Sunday, July 3, 2016

Aeronca 11AC, N86078: Fatal accident occurred July 03, 2016 near William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan

Analysis

The pilot and passenger were on a local pleasure flight in a single-engine airplane. A witness reported that the pilot was doing touch-and-go landings. The wind was calm, so the pilot departed to the east and then returned to land to the west. The witness did not see the crash but heard the impact and then saw smoke. The airplane impacted a cornfield about 1/4 mile east of the airport. A postcrash fire consumed or thermally damaged the majority of the airplane. The fire and impact damage limited the scope of the examination; however, no evidence of pre-impact abnormalities was noted with the engine or airframe. The pilot's autopsy and toxicology testing found no evidence of any medical condition or medication use that would have impaired his performance, and he had favorable weather conditions for the flight. The accident was consistent with the pilot's loss of control for undetermined reasons.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's loss of control for undetermined reasons based on available information.

Findings

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Unknown or undetermined


Eugene L. Root Jr. (Papa) and Samuel A. Simon (grandson to Eugene) flew home together to be with Jesus late Sunday afternoon July 3, 2016, Eugene was 54 and Samuel was 9.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N86078


Location: Frankenmuth, MI
Accident Number: CEN16FA240
Date & Time: 07/03/2016, 1722 EDT
Registration: N86078
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 3, 2016, about 1722 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca Chief 11AC airplane, N86078, impacted terrain near Frankenmuth, Michigan. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Michigan.

A witness, who was located at 66G, said the wind was calm, and the pilot was making touch-and-go landings, departing to the east and then landing to the west. The witness added that he heard the crash and saw smoke east of the airfield.  

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 54
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/15/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 600 hours (Total, all aircraft)

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He held a third-class medical certificate that was issued on May 15, 2016, with the limitation: must have glasses available for near vision. At the time of the medical exam, the pilot reported 600 total flight hours and 0 hours in the previous 6 months. The pilot's most current flight records were not located during the investigation. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERONCA
Registration: N86078
Model/Series: 11AC NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 11AC-501
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 553.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: A&C65 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 65 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The Aeronca Chief 11AC is a high-wing, single-engine airplane with fixed, conventional landing gear and powered by a 65-horsepower, four-cylinder, reciprocating Continental engine and a fixed pitch propeller. The fuselage is mixture of thin aluminum skin and welded steel tubes covered with fabric. The wings are covered with fabric with wood spars. 

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed the last annual inspection was completed June 12, 2016, with an airplane tachometer time of 553.7 hours and 191.9 hours since engine overhaul. The previous annual inspection was dated June 21, 2015 andlisted a tachometer time of 552.29 hours and a time since engine overhaul of 190.49 hours. 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace:

At 1715, the automated weather observation station located at the Saginaw County H W Browne Airport, Saginaw, Michigan, about 10 miles northwest of the accident site, recorded the wind calm, 10 miles visibility, a clear sky, temperature 80°F, dew point 39°F, and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury.  

Airport Information

Airport: William Zehnder Field Airport (66G)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 645 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go 

66G is a privately owned, open to the public, non-towered airport, located 2 miles southeast of Frankenmuth, Michigan. Pilots are to use the CTAF (Common Traffic Advisory Frequency) for communications. 66G has a single turf runway orientated 09/27 that measures 2,530 ft by 100 ft. The airport is at an elevation of 645 ft.  

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.315000, -83.705278

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted terrain about 1/4 mile east of 66G. The wreckage was located in a cornfield with the height of the corn varying between 5 and 7 ft. A postcrash fire consumed a majority of the airplane. 

The right wing had extensive thermal damage, and the inboard and outboard sections of the wing displayed heavy impact damage. The left wing also had thermal/fire damage and minor impact damage near the outboard tip. The airplane's cabin was consumed by fire with only the tubular frame remaining; the aft section of the fuselage's fabric was also burnt away, exposing the tubular frame. Other than a piece of fabric that remained on the rudder, the fabric on the empennage was burned away. The elevators were in the down position, and the trim tab was pushed down past its limit. The tailwheel assembly was twisted to one side, and the tailwheel was separated and located under the aft section of the fuselage. The engine and cowling area were thermal and impact damaged. The wooden two-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine, and the outboard sections of both blades were broken off, with a splintered appearance. 

