Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Progressive Aerodyne SeaRey, N371D: Incident occurred July 18, 2020 - Lake Norman, Catawba County, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

https://registry.faa.gov/N371D

Date: 18-JUL-20

Time: 12:30:00Z
Regis#: N371D
Aircraft Make: PROGRESSIVE AERODYNE
Aircraft Model: SEAREY
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LAKE NORMAN
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Piper PA-22-150 Caribbean, N4816A: Accident occurred July 18, 2020 in Loveland, Clermont County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N4816A

Location: Loveland, OH
Accident Number: CEN20LA290
Date & Time: 07/18/2020, 1630 EDT
Registration: N4816A
Aircraft: PIPER PA22
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 18, 2020, about 1630 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-22 airplane, N4816A, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Loveland, Ohio. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, he added 15 gallons of fuel at the Wadsworth Municipal Airport (3G3) and departed. Just short of the Cincinnati Municipal Airport-Lunken Field, the engine lost power, and the pilot selected a road for a forced landing. The airplane impacted mailboxes and a light pole during the forced landing and resulted in substantial damage to the left wing.

The airplane and engine were recovered and will be examined.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration:N4816A 
Model/Series: PA22 150
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Amateur Built:No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLUK
Observation Time: 1653 EDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 230°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Wadsworth, OH (3G3)
Destination: Lunken, OH (KLUK) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:











Miami Township, Ohio – “I knocked on the window and he was like still holding on…” Alex Salatin explained, holding out both arms stiff imitating the pilot. “He was still holding onto the controls to fly it.”

Alex was talking about the airplane pilot, only a few years older than him who put a Piper PA-22-150 Caribbean plane down safely about fifty feet away from him as he was mowing the front lawn of his home in Miami Trails. “He was like, ‘Yeah, I’m good. I’m good.” Alex is a Senior at Loveland High School.

The pilot, Phillip Sullivan made the emergency landing while returning from Wadsworth, Ohio to Louisville. He was on a Pilots-N-Paws flight and had delivered puppies to the northern Ohio town that is South of Cleveland.

No one was injured.

Nick Early explains what it was like and what he did when he heard the crash from the upstairs of his home The plane ended up in his front yard. He said, “It was a pretty skilled job, him being able to land it on the street here.”

The plane was headed into John Chevalier’s front yard when a wing clipped off a driveway lamp pole and spun it around preventing any damage to his home. John said that he had already, “Fired up the grill” so he treated the young pilot along with the pilot’s father who drove up from Louisville to check on his son to a steak dinner.

You will hear from Alex, his father Ron, and their neighbors John Chevalier and Nick Early in these LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV interviews.

Ron Salatin said about his son, “What a proud moment. He did all the right things.” He said he told his son, “He should be proud of himself.”

https://www.lovelandmagazine.com

Beech A23-24 Musketeer Super III, N3412C: Accident occurred July 18, 2020 in Burns Flat, Washita County, Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3412C

Location: Burns Flat, OK
Accident Number: CEN20LA292
Date & Time: 07/18/2020, 2245 CDT
Registration: N3412C
Aircraft: Beech A23-24
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 18, 2020, about 2245 central daylight time, a Beech A23-24 airplane, N3412V, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Burns Flat, Oklahoma. The pilot and his 3 passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that while established in cruise flight the airplane experienced a gradual loss of engine power. He was unable to restore engine power by switching fuel tanks, turning on the fuel boost pump, and advancing the throttle, mixture, and propeller controls full forward. The pilot stated that he turned on the landing light and made a forced landing in a grass field. The pilot reported that after touchdown the airplane traversed over 3 large terraces, and that the main landing gear collapsed when he tried to swerve the airplane to avoid a tree. The horizontal stabilizer and both wings were substantially damaged during the forced landing.

The airplane was examined at the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration airworthiness inspector. Both wing fuel tanks contained about 25 gallons of 100 low-lead aviation fuel. The throttle control was very loose when moved by hand in the cockpit. A visual inspection of the fuel servo revealed that the throttle linkage was not connected to the throttle control rod-end. The retaining bolt, washer, and self-locking nut were not located during the investigation.

Figure 1. Throttle control rod-end found disconnected from the fuel servo throttle linkage.

