Sunday, July 3, 2016

Aeronca 11AC, N86078: Fatal accident occurred July 03, 2016 near William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan

Eugene L. Root Jr. (Papa) and Samuel A. Simon (grandson to Eugene) flew home together to be with Jesus late Sunday afternoon July 3, 2016, Eugene was 54 and Samuel was 9.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Eugene L. Root: http://registry.faa.gov/N86078


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Frankenmuth, MI
Accident Number: CEN16FA240
Date & Time: 07/03/2016, 1722 EDT
Registration: N86078
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 3, 2016, about 1722 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca Chief 11AC airplane, N86078, impacted terrain near Frankenmuth, Michigan. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Michigan.

A witness, who was located at 66G, said the wind was calm, and the pilot was making touch-and-go landings, departing to the east and then landing to the west. The witness added that he heard the crash and saw smoke east of the airfield.  

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 54
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/15/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 600 hours (Total, all aircraft)

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He held a third-class medical certificate that was issued on May 15, 2016, with the limitation: must have glasses available for near vision. At the time of the medical exam, the pilot reported 600 total flight hours and 0 hours in the previous 6 months. The pilot's most current flight records were not located during the investigation. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERONCA
Registration: N86078
Model/Series: 11AC NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 11AC-501
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 553.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: A&C65 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 65 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The Aeronca Chief 11AC is a high-wing, single-engine airplane with fixed, conventional landing gear and powered by a 65-horsepower, four-cylinder, reciprocating Continental engine and a fixed pitch propeller. The fuselage is mixture of thin aluminum skin and welded steel tubes covered with fabric. The wings are covered with fabric with wood spars. 

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed the last annual inspection was completed June 12, 2016, with an airplane tachometer time of 553.7 hours and 191.9 hours since engine overhaul. The previous annual inspection was dated June 21, 2015 andlisted a tachometer time of 552.29 hours and a time since engine overhaul of 190.49 hours. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace:

At 1715, the automated weather observation station located at the Saginaw County H W Browne Airport, Saginaw, Michigan, about 10 miles northwest of the accident site, recorded the wind calm, 10 miles visibility, a clear sky, temperature 80°F, dew point 39°F, and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury.  

Airport Information

Airport: William Zehnder Field Airport (66G)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 645 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go 

66G is a privately owned, open to the public, non-towered airport, located 2 miles southeast of Frankenmuth, Michigan. Pilots are to use the CTAF (Common Traffic Advisory Frequency) for communications. 66G has a single turf runway orientated 09/27 that measures 2,530 ft by 100 ft. The airport is at an elevation of 645 ft.  

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.315000, -83.705278

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted terrain about 1/4 mile east of 66G. The wreckage was located in a cornfield with the height of the corn varying between 5 and 7 ft. A postcrash fire consumed a majority of the airplane. 

The right wing had extensive thermal damage, and the inboard and outboard sections of the wing displayed heavy impact damage. The left wing also had thermal/fire damage and minor impact damage near the outboard tip. The airplane's cabin was consumed by fire with only the tubular frame remaining; the aft section of the fuselage's fabric was also burnt away, exposing the tubular frame. Other than a piece of fabric that remained on the rudder, the fabric on the empennage was burned away. The elevators were in the down position, and the trim tab was pushed down past its limit. The tailwheel assembly was twisted to one side, and the tailwheel was separated and located under the aft section of the fuselage. The engine and cowling area were thermal and impact damaged. The wooden two-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine, and the outboard sections of both blades were broken off, with a splintered appearance. 

Aileron control continuity was established with the exception of the aileron cable's fastener, located behind the cabin area, which was melted by the fire, and the cable at the right aileron bellcrank, which appeared separated by overload. Rudder and elevator control continuity were established from the respective control surface to the control column.

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane's engine was separated from the airframe and transported to another facility for further examination.

The engine sustained extensive fire damage. When the propeller was rotated by hand, continuity through the valve train and to the accessory section was observed. The carburetor was broken from its intake flange. The oil screen was removed and was found clear of contaminants. The left magneto contained an impulse coupling and would not rotate. Both magnetos had thermal/fire damage. 

The top set of sparkplugs were removed. The spark plugs exhibited light colored combustion deposits, and the electrodes exhibited normal signatures.

Although the examination was limited by thermal and fire damage, no pre-impact abnormalities were noted during the airframe or engine examinations.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Saginaw County Medical Examiner's Office, Saginaw, Michigan, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was determined to be "blunt force chest trauma."