Aileron control continuity was established with the exception of the aileron cable's fastener, located behind the cabin area, which was melted by the fire, and the cable at the right aileron bellcrank, which appeared separated by overload. Rudder and elevator control continuity were established from the respective control surface to the control column.

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane's engine was separated from the airframe and transported to another facility for further examination.

The engine sustained extensive fire damage. When the propeller was rotated by hand, continuity through the valve train and to the accessory section was observed. The carburetor was broken from its intake flange. The oil screen was removed and was found clear of contaminants. The left magneto contained an impulse coupling and would not rotate. Both magnetos had thermal/fire damage. 

The top set of sparkplugs were removed. The spark plugs exhibited light colored combustion deposits, and the electrodes exhibited normal signatures.

Although the examination was limited by thermal and fire damage, no pre-impact abnormalities were noted during the airframe or engine examinations.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Saginaw County Medical Examiner's Office, Saginaw, Michigan, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was determined to be "blunt force chest trauma."

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing of the pilot's specimens. The specimens were not tested for cyanide. The tests were negative for ethanol and tested drugs.

Additional Information

A personal smartphone was located at the accident site and shipped to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Lab in Washington, DC, for download and data extraction. A review of photos extracted from the phone revealed six images taken on the day of the accident from the front seat of the airplane that featured the area around the airport. The first image time stamp was 1708:57, and the final image time stamp was 1709:54.



NTSB Identification: CEN16FA240 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Frankenmuth, MI
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N86078
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 3, 2016, about 1720 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca Chief AC11, airplane, N86078, impacted terrain near Frankenmuth, Michigan. The private rated pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal fight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from the William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Michigan, at the time of the accident.

Several witness reported seeing the airplane earlier. One witness said the wind was calm, and the pilot was doing "touch-n-goes"; departing to the east and then landing to the west. The witness added that they heard the crash and saw smoke. 

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted about a quarter mile, east of the 66G airport. A post-crash fire consumed much of the airplane.  After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane's engine was recovered to a secure facility for further examination. The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Eugene L. Root: http://registry.faa.gov/N86078


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Frankenmuth, MI
Accident Number: CEN16FA240
Date & Time: 07/03/2016, 1722 EDT
Registration: N86078
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 3, 2016, about 1722 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca Chief 11AC airplane, N86078, impacted terrain near Frankenmuth, Michigan. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Michigan.

A witness, who was located at 66G, said the wind was calm, and the pilot was making touch-and-go landings, departing to the east and then landing to the west. The witness added that he heard the crash and saw smoke east of the airfield.  

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 54
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/15/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 600 hours (Total, all aircraft)

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He held a third-class medical certificate that was issued on May 15, 2016, with the limitation: must have glasses available for near vision. At the time of the medical exam, the pilot reported 600 total flight hours and 0 hours in the previous 6 months. The pilot's most current flight records were not located during the investigation. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AERONCA
Registration: N86078
Model/Series: 11AC NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1946
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 11AC-501
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 553.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: A&C65 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 65 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The Aeronca Chief 11AC is a high-wing, single-engine airplane with fixed, conventional landing gear and powered by a 65-horsepower, four-cylinder, reciprocating Continental engine and a fixed pitch propeller. The fuselage is mixture of thin aluminum skin and welded steel tubes covered with fabric. The wings are covered with fabric with wood spars. 

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed the last annual inspection was completed June 12, 2016, with an airplane tachometer time of 553.7 hours and 191.9 hours since engine overhaul. The previous annual inspection was dated June 21, 2015 andlisted a tachometer time of 552.29 hours and a time since engine overhaul of 190.49 hours. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Frankenmuth, MI (66G)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace:

At 1715, the automated weather observation station located at the Saginaw County H W Browne Airport, Saginaw, Michigan, about 10 miles northwest of the accident site, recorded the wind calm, 10 miles visibility, a clear sky, temperature 80°F, dew point 39°F, and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury.  

