Wednesday, April 25, 2018

North American SNJ-5 (AT-6D) Texan, N12377, registered to and operated by the pilot: Fatal accident occurred April 25, 2018 at Kingsville Naval Air Station (KNQI), Kleberg County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Kingsville, TX
Accident Number: CEN18FA147
Date & Time: 04/25/2018, 1230 CDT
Registration: N12377
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN SNJ 5
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 25, 2018, about 1230 central daylight time, a North American SNJ-5 airplane, N12377, impacted terrain following a loss of control during initial climb after takeoff from runway 13R (8,000 ft. by 200 ft.) at Kingsville Naval Air Station (NQI), Kingsville, Texas. The pilot and pilot rated passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and the intended destination has not been confirmed.

Witnesses reported that the airplane took off on runway 13R and had requested a right hand teardrop turn for a departure toward the north. The witnesses reported seeing the airplane in a steep right bank with some witnesses reporting that the bank angle exceeded 90 degrees of bank. The airplane descended nose low and the right bank angle lessened before the airplane struck the ground.

The initial impact point was located between runway 17R/35L and taxiway B, and just south of the intersection of taxiway B and taxiway E. Both wings separated with the right wing coming to rest at the east edge of the pavement for taxiway B. The fuselage came to rest on its right side about 30 feet west of the right wing. The left wing came to rest about 100 feet further west. The airplane's engine separated from the fuselage and the supercharger section of the engine separated from the cylinder section. Control system continuity from the elevator and rudder was confirmed from the surfaces forward to their respective cockpit controls. The aileron control system had numerous cable breaks, however, each identified cable break was consistent with overload failure of the cables. The removable rear cockpit control stick was found lying on the ramp adjacent to the airplane. Examination could not confirm if the stick had been installed in its socket prior to impact. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: NORTH AMERICAN
Registration: N12377
Model/Series: SNJ 5 5
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: NQI, 50 ft msl
Observation Time: 1232 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots/ 23 knots, 120°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Kingsville, TX (NQI)
Destination: Dallas, TX

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 27.503889, -97.812222 


Naval Air Station Kingsville Fire and Emergency Services personnel spray foam onto the wreckage of a civilian-owned and operated North American SNJ-5 (AT-6D) Texan, N12377, that crashed shortly after takeoff from the air station April 25, 2018. Both the pilot and passenger were killed in the crash.





http://registry.faa.gov/N12377


Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov

Steve DeWolf’s passion for aviation is just a part of what makes him such an interesting neighbor. (Photo by Danny Fulgencio)


Charles Skoda was one of two men killed when the privately owned airplane they were in crashed shortly after takeoff from NAS Kingsville. Missouri State Senator Doug Libla said that Skoda was a former Navy fighter pilot and government relations employee.  “He was widely known and a friend to many in the Missouri State Capitol for several years,” said Libla.


  



UPDATE: Forest Hills neighbor Steve DeWolf died April 25, 2018, in a plane crash, according to his wife, Tammy DeWolf. The civil lawyer, wind energy pioneer and author was flying his T-6 Texan, one of two World War 2-era planes that he owned. He and a passenger died when the plane crashed at Naval Air Station Kingsville shortly after takeoff Wednesday at about 12:30 p.m., according to the Caller Times. The story says the plane caught fire shortly after takeoff. In addition to his wife, DeWolf is survived by his son, Jake DeWolf. Memorial details are pending. This article about DeWolf appears in the May issue of the Lakewood/East Dallas Advocate, which went to press before news of his death.

When Steve DeWolf isn’t jogging through his Forest Hills neighborhood, he’s probably flying over it in one of his vintage planes.

The civil lawyer, author and wind energy pioneer owns a PT-17 Stearman that was built in 1943 and a T-6 Texan built in 1942. His father was a colonel in the Air Force, and DeWolf attended the United States Naval Academy, intent on flying carrier-based jets. But his vision wasn’t good enough. After graduation, he went to law school and earned a pilot’s license in 1985. After a girlfriend broke up with him in 1991, he says he thought, “F it, I’m just going to spend $80,000 and go buy an old open cockpit biplane.”