The airplane had accumulated 8.72 hours since the last annual inspection that was completed on October 22, 2019. The inspection authorized (IA) mechanic who had completed the annual inspection stated that the fuel servo had been removed from the engine and overhauled in conjunction with the annual inspection. The IA mechanic stated that he personally reinstalled the overhauled fuel servo on the engine, while another individual moved the throttle and mixture controls in the cockpit. The IA mechanic stated that it is his standard practice to connect both the throttle and mixture controls to the fuel servo at the same time. The IA mechanic stated that he likely reused the bolt and washer to connect the throttle control rod-end to the fuel servo throttle linkage, and that it is possible that he also reused the self-locking steel nut. However, he would not have reused the self-locking nut if it had fully engaged the bolt threads by hand. The IA mechanic stated that he used two wrenches to secure the self-locking nut and that he did not use a torque wrench. A review of the Beech A23-24 Maintenance Manual revealed no specific assembly instructions on how to physically connect the throttle control rod-end to the fuel servo throttle linkage. The Beech A23-24 Illustrated Parts Catalog specified that the throttle control rod-end be attached to the fuel servo throttle linkage with a 169-910021 bolt, AN960-10 washer, and MS20365-1032 self-locking nut.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N3412C
Model/Series: A23-24
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Elk City, OK (ELK)
Destination: Elk City, OK (ELK)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.381667, -99.201111

Cessna 182A, N5900B: Incident occurred July 18, 2020 in Portland, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft made an emergency landing on a road.

https://registry.faa.gov/N5900B

Date: 18-JUL-20
Time: 19:20:00Z
Regis#: N5900B
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: SIGHTSEEING
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: PORTLAND
State: OREGON




Envi Adventures


"Whether you believe in miracles or not, we had our own miracle happen on Saturday which you may or may not have heard about. Around 12pm over Portland, one of our airplanes experienced an unexpected event requiring the airplane to make an emergency landing in the intersection of Greeley and Going in North Portland. Avoiding power lines, trees, utility poles, and cars, incredibly there was no damage to the airplane and most importantly nobody was injured. Words can’t describe how thankful I am to have had an amazing pilot flying during that time who kept a cool head and kept everyone safe from start to finish. Also a very big thank you to @pdxairport air traffic control, as well as their fire department, and to @pdxfirerescue and @portlandpolice for their quick response in ensuring everyone was ok. Also, thank you to all of the unnamed people who stopped by offering us water and any help they could during a very strange day. The only word I can really use is ‘humbling’ and for that I am extremely grateful." -Envi Adventures



A Cessna 182A lost power and made an emergency landing onto a street in North Portland on Saturday, according to Portland Fire & Rescue.

The pilot and three passengers - a man, a woman and a young boy – were unharmed. 

Officers at the Portland Police Bureau North Precinct responded to North Greeley Avenue at North Going Street after receiving reports that an airplane had landed on the street, causing no accidents. The street was closed Saturday afternoon while an investigation was conducted.

Casey Holdahl, who was at the scene, described the pilot as in his late 20s. He was reportedly wearing a shirt with the logo of “Envi Adventures” - an air-tourism company that provides commercial flights over scenic areas like Mt. Hood, downtown Portland and the Columbia River Gorge.

https://www.oregonlive.com

Fleet Model 7B Fawn Mk I , N174RS: Incident occurred July 19, 2020 in Toughkenamon, Chester County, Pennsylvania

If you find the propeller, contact Pennsylvania State Police, Avondale Barracks at 610-268-2022.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aircraft landed in a field due to wooden propeller splitting apart during flight. 

https://registry.faa.gov/N174RS

Date: 19-JUL-20
Time: 17:40:00Z
Regis#: N174RS
Aircraft Make: FLEET
Aircraft Model: 7B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: TOUGHKENAMON
State: PENNSYLVANIA

NEW GARDEN, Pennsylvania — An airplane made an emergency landing in New Garden Township Saturday after a propeller became dislodged.

The plane was in distress about 1:40 p.m. and the pilot made an emergency landing at the Glen Willow Road overpass in New Garden Township.

Troopers from the Pennsylvania State Police, Avondale Barracks, were dispatched to the above listed location for a report of a plane crash. It was later determined that midflight, a propeller section of the plane had become dislodged causing the plane to make an emergency landing.

The emergency landing was successful and there were no injuries as a result.

The Federal Aviation Administration was contacted and will be responding to the area tomorrow to assume the investigation.

At the direction of the FAA, the Pennsylvania State Police, Avondale Barracks is requesting all residents within the area of the above listed location and surrounding areas to be on the lookout for the propeller that had dislodged. It is described as a light brown wooden propeller section, approximately 2-3 feet in length.