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing of the pilot's specimens. The specimens were not tested for cyanide. The tests were negative for ethanol and tested drugs.

Additional Information

A personal smartphone was located at the accident site and shipped to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Lab in Washington, DC, for download and data extraction. A review of photos extracted from the phone revealed six images taken on the day of the accident from the front seat of the airplane that featured the area around the airport. The first image time stamp was 1708:57, and the final image time stamp was 1709:54.

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA240 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Frankenmuth, MI
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N86078
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 3, 2016, about 1720 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca Chief AC11, airplane, N86078, impacted terrain near Frankenmuth, Michigan. The private rated pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal fight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from the William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Michigan, at the time of the accident.

Several witness reported seeing the airplane earlier. One witness said the wind was calm, and the pilot was doing "touch-n-goes"; departing to the east and then landing to the west. The witness added that they heard the crash and saw smoke. 

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted about a quarter mile, east of the 66G airport. A post-crash fire consumed much of the airplane. 

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane's engine was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.






FRANKENMUTH, MI — Police have identified one of the victims who died in a plane crash that happened in Frankenmuth on July 3.

Police, firefighters and paramedics responded at about 5:22 p.m. on Sunday to the William "Tiny" Zehnder Air Field for the report of a plane crash, according to a press release from Frankenmuth Police Department.


Officers who arrived on the scene found the aircraft completely engulfed in flames, according to police Chief Don Mawer.


The pilot of the aircraft was Eugene Root, 55, of Millington. Root's 9-year-old grandson, also of Millington, was also killed in the crash.


Witnesses said the pilot had kept the aircraft at the air field and was holding a birthday get together at his hanger.


Witnesses also said that the pilot had been performing a maneuver described as "touch and goes," and last observed the aircraft banking right, before losing sight of the aircraft and hearing the impact.


The William "Tiny" Zehnder Air Field is a privately-owned airport run by Frankenmuth Airport Inc. that features a 2530-foot-long turf runway marked by yellow cones.

This investigation has now been turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, Mawer said.

Story and video:   http://www.mlive.com


A small plane crashed Sunday evening in a field near Frankenmuth, killing two people, the FAA said.

Police responded to an emergency call just before 5:30 p.m. They came upon wreckage near the Curtis Road/Block Road intersection, southeast of Frankenmuth.

A post Monday on the Frankenmuth Police Department Facebook page identified the two victims as Eugene Root, 55, of Millington, and his 9-year-old grandson, who is also from Millington.

Police said Root, the pilot, was holding a “birthday get together” at his hangar at “Tiny Zehnder Air Field.”

“Witnesses stated that the pilot had been performing a maneuver described as ‘touch and goes,’ police said in a statement. “Witnesses last observed the aircraft banking right, before losing sight of the aircraft, and hearing the impact.”

Roland Herwig, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, said the plane involved in the crash was a Piper PA 22, described as a “general aviation small airplane.”

The FAA registry indicates the “fixed wing single-engine plane” is based at William “Tiny” Zehnder Field, which is close to the crash site.

Original article can be found here: http://www.detroitnews.com







FRANKENMUTH TOWNSHIP — A plane crash in Frankenmuth Township has left two dead, according to the Frankenmuth Police Department.

The crash happened around 6:00 p.m. in a field by Curtis Road near Block Road, near the Tiny Zehnder Airfield located along South Block Road in Frankenmuth Township.

The Frankenmuth Police Department says that the 55-year-old pilot, Eugene Root of Millington, was killed in the crash.

Also killed was Root's 9-year-old grandson. The grandson's name was not released.

Police say Root kept his plane at the airfield and was having a birthday party. Police were told Root was performing a maneuver called the "touch and goes" when the crash took place.

The FAA and the NTSB are both now handling the investigation.

Story and video:   http://nbc25news.com 

Maule M-4-210, N4745T: Incident occurred May 29, 2016 - While taxiing the right main gear leg separated at the mounting flange, gear folded and right wing struck the ground with a propeller strike











AIRCRAFT:   1964 Maule M-4-210  SN# 1015  N4745T

ENGINE:        Continental IO-360A5B  SN# 20117-R          

PROPELLER: McCauley D2A34C67-NP  SN# 758280

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   1314.5 TT since factory rebuild on 5/23/1978

21.7 since overhauled cylinders on 2/4/2016

PROPELLER: 597.47 SMOH   TT unknown   

AIRFRAME:      2740.9  NOTE: airframe log starts 10/21/1982 @ 1426.38, prior logs lost                     

OTHER EQUIPMENT: Apollo SL15, GNX-80, JPI 701-830

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  While taxiing on 5/29/2016 the right main gear leg separated at the mounting flange, gear folded and right wing struck the ground with a propeller strike.    