That was the Stearman. “I’ve loved it ever since,” he says.

DeWolf says he tries to fly his planes at least once a week. His home base is the Dallas Executive Airport, formerly Redbird Airport. “My dad said that you have to fly a lot to be safe. I tell my son, Jake, the same thing.”

Why planes from that era? “It goes back to my dad,” DeWolf says. “It’s very pure flying. It’s black or white. You can either fly the numbers or you can’t. Can you fly it in a certain direction, can you keep it stable, can you land well? In law, there’s gray and nuances.”

How does he feel when he’s up there? “Like a million bucks,” he says.

DeWolf has had close calls, including seeing lightning below him while flying over Seguin from the Rio Grande Valley and encountering fog so dense he was forced to fly according to the air traffic controller’s signals. Years ago, in the Stearman, an oil line broke. DeWolf was close to Lancaster and tried to land. People were saying, “You’re streaming oil.” He landed and had the shakes. “Some tall, thin guy who was in charge of the airport came out and said, ‘Well, I’d let you use the restroom, but I bet you done already used it.’

“Fortunately, I hadn’t.”

DeWolf’s law office on the 14th floor of a North Central Expressway building feels like working in the clouds. He sits at a long, cluttered table in a room surrounded by windows. The office is decorated with framed illustrations of him in court, a photo of him in his plane flying over opening day of the Rangers in 2014, a 1942 Saturday Evening Post cover of his father in uniform and his son’s Lego wind farm project.

Rocks collected from his travels hold down pages of law cases and maps of his wind farm projects. “A rock for everything I have to do,” he says. “I like rocks. Every time I go someplace, I get them.”

In the early 2000s, he was sitting on a beach and penning an editorial for The Dallas Morning News about the need to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. He thought about an in-law in Minnesota who was a progressive farmer researching windmills.

“I thought, ‘Texas… we have a lot of land, we ought to be able to do that.’ I had no idea what I was doing.” He went to TXU Energy and said, “I’d like to build a wind farm.” He asked his wife, Tammy, to give him $25,000 to learn the business. She was OK with it, so he went to West Texas A&M University and studied with the experts. He’s been investing in wind farms ever since.

He also wrote a book. “Dead Stick” is about a Texas civil trial lawyer, “a gritty street-wise” character investigating the death of his brother in Iraq. The main character is Jake, named after DeWolf’s son, and the book’s cover photo is DeWolf in his plane. “Dead Stick” is published by Stephen F. Austin University Press. A producer in Los Angeles has optioned the book to be a movie, and a writer in New York is working on the screenplay.

DeWolf is at work on a sequel. In addition, he writes “The Moderate Minute” column for the Mount Vernon Optic Herald in Franklin County, where he owns a lake house. He’s also on the board of the Cavanaugh Flight Museum.

In the meantime, son Jake is studying at Oklahoma State University, learning to be a commercial airline pilot.

“Flying is not without dangers, and flying these old planes? It’s more dangerous,” DeWolf says. “But crossing the street is dangerous. I do my best to make sure that the planes are well maintained. Like I told Jake, ‘You don’t fly into bad weather. You try and make good judgments.’ At some point, 10 to 15 years from now, I may say, ‘I think I’ve been flying long enough.”

Story, video, photo gallery ➤ https://lakewood.advocatemag.com

Jake (left) and his father Steven DeWolf. Steven was killed when the airplane he was flying crashed shortly after takeoff from NAS Kingsville.


Two men killed in a plane crash at Naval Air Station Kingsville yesterday have been identified.

Steven DeWolf and Charles Skoda were killed yesterday when the North American SNJ-5 (AT-6D) Texan they were flying in crashed shortly after takeoff from the air station.

In a message sent to KRIS 6 News, DeWolf’s son Jake said “He’s the best damn father in the whole world. He died doing what he loved which was flying that Yellow T-6 Texan."

In an online statement, Missouri State Senator Doug Libla said that Skoda was a former Navy fighter pilot and government relations employee.

“He was widely known and a friend to many in the Missouri State Capitol for several years,” said Libla.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kristv.com


Photo of aircraft involved in Naval Air Station-Kingsville crash. 
Photo date April 24, 2018


KINGSVILLE — Two people were killed when a civilian-owned plane crashed at Naval Air Station Kingsville shortly after takeoff Wednesday afternoon.