If propeller is located, contact the Avondale Barracks, 610-268-2022, so that it can be turned over to the  Federal Aviation Administration.

https://www.dailylocal.com

Piper PA-28R-200, N5326F: Incident occurred July 18, 2020 at Block Island State Airport (KBID), New Shoreham, Washington County, Rhode Island

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aircraft rolled off end of runway on landing and gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N5326F

Date: 18-JUL-20
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N5326F
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BLOCK ISLAND
State: RHODE ISLAND

Mooney M20J, N58066: Accident occurred July 18, 2020 at Block Island State Airport (KBID), Washington County, Rhode Island

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Unicorn Aviation Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N58066


NTSB Identification: ERA20CA264
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 18, 2020 in Block Island, RI
Aircraft: Mooney M20J, registration: N58066


NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on landing, right gear collapsed and veered off runway.

Date: 18-JUL-20
Time: 22:05:00Z
Regis#: N58066
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BLOCK ISLAND
State: RHODE ISLAND

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Cessna 140A, N140AB; accident occurred July 18, 2020 at Arlington Municipal Airport (KGKY), Tarrant County, Texas

Supplied image of the right-side fuselage. 
The fuselage exhibits wrinkle deformation.
Carb Icing Chart.



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N140AB



Location: Arlington, TX
Accident Number: CEN20LA291
Date & Time: 07/18/2020, 0745 CDT
Registration:N140AB 
Aircraft:CESSNA 140 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On July 18, 2020, about 0745 central daylight time, a Cessna 140 airplane, N140AB, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Arlington, Texas. The flight instructor and student pilot were uninjured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

The flight instructor reported the purpose of the flight was to fly the airplane cross-country for tire repairs, and at the same time, train the student pilot in the airplane. The student pilot started the engine about 0715. The recorded weather indicated the temperature was 79° F and the dew point was 73° F. The flight instructor mentioned that since the outside air temperature was close to the dew point, they would have to be careful and cautious about carburetor icing, even if there was no visible moisture in the air.

The flight instructor related a previous occurrence when he flew this airplane for the first time with another instructor. Then, the condition was almost 100% relative humidity and the carburetor heat was kept on about "10%" during the flight when at cruise power setting, and full carburetor heat at lower than cruise power. However, a rough engine or any sign of carburetor ice was not encountered during that flight.

During the accident flight, the airplane's engine performed as expected during the run up. The student pilot set the carburetor heat on cold for takeoff and departed without issues. The flaps were retracted and the airplane was accelerated to best climb airspeed. The rate of climb was about 250 ft per minute and the engine was running at full power.

About two minutes into the flight, the engine started to run a "little bit rough and shaky." The instructor pulled the carburetor heat on about 10% hot and left it in this position in accordance with his training for this airplane. The engine roughness disappeared, and the airplane kept climbing at the same rate.

About one minute later, the roughness came back, more severe this time. The instructor pulled the carburetor heat all the way on to full hot and waited. The roughness continued and the power available was not allowing the airplane to continue the climb at the same rate.

The airplane's pitch attitude was progressively lowered to maintain the airspeed, and full power was not sufficient to keep the airplane in a level flight attitude at 1,200 ft. There was no suitable area ahead for about the next 8 to 10 miles to perform an off-field emergency landing, so the instructor elected to turn back to the departure airport. He was not confident that the airplane could maintain altitude in the traffic pattern, so he elected to land on a closer runway with a quartering tailwind. During the landing roll, as the airplane slowed down, he retracted the flaps to remove any residual lift and applied the yoke "slightly diving" away from the wind. While the airplane was still moving forward at a low ground speed, the nose "suddenly" yawed very "quickly and strongly" to the right. The instructor pilot applied ailerons, elevators, and full left rudder and brake, but these did not stop the yaw. The airplane subsequently ground looped and came to rest in the grass resulting in substantial damage to the aft fuselage and tailwheel.

Using the pilot's reported departure weather, the plotted relative humidity at this temperature and dew point spread was about 80%. A review of the icing probability chart contained in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 revealed that the weather conditions at the time of the accident were "conducive to serious icing at glide power."