Airport Information

Airport: William Zehnder Field Airport (66G)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 645 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go 

66G is a privately owned, open to the public, non-towered airport, located 2 miles southeast of Frankenmuth, Michigan. Pilots are to use the CTAF (Common Traffic Advisory Frequency) for communications. 66G has a single turf runway orientated 09/27 that measures 2,530 ft by 100 ft. The airport is at an elevation of 645 ft.  

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.315000, -83.705278

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted terrain about 1/4 mile east of 66G. The wreckage was located in a cornfield with the height of the corn varying between 5 and 7 ft. A postcrash fire consumed a majority of the airplane. 

The right wing had extensive thermal damage, and the inboard and outboard sections of the wing displayed heavy impact damage. The left wing also had thermal/fire damage and minor impact damage near the outboard tip. The airplane's cabin was consumed by fire with only the tubular frame remaining; the aft section of the fuselage's fabric was also burnt away, exposing the tubular frame. Other than a piece of fabric that remained on the rudder, the fabric on the empennage was burned away. The elevators were in the down position, and the trim tab was pushed down past its limit. The tailwheel assembly was twisted to one side, and the tailwheel was separated and located under the aft section of the fuselage. The engine and cowling area were thermal and impact damaged. The wooden two-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine, and the outboard sections of both blades were broken off, with a splintered appearance. 

Aileron control continuity was established with the exception of the aileron cable's fastener, located behind the cabin area, which was melted by the fire, and the cable at the right aileron bellcrank, which appeared separated by overload. Rudder and elevator control continuity were established from the respective control surface to the control column.

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane's engine was separated from the airframe and transported to another facility for further examination.

The engine sustained extensive fire damage. When the propeller was rotated by hand, continuity through the valve train and to the accessory section was observed. The carburetor was broken from its intake flange. The oil screen was removed and was found clear of contaminants. The left magneto contained an impulse coupling and would not rotate. Both magnetos had thermal/fire damage. 

The top set of sparkplugs were removed. The spark plugs exhibited light colored combustion deposits, and the electrodes exhibited normal signatures.

Although the examination was limited by thermal and fire damage, no pre-impact abnormalities were noted during the airframe or engine examinations.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Saginaw County Medical Examiner's Office, Saginaw, Michigan, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was determined to be "blunt force chest trauma."

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing of the pilot's specimens. The specimens were not tested for cyanide. The tests were negative for ethanol and tested drugs.

Additional Information

A personal smartphone was located at the accident site and shipped to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Lab in Washington, DC, for download and data extraction. A review of photos extracted from the phone revealed six images taken on the day of the accident from the front seat of the airplane that featured the area around the airport. The first image time stamp was 1708:57, and the final image time stamp was 1709:54.

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA240 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Frankenmuth, MI
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N86078
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 3, 2016, about 1720 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca Chief AC11, airplane, N86078, impacted terrain near Frankenmuth, Michigan. The private rated pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal fight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from the William 'Tiny' Zehnder Field Airport (66G), Frankenmuth, Michigan, at the time of the accident.

Several witness reported seeing the airplane earlier. One witness said the wind was calm, and the pilot was doing "touch-n-goes"; departing to the east and then landing to the west. The witness added that they heard the crash and saw smoke. 

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted about a quarter mile, east of the 66G airport. A post-crash fire consumed much of the airplane. 

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane's engine was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.






FRANKENMUTH, MI — Police have identified one of the victims who died in a plane crash that happened in Frankenmuth on July 3.

Police, firefighters and paramedics responded at about 5:22 p.m. on Sunday to the William "Tiny" Zehnder Air Field for the report of a plane crash, according to a press release from Frankenmuth Police Department.


Officers who arrived on the scene found the aircraft completely engulfed in flames, according to police Chief Don Mawer.