The North American SNJ-5 (AT-6D) Texan crashed just after 12:30 p.m., said Kevin Clarke, a public affairs officer for the base.

The plane caught fire and was put out by naval emergency personnel, Clarke said in a video posted on the naval base's Facebook page. 

The pilot and one passenger had been visiting an employee of the base and had just taken off when the mishap occurred, Clarke said. 

Officials of the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were on the way to conduct an investigation into the crash, Clarke said in the video.

The two people were taken to a nearby funeral home, he said in the video. 

Their identities were not released Wednesday, pending notification of family.

Clarke said no naval aviators were involved and there was no damage to the airfield’s runways or equipment. Naval Air Station Kingsville is one of 15 military installations in Texas, and is the workplace of 1,650 people.  About 200 flight students train there, along with roughly 150 flight instructors.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.caller.com



A civilian owned and operated vintage warbird aircraft crashed shortly after 12:30 p.m. Wednesday near the lower gate of Naval Air Station-Kingsville.

The Kleberg County Sheriff's Department confirmed that the pilot and one passenger died in the crash. NAS officials said the pilot and one passenger had been visiting an employee on base. They had just taken off from the airfield when it the mishap occurred.

A witness told 3News that it looked like the pilot lost control and rolled backward in the direction of the hangars. They said they couldn't tell if it was a mechanical failure or the wind, which was pretty strong at the time, but they did hear what sounded like the pilot hitting the throttle before an explosion.

Training Air Wing 2 was sent to secure the scene. NAS officials said the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate as is standard procedure when plane crashes are involved.  NAS officials said no naval aviators were involved and there was no damage to the runways or equipment.

Story and video ➤ http://www.kiiitv.com




Two people were killed when a civilian-owned and operated vintage warbird aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff from Naval Air Station Kingsville.

According to the base, the pilot and one passenger had been visiting an employee of the base and had just taken off when the crash occurred at approximately 12:30 p.m.

The identities of the deceased are being withheld pending notification of the next of kin, base officials say.

The base says no Naval aviators were involved and there was no damage to the airfield runways or equipment. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.kristv.com

Boeing to Open Plant in China This Year: The aerospace company reports a higher-than-expected quarterly profit; shares rise



The Wall Street Journal
By Doug Cameron
Updated April 25, 2018 1:23 p.m. ET

Boeing Company aims to have a new facility in China ready to complete some of its 737 jets by the end of this year, a sign that the aerospace giant is taking trade tensions in stride.

Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg said Wednesday that construction is under way on a finishing center near Shanghai that Boeing has said it needs to compete with rival Airbus SE, which already builds jets in China.

His comments on a post-earnings call came as Boeing’s first quarter results soared past analysts’ expectations, and as the company boosted its full-year guidance for profits and operating cash flow. The new guidance signals Boeing is working through challenges in the broader aerospace supply chain related to engines and other plane parts as it and Airbus—which reports Friday—boost jetliner production.

The results also suggest that Boeing’s business hasn’t been hurt by trade-related rhetoric between officials in the U.S. and China. Mr. Muilenburg said Boeing hadn’t been affected by to-and-fro tariff proposals from the U.S. and China.

China accounts for a fifth of Boeing’s jetliner deliveries. The new facility to install seats and other fittings such as in-flight entertainment systems had drawn scrutiny from then-presidential candidate Donald Trump, who cited it as an example of U.S. jobs being moved overseas.

Mr. Muilenburg has said such overseas facilities aren’t a direct threat to the U.S. jobs, and will help protect and expand domestic employment. He said the effort is an essential part of doing business in China.

The aerospace company will continue assembling 737s at its plant near Seattle but send some planes to China for completion at the new plant, a joint venture with the state-controlled Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China Ltd.

Mr. Muilenburg also said on Wednesday that Boeing is following guidance from U.S. officials on potential airplane sales to carriers in Iran. He said planned deliveries of jets had been deferred beyond 2018 as officials in Iran, the U.S. and Europe debate sanctions tied to Iran’s nuclear program

Potential sales to Iran aren’t in Boeing’s order book, which has swelled to more than 5,800 jets worth $415 billion.

