Monday, July 11, 2016

Cessna 206, Silverado Air Taxi LLC, N1222V: Accident occurred July 20, 2016 in Cordova, Alaska

SILVERADO AIR TAXI LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1222V

NTSB Identification: ANC16CA049
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 20, 2016 in Cordova, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA U206, registration: N1222V
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while landing the tricycle-geared airplane on a remote beach, he "landed a little hard, but not too hard." Following touchdown, the right main landing separated at the axle, the right wing impacted the ground, and the left main landing gear collapsed. Subsequently, the left wing and the left horizontal stabilizer impacted the ground and sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A (2004). This handbook discusses soft-field landings and states in part:

Landing on fields that are rough or have soft surfaces, such as snow, sand, mud, or tall grass requires unique procedures. When landing on such surfaces, the objective is to touch down as smoothly as possible, and at the slowest possible landing speed. The pilot must control the airplane in a manner that the wings support the weight of the airplane as long as practical, to minimize drag and stresses imposed on the landing gear by the rough or soft surface.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing and subsequent landing gear separation and collapse.

Aeropro CZ A220, N151J: Accident occurred July 19, 2016 in McCarthy, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N151J

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA047
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in McCarthy, AK
Aircraft: AEROPRO CZ A220, registration: N151J
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2016, about 1000 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped, light sport, experimental, Aeropro CZ A220 airplane, N151J, sustained substantial damage following a loss of directional control after a partial loss of engine power during takeoff from an unimproved airstrip about 5 miles south of McCarthy, Alaska. The certificated private pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight was planned from the airstrip to the Wasilla Airport (IYS), Wasilla, Alaska.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on July 20, 2016, the pilot stated that while attempting to takeoff, shortly after raising the tail of the airplane, a partial power loss occurred. While attempting to maintain directional control, full engine power abruptly returned. The pilot was unable to input the correct amount of rudder pressure quickly enough to compensate for the increase in left turning tendencies, resulting in the airplane impacting surrounding terrain and sustaining substantial damage to the wings, empennage and fuselage.

The closest weather reporting facility is the Valdez Airport, Valdez, Alaska, about 98 miles southwest of the accident site. At 0956, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) was reporting, in part: wind from 080 degrees at 16 knots, gusting to 21 knots; sky condition, clear; visibility, 10 statute miles; temperature 77 degrees F; dew point 48 degrees F; altimeter, 29.88 inHG.

The airplane was equipped with a Rotax 912ULS engine. A detailed wreckage examination is pending recovery of the airplane.

AIRCRAFT LOST POWER AND CRASHED. AEROPRO CZ A220. MCCARTHY, ALASKA.

BAC 167 Strikemaster, Blue Air Training LLC, N72445; incident occurred July 11, 2016 in Missoula, Montana -Kathryn's Report

BLUE AIR TRAINING LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N72445

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Helena FSDO-05

Date: 11-JUL-16
Time: 20:01:00Z
Regis#: N72445
Aircraft Make: BAC
Aircraft Model: 167
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: MISSOULA
State: Montana

AIRCRAFT DURING FLIGHT, CANOPY SEPARATED FROM FUSELAGE, HAD RAPID DECOMPRESSION, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, MISSOULA, MONTANA.

Zenair STOL CH-701, N701ZG: Accident occurred July 10, 2016 in Dexter, Washtenaw County, Michigan



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Belleville, Michigan 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N701ZG

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA264
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 10, 2016 in Dexter, MI
Aircraft: ALONSO CH 701, registration: N701ZG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 10, 2016, at 1205 eastern daylight time, an Alonso CH 701 airplane, N701ZG, collided with the terrain during an off-airport landing in Dexter, Michigan, following a loss of engine power. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from Livingston County Spencer J Hardy Airport (OZW), Howell, Michigan about 1150.

The pilot reported he departed from Howard Nixon Memorial Airport (50G), Chesaning, Michigan, and was flying to Ann Arbor Municipal Airport (ARB) when the engine began running rough. He landed at OZW to examine the engine with another pilot who was flying in an accompanying airplane. He stated they were not able to find anything wrong with the engine. The pilot started the engine and performed a run-up which he stated were normal, so he departed OZW to continue the flight to ARB. While en route, the engine once again started running rough and subsequently experienced a total loss of power.

The pilot chose to land in a soybean field. During the forced landing approach, he saw power lines and had to lower the pitch altitude to fly under them. The airplane impacted hard in the soybean field.

