Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Yeager Airport (KCRW), Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia: Man accused of breaking into plane not competent for trial

A Charleston man who allegedly broke into an airplane at Yeager Airport “just to see” how it felt isn’t competent to stand trial, a judge ruled Wednesday.

Daylen Wayne Brightwell, 21, will be sent to William R. Sharpe Hospital in Weston for treatment, per the ruling of Kanawha Circuit Judge Tod Kaufman.

Kaufman’s ruling said Brightwell was likely to regain competency with medical treatment, and the judge scheduled another hearing for Dec. 15.

Brightwell’s attorney, John Danford, had asked for a competency evaluation for his client.

Brightwell was charged with breaking and entering on July 7, after employees at Yeager Airport discovered he boarded an airplane in a restricted area of the airport earlier that day.

He had already been in and out of the airplane before an airport employee called for help with a shirtless man in the ticket lobby at about 2:30 a.m. The employee described Brightwell as “unpredictable” during the encounter.

While he was being arraigned in Kanawha County Magistrate Court, Brightwell rapped for law enforcement officers and media, and became increasingly angry when asked to sign his bail agreement for $100,000.

He was still listed as an inmate at the South Central Regional Jail Wednesday afternoon. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wvgazettemail.com

Cessna 182M Skylane, N70634: Accident occurred September 27, 2017 near Piqua Airport (I17), Piqua, Miami County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N70634

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA376 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 27, 2017 in Piqua, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 182M, registration: N70634
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 27, 2017, about 1130 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182M airplane, N70634, impacted a corn field and terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Piqua, Ohio. The private pilot was uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial firewall damage during the impact. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Phillipsburg Airport, near Phillipsburg, Ohio, about 1100, and was destined for the Piqua Airport - Hartzell Field (I17), near Piqua, Ohio.

According to the pilot's report, the airplane was approaching I17 when the airplane had a total loss of engine power. The pilot performed a forced landing and the airplane impacted a "standing" cornfield where the substantial damage occurred.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector, assisted by a mechanic, examined the entire fuel system to include the vents and sumps and found no anomalies. The engine was started and it was operational. The inspector confirmed that the skin panel directly behind the firewall was bent and stringers were bent. In addition, a review of the aircraft records indicated the airplane's last annual inspection was completed about 2 years prior to the accident.

At 1135, the recorded weather, about 11 miles and 283° from the accident site, at the Darke County Airport, near Versailles, Ohio, was: Wind 360° at 10 kts; visibility 7 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 26° C; dew point; 18° C; altimeter 30.01 inches of mercury.


The temperature and dew point spread were plotted on a carburetor icing probability chart. Their intersection was within the moderate icing at cruise power and serious icing at descent power setting envelope.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA376
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 27, 2017 in Piqua, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 182M, registration: N70634
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 27, 2017, about 0930 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182M airplane, N70634, impacted a corn field and terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Piqua, Ohio. The private pilot was uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial firewall damage during the impact. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Phillipsburg Airport, near Phillipsburg, Ohio, and was destined for the Piqua Airport - Hartzell Field (I17), near Piqua, Ohio.

According to preliminary information, the airplane was approaching I17 when the airplane lost engine power. The pilot performed a forced landing and the airplane impacted a cornfield where the substantial damage occurred.

At 0935, the recorded weather at the Darke County Airport, near Versailles, Ohio, was: Wind 320° at 7 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 23° C; dew point; 18° C; altimeter 30.00 inches of mercury.






PIQUA — An area pilot proved the adage that “any landing you can walk away from is a good one,” after the engine on his Cessna 182 aircraft failed short of the runway at Piqua/Hartzell Airport on Wednesday.

The pilot, identified by the Ohio State Highway Patrol as Myron Sowry, 77, of Phillipsburg, was making a long final on Runway 08 around just after 11 a.m. on Wednesday when he lost power. Sowry initiated forced landing procedures, bringing the aircraft down in standing corn approximately one-quarter mile from the end of the runway.

He landed safely, exited the aircraft, and made his way through around 100 yards of standing corn to Brian Bros. Painting & Restoration on Versailles Road where he contacted authorities.

The Piqua Fire Department along with mutual aide from both Covington and Lockington Fire Departments responded to the scene where a search to re-locate the aircraft was started.

Lt. Joe Gephardt of the Piqua Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol said, “He did a good job of keeping it upright,” speaking of Sowry’s skill in making the difficult landing in the corn.

