Saturday, March 3, 2018

Triple WWII ace accepts national designation for Colorado Springs aviation museum

Col. Clarence "Bud" Anderson, the last living American triple-ace fighter pilot from World War II, left, stands in front of a replica of the P-51 "Old Crow" that Bud flew in WWII Saturday, March 3, 2018, after Anderson became the first induction into the museum's Veterans Honor Program at the National Museum of World War II Aviation in Colorado Springs.


Seated across from "Old Crow," the P-51 Mustang fighter he flew in World War II, retired Air Force Col. Clarence "Bud" Anderson on Saturday accepted Congress' official recognition on behalf of the National Museum of World War II Aviation in Colorado Springs.

Anderson, 96, who flew 116 combat missions escorting heavy bombers during the war, destroyed more than 16 enemy aircraft in dogfights and another on the ground. He is the war's last surviving American triple ace.

His presence lent an extra historical touch to the long-sought national museum designation bestowed by Congress last year.

U.S. Rep. Doug Lamborn, R-Colorado Springs, who introduced a measure honoring the museum in 2010 - two years before it had even opened - also attended the ceremony.

The P-51 was flown in as a surprise for Anderson from the National Warbird Hall of Fame in OshKosh, Wis. Anderson was shocked to see it when he walked in, saying, "It's always great to have a Mustang around. But to have one with your own markings on it is incredible."


Museum president and CEO Bill Klaers speaks during a ceremony Saturday, March 3, 2018, at the National Museum of World War II Aviation in Colorado Springs


"Old Crow," the name of Anderson's plane - an homage, according to Anderson, "to that good ol' Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey" - gleamed on the cowling behind the plane's nose under the hangar's fluorescent lights.

Reuniting pilots with planes is an important function of the National Museum of WWII Aviation. Bill Klaers, museum president and the head of affiliated Westpac Restorations, was inspired in part to take over the museum at the Colorado Springs Airport eight years ago from its founder after two former pilots recognized planes they had flown during World War II that were being restored in Westpac's hangar.

The museum has been pursuing national recognition ever since.

The designation has only been awarded to 12 other museums across the U.S., according to Lamborn, one of the congressional sponsors along with Sens. Michael Bennet, a Democrat, and Cory Gardner, a Republican.

The museum prides itself on being a "living museum" - all of its 23 planes are restored to flying condition.

"Kids today don't even know what WWII was because the teachers don't know. . When we got here, you couldn't even teach WWII within the Standards of Learning in Colorado Springs," Klaers said.

Lead docent Phil Heacock says having restored WWII planes that young people can touch helps them connect with the history.

After the ceremony, a crumbling, dirt-encrusted carcass of a plane that had been dug out of the ground half a world away was wheeled into the area where the 300 attendees had been sitting. Another piece of a plane that smelled like gasoline was rolled back next to the flight simulator.


Pearl Harbor survivor and Colorado Springs resident Donald Stratton salutes the crowd after being honored Saturday, March 3, 2018, during a ceremony at the National Museum of World War II Aviation in Colorado Springs.


"I think it's nice for us to come in and see physical evidence of this rather than learning from a book that, 'so and so' did this, or that, 'this happened.' It's nice to get these physical things," said Corey Patton Lossner, a Cheyenne Mountain High School senior who attended the ceremony as one of Lamborn's congressional nominees to attend the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Klaers and Heacock said the national designation will give the museum the prestige its collection deserves, help attract donations, and foster collaboration with other high-profile museums and foundations.

During the ceremony, Klaers said a $16.5 million donation from the philanthropic Shook family would enable the museum to add an 80,000-square-foot hangar.

"And the catalyst was not so much the money or the donation of the aircraft, it was bringing the national designation," he said.

The addition will allow the museum to display all its aircraft, some of which are stored in Pueblo, Texas and Arizona because of lack of space in Colorado Springs.

Walking around the hangar, Bob Waltzer, a retired airman who drove up for the day from Pueblo, said he has been to a lot of air museums, but this was his first time to a museum dedicated solely to WWII aviation.

"I've been to a lot of aviation museums where you walk in and it looks like a junkyard, but this thing is primo."

Original article can be found here ➤  http://gazette.com

Southwest Airlines sued for wrong airport landing

Taney County man is suing Southwest Airlines over a 2014 incident in which one of the airline’s planes landed at the wrong airport.

Troy Haines, who court documents state lived in Cedarcreek at the time of the incident, is seeking damages from “mental anguish, fear and anxiety” as a passenger on a Boeing 737 that landed at the wrong airport Jan. 12, 2014, on a runway smaller than is normally intended for an aircraft that large.

Haines is asking for damages of $74,999.99. (A larger amount would require filing in federal court.)

According to the petition filed by Haines’ attorney, Haines was returning to Branson as a passenger on Southwest Airlines flight 4013 from Chicago. The petition states:

– The captain of the flight had never flown into the Branson Airport, and the first officer had only flown in once.