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Propeller Strike, engine stoppage, right gear mounting flange broken at fuselage, lower fuselage fabric punctured, antenna pulled away,                       

right wing lift strut damaged, right wing buckled with skins wrinkled, wing tip damaged, aileron damaged.    

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:     Hicks Airport in Fort Worth, TX  

REMARKS: Adjuster has logs and records   

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N4745T.htm

Alaska to Louisiana: father-son duo reunited with dream plane

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Major Monty Harper always dreamed about building one of these rare kit planes with his children. 



SULPHUR, LA (KPLC) -

David Harper, the assistant principal at Elton Elementary school, thought a field trip to the Southland Field Airport was just going to be another day with his students. 

That is, until he saw a Long-Ez in the corner of the hangar. 

Harper was born and raised in Eagle River Alaska. His father was a combat pilot in the U.S. Air Force for 22 years.

He was, of course, a plane enthusiast and had a favorite plane called the Long-Ez. 

Major Monty Harper always dreamed about building one of these rare kit planes with his children. David fondly recalls the days when his father would rush them out onto the deck to watch a Long-Ez pass over their house. 

Although they had all of the plans and knew every detail about the plane, Monty and David would never get to build one. 

Later on 7News Nightcast, KPLC's Kaitlin Rust has the full story of what that fateful trip to the Southland Field Airport meant for Monty and David.

Story and video:  http://www.ksla.com

Cessna Ector 305A, N12633, East Moriches Aerial Advertising Ltd: Accident occurred July 03, 2016 at Brookhaven Airport (KHWV), Shirley, Suffolk County, New York

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA241
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Shirley, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 305, registration: N12633
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel- equipped airplane, the airport UNICOM operator advised the active runway as 33, and he did not listen to the automated weather broadcast. The pilot performed a two-point (main wheel) landing to the asphalt runway, and the airplane initially tracked straight, slightly right of centerline. As it decelerated, the tailwheel touched down, and the airplane began to turn left. The pilot applied right rudder with no effect. He then applied the right brake, but the airplane kept turning to the left. It then slid sideways, and the right main landing gear folded, damaging the outboard section of the right wing as it contacted the runway. When the pilot disembarked, he noted that he had landed with a quartering tailwind. Wind, recorded at the airport about the time of the accident, was from 190° at 7 knots, and runway 24 was available. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. In retrospect, he noted that he landed on an advised runway instead of determining actual winds to land on the most appropriate runway.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control while landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to accept an advised runway rather than determine actual airport winds, which resulted in the airplane landing with a quartering tailwind.




Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

East Moriches Aerial Advertising Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N12633

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA241 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Shirley, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 305, registration: N12633
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane, the airport Universal Communications (UNICOM) operator advised the active runway as 33, and he did not listen to the automated weather broadcast. The pilot performed a two-point (main wheel) landing to the asphalt runway, and the airplane initially tracked straight, slightly right of centerline. As it decelerated, the tailwheel touched down and the airplane began to turn left. The pilot applied right rudder, with no effect. He then applied the right brake, but the airplane kept turning to the left. It then slid sideways, and the right main landing gear folded, damaging the outboard section of the right wing as it contacted the runway. When the pilot disembarked, he noted that he had landed with a quartering tailwind. Wind, recorded at the airport about the time of the accident, was from 190° true at 7 knots, and runway 24 was available. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. In retrospect, he noted that he landed on an advised runway instead of determining actual winds to land on the most appropriate runway.

======

The landing gear of a single-engine airplane collapsed while coming in to Brookhaven Calabro Airport on Sunday afternoon, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said.

The FAA will investigate the cause of the rough landing, spokesman Jim Peters said. A single person was aboard the plane, he said. The pilot walked away from the aircraft after the landing and was not hurt, according to the Mastic Fire Department.

Suffolk police said the 911 call came in at 12:51 p.m.

The vintage plane came to rest on its belly, with its right wing on the ground.

The aircraft is a Cessna 305C, Peters said. Aviation websites describe it as a military aircraft that flew for the first time in 1949 and that the Army retired in 1974. It was a liaison and observation plane, the websites said.