A Lockington firefighter who was on the scene got permission from the landowner and used a tractor and Bushhog to mow a path to the aircraft. 

Officials from the FAA are expected to arrive at the scene to join the Highway Patrol in the investigation, following which the aircraft will be loaded onto a trailer and transported to the Piqua/Hartzell Airport.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.dailycall.com






MIAMI COUNTY — A small plane ended up in a cornfield near the Piqua Airport Wednesday after mechanical issues caused a ‘forced landing.’ 

Emergency crews responded to the airport in Miami County near Spiker Road around 11:30 a.m. Wednesday after the incident reported. 

State troopers said the small Cessna aircraft encountered mechanical issues and ended up in a cornfield. 

Investigators did not indicate if the plane was landing or taking off. 

The pilot was not injured in the incident. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.whio.com

Why Big, Bad Boeing Is Picking on Bombardier: Staying big and dominant is part of the long game



The Wall Street Journal
By Alex Frangos
Sept. 27, 2017 2:23 p.m. ET


Why is Boeing picking on the little guy? Because that is how you stay big and dominant.

Boeing scored a victory Tuesday when the Commerce Department placed a 220% tariff on the import of Bombardier CSeries jets from Canada, 75 of which are on order by Delta Air Lines .

It would seem to be a curious fight for Boeing to start. The jet giant doesn’t produce airplanes that directly compete with the CSeries, which seat 100 to 145 passengers. And there is clear blowback. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said the dispute could scuttle a potential Royal Canadian Air Force order for Boeing-made F/A-18 Hornet fighters.

Boeing accuses Bombardier of dumping—or selling aircraft for less than the cost of production. But this is a widespread industry practice that Boeing itself employs on its jet programs.

In the early years of a new plane, manufacturers sell below cost and hope that efficiencies on the production line improve enough so that later planes make up for the upfront losses. Boeing’s 787 program, which delivered its first plane in 2011, accumulated $29 billion in losses before it started turning a profit on each plane only last year, notes Robert Stallard of Vertical Research Partners.

Boeing’s other complaint is Bombardier’s receipt of government funds, which it says is an unfair advantage. Though not exactly the same, Boeing enjoys the fruits of its relationship with Washington, as evidenced by its furious lobbying campaign with President Donald Trump to preserve the U.S. Export-Import Bank, which it uses to finance aircraft sales.

So why go at it? The long game demands it. Boeing may regret not doing more to keep a dysfunctional pipsqueak that has become Airbus at bay 30 years ago. Though Bombardier is hardly a budding giant, there are others on the horizon, including China’s Comac and Russia’s Irkut Corp.  Brazil’s Embraer would seem to be the beneficiary from this fight if it can sell its similar-sized jets instead of Bombardier. The Brazilians and others would have to be ready for action, however.

Boeing is sending the message that any attempt to sell any passenger aircraft, even if it doesn’t compete with Boeing’s offerings, on its home turf will be met with a punch in the nose.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Life Flight lands agreement with St. Luke's

Geisinger's Life Flight program will log in even more flight time beginning in mid-2018.

Geisinger and Lehigh County-based St. Luke’s University Health Network Wednesday announced an agreement for air medical collaboration. Under the agreement, Life Flight will provide air medical services for St. Luke’s, beginning on July 1.

"We'll be supplying them with this service," David Cutright, Geisinger's director of treasury operations said Wednesday following the Geisinger Authority meeting. "They're currently using another provider."

Cutright announced the agreement to authority members during the meeting, just after Geisinger had emailed announcements about the agreement to the media.

"This collaboration only impacts and replaces the current relationship between St. Luke’s and PennStar’s air medical transport," Geisinger spokeswoman Alysha Davis said. "Currently, PennStar does house a helicopter in Northampton County. The logistics regarding where the helicopter will be based have not been finalized. The helicopter is similar to those currently flown by Geisinger and will be larger than any helicopter currently serving the Lehigh Valley."

The service will feature a state-of-the-art, twin-engine EC145 helicopter manufactured from Airbus Helicopters. The aircraft is night vision goggle-certified and is more spacious, with room to carry two patients, the care team and specialized medical equipment, according to Geisinger.

"The EC145’s advanced avionics capabilities allow flight crews to conduct both instrument-only and single-pilot flights," the release stated.