The pilot of the aircraft was Eugene Root, 55, of Millington. Root's 9-year-old grandson, also of Millington, was also killed in the crash.


Witnesses said the pilot had kept the aircraft at the air field and was holding a birthday get together at his hanger.


Witnesses also said that the pilot had been performing a maneuver described as "touch and goes," and last observed the aircraft banking right, before losing sight of the aircraft and hearing the impact.


The William "Tiny" Zehnder Air Field is a privately-owned airport run by Frankenmuth Airport Inc. that features a 2530-foot-long turf runway marked by yellow cones.

This investigation has now been turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, Mawer said.

Story and video:   http://www.mlive.com


A small plane crashed Sunday evening in a field near Frankenmuth, killing two people, the FAA said.

Police responded to an emergency call just before 5:30 p.m. They came upon wreckage near the Curtis Road/Block Road intersection, southeast of Frankenmuth.

A post Monday on the Frankenmuth Police Department Facebook page identified the two victims as Eugene Root, 55, of Millington, and his 9-year-old grandson, who is also from Millington.

Police said Root, the pilot, was holding a “birthday get together” at his hangar at “Tiny Zehnder Air Field.”

“Witnesses stated that the pilot had been performing a maneuver described as ‘touch and goes,’ police said in a statement. “Witnesses last observed the aircraft banking right, before losing sight of the aircraft, and hearing the impact.”

Roland Herwig, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, said the plane involved in the crash was a Piper PA 22, described as a “general aviation small airplane.”

The FAA registry indicates the “fixed wing single-engine plane” is based at William “Tiny” Zehnder Field, which is close to the crash site.

Original article can be found here: http://www.detroitnews.com







FRANKENMUTH TOWNSHIP — A plane crash in Frankenmuth Township has left two dead, according to the Frankenmuth Police Department.

The crash happened around 6:00 p.m. in a field by Curtis Road near Block Road, near the Tiny Zehnder Airfield located along South Block Road in Frankenmuth Township.

The Frankenmuth Police Department says that the 55-year-old pilot, Eugene Root of Millington, was killed in the crash.

Also killed was Root's 9-year-old grandson. The grandson's name was not released.

Police say Root kept his plane at the airfield and was having a birthday party. Police were told Root was performing a maneuver called the "touch and goes" when the crash took place.

The FAA and the NTSB are both now handling the investigation.

Story and video:   http://nbc25news.com 

Maule M-4-210, N4745T: Incident occurred May 29, 2016 - While taxiing the right main gear leg separated at the mounting flange, gear folded and right wing struck the ground with a propeller strike











AIRCRAFT:   1964 Maule M-4-210  SN# 1015  N4745T

ENGINE:        Continental IO-360A5B  SN# 20117-R          

PROPELLER: McCauley D2A34C67-NP  SN# 758280

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   1314.5 TT since factory rebuild on 5/23/1978

21.7 since overhauled cylinders on 2/4/2016

PROPELLER: 597.47 SMOH   TT unknown   

AIRFRAME:      2740.9  NOTE: airframe log starts 10/21/1982 @ 1426.38, prior logs lost                     

OTHER EQUIPMENT: Apollo SL15, GNX-80, JPI 701-830

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  While taxiing on 5/29/2016 the right main gear leg separated at the mounting flange, gear folded and right wing struck the ground with a propeller strike.    

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Propeller Strike, engine stoppage, right gear mounting flange broken at fuselage, lower fuselage fabric punctured, antenna pulled away,                       

right wing lift strut damaged, right wing buckled with skins wrinkled, wing tip damaged, aileron damaged.    

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:     Hicks Airport in Fort Worth, TX  

REMARKS: Adjuster has logs and records   

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N4745T.htm

Alaska to Louisiana: father-son duo reunited with dream plane

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Major Monty Harper always dreamed about building one of these rare kit planes with his children. 



SULPHUR, LA (KPLC) -

David Harper, the assistant principal at Elton Elementary school, thought a field trip to the Southland Field Airport was just going to be another day with his students. 

That is, until he saw a Long-Ez in the corner of the hangar. 