A postaccident examination of the airplane and engine was conducted by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector along with an airframe and powerplant mechanic. The examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have resulted in the loss of engine power.


The FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) CE-09-35 "Carburetor Icing Prevention" chart indicated that the temperature and dewpoint, 79° F and 61° F respectively, were conducive for serious icing at glide power, not cruise power.
========

A plane landed into a field, in an apparent crash, at the corner of Vaughn and Daly Roads, Sunday, July 10.

The single engine airplane was sticking nose first into the ground two thirds of the way between Vaughn Road and the farm that We Love Dexter has made the decision not to name. It came to an abrupt halt about one third of the way between the farm buildings and Vaughn Road, towards the direction of Daley Pond.

“We are not exactly sure how this happened, but the FAA is investigating,” Washtenaw County Sheriff Director of Communications Derrick Jackson said. “A call came in just after noon on Sunday from a woman saying that she saw a small plane flying very low and heard the engine sputtering. Soon after she heard a loud boom and thought the plane might have crashed. The plane did indeed crash but the pilot was not injured. The plane was removed a short time ago. It was called into us so we are the responding agency.”

Steven Hanes is a supervisory inspector for the Eastern Michigan office of the Flight District Safety Offices component of the Federal Aviation Administration.

“Our office is aware of the aircraft and the incident / accident is being investigated by one of our inspectors. Information received so far indicates that there were no injuries,” Hanes said by email. “If it is determined the there is enough damage to the aircraft to qualify the event as an accident the NTSB will also be involved in the investigation.”

The owners of the property were on scene, but declined to comment.

This apparent crash comes in the middle of a protracted disagreement between local homeowners and a property owner on Gregory Road, who wants to use his land to make a 2,000 foot long sod landing strip on his property for his aircraft.

There have been no reports of injuries. Webster Township Supervisor John Kingsley said by email said he was not initially aware of the incident, Tuesday.


“It was not a true ‘airplane.’ It appears to be a ‘sports plane,'” Kingsley wrote.


http://welovedexter.com

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA264
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 10, 2016 in Dexter, MI
Aircraft: ALONSO CH 701, registration: N701ZG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 10, 2016, at 1223 eastern daylight time, an Alonso CH 701, N701ZG, collided with the terrain during an off airport landing in Dexter, Michigan, following a loss of engine power. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to a private individual and was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from Livingston County Spencer J Hardy Airport (OZW), Howell, Michigan about 1155.

The pilot reported he originally took off from the Howard Nixon Memorial Airport (50G), Chesaning, Michigan, and was flying to the Ann Arbor Municipal Airport (ARB) when the engine began running rough. He landed at OZW to examine the engine with another pilot who was flying in an accompanying airplane. He stated they were not able to find anything wrong with the engine. The started the engine and performed a run-up which he stated were normal so he took off to continue the flight to ARB. While en route, the engine started running rough once again and subsequently lost all power. 

The pilot chose to land in a soybean field. During the landing approach, he saw powerlines and had to lower the pitch altitude to fly under them. The airplane impacted hard in the field.

McDonnell-Douglas DC-10-30, N522AX; incident occurred July 10, 2016 at at Pueblo Memorial Airport (KPUB), Pueblo, Colorado -Kathryn's Report

BC AIRCRAFT LEASING LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N522AX

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

Date: 10-JUL-16
Time: 02:45:00Z
Regis#: N522AX
Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Aircraft Model: DC10
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Flight Number: TANKER912
City: PUEBLO
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT, N522AX TANKER 912, MCDONNELL DOUGLAS DC10, ON TAXI STRUCK A HANGAR, PUEBLO, COLORADO.

Schweizer 269C-1, RDJ Brothers Trucking Inc., N1624B: Incident occurred July 09, 2016 in Polson, Lake County, Montana











AIRCRAFT:   Schweizer 269C-1 SN# 0204  N1624B

ENGINE – Lycoming HIO-360-G1A   SN# L-32791-51A           

PROPELLER – N/A

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:  2,261.7 TTSN  

PROPELLER:      N/A             

AIRFRAME:  4,537.1 TTSN                    

OTHER EQUIPMENT:  Garmin GNS-430, King KT-76A            

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  On 7/9 helicopter clipped an electrical line followed by a hard landing with main rotors striking a tall fence post. 