–The crew decided to make a visual runway approach, backed up with an RNAV instrument approach and a Heads Up Display.

– The first officer was not wearing glasses, as he was required to do.

–At 6:02 p.m., the crew visually identified what they thought was the Branson Airport, but was actually the  M. Graham Clark Downtown Airport in Hollister, about a nine-mile drive away.

According to the petition, when Haines, who had flown to Branson many times, became aware they were flying into the wrong airport, he “was immediately struck with fear and anxiety over potentially crashing.”

Because they were landing on a shorter runway, the flight crew applied the speedbrake, thrust reversers and autobrakes, causing the passengers to slam forward and bounce around in their seats. The braking caused the overhead bins to unlatch and toss their contents around the cabin. The cabin filled with smoke, according to the petition.

The petition states the plane came to rest 300 feet from the end of the runway and that passengers had to stay in the smoke-filled cabin for two hours while the plane sat at the edge of the runway.

The petition states Haines suffered “mental anguish, fear and anxiety” for months following the incident. It states Haines suffered a panic attack that caused him to be removed from another flight before take-off.

According to the petition, because Haines was no longer able to fly from venue to venue as his job required, he was forced to find new employment at a “substantially diminished salary.”

The petition also states that Haines is expected to incur further medical expenses in the future.

By press time Friday, Southwest Airlines had not responded to a request for a comment.

According to Branson Tri-Lakes News archives, the Boeing 737 landed with 124 passengers and five crew members at the county-owned airport. According to local aviation expert Michael Hynes, of Hynes Aviation Services, the Boeing 737 normally requires 5,100 feet to land. The runway at M. Graham Clark is approximately 3,700 feet. The Branson Airport runway is 7,140 feet.

The plane was safely flown out of the airport, without passengers, the next day.

Four months after the incident, Southwest Airlines announced that the flight’s first officer had retired.

Southwest Airlines operated flights to and from the Branson Airport from March 2013 to June 2014.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://bransontrilakesnews.com

Aviation Incident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N272WN



Location: Branson, MO
Incident Number: DCA14IA037
Date & Time: 01/12/2014, 1810 CST
Registration: N272WN
Aircraft: BOEING 737 7H4
Aircraft Damage: None
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 131 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled

Analysis

The flight crew briefed a plan to have radar vectors to the final approach course at Branson Airport and to use the RNAV (GPS) Runway 14 to line up on the final approach. The flight crew programmed the flight management system for the approach and set up the onboard navigation systems accordingly; including the use of distance measuring equipment from another approach navigation aid to provide additional situation awareness. During descent, the flight crew discussed the navigation information displayed, compared it to the lights they could see on the horizon, and confirmed what they believed to be the airport beacon based on that comparison early in the descent.

The approach controller cleared the flight direct to the final approach fix depicted on the RNAV approach to the runway of intended landing. While still about 20 miles from the destination airport, the approach controller advised the crew the airport was located at their 11 o'clock position and 15 miles although at the time, that position more closely approximated Downtown Airport. Branson Airport was slightly left at their 10 o'clock position and almost 20 miles. The flight crew called the airport in sight and accepted a visual approach clearance and handoff to Branson control tower. Upon checking in with Branson Tower, the crew was cleared to land on runway 14 at Branson.

When the crew identified what they believed to be Branson Airport early in the descent, they did not crosscheck or verify the airport position using onboard navigation after that point. Perceiving they were a little high on the approach into Downtown Airport, they widened the base leg for descent and then descended below approach control radar coverage as they turn onto final approach. Therefore, from the perspective of the approach controller this appeared to be a normal flight path into Branson Airport up to the point when radar contact was lost.

Instead, the flight crew lined up on final approach to runway 12 at Downtown Airport and proceeded to land. The captain recognized the error soon after touchdown when he realized the runway was shorter than expected and he applied maximum braking, coming to a stop about 300 feet from the end of the paved surface.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this incident to be:
The Flight crew's failure to properly identify the airport and runway of intended landing.

Contributing to the incident was the flight crew's failure to comply with procedures for use of navigation information and visual cues to verify the airport and runway of intended landing and the air traffic controller's issuance of erroneous airport geographic information without including the location of proximate airports.

Findings

Personnel issues
Identification/recognition - Flight crew (Cause)
Use of equip/system - Flight crew (Factor)
Task performance - Flight crew (Factor)
Incomplete action - ATC personnel (Factor)



Factual Information

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 12, 2014, about 1810 Central Standard Time (CST), Southwest Airlines flight 4013 (SWA4013), a Boeing 737-7H4, registration N272WN, mistakenly landed at M. Graham Clark Downtown Airport (PLK), Branson, Missouri, which was 6 miles north of the intended destination, Branson Airport (BBG), Branson, Missouri.  The flight had been cleared to land on runway 14 at BBG, which was 7,140 feet long, however, landed on runway 12 at PLK, which was 3,738 feet long. There were no injuries to the 124 passengers and 7 crewmembers and the aircraft was not damaged.  The aircraft was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 as a regularly scheduled passenger flight from Chicago Midway International Airport (MDW), Chicago, Illinois.  Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The flight was scheduled to depart MDW at 1545 CST but due to delays from the previous flight, did not depart until 1643 CST.. The first officer was the pilot flying, the captain was the pilot monitoring, and a company dispatcher occupied the flight deck jumpseat as an observer. During preflight preparation the first officer loaded the flight plan into the flight management computer (FMC). The departure and initial climb were uneventful.