The operator of the airplane was asked to run the engine after the accident. The engine started and operated "normally." 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:  Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/06/2020
Occupational Pilot:Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/25/2020
Flight Time:  1314 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 978 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 49 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 45, Female
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied:Left 
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/13/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  159 hours (Total, all aircraft), 17 hours (Total, this make and model), 17 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N140AB
Model/Series: 140 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1951
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: 15703
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/14/2020, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 10434 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-200A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGKY, 630 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time:0653 CDT 
Direction from Accident Site: 52°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:Arlington, TX (GKY) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fort Worth, TX (FWS)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0730 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: ARLINGTON MUNI (GKY)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 628 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6080 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.663889, -97.094167 (est)

Location: Arlington, TX
Accident Number: CEN20LA291
Date & Time: 07/18/2020, 0745 CDT
Registration: N140AB
Aircraft: CESSNA 140
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On July 18, 2020, about 0745 central daylight time, a Cessna 140 airplane, N140AB, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Arlington, Texas. The flight instructor and student pilot were uninjured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

According to the flight instructor, the purpose of this flight was to fly the airplane cross-country for tire repairs, and at the same time, to train the student pilot on the airplane. The student pilot started the engine about 0715. The recorded weather indicated the temperature was 26° C and the dew point was 23° C. The flight instructor mentioned that since the outside air temperature was close to the dew point, they would have to be careful and cautious about carburetor icing, even if there was no visible moisture in the air.

The flight instructor related a previous occurrence when he flew this airplane for the first time with another instructor. The condition was almost 100% relative humidity and the carburetor heat was kept on about "10%" during the flight when at cruise power setting and full carburetor heat at lower than cruise power. However, a rough engine or any sign of carburetor ice was not encountered during that flight.

During the accident flight, the airplane's engine performed as expected during the run up. The student pilot set the carburetor heat on cold for takeoff and departed without issues. The flaps were retracted and the airplane was accelerated to best climb airspeed. The rate of climb was about 250 ft per minute and the engine was running at full power.

About 2 minutes into the flight, the engine started to run a "little bit rough and shaky." The instructor pulled the carburetor heat on about 10% hot and left it in this position in accordance with his training for this airplane. The engine roughness disappeared, and the airplane kept climbing at the same rate.

About 1 minute after this event, the roughness came back more severe this time. The instructor pulled the carburetor heat all the way on to full hot and waited. The roughness continued and the power available was not allowing the airplane to continue the climb at the same rate.

The airplane's pitch attitude was progressively lowered to maintain the airspeed and full power was not sufficient to keep the level flight attitude at 1,200 ft. There was no suitable area ahead for about the next 8 to 10 miles to perform an off-field emergency landing.

The instructor elected to turn back to the departure airport. He was not confident that the airplane could maintain altitude in the traffic pattern, so he elected to conduct a landing on a closer runway with a quartering tailwind. During the landing roll, as the airplane slowed down, he retracted the flaps to remove any residual lift and applied the yoke "slightly diving" away from the wind. While the airplane was still moving forward at a low ground speed, the nose "suddenly" yawed very "quickly and strongly" to the right. Application of the ailerons, elevators, and full left rudder and full left brake did not remedy the yaw. The airplane subsequently ground looped and came to rest in the grass.

Using the pilot's reported departure weather, the plotted relative humidity at this temperature and dewpoint spread was about 80%. Review of the icing probability chart contained in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 revealed that the weather conditions at the time of the accident were "conducive to serious icing at glide power."

The operator of the airplane was asked to run the engine after the accident. The engine started and operated "normally."

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N140AB
Model/Series: 140 A
Aircraft Category:Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light:Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGKY, 630 ft msl
Observation Time: 0653 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 150°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Arlington, TX (GKY)
Destination: Fort Worth, TX (FWS)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.663889, -97.094167 (est)

Cessna 177B Cardinal, N34099: Incident occurred July 17, 2020 at Freeman Ranch Airport (8TX2), Rocksprings, Edwards County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aircraft during departure ran off runway.

https://registry.faa.gov/N34099

Date: 17-JUL-20
Time: 20:28:00Z
Regis#: N34099
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 177
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: ROCKSPRINGS
State: TEXAS

Cessna 182 Skylane, N6328A: Incident occurred July 17, 2020 in Alpine, Brewster County, Texas


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aircraft made an emergency landing on a highway.

https://registry.faa.gov/N6328A

Date: 17-JUL-20
Time: 15:35:00Z
Regis#: N6328A
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: ALPINE
State: TEXAS




Brewster County Sheriff's Office

Friday morning, a Cessna 182 Skylane, ran out of fuel and performed an emergency landing, on Highway 67, approximately 22 miles North of Alpine. There was no damage to the aircraft, and the pilot was able to takeoff, after refueling. Deputies and State Troopers secured the area to ensure the safety of the highway/runway.