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: A main rotor blades have damage from wire and pole strikes, helicopter landing skids stressed, fuselage deformed.   Inspection recommended              

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Beegles Aircraft in Greeley, CO           

REMARKS:  Main rotor blades removed for transport  


Read more here:      http://www.avclaims.com/N1624B.htm 

RDJ BROTHERS TRUCKING INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1624B

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Helena FSDO-05

Date: 09-JUL-16
Time: 20:30:00Z
Regis#: N1624B
Aircraft Make: SCHWEIZER
Aircraft Model: 269C
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Aerial Application
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: POLSON
State: Montana

N1624B SCHWEIZER H269 HELICOPTER STRUCK A POWERLINE DURING AERIAL OPERATION, NEAR POLSON, MONTANA.

Pilots Test New Flight Path To Teterboro Airport (KTEB) -Kathryn's Report



HACKENSACK, N.J. (CBSNewYork/AP) — Pilots are flying a new approach route to a New Jersey airport following a two-month delay caused by technical difficulties and bad weather.

The flight path to Teterboro Airport was officially introduced in April and sparked protests from communities that it could affect.

More than 200 planes have used the path since mid-June and those living under it have registered only a small number of complaints.

The Port Authority, which owns the airport, has received 13 complaints from nine people.

But officials in Mahwah, more than 15 miles north of the airport, say 50 residents have complained about increased noise.

“They’re sitting on their back decks enjoying their time outside with their families, and here comes a jet at about 2,000, 3,000 feet. So it’s unusual for us, we have never been subjected to this,” Mahwah Mayor Bill Laforet said.

The path is intended to divert some arriving jets from a path that’s close to Hackensack University Medical Center. The route was shifted west and pilots rely on landmarks and track Route 17 to stay away from homes, schools and hospitals.

Federal Aviation Administration officials said other aircraft regularly use that airspace.

The FAA intends to run the test until Oct. 4.

Story and video:  http://newyork.cbslocal.com

Beech 58P, N7SS LLC, N7SS; incident occurred July 10, 2016 at Eagle Creek Airpark (KEYE), Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N7SS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Indianapolis FSDO-11

Date: 10-JUL-16
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N7SS
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: INDIANAPOLIS
State: Indiana

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, EAGLE CREEK AIRPARK, INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.

Robinson R44 II, Spitzer Helicopter LLC, N444SK; accident occurred July 09, 2016 in Kissimmee, Osceola County, Florida -Kathryn's Report

SPITZER HELICOPTER LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N444SK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

Date: 09-JUL-16
Time: 23:20:00Z
Regis#: N444SK
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R44
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: KISSIMMEE
State: Florida

N444SK ROBINSON R44 ROTORCRAFT SUSTAINED A BIRDSTRIKE THAT WENT THROUGH THE WINDSHIELD, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA.

Aventura II, N932MC; accident occurred July 09, 2016 in Pittsfield, Somerset County, Maine -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N932MC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-65

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA247
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 09, 2016 in Pittsfield, ME
Aircraft: MORMILE FRANCIS W AVENTURA II, registration: N932MC
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 9, 2016, about 1542 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Aventura II, N932MC, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while on approach to a private airfield in Pittsfield, Maine. The pilot/owner sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. No flight plan was filed for the flight that departed the private airfield about 1535.

The pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was to perform a functional test of the retractable landing gear. He said he started the engine and taxied for about 10 minutes before he departed. The takeoff was normal and the pilot made a left turn to stay in the traffic pattern and climbed to an altitude of about 200 feet. The pilot said that when he was making the turn toward the final approach leg of the traffic pattern, he noticed the controls were very stiff when he tried to roll level. He needed two hands to move the control wheel. The pilot also noticed that he was descending and was unable to avoid trees off the side of the runway. The airplane struck the trees and impacted the ground in a nose-down attitude.

A review of photographs taken by law enforcement revealed the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings.

Two witnesses reported that the engine stopped producing power prior to the airplane impacting the trees. The pilot said he was wearing a full size helmet and was unaware that the engine had failed and was focused on trying to level the airplane.

The airplane and engine were recovered for further examination.

Stinson 108-3 Voyager, N955C: Accident occurred July 08, 2016 at Red Lodge Airport (KRED), Carbon County, Montana















AIRCRAFT: 1948 Cessna 108, N955C, Serial No. 108-3955

ENGINE:     Franklin 6A-350-C1R Serial No. L-2611100019

PROPELLER:  Destroyed

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:     107.9  TSMOH, Last overhaul was on 08/01/09.