At 1702, after climbing through 18,000 feet, the crew initiated a discussion about the planned landing runway at BBG. The first officer indicated he had been there only one time before when he had landed on runway 32.

At 1708, the crew discussed the wind conditions at BBG and agreed runway 14 would be used for landing. They discussed the fact that runway 14 was not served by an ILS approach and that they would conduct a visual approach backed up with an RNAV instrument approach and use of the Heads Up display (HUD). The captain stated that he was setting up distance measuring equipment (DME) from the runway 32 localizer in his avionics. From 1708 to 1734, the crew discussed the airplane fuel system and the fuel crossfeed operations required due to the airplane having inoperable equipment deferred in accordance with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved minimum equipment list.

At 1727 the first officer began to brief the approach into BBG. He indicated a plan to have radar vectors to the approach and let the RNAV line them up for a visual. He noted the inbound final approach course was 143 degrees and the touchdown zone elevation was 1,278 feet. The crew then engaged in a discussion regarding the after landing taxi route to the gate. After the first officer initially indicated they would not need to make a 180 degree turn on the runway to taxi back to the gate, the captain prompted further discussion and the crew agreed they would need to make a 180 degree turn on the runway when landing from this direction.

At 1744 Air Traffic Control (ATC) cleared the flight to descend to 24,000 feet and at 1746 cleared the flight direct to BBG.

At 1750 the crew received the current BBG automated terminal information service (ATIS) weather report via radio indicating runway 14 was in use and a few minutes later, as the airplane descended through 18,000 feet, the first officer called for the descent checklist.

At 1752:22, when the flight was approximately 60 nautical miles northeast of BBG, ATC cleared the flight to descent to 4,000 feet, advised them to expect a visual approach to runway 14, and to proceed direct to VUCUG intersection, the final approach fix on the RNAV (GPS) runway 14 approach.

At 1752:53 while conducting the descent checks, the crew noted that they were putting a 5 and 10 mile ring around "it" in reference to BBG airport on their navigation display.

During the next few minutes, the crew (including the observer occupying the jumpseat) discussed the navigation fixes and stations on the navigation display and compared them to the lights visible from the flight deck. They confirmed which lights they believed to be Branson and which lights they believed to be Springfield.

At 1800:10 Springfield ATC advised BBG tower that SWA4013 was 20 miles northeast of BBG for a visual approach to runway 14.

At 1801:57 the first officer said "well I see the beacon down there…no runway yet."

At 1802:06 the captain said "I think that's it. I see a bunch of bright white lights to the right and just a little to the left of the beacon."

About 1802:51 ATC advised the airport was located at "…eleven o'clock and one five miles."

At 1802:57, after the crew conferred, the captain responded to ATC "…field in sight."

At 1803:00 ATC cleared the flight for a visual approach to runway 14, terminated radar service, and advised the flight to contact BBG tower.

At 1803:15, the captain reported to BBG tower that the flight was descending out of 6,600 feet for 3,000 feet direct to VUCUG for a visual approach and the BBG tower controller cleared them to land on runway 14.

From 1805:41 through 1808:09, the crew configured the airplane for landing, deployed flaps, landing gear, and completed the landing checklist. The crew then exchanged callouts regarding speed, altitude, glidepath, and sink rate until touchdown on runway 12 at PLK at 1809:15.

The airplane touched down about 300 feet past the displaced threshold.

During the landing roll, following callouts for operation of the speedbrake, thrust reversers, and autobrakes, the captain stated "this ain't it" and the crew applied maximum braking. The airplane came to a stop about 300 feet from the end of the paved surface for runway 12.

At 1809:45 the captain called BBG tower and stated "I assume I'm not at your airport."

INJURIES TO PERSONS

There were no injuries to the 124 passengers and 7 crewmembers.

DAMAGE TO AIRPLANE

The aircraft was not damaged.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The crew consisted of two pilots, three flight attendants, and a company dispatcher who occupied the flight deck jumpseat as an observer.

The Captain, age 58, was hired by Southwest Airlines in June 1999 as a first officer on a Boeing B-737. He upgraded to captain on the B-737 in July 2005.