First-quarter profits beat expectations as Boeing continued to boost productivity and aimed to raise margins to the midteen range from around 11%. The company didn’t book another charge on its delayed military refueling tanker program, though it said costs had increased, but added its defense and services units contributed to the rise in earnings.

Boeing said its profit rose to $2.48 billion in the quarter from $1.58 billion a year earlier, with per-share earnings up to $4.15 from $2.54. Stripping out pension costs, profit of $3.64 a share was well ahead of the $2.58 analyst consensus.

The company boosted its guidance for full-year profit by 50 cents a share to a range of $14.30 to $14.50, and added $500 million to its forecast for operating cash flow, with a new top end of $15.5 billion.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Cessna 210D Centurion, N884KM: Accident occurred January 21, 2018 at Sussex Airport (KFWN), New Jersey

Cessna 210D Centurion, N884KM


A New York doctor and former television sportscaster landed a small airplane with its landing gear retracted in Sussex County in January, leading to a fire that destroyed the plane, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. 

Marvell Scott and a passenger escaped after the Cessna 210D Centurion went up in flames January 21 at Sussex Airport in Wantage, the NTSB said in a report.

Scott, 45, had just obtained his private pilot license and had about 150 hours of flying time, according to the NTSB.

After the crash, Scott told air-safety investigators he "thought he put the gear down but realized that he probably recycled the gear up" while handling another control next to it, according to a report.

There was nothing mechanically wrong with the plane.

As they landed, the tail hit first and the nose hit the landing strip hard. They skidded to a stop and Scott and an unidentified passenger got out as the plane caught fire.

Scott told the investigator he was surprised at how quickly the plane became engulfed in flames.

"He acknowledged his wounded pride but was glad nobody got hurt," the NTSB report said.


Marvell Scott (credit: Facebook)

Public records show Scott has addresses in Sparta and New York City. He could not immediately be reached for comment at his sports medicine practice in Manhattan.

The medical doctor and former journalist left his job with WABC-TV in New York after he was charged with the second-degree rape of a 14-year-old runaway.

The victim had been coerced into prostitution by an adult male, according to reports.

Scott pleaded guilty to misdemeanor injuring the welfare of a child, received 20 days of community service and had his record cleared, reports said. Public records show Scott was reprimanded over the allegations but did not lose his medical license.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.nj.com

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
  
http://registry.faa.gov/N884KM


Cessna 210D Centurion, N884KM


National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report

Location: SUSSEX, NJ
Accident Number: GAA18CA115
Date & Time: 01/21/2018, 0230 EST
Registration: N884KM
Aircraft: CESSNA 210
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The pilot of the retractable-landing-gear-equipped airplane reported that, during approach, the green landing gear extended light was illuminated. He further reported that "it [was] possible that [he] inadvertently cycled the landing gear back to a gear up position." The airplane landed gear up and was destroyed by postaccident fire.

During a telephone interview with a National Transportation Safety Board investigator, the pilot reported that the landing gear handle and the trim wheel were next to each other, and it is probable that, when operating the trim wheel, he moved the landing gear handle. He added that that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's inadvertent landing gear retraction during approach. 

Findings

Aircraft
Gear extension and retract sys - Unintentional use/operation (Cause)

Personnel issues
Incorrect action performance - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Landing gear not configured (Defining event)
Fire/smoke (non-impact)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/08/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/24/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 150 hours (Total, all aircraft), 50 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N884KM
Model/Series: 210 D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1964
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 21058503
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-A32D
Registered Owner: Pinnacle Medical Solutions LLC
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFWN, 421 ft msl
Observation Time: 0653 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 171°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -7°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: MOUNT POCONO, PA (MPO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: SUSSEX, NJ (FWN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0215 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: SUSSEX (FWN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 421 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 03
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3499 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.200278, -74.623056 (est)

The pilot of the retractable landing gear-equipped airplane reported that, during approach the green landing gear extended light was illuminated. He further reported that "it [was] possible that [he] inadvertently cycled the landing gear back to a gear up position". The airplane landed gear up and was destroyed by a postaccident fire.