St. Luke’s currently contracts with Penn Medicine, of Philadelphia, to provide air medical services through the PennSTAR program, that health system's critical care flight and ground transportation service.

Neither St. Luke's nor Geisinger responded to questions of why St. Luke's decided to switch to Geisinger's medical helicopter program and what the network will pay Geisinger for the service.

But officials of both health systems issued statements on the agreement.

“St. Luke’s is excited to be collaborating with Geisinger to provide excellent air transport and medical coverage for patients in the Lehigh Valley and surrounding counties,” said Joel Fagerstrom, St. Luke’s University Health Network’s executive vice president and chief operating officer.

“Our Life Flight program has a long history of providing the highest level of critical care emergent transport services to people in need, and we look forward to working in conjunction with St. Luke’s to ensure that patients have access to professional and timely air medical services,” said Thomas B. Weir, associate chief administrative officer, Geisinger Clinic.

According to Geisinger, its Life Flight helicopters have transported more than 60,000 patients over the past 36 years. The program that includes 100 team members utilizes seven helicopters out of five bases, at the medical center near Danville, outside Minersville in Schuylkill County, State College, at the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport in Pittston Township and at Williamsport Regional Airport. Approximately 65 percent of the program's flights are transports from one hospital to another, and 35 percent are from vehicle crashes and other incidents in Northeastern and Central Pennsylvania.

According to the release, St. Luke’s University Health Network is a regional, nonprofit network providing services at seven hospitals and more than 270 outpatient sites in Lehigh, Northampton, Carbon, Schuylkill, Bucks, Montgomery, Berks and Monroe counties in Pennsylvania and Warren and Hunterdon counties in New Jersey. In partnership with Temple University, St. Luke’s created the region’s first and only regional medical school campus. It also operates the nation’s oldest nursing school and 23 graduate medical educational programs.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.dailyitem.com

Piper PA-24-260, N9020P: Accident occurred September 26, 2017 at Whiteman Airport (KWHP), Pacoima, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9020P

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA217
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 26, 2017 in Los Angeles, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24-260, registration: N9020P
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 26, 2017, at 1638 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-24-260 (Comanche), N9020P, sustained substantial damage following a landing gear collapse at Whiteman Airport, Los Angeles, California. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The local personal flight departed from Camarillo, California about 1600 with a planned destination of Whiteman. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that he lowered the landing gear while preparing to land on runway 12. He stated that after lowering the gear, he felt the airplane's drag increase but could not remember if he got a confirmation they were down and locked from the indicator light. He further stated the landing flare was normal and the airplane touched down on the main landing gear. Thereafter, the nose gear settled toward the runway and as the airplane continued on the landing roll, all three gear collapsed. The airplane incurred structural damage to the fuselage.

Boeing 737-900, Delta Air Lines: Incident occurred September 26, 2017 in Orlando, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft reported a possible bird strike with damage to the left horizontal stabilizer leading edge.

Date: 26-SEP-17
Time: 20:10:00Z
Regis#: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA
Flight Number: DAL507
City: ORLANDO
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 152, N53393: Accident occurred September 26, 2017 at Barrow County Airport (KWDR), Winder, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N53393

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA336
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 26, 2017 in Winder, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N53393
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 26, 2017, about 2030 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 152, N53393, was substantially damaged during a collision with terrain while performing a forced landing following a loss of engine power after takeoff from Barrow County Airport (WDR), Winder, Georgia. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

In a telephone interview, the pilot stated that the airplane had been parked for an extended period, and he was preparing it for an annual inspection which was more than 1 year overdue. On the day prior to the accident flight, he charged the airplane's battery, and ran the engine for about 30 minutes. Prior to the accident flight, he performed a preflight inspection of the airplane, measured the level of fuel in each tank, sampled the fuel tanks and fuel strainer for contaminants, and ran the engine for approximately 5-7 minutes with no anomalies noted.

The pilot taxied the airplane for takeoff, performed the before-takeoff checks, and departed from runway 31. When the airplane reached about 200 ft above ground level, the engine "sputtered" and then stopped producing power. The pilot performed a forced landing to a field beyond the departure end of the runway, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage and wings.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued July 31, 2014. The pilot estimated he had 700 total hours of flight experience, 300 hours of which were in the Cessna 152.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1979, and had accrued approximately 1,875.1 total aircraft hours. Its most recent annual inspection was completed November 6, 2012 at 1,864.4 total aircraft hours.