The captain reported approximately 15,700 hours total time including about 9,035 hours pilot-in-command and 10,400 hours on the B-737. There was no record of previous aviation incidents, accidents, or enforcement actions involving the captain. He held a valid FAA Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate with type ratings for DC-9, BA3100, and B737, and a current FAA first-class medical certificate with no limitations.  The captain stated in an interview that since his last FAA medical evaluation, he had started to wear glasses and that he was wearing them at the time of the incident.

The first officer, age 62, was hired by Southwest Airlines in June 2001. He reported 20,538 hours total time including 9,880 hours in the B-737. There was no record of previous aviation incidents, accidents, or enforcement actions involving the first officer. He held a valid FAA ATP certificate with type ratings for BA3100, BA4100, and B737, and a current FAA first-class medical certificate with a limitation stating that he must have available glasses for near vision. He indicated in an interview that he was not wearing the glasses at the time of the incident.

Company records indicated the first officer had attempted an upgrade training event to become a captain on the B-737 but received an unsatisfactory grade during the Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) portion of the training in December 2011. He re-entered upgrade training on January 4, 2012 for "situational awareness training", and received an unsatisfactory grade during the LOFT for the second time on January 5, 2012. He then returned to line flying as a first officer.

Company records indicated the captain had not flown to BBG before, and the first officer had flown into BBG one time previously on June 24, 2013.

The captain and first officer had started the first day of their respective trips together but were then separated, flying different flight schedules until meeting again to fly on the third day. The incident flight was the second flight on the third day of the captain's 3-day trip and the first flight (following two deadhead legs) of the third day of the first officer's 4-day trip.

At the time of the incident, the captain had been on duty for approximately 8 hours and the first officer had been on duty for approximately 10 hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The incident airplane, manufacturer serial number 32527, was a Boeing B737-7H4 equipped with two CFM International CFM56-7B24 turbofan engines.  The certificated maximum gross weight of the airplane was 154,000 pounds, the maximum landing weight was 128,000 pounds, and the actual landing weight was 124,763 pounds.

Company records indicated that the airplane was operated on the incident flight with two deferred maintenance items.  The number 2 aft fuel boost pump and the right retractable landing light were both inoperative and deferred in accordance with the FAA-approved minimum equipment list.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

There was no official aviation weather observation recorded for PLK. The aviation routine weather report (METAR) recorded at 1747 and reported as ATIS information Delta at BBG, approximately 6 miles south of PLK, indicated wind from 150 degrees at 12 knots gusting to 23 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few scattered clouds at 25,000 feet, temperature 17 degrees Celsius, dewpoint minus 2 degrees Celsius, altimeter setting 29.70 inches mercury, and visual approaches for runway 14 in use.

The flight crew received BBG ATIS information Delta via radio and the BBG METAR via the ACARS (Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System) about 20 minutes prior to landing.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION

The crew briefed a plan to conduct a visual approach and use the RNAV approach as a reference. The RNAV (GPS) Runway 14 was a straight in approach that began over WUTIB waypoint at 4,000 feet, proceeded to cross VUCUG, the final approach fix, at 3,000 feet on an inbound course of 143 degrees. A vertical descent path began at VUCUG which was located 5.2 miles from the end of BBG runway 14 and about 2 miles southwest of PLK.

There was no localizer based approach to BBG runway 14 though DME was available from the runway 32 localizer frequency.

COMMUNICATIONS

No communications problems were noted at any time during the incident.

FAA order 7110.65, "Air Traffic Control", stated, in part, that Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCC) and approach controls may clear aircraft for visual approaches using the following procedures:  "In those instances where airports are located in close proximity, also provide the location of the airport that may cause the confusion." When ATC communicated the airport location and provided an approach clearance to the flight crew, the approach controller did not provide the location of other airports in the area.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Branson Airport is located 8 miles SSE of Branson, Missouri at an elevation of 1302 feet above mean sea level. The airport has two runways, 14 and 32. The runway of intended landing, runway 14, is grooved concrete 150 feet wide and 7,140 feet long with available landing distance of 7,140 feet and a touchdown zone elevation of 1,278 feet above mean sea level. The runway is served by a 4-light precision approach path indicator with a 3 degree glideslope on the left side of the runway, runway end identifier lights (REILs) and high intensity runway edge lights.

Air traffic control services at Branson Airport are provided by a federal contract tower. Airfield lighting was controlled by the air traffic control tower personnel during hours of tower operation from 0700 to 2100 daily.

M. Graham Clark Downtown Airport is located 1 mile south of Branson, Missouri at an elevation of 940 feet above mean sea level. The airport has two runways, 12 and 30. Runway 12 is grooved asphalt 100 feet wide and 3,738 feet long with a displaced threshold of 289 feet providing an available landing distance of 3,449 and a touchdown zone elevation of 940 feet above mean sea level. The runway is served by REILs located at the displaced threshold and medium intensity edge lights. There is no visual approach slope guidance for runway 12.