The airport is owned by the Town of Brookhaven.

Story and video:  http://www.newsday.com



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

East Moriches Aerial Advertising Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N12633

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA241 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Shirley, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 305, registration: N12633
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


According to the pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane, the airport Universal Communications (UNICOM) operator advised the active runway as 33, and he did not listen to the automated weather broadcast. The pilot performed a two-point (main wheel) landing to the asphalt runway, and the airplane initially tracked straight, slightly right of centerline. As it decelerated, the tailwheel touched down and the airplane began to turn left. The pilot applied right rudder, with no effect. He then applied the right brake, but the airplane kept turning to the left. It then slid sideways, and the right main landing gear folded, damaging the outboard section of the right wing as it contacted the runway. When the pilot disembarked, he noted that he had landed with a quartering tailwind. Wind, recorded at the airport about the time of the accident, was from 190° true at 7 knots, and runway 24 was available. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. In retrospect, he noted that he landed on an advised runway instead of determining actual winds to land on the most appropriate runway.
======

The landing gear of a single-engine airplane collapsed while coming in to Brookhaven Calabro Airport on Sunday afternoon, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said.

The FAA will investigate the cause of the rough landing, spokesman Jim Peters said. A single person was aboard the plane, he said. The pilot walked away from the aircraft after the landing and was not hurt, according to the Mastic Fire Department.

Suffolk police said the 911 call came in at 12:51 p.m.

The vintage plane came to rest on its belly, with its right wing on the ground.

The aircraft is a Cessna 305C, Peters said. Aviation websites describe it as a military aircraft that flew for the first time in 1949 and that the Army retired in 1974. It was a liaison and observation plane, the websites said.

The airport is owned by the Town of Brookhaven.

Story and video:  http://www.newsday.com

Cessna 182M Skylane, N1642T: Accident occurred July 03, 2016 at Brian Ranch Airport (CL13), Palmdale,, Los Angeles County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N1642T

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA356
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Llano, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N1642T
Injuries: 4 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during takeoff from a private dirt airstrip with an air density altitude near 6,100 feet, the airplane became airborne in ground effect, but was not able to "build airspeed sufficient to pitch for Vy (best rate of climb)". The pilot further reported that the wind pushed the airplane over an orchard and he intentionally put the airplane into an aerodynamic stall prior to impacting terrain.

A post-impact fire ensued and the airplane was destroyed.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that during the takeoff roll he heard a "bang" which he initially assumed to be a rock hitting the fuselage, but later believed to be an engine failure. 

An examination of the postaccident photographs of the two-bladed propeller showed, approximately 1/3 of the outer portion of one propeller blade was snapped off across the cord perpendicular to the leading edge and the second propeller blade showed "S" bending, torsional twisting, and tip curl, which are all indications consistent with the engine producing power at the time of impact.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain an adequate airspeed and his intentional aerodynamic stall, which resulted in an impact with terrain and a post-impact fire.




LLANO, Calif. (KABC) -- A small plane carrying four people crashed while taking off in Llano on Sunday, according to officials.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said the crash was reported at Brian Ranch Airport, located at 34810 Largo Vista Rd., at about 1:35 p.m.

Deputies with the Palmdale sheriff's station said the plane was taking off when it got about 30 feet into the air and crashed back down onto the ground.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the aircraft, which was identified as a Cessna, hit a tree, crashed and then caught on fire.

According to the sheriff's department, the four adult passengers were taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

Original article can be found here:   http://abc7.com

PALMDALE, Calif. - Federal aviation officials say no one was injured after a small aircraft with four people on board crashed north of Los Angeles.

The FAA says a Cessna went down Sunday at the Brian Ranch Airport in the unincorporated community of Llano, about 75 miles north of Los Angeles.

FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said the plane crashed after striking a tree. The impact sparked a small fire, but the pilot and passengers were not seriously injured.

A Los Angeles County Fire Department dispatcher said no one required treatment at the scene.

Original article can be found here: http://www.brandonsun.com

A small plane went down Sunday afternoon at a private airport in the Llano community of the Antelope Valley, prompting a response from emergency personnel, according to sheriff’s and fire officials.

The incident was reported shortly after 1:30 p.m. at Brian Ranch Airport, said Lt. Ken Wright of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

Four male occupants were aboard the four-seater aircraft when it went down, the lieutenant said.

There were conflicting reports about whether anyone was injured.

A spokesman for the Los Angeles County Fire Department, who described the incident as a “hard landing,” said no one was hurt.