Harper was born and raised in Eagle River Alaska. His father was a combat pilot in the U.S. Air Force for 22 years.

He was, of course, a plane enthusiast and had a favorite plane called the Long-Ez. 

Major Monty Harper always dreamed about building one of these rare kit planes with his children. David fondly recalls the days when his father would rush them out onto the deck to watch a Long-Ez pass over their house. 

Although they had all of the plans and knew every detail about the plane, Monty and David would never get to build one. 

Later on 7News Nightcast, KPLC's Kaitlin Rust has the full story of what that fateful trip to the Southland Field Airport meant for Monty and David.

Story and video:  http://www.ksla.com

Cessna Ector 305A, N12633, East Moriches Aerial Advertising Ltd: Accident occurred July 03, 2016 at Brookhaven Airport (KHWV), Shirley, Suffolk County, New York

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA241
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Shirley, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 305, registration: N12633
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel- equipped airplane, the airport UNICOM operator advised the active runway as 33, and he did not listen to the automated weather broadcast. The pilot performed a two-point (main wheel) landing to the asphalt runway, and the airplane initially tracked straight, slightly right of centerline. As it decelerated, the tailwheel touched down, and the airplane began to turn left. The pilot applied right rudder with no effect. He then applied the right brake, but the airplane kept turning to the left. It then slid sideways, and the right main landing gear folded, damaging the outboard section of the right wing as it contacted the runway. When the pilot disembarked, he noted that he had landed with a quartering tailwind. Wind, recorded at the airport about the time of the accident, was from 190° at 7 knots, and runway 24 was available. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. In retrospect, he noted that he landed on an advised runway instead of determining actual winds to land on the most appropriate runway.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control while landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to accept an advised runway rather than determine actual airport winds, which resulted in the airplane landing with a quartering tailwind.




Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

East Moriches Aerial Advertising Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N12633

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA241 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Shirley, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 305, registration: N12633
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane, the airport Universal Communications (UNICOM) operator advised the active runway as 33, and he did not listen to the automated weather broadcast. The pilot performed a two-point (main wheel) landing to the asphalt runway, and the airplane initially tracked straight, slightly right of centerline. As it decelerated, the tailwheel touched down and the airplane began to turn left. The pilot applied right rudder, with no effect. He then applied the right brake, but the airplane kept turning to the left. It then slid sideways, and the right main landing gear folded, damaging the outboard section of the right wing as it contacted the runway. When the pilot disembarked, he noted that he had landed with a quartering tailwind. Wind, recorded at the airport about the time of the accident, was from 190° true at 7 knots, and runway 24 was available. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. In retrospect, he noted that he landed on an advised runway instead of determining actual winds to land on the most appropriate runway.

======

The landing gear of a single-engine airplane collapsed while coming in to Brookhaven Calabro Airport on Sunday afternoon, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said.

The FAA will investigate the cause of the rough landing, spokesman Jim Peters said. A single person was aboard the plane, he said. The pilot walked away from the aircraft after the landing and was not hurt, according to the Mastic Fire Department.

Suffolk police said the 911 call came in at 12:51 p.m.

The vintage plane came to rest on its belly, with its right wing on the ground.

The aircraft is a Cessna 305C, Peters said. Aviation websites describe it as a military aircraft that flew for the first time in 1949 and that the Army retired in 1974. It was a liaison and observation plane, the websites said.

The airport is owned by the Town of Brookhaven.

Story and video:  http://www.newsday.com



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

East Moriches Aerial Advertising Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N12633

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA241 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Shirley, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 305, registration: N12633
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


According to the pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane, the airport Universal Communications (UNICOM) operator advised the active runway as 33, and he did not listen to the automated weather broadcast. The pilot performed a two-point (main wheel) landing to the asphalt runway, and the airplane initially tracked straight, slightly right of centerline. As it decelerated, the tailwheel touched down and the airplane began to turn left. The pilot applied right rudder, with no effect. He then applied the right brake, but the airplane kept turning to the left. It then slid sideways, and the right main landing gear folded, damaging the outboard section of the right wing as it contacted the runway. When the pilot disembarked, he noted that he had landed with a quartering tailwind. Wind, recorded at the airport about the time of the accident, was from 190° true at 7 knots, and runway 24 was available. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. In retrospect, he noted that he landed on an advised runway instead of determining actual winds to land on the most appropriate runway.
======

The landing gear of a single-engine airplane collapsed while coming in to Brookhaven Calabro Airport on Sunday afternoon, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said.