At 2035, the weather recorded at WDR included clear skies and calm wind. The temperature was 25°C, and the dew point was 20°C. The altimeter setting was 29.96 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. Both wings were substantially damaged. The left wing fuel tank was breeched by impact and contained no fuel. The right tank was intact and contained about 8 gallons of fuel. The gascolator was drained, and the first 4 ounces drained were clear water, and the remaining 4 ounces were a mixture of water and fuel.

The carburetor was separated from the engine, and was reattached with an adhesive to facilitate an engine operational check. An external fuel tank was then plumbed to the carburetor, and the engine was started on the airframe utilizing the airplane's own battery. The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously without interruption. A magneto check was performed satisfactorily, and the engine was shut down utilizing the airplane's engine controls.

Beech 200 King Air, N44UF, King Air LLC: Incident occurred September 26, 2017 at Delta County Airport (KESC), Escanaba, Michigan

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aircraft veered off runway striking several runway lights.

King Air LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N44UF

Date: 26-SEP-17
Time: 11:48:00Z
Regis#: N44UF
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ESCANABA
State: MICHIGAN

Kitfox IV, N477PR: Incident occurred September 26, 2017 in Spokane, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aircraft made a precautionary landing n a field due to an engine issue.

http://registry.faa.gov/N477PR

Date: 26-SEP-17
Time: 23:59:00Z
Regis#: N477PR
Aircraft Make: KITFOX
Aircraft Model: IV
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: SPOKANE
State: WASHINGTON

Westchester County (KHPN), White Plains, New York: Airport privatization deal on hold until after Election Day



Don't expect the county to move on a plan to privatize Westchester County Airport until after Election Day.

A plan to lease the county-owned facility to a private operator, allowing airport revenues to flow into county coffers has proven controversial, and with all 17 members of the Board of Legislators plus County Executive Rob Astorino all up for reelection, it seems officials are content to wait.

"We're shooting for the end of the year," said Astorino spokesman Ned McCormack. "Government doesn't always run as fast as people like."

Astorino first floated the idea of privatization last year, counting on $15 million from a deal with private equity firm Oaktree Capital Management to help fill out his 2017 budget. That deal did not move forward, but the Board of Legislators launched their own privatization process earlier this year, with the hope a deal could be in place by September.

Opponents of the proposal include the powerful Purchase Environmental Protective Association. They worry privatization means expansion and a loss of environmental safeguards and quality of life, citing a draft master plan that projects growth at the airport.




Astorino's office has denied any of that would happen.

McCormack said Astorino — a Republican running for reelection against state Assemblyman George Latimer — will hold a tele-Town Hall on Wednesday at 7:15 p.m. to answer questions on privatization.

Calls will go out to residents around 7:15. Those that wish to participate can answer the call and stay on the line.

Under federal law, all money made at the airport must stay at the airport, though the Federal Aviation Administration has a pilot program allowing privatization. Privatization would allow the county to cut a deal with a private operator that includes payments into the general fund.

"Once people understand the merits and understand there's a significant financial gain ... they're going to be supportive of that," McCormack said.

In August, it was announced three firms, FerroStar Westchester Airport Partners, HPN Aviation Group and MIC Airports, had submitted bids for the airport.

A six-member task force, with three representatives from the legislature and three from Astorino's office, are evaluating the bids.

Legislator MaryJane Shimsky, D-Hastings-on-Hudson, said vetting the proposals could take weeks.

Then, their findings would be sent to Astorino's office before Astorino forwards it to the legislature for approval — which would require a supermajority of 12 votes.

Any deal would also have to be approved by the FAA.

"What I can tell you now is that, essentially, the time schedule is going to pretty much guarantee that nothing will be sent down to us before Election Day," Shimsky said.

The task force is working confidentially. Shimsky said he could not discuss the bids.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.lohud.com

Cessna 182P, N9346G: Accident occurred September 27, 2017 near Brown Field Municipal Airport (KSDM), Otay Mesa, San Diego County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9346G

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: San Diego, CA
Accident Number: GAA17CA559
Date & Time: 09/27/2017, 0235 PDT
Registration: N9346G
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that he took off in dark night conditions and was using flight following. When he arrived at the destination airport, he activated the runway lights while entering the downwind leg. While on final approach the runway lights suddenly turned off, so he aborted the landing. The pilot again activated the runway lights on the downwind leg, but this time he flew a short base leg to final. The airplane was at a lower altitude for the approach and suddenly entered a heavy band of fog. The left wing subsequently hit the soft dirt, cartwheeled and came to rest inverted about ¼ mile short of runway 26.