There was no ATC control tower located at PLK and airfield lighting was activated by a pilot controlled lighting system operating on the common traffic advisory frequency.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

The cockpit voice recorder (CVR), a Honeywell model 6022, serial number 09032, was removed from the airplane and downloaded at the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory.  The CVR contained 2 hours, 5 minutes of recording on two sets of audio data files; a 2-channel recording containing the last 2 hours of recorded data and a 4-channel file containing the last 30 minutes of recorded data.  The audio quality of the channels containing information from the captain's and first officer's audio panels, was characterized as excellent, and the audio quality of the channel containing information from the cockpit area microphone was characterized as good. The recording included events from the flight beginning with the departure climb out of 10,000 feet, and ending when the CVR was deactivated about 53 minutes after landing. Timing on the CVR summary was established by correlating CVR elapsed time to common events on the flight data recorder (FDR) and adjusting to local CST.

The FDR, a Honeywell Model 980-4700, serial number 10856, was removed from the airplane and downloaded at the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory.  The recorder arrived in good condition and contained approximately 27 hours of data which was extracted normally. Correlation of the FDR data to event local time, CST, was established using the recorded GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) parameter.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On January 13, 2014, the captain and first officer complied with a company request to submit to drug and alcohol screening tests.  Results of these tests were negative for alcohol and major drugs of abuse.

ORGANIZATIONAL AND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION

Southwest Airlines is owned and operated by Southwest Airlines Co. who also owned Air Tran Airways. Southwest Airlines is based in Dallas, Texas. As of December 31, 2013, Southwest Airlines and AirTran Airways together operated flights to 96 destinations in the United States, Aruba, the Bahamas, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Mexico with a fleet of 614 Boeing B-737's and 66 B-717's.

AirTran Airways started service into BBG in 2009 and Southwest Airlines added service to BBG in March 2013. In December 2013 Southwest Airlines announced they would cease operations in BBG effective June 7, 2014.

The incident aircraft is owned by Southwest Airlines Co. and operated by Southwest Airlines for common carrier passenger operations.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Air Traffic Control Services

Approach control services were provide to SWA4013 by an approach controller at Springfield Terminal Radar Approach Control (SGF TRACON) and the airport ATC services were provided by BBG Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT). BBG ATCT, a federal contract tower, did not have radar monitor capability and both BBG and PLK were located at elevations below SGF radar coverage. Interviews with SGF controllers indicated that radar coverage ceased and radar contact was normally lost for aircraft arriving BBG when they descended below about 2,200 to 2,600 feet and no minimum safe altitudes alerts were triggered for SGF controllers for this flight.

The BBG tower controller indicated he normally kept the runway edge lights off, in order to save money, until an aircraft was reported on arrival.

FAA order 7110.65, "Air Traffic Control", stated in part, to turn on runway edge lights, from sunset to sunrise, for instrument flight rules arrivals before the aircraft begins final approach or for visual flight rules arrivals before the aircraft enters Class B, Class C, or Class D surface area associated with the airport.

There were no records or airfield lighting system recording capability to determine when the runway lights were turned on at BBG. The BBG tower controller indicated in an interview that he had turned on the runway edge lights after receiving notification from SGF TRACON at 1800:10 that SWA4013 was inbound. Prior to that time, he stated that only the runway end identifier lights and the precision approach slope indicator had been on for the runway of intended landing.

Approach Briefing

The flight crew conducted a briefing for a visual approach to runway 14 using an RNAV approach as a reference on the navigation display. During the approach briefing, the crew discussed the final approach course, the touchdown zone elevation, and the runway and airport layout. There was no discussion of airport lighting or visual approach path guidance.

The Southwest Airlines AOM required pilots to conduct an approach briefing prior to every approach. The AOM indicated that for visual approaches under visual meteorological conditions, flight crews must brief the final approach course and navaid frequency of the charted instrument approach for the expected runway. Although the procedures did not specify that airport lighting should be included in a briefing for a visual approach, interviews with Southwest Airlines personnel indicated that some pilots would include this information in their approach briefings.

The Southwest Airlines AOM Approach Briefing Requirements for an instrument approach specified that runway and approach lighting was to be reviewed during the briefing. Following this incident, Southwest Airlines revised the AOM to include runway lighting as a component in visual approach briefings.

Flight Crew Use of Onboard Navigation

During the approach brief and preparation, the crew had programmed RNAV approach guidance in the FMC and was navigating direct to the final approach fix. The crew stated they setup 5 and 10 mile distance rings around BBG on their navigation displays, and the captain stated he setup DME from runway 32 localizer to provide additional situation awareness.

Once they had what they believed to be BBG in sight, the crew stated that they did not reference on board navigation guidance and transitioned to outside visual reference. The Southwest Airlines Flight Operations Manual included specified pilot flying and pilot monitoring duties and required that flight crew members monitor flight and navigation instruments and crosscheck for consistency and accuracy. In addition, the Southwest Airlines AOM provided guidance indicating that flight crews should, when conducting a visual approach, reference an issued charted procedure contained in the FMC navigation database to assist with lateral and vertical guidance to the correct runway.

