, and remained at these values until the end of the recording.

Engine Examination/Test Run

The engine was examined and test run in Mobile, Alabama, between May 31 and June 2, 2016. During examination and preparation, the crankshaft was sleeved, and the fractured propeller flange was welded back onto the crankshaft. The aft left oil cooler mount/mount leg and the magneto ignition harnesses were replaced due to impact damage. The magnetos remained secured in their mounts, and timing was confirmed at 20° before top dead center.

The engine starter, Nos. 3 and 5 cylinder intake tubes, and the entire exhaust system were replaced due to impact damage and for compatibility with the engine test cell equipment. The engine's turbocharger and waste gate were intact and installed for the engine test run without modification.

The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously without interruption. The engine was run through the manufacturer's entire test run protocol with no anomalies noted. After completion of the test protocols, the engine was accelerated and decelerated rapidly several times between idle and full power. During the accelerations and decelerations, the engine ran smoothly and without interruption.

Fuel Selector Valve Tests

The 3-position fuel selector valve had detents corresponding to "Right Tank," "Left Tank," and "Off." When viewed relative to a clock face, the detents for "Right Tank," "Left Tank," and "Off" were positioned at 2 o'clock, 10 o'clock, and 8 o'clock, respectively.

As previously mentioned, the fuel selector valve handle was found in an intermediate position between the "Off" and "Left Tank" placard positions. Computerized axial tomography scan imagery revealed that the valve handle was positioned between the "Left Tank" and "Right Tank" detent positions and that all three valve ports were open to each other. The difference between the handle's position according to the placard and its actual position was consistent with the valve placard having been displaced relative to the handle.

The valve was placed on a flow bench in its as-found condition. When fuel was drawn through the selector valve at the engine port, fuel was drawn from both the left and the right tank ports simultaneously.

An exemplar Continental TSIO-360GB engine was placed in a test cell, and the engine fuel system was set up and adjusted to factory specifications of unmetered fuel pressure of 45 to 49.5 pounds per square inch (psi). The engine was then stopped, and the test stand fuel system was disconnected.

Fuel was then provided to the engine from an external fuel tank and a fuel system mockup (left tank, right tank, left and right vapor return, engine supply and return lines) through the accident fuel selector valve. The accident fuel selector valve was tested in the as-found position between the left tank and the right tank detent positions.

The engine was primed using the test cell's fuel system, but it was started and run on an external fuel tank that was positioned about wing level. The engine started immediately and ran continuously without interruption to full power of 2,700 rpm and 40 inches of manifold pressure. During the full-power portion of the run, which was between 8 and 10 minutes, the unmetered fuel pressure maintained 49 psi. Engine power was reduced to idle and the engine continued to run normally.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Step two in the Before Takeoff checklist found in the manufacturer's Pilot's Operating Handbook was: "Fuel Selector … FULLEST TANK."

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA150
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 09, 2016 in Ocala, FL
Aircraft: MOONEY M20K, registration: N96398
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On April 9, 2016, about 0850 eastern daylight time, a Mooney M20K, N96398, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power after takeoff from Ocala International Airport (OCF), Ocala, Florida. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the passenger was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight intended for Lakeland Regional Airport (LAL), Lakeland, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.


The runways at OCF were oriented 18/36 and 08/26. The departure end of runway 36 was just south of the approach end of runway 26. When facing north, the two runways form an inverted "L" configuration.


Preliminary information from the OCF air traffic control tower revealed that the airplane was cleared for takeoff and began its takeoff roll from runway 36 with about 7,000 feet of runway available. Approximately one minute later, the pilot announced, "I'm losing my engine… I'm going down on [runway] 26."


The OCF ground controller (GC) was receiving a clearance by telephone when he overheard the radio call by the accident airplane. He estimated the airplane was north of the tower about 200 to 300 feet above the runway, before it turned to the west. According to the GC, "The wings rocked a little in the turn, but when he lined up with the runway [26] he looked clean. He still looked high, like he might touchdown past midfield and go off the departure end. He looked stable, but then he turned left. The more he turned the steeper the turn got, and then when the wingtip hit the ground the airplane was 90 degrees."


The passenger was interviewed the day after the accident. She stated that she was not a pilot, but had flown in the airplane several times. After landing at OCF the previous day, the pilot requested a fuel service of 10 gallons per wing, and they then spent the night with family. On the morning of the accident, they boarded the airplane for a flight to the Sun-n-Fun fly-in event. According to the passenger, engine start, taxi, run-up, acceleration, takeoff and initial climb from runway 36 were "normal."


The passenger said she heard a sudden noise "like a click" and the engine stopped producing power. The pilot announced the loss of power and his plan for the forced landing over the radio. The airplane was north of both runways and the left turn westbound was "steady" until the airplane was approximately over runway 26. The wings began "rocking" and the turn continued to the left until the bank was 90 degrees and the left wing struck the ground.


An airport employee said his attention was drawn to the airplane by a "sputter-cough" sound. Demonstrating what he observed with a model of an airplane, he described a straight-ahead descent, followed by a left turn over runway 26, two "dips" which resembled a porpoising motion, and then a sharp, 90-degree left turn to ground contact.


The airplane came to rest on the flat, grass surface of the airport infield and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented 212 degrees and about 300 feet in length. The airplane came to rest upright. The engine and its mount were separated from the airframe, but remained attached by cables and wires. The propeller was separated and located 45 feet down the wreckage path from the first ground scar.