PROPELLER:   Damaged

AIRFRAME:  2922           

OTHER EQUIPMENT:   Basic Instruments, AT50

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:   During takeoff, a deer ran in front of the aircraft. The pilot swerved which caused the aircraft to ground loop and flip upside down.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Damages are to the propeller, spinner, fuselage, wings and tail section.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:     Red Lodge Airport, Red Lodge, MT.

REMARKS:     Logbooks only go back to 2004. Inspection of aircraft is highly recommended. 

Read more here:   http://www.avclaims.com/N955C.htm

http://registry.faa.gov/N955C

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Helena FSDO-05


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA369
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 08, 2016 in Red Lodge, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: STINSON 108, registration: N955C
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during takeoff he noticed movement from the left as a deer ran onto the runway. He further reported that he applied right rudder to avoid hitting the deer, but the deer impacted the airplane between the left pilot's door and the horizontal stabilizer causing the airplane to veer to the left. The pilot stated that he attempted to recover by applying maximum right brake and right rudder, however it was ineffective and the airplane exited the runway to the left, ground looped, and nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, empennage and fuselage. 

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A deer running across the runway and impacting the left side of the airplane, resulting in a loss of directional control, a runway excursion, and a ground loop.

Cessna 525A CitationJet CJ2, N525CK; incident occurred July 08, 2016 in Santa Fe, New Mexico -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N525CK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01

Date: 08-JUL-16
Time: 20:03:00Z
Regis#: N525CK
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SANTA FE
State: New Mexico

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLL WENT OFF THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK A RUNWAY LIGHT, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO.

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N9488G: Accident occurred July 08, 2016 in San Diego, California

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9488G

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Diego FSDO-09


Aviation Accident Final Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA371
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 08, 2016 in San Diego, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N9488G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while taxiing for takeoff in a non-movement area, the right wing of the airplane impacted a stationary fuel truck. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. 

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain situational awareness while taxiing, which resulted in an impact with a stationary fuel truck.

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, Cessna 7870U LLC, N7870U: Fatal accident occurred July 04, 2016 in Brookings, Oregon

CESSNA 7870U LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/aN7870U 

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA138
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 04, 2016 in Brookings, OR
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N7870U
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 4, 2016, about 2300 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172F, N7870U, impacted the Pacific Ocean shortly after takeoff from Brookings Airport (BOK), Brookings, Oregon. The private pilot and two passengers were presumed to have been fatally injured; the search for the airplane continues. The airplane was registered to Cessna 7870U, LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from BOK about 2300, with a destination of Grants Pass Airport, Grants Pass, Oregon.

Information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), revealed that the family of the pilot contacted local authorities after they became concerned when the pilot had not arrived at his intended destination. The FAA subsequently issued an Alert Notification, which was then cancelled on July 7, after airplane wreckage was found washed up on shore 3 miles northwest of BOK.

Review of the recorded radar data depicted that the airplane turned left shortly after takeoff, and then climbed westward to about 700 feet above the ground. The last recorded radar target was about 1 mile west of BOK, and less than 2 miles southeast from where the airplane wreckage was found.

A witness located 1 1/2 miles west of BOK reported that during the time of the accident, he heard an airplane flying nearby and assumed that it was taking off from the airport. He thought it was unusual for an airplane to be flying that late in the evening. As the airplane continued, he heard the engine slowdown in speed but couldn't remember whether it stopped or went out of hearing range.



GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — John Belnap would have experienced a "black hole" of darkness within moments after taking off from Brookings on the moonless night of July 4, when his Cessna 172 crashed into the Pacific Ocean.

The relatively inexperienced pilot from Grants Pass had some instrument training, but two veteran pilots with more than 75 years of experience between them doubt his ability to navigate safely in those conditions.

They believe it's almost certain that Belnap, licensed to fly since 2014, experienced what's called spatial disorientation, the same condition that caused John F. Kennedy Jr. to spiral into the Atlantic off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, Mass., exactly 17 years ago today.

"As soon as he got offshore, he's looking at a black hole," said Robert Katz of Dallas, Texas, a flight instructor and 35-year pilot who tracks plane crashes across the nation. He contacted the Daily Courier after reading of the Belnap crash. "No useful horizon at all. You don't see a thing. There is no doubt in my mind this pilot became spatially disoriented."