A postaccident examination revealed substantial damage to the left wing and fuselage.

The weather conditions reported at the airport, about the time of the accident, was calm wind, visibility 4 statute miles, moderate mist, scattered 100 ft, temperature 15°C, dew point 15°C, and an altimeter setting 29.24 inches of mercury.

The pilot did not submit the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident /Incident Report Form 6120.1. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Unknown Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/04/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 796 hours (Total, all aircraft), 754 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N9346G
Model/Series: 182 P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1971
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18260886
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSDM, 525 ft msl
Observation Time: 0932 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 212°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 100 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 15°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 4 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: COMPTON, CA (CPM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: San Diego, CA (SDM)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: BROWN FIELD MUNI (SDM)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 526 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.570833, -116.964167 (est)

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — A small plane crashed early Wednesday morning in an empty field just outside Brown Field Municipal Airport while approaching the Otay Mesa airfield, but the pilot and his two passengers survived with only minor injuries, authorities said. 

The crash was reported at 3 a.m. though it initially wasn't clear whether the incident was a crash or an emergency landing, San Diego police officer John Buttle said. Emergency responders at the scene and news reports said the plane went down in a field just east of Brown Field and west of state Route 125.

The pilot said he was cleared to land at Brown Field and was making his approach when he hit dense fog and lost all visibility. The three men onboard said the plane flipped twice upon landing, and photographs from one of the passengers showed the 1971 Cessna 182P came to a rest upside down in the field. 

The pilot said he had to kick out a window to escape from the fixed-wing single-engine aircraft. The men then walked about 15 minutes to the airport to report the crash. 

The pilot said he and both passengers live in Tijuana but had taken off from Los Angeles. He called it a "miracle" that they survived and told reporters "we were in God's hands."

The pilot helped lead emergency responders to find the plane after a brief search, but local authorities were holding off inspecting the plane until federal authorities from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board could reach the site.

Story, video, comments, photo gallery:  http://www.kusi.com




SAN DIEGO (CNS) - A small plane crashed early Wednesday morning in an empty field just outside Brown Field Municipal Airport while approaching the Otay Mesa airfield, but the pilot and his two passengers survived with only minor injuries, authorities said.

The crash was reported at 3 a.m. though it initially wasn't clear whether the incident was a crash or an emergency landing, San Diego police officer John Buttle said. Emergency responders at the scene and news reports said the plane went down in a field just east of Brown Field and west of state Route 125.

The pilot said that he was cleared to land at Brown Field and was making his approach when he hit dense fog and lost all visibility. The three men onboard said the plane flipped twice upon landing, and photographs from one of the passengers showed the 1971 Cessna 182P came to a rest upside down in the field.

The pilot said he had to kick out a window to escape from the fixed-wing single-engine aircraft. The men then walked about 15 minutes to the airport to report the crash.

The pilot said he and both passengers live in Tijuana but had taken off from Los Angeles. He called it a "miracle" that they survived and said "we were in God's hands."

The pilot helped lead emergency responders to find the plane after a brief search, but local authorities were holding off inspecting the plane until federal authorities from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board could reach the site.

Story and video ➤ http://www.cbs8.com



A pilot described the terrifying moments before his small plane crash landed at Brown Field south of San Diego Wednesday.

Phillip Lojas had two passengers on the Cessna 182 traveling from Compton when the plane flipped twice before landing.

"Suddenly we didn't see the lights. The fog was too thick. We lost control of it and we crashed," Lojas said. 

The plane attempted to land in heavy fog just after 3 a.m. at the airfield just north of the U.S.-Mexico border. 

Lojas said the plane suffered serious damage. 

One passenger suffered a cut to his forehead.

Lojas said he is relieved they were able to survive the landing.

"We're here. By the grace of God. We're here," Lojas said. 

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://www.nbcsandiego.com



SAN DIEGO — A small plane crashed early Wednesday morning in an empty field just outside Brown Field Municipal Airport while approaching the Otay Mesa airfield, but the pilot and his two passengers survived with only minor injuries, authorities said.

The crash was reported at 3 a.m. Wednesday though it initially wasn’t clear whether the incident was a crash or an emergency landing, San Diego police officer John Buttle said. Emergency responders at the scene and news reports said the plane went down in a field just east of Brown Field and west of state Route 125.