The firewall, instrument panel, and center console were crushed aft in compression, and canted about 45 degrees to the airplane's left. The windshield was destroyed, and the cabin roof was torn spanwise from the door opening to about mid-cabin. The inboard sections of both wings were intact and remained attached to the fuselage. The left wing outboard of the flap was separated by impact. The leading edge of the right wing was crushed aft in compression.


Control continuity could not be immediately established due to impact damage and the airplane's resting position. As the wreckage was sectioned for recovery, control continuity was established from the cockpit through impact breaks and saw cuts to the flight control surfaces.


The engine was rotated by hand through the vacuum pump drive pad. Continuity was established from the accessory section to the valvetrain and powertrain. Compression was confirmed using the thumb method. The turbocharger impeller moved freely when rotated.


The engine and airframe were recovered from the accident site and retained for further examination.


The maintenance records were not immediately recovered, but a copy of the airplane's most recent annual inspection revealed it was performed on June 10, 2015, at 2,435.2 total aircraft hours.


The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, rotorcraft-helicopter, and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on February 7, 2014. He report 1,670 total hours of flight experience on that date.


Weather reported at the time of the accident included winds from 010 degrees at 9 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 14 degrees C, dew point 3 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.




The man who died in an airplane crash Saturday at the Ocala International Airport has been identified as Ross Grand, 49, of Prairieville, Louisiana.


The crash happened about 8:50 a.m. after Grand reported an issue with the engine and tried to return to the airport after takeoff, according to airport director Matt Grow. A woman aboard the aircraft received minor injuries and was taken to a local hospital.



The airplane was not based in Ocala.



OCALA, Fla. -- While many still slept on an otherwise uneventful Saturday morning in Ocala, airport officials were awoken to the news of a deadly crash at Ocala’s International Airport.


It was just shortly before 9:00 am when air traffic controllers at Ocala International Airport sent out a call for emergency response after a small, single-engine plane made it
s crash landing.
  
“It was about 9 o’clock this morning we were advised that a single-engine airplane, four-seat aircraft had crashed on the airport and Ocala Fire Rescue and Ocala Police Department responded,” said Ocala International Airport Director Matthew Grow. 

“Upon our arrival, fire rescue was already on the scene tending to one victim who was outside of the plane and tending to one victim who was still inside the plane,” Ocala Police Department Sargent Matthew Bos said. 

Identification of the victims had yet to be released, though one -- a male passenger -- was reported dead at the scene. The other, a female, was taken to Ocala Regional Medical Center in stable condition. Little is still known as to where the plane was headed or what caused its sudden, deadly descent.
  
“Air traffic control tower personnel advised that the aircraft was departing on Runway 3-6, that is to say it was departing to the north and it experienced some engine problems," Grow explained. "The pilot turned around to try to come back to the airport and ended up putting in the field— landing in the field.”
  
“From what we know, the plane was taking off," said Bos. "We don’t know of any kind of trouble with the plane, don’t know what made them turn the plane and attempt to land or if that was just their flight plan.”
  
Grow said the crash of the single-engine Mooney cedar plane caused the airport to close temporarily while officials tended to the scene. A couple of hours later, the airfield did re-open, though with some limitations. 
  
“We’re not fully operational yet," Grow said early Saturday afternoon. "Our crosswind runway is still closed because of the proximity of the accident to that crosswind runway, but our main north-south runway is open. We’re open for business.”
  
Details were scarce as of Saturday evening, though more information was expected to be made known in the coming days, including names of the passengers, and the passengers’ flight plan. Grow, in his eleventh year of employment at Ocala International Airport, said he can't recall the last time there was an on-site crash resulting in a fatality.

Story and video:  http://www.wcjb.com




OCALA, Fla, - Authorities are investigating a plane crash that happened at the Ocala International Airport.

Ocala Fire Rescue said they were dispatched to 1200 Southwest 60th Avenue at 8:51 a.m. Saturday in response to a small aircraft crash.

Firefighters found two people inside the airplane. One person died and the other was taken to a hospital, officers said.

Preliminary information suggested the plane that departed from the Ocala International Airport encountered problems and the aircraft was turned around.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration were notified.

Airport Operations, Ocala Police Department, Marion County Fire Rescue and the Marion County Sheriff's Office officials also responded.

Story and video:  http://www.clickorlando.com



One person died and another person was injured Saturday morning when a small plane crashed at the Ocala International Airport, Ocala Fire Rescue said.

The crash happened at the city-owned airport shortly before 9 a.m., said OFR spokeswoman Ashley Lopez.

"Preliminary information suggests the plane departed from the Ocala International Airport and encountered problems and the aircraft was turned around," Lopez said.

The person who survived the crash has minor injuries, and was brought to Ocala Regional Medical Center for treatment, Lopez said.

Neither person in the plane was publicly identified.

The runway adjacent to the crash scene was closed.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were notified.

No other information was released.

Story and video:  http://www.wftv.com













OCALA, Fla. —One person is dead after a small plane crashed Saturday morning after taking off from the Ocala International Airport. 

Authorities with the Ocala Fire Department said the crash happened just before 9 a.m. on airport property.

Officials said a man was killed and a woman suffered minor injuries. Authorities have not released the names of either person in the plane. A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said that the propeller-driven aircraft was a Mooney M20. The National Transportation Safety Board will determine the cause of the crash.