The FAA will investigate the cause of the rough landing, spokesman Jim Peters said. A single person was aboard the plane, he said. The pilot walked away from the aircraft after the landing and was not hurt, according to the Mastic Fire Department.

Suffolk police said the 911 call came in at 12:51 p.m.

The vintage plane came to rest on its belly, with its right wing on the ground.

The aircraft is a Cessna 305C, Peters said. Aviation websites describe it as a military aircraft that flew for the first time in 1949 and that the Army retired in 1974. It was a liaison and observation plane, the websites said.

The airport is owned by the Town of Brookhaven.

Story and video:  http://www.newsday.com

Cessna 182M Skylane, N1642T: Accident occurred July 03, 2016 at Brian Ranch Airport (CL13), Palmdale,, Los Angeles County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N1642T

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA356
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 03, 2016 in Llano, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N1642T
Injuries: 4 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during takeoff from a private dirt airstrip with an air density altitude near 6,100 feet, the airplane became airborne in ground effect, but was not able to "build airspeed sufficient to pitch for Vy (best rate of climb)". The pilot further reported that the wind pushed the airplane over an orchard and he intentionally put the airplane into an aerodynamic stall prior to impacting terrain.

A post-impact fire ensued and the airplane was destroyed.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that during the takeoff roll he heard a "bang" which he initially assumed to be a rock hitting the fuselage, but later believed to be an engine failure. 

An examination of the postaccident photographs of the two-bladed propeller showed, approximately 1/3 of the outer portion of one propeller blade was snapped off across the cord perpendicular to the leading edge and the second propeller blade showed "S" bending, torsional twisting, and tip curl, which are all indications consistent with the engine producing power at the time of impact.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain an adequate airspeed and his intentional aerodynamic stall, which resulted in an impact with terrain and a post-impact fire.




LLANO, Calif. (KABC) -- A small plane carrying four people crashed while taking off in Llano on Sunday, according to officials.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said the crash was reported at Brian Ranch Airport, located at 34810 Largo Vista Rd., at about 1:35 p.m.

Deputies with the Palmdale sheriff's station said the plane was taking off when it got about 30 feet into the air and crashed back down onto the ground.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the aircraft, which was identified as a Cessna, hit a tree, crashed and then caught on fire.

According to the sheriff's department, the four adult passengers were taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

Original article can be found here:   http://abc7.com

PALMDALE, Calif. - Federal aviation officials say no one was injured after a small aircraft with four people on board crashed north of Los Angeles.

The FAA says a Cessna went down Sunday at the Brian Ranch Airport in the unincorporated community of Llano, about 75 miles north of Los Angeles.

FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said the plane crashed after striking a tree. The impact sparked a small fire, but the pilot and passengers were not seriously injured.

A Los Angeles County Fire Department dispatcher said no one required treatment at the scene.

Original article can be found here: http://www.brandonsun.com

A small plane went down Sunday afternoon at a private airport in the Llano community of the Antelope Valley, prompting a response from emergency personnel, according to sheriff’s and fire officials.

The incident was reported shortly after 1:30 p.m. at Brian Ranch Airport, said Lt. Ken Wright of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

Four male occupants were aboard the four-seater aircraft when it went down, the lieutenant said.

There were conflicting reports about whether anyone was injured.

A spokesman for the Los Angeles County Fire Department, who described the incident as a “hard landing,” said no one was hurt.

According to the Sheriff’s Department, the four people on the plane suffered minor injuries.

Brian Ranch Airport, located about 25 miles east of Palmdale, specializes in “ultralights and light sport aircraft,” according to its website.