Belnap, 46, his son Max, 17, and friend Ryan Merker, 17, are presumed dead. The Belnap family, including wife Cheryl and three other children, had met John Belnap for Fourth of July festivities in Brookings.

Aside from personal effects and the nose wheel of the plane, the main wreckage has yet to be found from the crash, approximately a half-mile from shore at Lone Ranch Beach northwest of Brookings.

Once the wreckage is found, the National Transportation Safety Board will attempt to determine an official cause.

One of the few clues of the doomed flight came from a resident above Highway 101.

Debra Itzen of Brookings was tending to her horses when she saw the plane go right over her house at 11:15 p.m., only about 150 feet off the ground, headed for the ocean. She likely heard the crash off in the distance, but unable to see anything, she dismissed a "crunching" sound she heard to Fourth of July fireworks and didn't learn of the crash until the next day.

Itzen said the Cessna flew low and slow, but with no signs the engine was straining, sputtering or stalling.

Chances are Belnap was straining to figure out up from down by then.

Spatial disorientation, commonly called vertigo, causes people to lose their bearings. It's a conflict in the brain between what the eyes see and what the body feels.

"You get it as soon as you lose your horizon," Katz said.

"You suddenly realize, 'I don't know what direction I'm facing. I don't know if I'm going up or down, turning right or left,'" said Larry Graves, Josephine County airports manager and lifelong pilot. "It's a fact, you can't tell where that airplane is going unless you're trained and have recent experience flying the plane on the instruments."

Belnap did have some instrument training. Anyone with a pilot's license, even at the "visual flight rules" level that Belnap was at, has to get three hours of training solely on the instruments.

He also had a smartphone application called ForeFlight with GPS, with some of the same capabilities as the standard "six-pack" of instruments on Cessna — air speed, attitude indicator, altitude, vertical speed, heading and turn coordination.

Jonathan Jenson, a fellow nurse anesthetist at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center who co-owned the Cessna with Belnap, said his friend was conscientious and safety minded. Belnap was well aware of the dangers, having lost his father and two younger siblings in a small plane crash in Arizona in 1982.

"He and I had those conversations many times, you have to learn to trust the instruments," Jenson said. "My guess is he would have done that. When you find yourself in instrument conditions, you turn and rely on the instruments."

Katz and Graves believe no matter the trust, and knowledge of the instruments, Belnap was a long shot in those conditions to keep the plane in the air. It takes 450 hours of instrument time to even qualify to take the test to be instrument-certified, Katz said.

"Three hours is just enough time combined with an iPad to fool a pilot into thinking he can handle this scenario," Katz said. "Instructors fail to demonstrate to students the reality of just how fast the situation will deteriorate because (they feel like) it is 'unpleasant' for the student to experience."

Graves said with no recent instrument experience or training, spatial disorientation can quickly cause a life-or-death situation.

"It's a very difficult and challenging thing to do, especially if it catches you off guard," he said.

Graves said he wouldn't have made the flight from Brookings to Grants Pass that night, "and I've been flying for 40 years. I avoid those situations when I can."

Making a turn over the ocean while gaining the required altitude to clear mountains later in the flight would have made the task even tougher, he said.

"One of the most difficult things to do under instrument conditions is to maintain a constant turn rate," Graves said.. "You have to suspend your disbelief. You have to disregard what your brain is telling you and focus on the instrument panel."

Belnap had flown at night before, Jenson said. He flew to Salinas, Calif., every month for work as a nurse anesthetist, often landing at night, but in a heavily populated, well-lit area.

Hours before the crash, Belnap talked to Jenson about not making the flight if weather conditions were poor, but they didn't talk about darkness.

"The fact that it was a new moon made this one challenging," Jenson said in retrospect. "Whether that had anything to do with it, we may never know. I still think the plane was mechanically sound. I've been over it and over it."

Katz said spatial disorientation would have been a problem on the entire flight path to Grants Pass, which is mostly mountainous wilderness.

To add more context, Graves said flying just from Cave Junction to Grants Pass at night is a total instrument-only flight, and "you can't fly it successfully looking for visual references."

For Katz, it's a classic example of overconfidence in an ability to fly, an especially challenging endeavor.

"In an airplane, what you see and feel is in conflict. Flying an airplane is like balancing on the head of a pin.

"Human beings do not have the natural capacity to maintain a physical sense of balance without a stable visual reference — either the natural horizon or an artificial horizon" via the attitude indicator, Katz said.