During the approach, the captain stated he used the heads up display (HUD) in VMC (visual meteorological conditions) mode. Southwest Airlines procedures do not require use of the HUD, which is only installed on the captain's side, for visual approaches but provides guidance allowing the HUD to be used in VMC mode. Southwest Airlines AOM guidance indicated that when using the HUD in VMC mode, the alignment with the landing runway should normally be accomplished by visually acquiring the runway and maneuvering the aircraft using outside references. The HUD could be used for descent rate reference in VMC mode by adjusting rate of descent to hold a reference line over the point of intended touchdown. The HUD does not provide navigation or flight director guidance in VMC mode.

History of Flight

Approach
Course deviation

Landing
Miscellaneous/other (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 58
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/12/2013
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/10/2013
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 15700 hours (Total, all aircraft), 10400 hours (Total, this make and model), 9035 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 188 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 63 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 62
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/05/2013
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/28/2013
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 20538 hours (Total, all aircraft), 9880 hours (Total, this make and model), 8295 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 125 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 55 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BOEING
Registration: N272WN
Model/Series: 737 7H4 7H4
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 32527
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 154500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  2 Turbo Fan
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CFM INTL
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: CFM56-7B24
Registered Owner: SOUTHWEST AIRLINES CO
Rated Power: 10142 hp
Operator: SOUTHWEST AIRLINES CO
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: SWAA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBBG, 1302 ft msl
Observation Time: 1747 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 170°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 24000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / -2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots/ 23 knots, 150°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 29.7 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Chicago, IL (KMDW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Branson, MO (KBBG)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1654 CST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: M. Graham Clark Downtown (KPLK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 940 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3738 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 7 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: 124 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 131 None
Latitude, Longitude:  36.625833, -93.228889 (est)

Peach to start training its pilots in-house



Peach Aviation Limited has announced that it will begin training to its own pilots. To date, Peach has been hiring pilots who have graduated from aviation universities or taken pilot courses at private universities and obtained the necessary licenses to fly as pilots at airlines, providing in-house training as copilots. This will be the first time for the company to train pilots from their initial step to obtain their licenses.

With expansions of LCCs and other such factors, aviation demand in Asia is rapidly increasing, and a shortage of pilots is becoming a major issue. To post further growth as a bridge between Japan and Asia and to contribute to expansions in aviation demand, Peach believes that it is important to nurture pilots under its own scheme and has decided to take these steps at this time.

Peach will make a call for the first pilots to be trained in-house on its company website and through other such methods around the summer of 2018 and is planning to have them join the company as trainee pilots by the end of FY 2019.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://japantoday.com

Airplane noise is rattling Charlotte windows. It doesn’t have to be that way



By Special to the Observer editorial board

From Sam Blair, Brian Cox, Denise Davis, Patreece Lanier, Calvin McGuirt, Ben Miley and Bob Petruska of Charlotte, in response to “Discuss noise, but know airport is vital” (Feb 10):

In his op-ed, Charlotte Chamber CEO Bob Morgan states, “Even if you don’t fly, you should recognize Charlotte Douglas is important.”

We agree, and we do fly.

The importance of the airport is not the issue, nor is its growth. In fact, growth at the airport is relatively flat: 44.9 million passengers in 2015, down to 44.4 million in 2016, and back up to 45.9 million in 2017. Also of note, statistics show passengers on three out of every four flights are connecting and not originating or ending in Charlotte.

The issue is the procedural changes made by the FAA in 2016 to decades-old and well-known air traffic patterns that we all relied on when purchasing our homes. These changes were made without conversations involving those most affected: Charlotte citizens on the ground.

The new FAA procedures subject long-established neighborhoods, some over 10 miles from the airport, to hundreds of daily arrivals flying on concentrated flight paths at altitudes as low as 3,000 feet. Furthermore, departures that previously ascended over industrially zoned land now immediately turn and rattle the windows in residential areas. Even neighborhoods historically somewhat affected are now inundated with even lower and more frequent air traffic. The most unfortunate live where routes for arrivals and departures converge.

The FAA has operated flights safely over Charlotte-area skies for decades. The long-overdue implementation of new satellite technology should help reduce the impact of noise and emissions on the ground. Instead, that technology is being used to shorten and fly more direct routes, ultimately benefiting the bottom line of airlines at the expense of the quality of life in Charlotte.

Having a “world-class” airport coupled with “quality neighborhoods and a high quality of life” should not be mutually exclusive concepts. But let’s be candid: the FAA is not interested nor invested in the latter. It is a federally funded agency imposing bureaucratic will on Charlotte-area taxpayers, without meaningful pre-implementation citizen involvement or consultation with Charlotte’s mayor and City Council.