According to the Sheriff’s Department, the four people on the plane suffered minor injuries.

Brian Ranch Airport, located about 25 miles east of Palmdale, specializes in “ultralights and light sport aircraft,” according to its website.

QuickSilver Sprint2S, N250AB: Accident occurred July 02, 2016 in Bullard, Cherokee County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N250AB

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA244
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 02, 2016 in Bullard, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/26/2017
Aircraft: POLLACK QUICKSILVER SPRINT2S, registration: N250AB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot stated that a preflight check of the flight controls revealed no anomalies, and he and the passenger taxied the float-equipped airplane from its dock onto the lake for takeoff. The pilot reported that, shortly after takeoff, the flight controls felt abnormal, and he elected to return to the lake for landing. He stated that he could not correct the airplane’s bank angle before touching down, and the airplane landed hard on the water in a right bank. The pilot and passenger egressed, and the airplane subsequently sank. Attempts to locate and retrieve the airplane following the accident were unsuccessful; therefore, no examination of the airplane was performed, and the reason for the pilot’s reported control difficulties could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of airplane control during landing for reasons that could not be determined, because the airplane sank and was not recovered.

On July 2, 2016, about 1945 central daylight time, a Pollack Quicksilver Sprint2S airplane, N250AB, impacted Lake Palestine, Texas, during a forced landing. The airline transport rated pilot and his passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed in the area of the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.


According to the pilot's accident report, he performed a preflight check of the airplane while it was tied to a dock. He taxied out about 1930 and the flight control check was "all good." The pilot started a takeoff to the south and after takeoff, the controls did not feel right. He arrested the climb out and turned north. The controls still did not "seem right" so the pilot turned right to return for a landing. He could not arrest all of the right turn and landed hard with a right bank. The airplane impacted the water with its right float first and the float took on water. The airplane remained afloat as the pilot began towing it to shore. The towing process was delayed as wardens and troopers requested reports and it was during this time that the airplane sank. The pilot hired a salvage company. However, the airplane was not located and therefore could not be examined as part of this investigation.


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA244
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 02, 2016 in Bullard, TX
Aircraft: POLLACK QUICKSILVER SPRINT2S, registration: N250AB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 2, 2016, about 1945 central daylight time, a Pollack Quicksilver Sprint2S airplane, N250AB, impacted Lake Palestine, near Bullard, Texas, during a rejected takeoff. The pilot and passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed in the area of the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to preliminary information, the pilot reported that there was a mechanical malfunction in the flight control system during the takeoff and he rejected the takeoff.


Cherokee County, Texas --   Emergency crews are on scene of a plane which crashed into Lake Palestine early Saturday evening. 


The ultralight plane crashed into the southern part of the lake around 8:30.

We are told two people were inside the plane when it crash. However, they have been rescued and are okay. 

At this time it's unknown why the plane went down. 

Crews are working to pull the plane from the lake. 

Story and video:  http://www.myeasttex.com


CHEROKEE COUNTY, TX --   Officials are investigating after a plane crashed on Lake Palestine Saturday evening.

According to the Department of Public Safety, the ultralight plane crashed after 8:30 p.m. near Charlya Drive.

Two people were on the Quicksilver MX II Sprint LSA Light Sport Aircraft Ultralight plane when the crash occurred, according to the FAA. They say it was a hard landing float plane aviation accident. There were no injuries.

The FAA is investigating the incident.

Story and video:  http://www.kltv.com

Efforts to expanded Pullman/Moscow Regional Airport (KPUW) runway hit snag

Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport manager Tony Bean stands on the tarmac at the airport in Pullman, Wash., Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Plans to expand the runway at the Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport have run into a snag, as the proposal could lead to the demolition of dozens of buildings at Washington State University. The airport needs to lengthen and widen its main runway under Federal Aviation Administration rules because it is being served by larger planes, Bean said. 



PULLMAN, WASH.   Plans to expand the runway at the Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport have run into a snag, as the proposal could lead to the demolition of dozens of buildings at Washington State University.


The airport needs to lengthen and widen its main runway under Federal Aviation Administration rules because it is being served by larger planes, airport manager Tony Bean said.


An offer by the airport to buy about 100 acres of land from WSU to accommodate the larger runway was rejected because the land includes about 40 buildings involved in millions of dollars' worth of research.


The university is preparing a counter-offer, and both sides are trying to work out a deal.