During a telephone interview with a National Transportation Safety Board investigator, the pilot reported that the landing gear handle and the trim wheel were next to each other and it is probable that when operating the trim wheel, he moved the landing gear handle. He added that that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

A friend of the pilot reported that the pilot used a LightSpeed Zulu headset with ANR (active noise reduction).

The manufacturer published a service manual for Cessna 210s from 1960-1965. In the service manual, it stated:

"Current production 210 models have incorporated a stall and gear warning unit which has two horns built into the unit, thereby eliminating the need of a speaker." 

Piper PA-31-350 Chieftain, C-FCWW: Incident occurred April 25, 2018 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada










The pilot of a small plane with engine trouble used a stretch of Calgary road as a runway early Wednesday, landing on 36th Street just south of 16th Avenue N.E. 

No injuries were reported. 

The Piper PA-31-350 Chieftain was inbound to Calgary International Airport with six people aboard just after 5:30 a.m. MT when engine trouble forced the pilot to land on the roadway.

Acting District Chief Jason Graham of the Calgary Fire Department said the pilot did "an amazing job" to land the plane safely.

Graham said a crane will be brought in from the airport to lift the plane onto a flatbed truck. Police said it had minor damage.

The plane, registered to Super T Aviation, left Medicine Hat, Alta., about 4:45 a.m. and was headed to Calgary, a company official said.

Owner Terri Super said the pilot has been with the company for "several years" and has more than 20 years of flight experience. 

Jarrett Stobbe had just left the C-Train and was walking to work when he saw the plane about 10 metres overhead. 

"I heard this loud noise and looked up, and it come right over my head," he said. "It was coming in at kind of an angle and clipped that light post, then landed. The pilot did a heck of a job to get it down like that."

Another witness, Michael Nadon, said he wasn't sure what he was seeing was real.

Shaken but unhurt

"I had to do a double take, definitely, this early in the morning," he said. "It looked like it [the plane] was approaching these businesses here, but it veered off just enough and that's when it clipped the light post."

Nadon spoke to people on board who said they were shaken but unhurt.

"They were mentioning that the plane lost its fuel pump. The female pilot, she landed the plane absolutely amazingly, given the circumstances."

It was expected the street would remain closed for several hours.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada has been called in to investigate.

Story and video ➤ http://www.cbc.ca

Piper PA-24 Comanche, N180ML: Accident occurred April 11, 2018 at Posey Field Airport (1M4), Haleyville, Winston County, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and Northwest Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N180ML

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA230
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 11, 2018 in Haleyville, AL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 24, registration: N180ML

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 11-APR-18
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N180ML
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HALEYVILLE
State: ALABAMA

Piper PA-28-181, N922PA: Accident occurred April 24, 2018 and Incident occurred June 09, 2016 at Wickenburg Municipal Airport (E25), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Bird Acquisition LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N922PA

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA234
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, April 24, 2018 in Wickenburg, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N922PA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft experienced a nose gear collapse on landing.

  
Date: 24-APR-18
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N922PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 181
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WICKENBURG
State: ARIZONA

June 09, 2016: Aircraft sustained a propeller strike.

Date: 09-JUN-16

Time: 16:30:00Z
Regis#: N922PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: WICKENBURG
State: Arizona

Glasair GS-2 Sportsman, N454HP: Accident occurred April 24, 2018 in Kalispell, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

STS Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N454HP

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA240
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, April 24, 2018 in Kalispell, MT
Aircraft: BROWN JOSEPH SPORTSMAN GS-2, registration: N454HP

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances.

Date: 24-APR-18
Time: 22:36:00Z
Regis#: N454HP
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: SPORTSMAN GS 2
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: MEADOW CREEK
State: MONTANA

Cessna 162 SkyCatcher, N6020Y: Accident occurred April 22, 2018 at York Airport (KTHV), Thomasville, York County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

HK Aircraft Leasing LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6020Y

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA231
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 22, 2018 in York, PA
Aircraft: CESSNA AIRCRAFT CO 162, registration: N6020Y

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft landed hard on runway.