We hope Charlotte’s leaders will stand up for its neighborhoods and residents, as the leaders of Phoenix and Baltimore recently have, by insisting the FAA reconsider the extreme negative impact they have caused by not sufficiently researching what is beneath these new highways in the sky: decades old neighborhoods, schools, parks, families and children. We also urge American Airlines to use its influence to reduce the concentration of noise and emissions over Charlotte’s most populated areas.

Our neighborhoods and the people who reside in them are equally important to “the continued growth and vitality of our economy.”

The authors are members of the Charlotte Airport Community Roundtable. Their opinions are their own, and not necessarily the Roundtable’s.

Original article ➤ http://www.charlotteobserver.com

'Lofty' goals for Hagerstown Aviation Museum



The Hagerstown Aviation Museum might be without a permanent site, but it already has a following around the country, thanks to social media and a segment on the Travel Channel's "Mysteries at the Museum."

President John Seburn said a proposed plan for a permanent home for the museum is highlighted in the February 2018 issue of the museum's newsletter, Pegasus Flyer, which is available on its website.

The site near the former Fairchild Aircraft ramp at Hagerstown Regional Airport would have an outdoor air park with room for the current collection of large Fairchild aircraft and space for more acquisitions.

The small aircraft, indoor exhibits and more would be housed in a hangar to be constructed onsite, with a view of the airport's main runway.

All that's needed to move forward is for the lease to be signed by the county. Hagerstown Regional Airport Director Phil Ridenour said by phone Thursday that the lease is awaiting review by the county attorney's office, which is backlogged right now.

Ridenour said that as far as he knows, there is nothing to prevent the lease from being signed. He anticipates that it will happen within the next couple of weeks.

"We know there's an interest and demand," said Seburn, adding that the museum might be "the best kept secret at the airport."

It's been 22 years since the founding group of the museum first met.

Seburn was one of the initial members, along with Richard Henson, a local aviation pioneer for whom a road at Hagerstown Regional Airport is named for.



"We're carrying that passion forward with what we're doing now," Seburn said.

Other founding members included former Fairchild employees.

"We're surrounded by people who lived the history we are preserving," Seburn said.

The collection of 20 aircraft, large and small; salvaged parts; and four historic vehicles are in four locations at and near the airport. Fourteen of the aircraft were built in Washington County at Fairchild Aircraft.

Seburn said the Travel Channel segment on "Operation Haylift," which was filmed on Oct. 8, 2016, has aired multiple times. People across the U.S. call to express interest in visiting the museum.

Without a museum to visit, he said, callers can come to special events hosted throughout the year.

There are five Open Airplane Afternoon events this year for rides in a Fairchild PT-19 Trainer from World War II.

Three EAA Chapter 36 Fly-in, Drive-in Breakfasts are on the schedule with Young Eagle plane rides for ages 8 to 17, weather permitting. A Wings & Wheels Expo is on the calendar for Sept. 8.

A "very active" Facebook page generates interest among families with connections to Fairchild.

Seburn said what sets Hagerstown Aviation Museum apart from other aviation museums is that the airplanes and artifacts relate to this area. They sum up their mission with the words "Preserving Hagerstown's Aviation Heritage."

"It's very local and very personal for the families that come out," Seburn said.

While he's giving tours of the aircraft, Seburn has overheard people telling children about a grandfather who built a similar airplane or a grandmother who was a Rosie the Riveter.

"They're sharing ancestral history," Seburn said.

He wonders if his own interest in the museum doesn't come from his grandfather, who worked at Fairchild from 1941 to 1966, and his father, who is a retired history teacher.



The museum raises money through its annual membership drive of about 300 members, as well as fundraisers, private donations to specific projects, and grants from different foundations and organizations, including the Mary K. Bowman Historical and Fine Arts Fund through the Community Foundation of Washington County and the Delaplaine Foundation Inc. in Frederick, Md.

Information about the effort is available by emailing info@hagerstownaviationmuseum.org, going to facebook.com/HagerstownAviationMuseum. Donation checks can be mailed to Hagerstown Aviation Museum, 14235 Oaks Spring Road, Hagerstown, MD 21742.

Seburn said that once there is a signed lease, organizers will regroup and start a capital campaign to raise funds for the project. Donations are welcome.

"We need a building for the public to come to. There's an urgency to get something open for the public," he said.

Original article ➤  https://www.heraldmailmedia.com

Finley, Benton County, Washington: Officials look for person who shined a laser light at passenger plane

FINLEY, Wash. -- Aiming a laser pointer at a flying plane can put pilots and passengers in danger.

The Benton County Sheriff’s Office said they're looking for the person who shined a laser light at a passenger plane Friday night as it was descending to land at the Pasco airport.

The pilots reported to Seattle Air Traffic Control that the light went into one of the cockpit windows where they were sitting.

They said the light came from the area between Nine Canyon Rd, SR 397, Terril Rd, Fremont Rd, and 1924 PR SE in the Finley area.