The stakes are high for travelers in these remote college towns. The airport is a major transportation lifeline for Pullman, home to Washington State, and Moscow, Idaho, home to the University of Idaho. There is no interstate highway or passenger train service near the towns, which straddle the border about 300 miles east of Seattle.


"If we don't realign the runway, the consequence is a loss of air service," Bean said.


The towns, with a combined population of about 50,000 people, are served by Alaska Airlines with three incoming flights from Seattle and three outgoing flights to Seattle each day. About 50,000 people boarded planes at the airport last year, and the number is projected to reach 60,000 this year.


The problem is the airport was built to handle the old 19-seat propeller planes that were major commuter aircraft in the past. But Alaska serves the airport with 76-seat Bombardier Q400 planes. The airport is also sometimes used by Boeing 737 charter planes delivering college sports teams.


The larger planes have larger wingspans, which makes it impossible to use the existing runway and taxiway at the same time. That is a violation of FAA rules, and the airport is operating under an FAA waiver that allows operations to continue only while a solution is being pursued, Bean said.


Plans call for increasing the runway from 100 to 150 feet wide, and from 6,730 feet to 7,100 feet long, Bean said. That work will require that the runway be realigned about 5 degrees, meaning some 40 WSU buildings and other facilities will suddenly find themselves at the end of the pavement.


The FAA would prefer there be no buildings in the so-called runway protection zone, Bean said, hence the push to remove those structures, which include laboratory buildings, animal pens, large equipment storage sheds and other buildings.


Both sides insist they want to settle the dispute.


"We're trying very hard not to make it a controversy," said Olivia Wang, a vice president of WSU.


But she said the research being conducted in those buildings, especially in the area of food safety, is important.


Ideally, WSU would like to sell the land to the airport for an amount that allows it to replace the buildings and other research facilities that will be lost, Wang said. She estimated that the impacted area has drawn $100 million in research dollars since 2006.


Washington State University is the largest employer in Pullman-Moscow, and a heavy user of the airport.


"'We would all benefit from better air service," Wang said.


The new runway is expected to cost some $100 million, the vast majority paid by federal funds.


The airport has already received some funding from the FAA and will start moving dirt on property it already owns in early July.


One option for the airport is to invoke eminent domain status, but Bean said it's too early to say if that is needed.


Original article can be found here:   http://www.sunherald.com

BB Gun-Wielding Boy Stops Vehicle Traffic Near Hector International Airport (KFAR)

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com




Hector International Airport was shut down for about an hour Friday night after a report of a man with a gun.

This situation sounds very serious, but was actually a big misunderstanding. It actually turned out to be a 10-year-old and a family playing with a BB gun.

The call came in just before 9pm for a person with a gun at the cell phone park. Police closed off the airport road and started to slowly approach the park with guns drawn.

They also started communicating with the Airport Traffic Control Tower to see what they could see.

Then when a car left with the alleged suspect, police pulled it over to find the 10 year old with the BB gun. Police say the family now understands why it may have been a bad idea to play with the gun here.

They were then allowed to leave. As for the airport, it's now functioning as normal and allowing people in and out.

Story and video:  http://www.wday.com

Piper PA-24-260, N9246P: Incident occurred July 03, 2016 at Sacramento International Airport (KSMF), Sacramento County, California

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N9246P

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

Date: 03-JUL-16
Time: 15:10:00Z
Regis#: N9246P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SACRAMENTO
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA.




SACRAMENTO, Calif. —A landing gear failure led to a hard landing Sunday for a private plane at Sacramento International Airport.

Authorities said the landing happened just after 8 a.m. while the single-engine plane was attempting to land.

Officials said the three people aboard the plane were able to escape without injury after the plane landed on its belly.

The runway was closed and other aircraft diverted to the airport's east runway.


The plane was towed from the runway.


Officials said the plane was heading to Sacramento from Modesto.


Original article can be found here:  http://www.kcra.com 


A private plane experienced landing failure while attempting to land at Sacramento International Airport.

Passengers walked away unscathed after the private jet made a low belly impact on the runway. According to a press release from Sacramento airport spokeswoman Laurie Slothower, just after 8 a.m. Sunday, July 3, Airport Rescue Firefighters responded to the scene. No fuel hazards were reported.

The disabled aircraft was on the runway until just before 11 a.m. before it was towed. During that time period, the runway was closed, causing flights arriving and departing to move to the airport's easy runway. No impact to customers was reported. 

The plane is believed to have originated from Modesto. The National Transportation Safety Board has been notified.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.abc10.com