He said spatial disorientation probably happened extremely quickly to Belnap.

"This totally preventable scenario has occurred so many times throughout history that the NTSB has the investigation process down to a science," Katz said. "The circumstances are almost identical to the JFK Jr. incident.

"I study these incidents every day. Pilots are not learning from the mistakes of others."

A memorial was held to honor Max and John Belnap at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.


BROOKINGS, Ore. -- The Curry County Sheriff says Tuesday could be the day the missing plane is found.

A sonar expert with investigative equipment is arriving on the coast Monday night, a day ahead of schedule. More dive teams from across Oregon will be assisting in the search during ideal weather conditions.

"Tomorrow morning we're going to have the expert with side scan sonar out there: mapping the area, scanning, and if he finds a location of interest we'll mark it and we'll send divers down on it," Sheriff John Ward said.

After finding oil from the plane and what is confirmed to be John Belnap's t-shirt, the Sheriff knows they are looking in the right area. He said they needed new equipment to move forward.

Original article can be found here:  http://ktvl.com

Unknown registered ultralight; accident occurred July 09, 2016 in Bluffton, Ohio -Kathryn's Report

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Columbus FSDO-07

Date: 09-JUL-16
Time: 00:20:00Z
Regis#: UNKNOWN
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Serious
Damage: Destroyed
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: BLUFFTON
State: Ohio

UNKNOWN REGISTERED ULTRALIGHT STRUCK A POWERLINE AND CRASHED, NEAR BLUFFTON, OHIO.

Cessna 182C, Sweet Springs Steel Inc., N9046T: Accident occurred July 07, 2016 at Searcy Municipal Airport (KSRC), White County, Arkansas

SWEET SPRINGS STEEL INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N9046T

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Little Rock FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA367
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in Searcy, AR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N9046T
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During an approach to a 2,000-foot private grass airstrip, the pilot reported that he flew the approach "a little high and fast" and slipped the airplane. The pilot further reported that the airplane touched down about mid-field and he applied brakes, but the airplane overran the runway and impacted trees.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings. 

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot landed long and failed to stop before the end of the runway, which resulted in a runway overrun and impact with trees. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to maintain a stabilized approach.

Buckeye Dream Machine, N3519T; accident occurred July 10, 2016 at Ohio County Airport (KJQD), Hartford, Kentucky -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N3519T 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Louisville FSDO-17

Date: 10-JUL-16
Time: 22:45:00Z
Regis#: N3519T
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Serious
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Cityy: HARTFORD
State: Kentucky


AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL BUCKEYE DREAM MACHINE, ON TAKEOFF CRASHED INTO TERRAIN, HARTFORD, KENTUCKY.

HARTFORD, Ky. (7/11/16) — Beaver Dam City Commissioner Keith Dale was injured in a light aircraft crash last night in Hartford.

According to Ohio County Emergency Management, around 7 p.m., last night, Ohio County Central Dispatch received a call about a light-sport aircraft that crashed during takeoff at the Ohio County Airport. Dale was the only person aboard the aircraft. 

Dale was transported to University of Louisville Hospital via PHI Air Medical and is listed in serious condition. The FAA and NTSB were notified and will be conducting investigations.

Ohio County EMA was assisted at the crash site by Ohio County EMS and PHI Air Medical of Greenville.

While the Ohio County EMA did not release the Dale's name to the public, his condition was discussed at tonight's Beaver Dam City Commission meeting.

Original article can be found here:   http://surfky.com

One person is recovering on Monday after a small plane crash in Ohio County.

EMA officials say a light sport aircraft crashed Sunday night during takeoff at Ohio County Airport in Hartford.

The victim was flown to the University of Louisville Hospital and is listed in serious condition.

The victim's name has not been released.

Federal officials are investigating the cause of the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.tristatehomepage.com

Vans RV-6A, N822DC: Accident occurred April 17, 2017 in Indianola, Warren County, Iowa (and) Incident occurred July 08, 2016 in Santa Fe, New Mexico

http://registry.faa.gov/N822DC

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aircraft on landing,  went off the end of the runway and into a ditch.

Date: 17-APR-17
Time: 15:47:00Z
Regis#: N822DC
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6A
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: INDIANOLA
State: IOWA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aircraft on taxi, struck a taxiway light. 

Date: 08-JUL-16
Time: 19:40:00Z
Regis#: N822DC
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: SANTA FE
State: New Mexico