Officials said aiming a laser at a plane can distract the pilot, cause a glare, temporary blindness, and can damage a pilot's eyes.

Police said it is an arrestable offense.

Benton County Sheriff’s Office said if you have any information on who might be involved, please call 628-0333, case #18-03003.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://keprtv.com

Aero Commander 100-180 Lark, N3733X, owned and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred March 02, 2018 in Deport, Lamar County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N3733X


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Deport, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA113
Date & Time: 03/02/2018, 1625 CST
Registration: N3733X
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 100-180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 2, 2018, about 1625 central standard time, an Aero Commander 100-180, N3733X, sustained substantial damage when it hit a tree during a forced landing to a field after a total loss of engine power near Deport, Texas. The pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight departed from the Cox Field Airport (PRX), Paris, Texas, about 1600 on a local flight.

The pilot reported that he attempted to fly his airplane the day before the accident, but he had maintenance problems and decided not to fly. He reported that there had been an extended period of rain in area and his airplane was parked on the airplane ramp during that time. During the preflight inspection, he sumped the fuel twice with about 4oz of water in the samples. The airplane had not been flown since January 28, 2018, and the battery was "completely dead." The battery was charged enough to get the engine started and he taxied to the run-up area. During the magneto checks, the engine "died," and he needed assistance to get the engine running again. While waiting for the assistance to arrive start the engine again, he decided to recheck the fuel system. He reported that he sumped thirty 8oz bottles of water from the fuel system before he saw clean blue fuel. After getting the engine started again, he taxied back to the ramp and tied the airplane down. He reported that the right wing was sloping to the west (right wing down).

On the day of the accident flight, a mechanic charged the battery. During the preflight inspection, the pilot sumped the fuel system and found a small amount of water during the first check, but it was clear on the second check. During the run-up, the airplane operated normally, and he departed.

The pilot reported that after flying for about 25 minutes, he executed a left turn at a 45° bank angle. He stated that about 1 minute after leveling off at 500 ft above ground level, the engine sputtered once and stopped producing power. His attempt to restart the engine was unsuccessful. He executed a forced landing to a field but was unable to stop the airplane before hitting trees during the landing roll.

The pilot reported that on the day of the accident, he purchased gasket material and made "additional gaskets for the fuel cap hoping that if water got in that way this might stop it." He reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

An FAA inspection of the airplane's filler neck and cap showed large amounts of rust. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/04/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 170 hours (Total, all aircraft), 73 hours (Total, this make and model), 120 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERO COMMANDER
Registration: N3733X
Model/Series: 100-180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1968
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 5041
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/10/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2450 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-AA2B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PRX, 547 ft msl
Observation Time: 1635 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 320°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 7°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 110°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Paris, TX (PRX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Paris, TX (PRX)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1600 CST
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  33.520000, -95.337778


Location: Deport, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA113
Date & Time: 03/02/2018, 1635 CST
Registration: N3733X
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 100-180
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 2, 2018, about 1635 central standard time, an Aero Commander 100-180, N3733X, sustained substantial damage when it hit a tree during a forced landing to a field after a total loss of engine power near Deport, Texas. The pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight departed from the Cox Field Airport (PRX), Paris, Texas, about 1600 on a local flight.

The pilot reported that he flew southeast to Deport, Texas, and turned south for about 1 mile. He banked left and started heading west to return to PRX. He stated that about 1 minute after leveling off at 500 ft above ground level, the engine sputtered once and stopped producing power. He executed a forced landing to a field but was unable to stop before hitting trees during the landing roll.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERO COMMANDER
Registration: N3733X
Model/Series: 100-180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: DENISON JOHN
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PRX, 547 ft msl
Observation Time: 1635 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 110°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Paris, TX (PRX)
Destination: Paris, TX (PRX) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  33.520000, -95.336667

DEPORT, Tex. (KXII) The plane crashed off of F.M. 1501 and F.M. 1503 in Deport Friday evening.

According to Texas State Troopers, the crash happened just before 5 PM in Lamar County on Friday.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the plane was a Aero Commander 100-180 Lark and was flying to Reno airport when it went down after the engine failed and the plane lost power.

They say the aircraft hit a line of trees which caused the right wing of the plane to shear off.

We're told the pilot, John Denison of Bogota, didn't suffer any serious injuries and had to get a few stitches.

The Federal Aviation Administration continues to investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.kxii.com

One man was involved in a plane crash around 4:45 p.m.

Volunteer firefighters from Deport and Pattonville are on the scene. Officials say the man’s plane went down on FM 1503 about three miles south of Hwy 271. 

“The pilot walked from the crash to a residence on FM 1501,” officials said. “He will need stitches, but didn’t sustain any major injuries.”

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration are expected to be on scene in the morning to investigate. The pilot, John Denison, is a registered pilot out of Bogata.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://eparisextra.com