Date: 22-APR-18
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N6020Y
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 162
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: YORK
State: PENNSYLVANIA

PSA Airlines, Bombardier CRJ900: Incident occurred April 24, 2018 near Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport (KAVP), Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Flight 5033:  Aircraft struck a bird on final.

Date: 24-APR-18
Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CRJ9
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: PSA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 5033
City: SCRANTON
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Cessna 172G, N1350F: Incident occurred April 24, 2018 at McKellar–Sipes Regional Airport (KMKL), Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Memphis, Tennessee

Nose gear collapsed on landing roll-out on runway.

Old School Aircraft LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N1350F

Date: 24-APR-18
Time: 20:38:00Z
Regis#: N1350F
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172G
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: JACKSON
State: TENNESSEE

St. Paul Downtown Airport (KSTP) new restaurant attracts fly-in diners, sometimes in classic aircraft

Robert Schroeder gets ready to fly out in his Nanchang CJ-6A at St. Paul’s Holman Field, after having lunch at Holman’s Table with fellow pilot Steve Hamel on Tuesday, April 24, 2018. Hamel owns a 1984 Russian Yak-52.


Robert Schroeder, left, and Steve Hamel stand near Schroeder's Nanchang CJ-6A at St. Paul's Holman Field, watching a B-25 (the little speck in the sky at far right), and a Minnesota Patrol helicopter practicing rescues, center, on Tuesday, April 24, 2018.


Spring is here, so why not hop a plane and grab some lunch?

Even better if a World War II-era B-25 is flying practice approaches nearby and the Minnesota State Patrol helicopter is doing practice rescues.

That’s what Robert Schroeder and Steve Hamel encountered Tuesday afternoon.

Schroeder, of Minneapolis, called up Hamel and said his 1983 Nanchang CJ-6A — a Chinese air force trainer plane — was good to go. Hamel, of Hudson, was leaving his Frogtown machine shop, heard the radial engine, and knew his friend was above. He drove over, and the two met at Holman’s Table, at the St. Paul Downtown Airport.

Schroeder hadn’t flown for six months — “This has no heat,” he said, pointing to his craft through the restaurant window  — and was thrilled to get into the air.

They raved about the newly opened Holman’s Table restaurant.

“We’ve been denied a restaurant that we can fly into in the Twin Cities area for a long time,” Schroeder said over a Reuben sandwich and fries. “So a lot of us would fly to Eau Claire for lunch for the infamous hundred-dollar burger and fly back.

“This is much finer. The food’s phenomenal. The location is fabulous. It requires the pilot to use their skills in dealing with the tower, taxiing, a mixed type of aircraft. … So it really does cause you as a pilot to improve your mixed skill set. And have a great meal.”

Just then, a World War II-era B-25 bomber — a “Billy Mitchell” from the Commemorative Air Force Minnesota Wing– flew in, drawing their attention. Diners filed out to watch the pilot’s “touch and go” practices. And then the rescue simulations began nearby.

The restaurant has airplane parking spaces right outside the door and gets fly-in guests several times a week, said manager Patty Pitka: “They come from St. Cloud, Duluth, all over, just to pop in for a meal.”

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.twincities.com

Gulfstream to add 200 Georgia jobs

Gulfstream Aerospace Corp., will invest $55 million and add 200 jobs in an expansion of its jet service center operations in Savannah, Ga.

Gulfstream located its headquarters in Savannah in 1967 and has since grown from 100 local employees to more than 16,000 employees on six continents.

"This expansion is the result of the strong and steady fleet growth we've had for several years and the arrival of our new Gulfstream G500 and G600 in the coming months," Mark Burns, president of Gulfstream, said in an announcement of the expansion Tuesday. "These new facilities will keep us well-positioned for support, maintenance and refurbishment of the Gulfstream fleet, which is now at nearly 2,700 aircraft and continues to grow."

Gulfstream's headquarters in Savannah includes facilities for manufacturing, research and development, maintenance, sales and support. Located at the site of Savannah's former airport terminal, the expansion will include an additional maintenance hangar, customer tower, and a hangar support area with office and shop space.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.timesfreepress.com