Tecnam P-2004 Bravo, N846JM: Accident occurred July 19, 2020 at Spokane International Airport (KGEG), Spokane County, Washington

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N846JM



Location: College Place, WA
Accident Number: WPR20LA229
Date & Time: 07/19/2020, 2052 PDT
Registration: N846JM
Aircraft: Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam P2004 Bravo
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 19, 2020, about 2052 Pacific daylight time, a Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam P2004 Bravo airplane, N846JM, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near College Place, Washington. The pilot and pilot-rated passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, after accomplishing a touch and go landing and during climb out, the airplane lost lift about 15 ft above ground level. Subsequently, the airplane settled, contacted the runway hard, and veered off the right side of the runway. The pilot-rated passenger also stated that the airplane lost lift during the climb out. He further stated that the climb out was not aggressive and that he did not notice any change in the engine's sound.

The airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam
Registration: N846JM
Model/Series: P2004 Bravo
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KALW, 1205 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 120°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: College Place, WA (S95)
Destination: College Place, WA (S95)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 46.046944, -118.417222 (est)

Hiller-Soloy UH-12DT, N2297W: Fatal accident occurred July 17, 2020 in Mehama, Marion County, Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N2297W

Location: Mehama, OR
Accident Number: WPR20LA224
Date & Time: 07/17/2020, 0854 PDT
Registration: N2297W
Aircraft: Hiller UH 12D
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

On July 17, 2020, at about 0854 Pacific daylight time, a Hiller UH-12D helicopter, N2297W, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Mehama, Oregon. The pilot was fatally injured. The helicopter was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 137 aerial application flight.

There were no witnesses to the accident. The support truck operator reported that the helicopter departed from the truck and flew towards the next field. Shortly after departing the truck operator heard the pilot report over the radio that he was "going down."

The helicopter impacted patch of tall trees in between Christmas tree fields. The helicopter came to rest upside down at the base of a tree. A post impact fire ensued and completely consumed the cabin area and engine compartment. The trees slightly west of the accident site were topped.

The operator reported that the turbine section of the engine had been removed and reinstalled three times in the past month due to continued problems with the engine. After final repairs, about a week before the accident, the helicopter was returned to service.

The helicopter has been recovered for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Hiller
Registration: N2297W
Model/Series: UH 12D No Series
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Western Helicopters
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SLE, 213 ft msl
Observation Time: 0856 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 320°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 3800 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Mehama, OR
Destination: Mehama, OR

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 44.794722, -122.619167

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




First responders on scene of fatal helicopter crash on July 17th, 2020 in rural Marion County, Oregon.


A helicopter piloted by Terry Harchenko with Industrial Aviation Services Inc, drops off a bundle of Christmas trees during a harvest at Hupp Farms on October 27, 2017, outside of Silverton, Oregon.



MEHAMA, Oregon — A helicopter pilot spraying Christmas trees east of Salem was killed July 17th in a crash shortly before 9 a.m.

Terry Harchenko, 65, was flying for Western Helicopter Services, a company that specializes in aerial spraying. The crash was reported near a Christmas tree field along Fern Ridge Road north of Mehama, Oregon. No one else was in the helicopter.

Sgt. Jeremy Landers, with the Marion County Sheriff's Office, said it is not clear why the helicopter crashed. The 1960 Hiller aircraft was found in a tree line next to the Christmas tree field where Harchenko was spraying. Investigators have contacted the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board.

Paul Washburn, branch manager for Western Helicopter Services in Newberg, said Harchenko was well known among Willamette Valley farmers from Albany to Woodburn. Harchenko's father founded Industrial Aviation Services in Salem, which was purchased by Western Helicopter Services in January.

"He's been in the flying industry since he was a young man," Washburn said. "I couldn't even begin to tell you how many hours of flight he had."

Washburn described Harchenko as a humble guy, eager to serve and passionate about flying.

"He was always willing to help everybody," Washburn said. "He enjoyed his industry and was a large part of it."

According to the company's website, Western Helicopter Services employs 5 full-time pilots with more than 100,000 hours of pilot-in-command flight time. It is licensed to spray in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Utah and California.

In addition to forestry work, Western Helicopter Services also works with several county vector control districts in Oregon and Washington. The company also flies aerial surveys for Oregon State University's grass seed certification program.

Washburn said the sudden loss of Harchenko has left his co-workers in shock and mourning.

"It will be a long healing process to come to terms with it," Washburn said. "We are mourning for Terry, and will be for quite some time."

The Marion County Sheriff's Office was assisted on scene by the Stayton Fire District, Oregon Department of Forestry, Polk County Sheriff's Office and the Marion County Medical Examiner's Office.

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