The pilot told reporters that he was cleared to land at Brown Field and was making his approach when he hit dense fog and lost all visibility. The three men onboard said the plane flipped twice upon landing, and photographs from one of the passengers showed the 1971 Cessna 182P came to a rest upside down in the field.

The pilot said he had to kick out a window to escape from the fixed-wing single-engine aircraft. The men then walked about 15 minutes to the airport to report the crash.

The pilot said he and both passengers live in Tijuana but had taken off from Los Angeles. He called it a “miracle” that they survived and told reporters “we were in God’s hands.”

The plane was registered to an individual in El Cajon. 

The pilot helped lead emergency responders to find the plane after a brief search, but local authorities were holding off inspecting the plane until federal authorities from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board could reach the site.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://fox5sandiego.com

























SAN DIEGO (KGTV/CNS) - A pilot made an emergency landing Wednesday morning in a dirt lot near Brown Field Airport in Otay Mesa, San Diego Police said.

The pilot and two passengers were on board when the plane landed.

The group walked 15 minutes to the airport for help.

Police classified the landing as a minor injury incident.

There's no word on what caused the pilot to land suddenly.

Story and photo gallery ➤  http://www.10news.com

U.S. to Slap Big Tariff on New Jetliner From Canada’s Bombardier: Boeing had complained that Bombardier used predatory pricing to sell its new CSeries jets to Delta



The Wall Street Journal
By Doug Cameron and  Jacquie McNish
Updated Sept. 26, 2017 


Bombardier Inc. received a double blow on Tuesday when a U.S. trade body slapped sanctions on its new jetliner and a long-sought deal evaporated with its main transportation partners.

U.S. trade officials said they plan to slap a large tariff on sales of a new Bombardier jetliner to U.S. airlines, inflaming a simmering trade spat with Canada that has attracted opposition from other countries.

In addition, Bombardier was left on the sidelines when Germany’s Siemens AG announced that it is forming an alliance with French train maker Alstom SA to create a train business with $18 billion of annual sales. The combination creates the world’s second-largest train maker. Bombardier had been in discussions with Siemens since early this year to form a similar partnership, but talks broke down in August.

The International Trade Commission ruled in favor of a complaint from Boeing Co. and said it would add a 220% tariff to the cost of the new CSeries jet. The jet’s sale to Delta Air Lines Inc. last year prompted a complaint from Boeing. A final decision on any duty is expected next year.

The U.S. agency’s decision was widely ridiculed by aerospace-industry experts, who said cutting prices to boost sales was a common practice.

“The Commerce Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of 100- to 150-seat large civil aircraft based on these preliminary rates,” the department said in a statement.

Delta, whose 75-jet order for the CSeries triggered the case, said it was confident the U.S. would take no action against it.

“Boeing has no American-made product to offer because it canceled production of its only aircraft in this size range, the 717, more than 10 years ago,” it said in a statement.

The Commerce Department ruled in favor of Boeing’s claims on the jet pricing despite vehement denials from Bombardier and Canadian officials.

Boeing said that “subsidies enabled Bombardier to dump its product into the U.S. market, harming aerospace workers in the United States and throughout Boeing’s global supply chain.”

Bombardier said it strongly disagrees with the trade ruling.

“The magnitude of the proposed duty is absurd and divorced from the reality about the financing of a multibillion-dollar aircraft program,” the company said.

The Montreal-based company accused Boeing of using a “skewed process” to “stifle competition and prevent U.S. airlines and their passengers from benefiting from the CSeries.”

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said that Canada strongly disagrees with the U.S. tariff ruling.

“This is clearly aimed at eliminating Bombardier’s CSeries aircraft from the U.S. market,” she said, reflecting the strident tone her Liberal government has taken in recent weeks about Boeing’s trade complaint.

The trade decision was issued after the close of markets Tuesday. Speculation about failed talks with Siemens last week sent the price of Bombardier’s Class A shares tumbling more than 14% since Thursday to a low of C$2.07 Tuesday morning on the Toronto Stock Exchange. A late day rally in heavy trading Tuesday lifted the stock to C$2.30 by the day’s close.

The dispute over the CSeries jet has already frozen talks on a potential multibillion-dollar deal in which Canada would buy Boeing-made combat jets, and the trade ruling comes as talks continue between the U.S., Canada and Mexico over the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com