Saturday, March 26, 2016

NetJets Cessna C560: Incident occurred March 26, 2016 near Monmouth Executive Airport (KBLM), Wall Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey

WALL — Officials were investigating after a drone was spotted near Monmouth Executive Airport Saturday, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

A NetJets Cessna C560 was flying at 2,000 feet when the crew reported seeing an unmanned aircraft three miles southwest of the Wall-based airport at 10:35 a.m., according to the FAA.

The plane did not take evasive action, the FAA said in a statement.

The flight had departed from New Castle Airport in Wilmington, Delaware, and was traveling to Monmouth Executive Airport when the sighting was reported.

Drones give us a bird's-eye view of Newark, Atlantic City, the Shore and many other corners of the Garden State.

New Jersey ranked high among states with reported sightings of drones, according to a report Friday.

Among other regulations, recreational drones are not allowed to fly within 5 miles of an airport without approvals.

Original article can be found here: http://www.nj.com

RotorWay Exec 162F: Incident occurred March 27, 2016 at Lismore Airport, New South Wales, Australia



An elderly man was lucky to escape with only minor injuries after he was trapped in a helicopter crash at Lismore Airport this morning.

About 10.50am NSW time police and paramedics were called following reports a small helicopter had crashed on the airport landing strip.

Police from Richmond Local Area Command located a two-seater RotorWay Exec 162F helicopter on its side with significant damage.

The 82-year-old male pilot was treated at the scene by NSW Ambulance paramedics for non-life threatening leg injuries.

Initial inquiries indicate the helicopter crashed at low altitude as the pilot was practicing takeoff and landing.

Police will assist the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), who will investigate the circumstances surrounding the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://www.goldcoastbulletin.com.au

Ryanair tries to entice rival airlines' pilots as fleet expands rapidly: Boeing says 95,000 new pilots will be needed in EU

Ryanair is seeking to poach pilots from competitors Stobart Air and CityJet as the Irish-listed carrier rapidly expands its fleet.

The Sunday Independent has learned that Ryanair will hold a recruitment day on Thursday for prospective pilots to join its ranks.

The company says it has no need to approach any rivals, insisting that it has "a flood of pilots" - a 3,000-strong waiting list, according to a spokesman - applying to join.

But in correspondence seen by this newspaper, Ryanair has invited Stobart and CityJet pilots to "drop in any time" to the Radisson Blu Hotel at Dublin Airport on Thursday.

The hotel confirmed the booking.

The recruitment move signals a renewed hiring strategy by Ryanair, which needs to hire more pilots as it seeks to substantially increase its fleet.

Ryanair plans to operate about 520 aircraft by 2024, compared to just over 300 that it had last year.

It held a recruitment event in Milan last week and is also advertising for qualified captains and first officers on its website, "due to the addition of new aircraft to the Ryanair fleet over the coming five years".

Airlines, including Ryanair, have been buying planes at an aggressive pace as they target growth, with the result that pilots are in higher demand.

Aer Lingus has also been hiring pilots and taking on cadets, with IAG planning to significantly expand the airline's transatlantic services.

Dublin-based CityJet, which last week was sold by German owners Intro Aviation to founder Pat Byrne and a group of investors, is also eyeing expansion.

Mr Byrne, who founded CityJet in 1992, said the airline was likely to pursue a stock market flotation in two to three years' time.

Such a move would presage a remarkable reversal of fortunes for the once-struggling carrier, which was bought by Intro from Air-France KLM for virtually nothing two years ago.

It is understood that pilots joining Ryanair from either Stobart or CityJet would have to be retrained and would have to pay for that retraining at a potential cost of €35,000.

Retraining could take about six months for captains currently flying turbo-prop aircraft, such as those used by Stobart Air.

CityJet pilots, who are already flying jets, would have a shorter training time.

Boeing, the world's largest plane manufacturer, has estimated that by 2034, there will be a need for 95,000 new commercial airline pilots in the European Union alone. This equates to 5,000 pilots a year.

Pilot shortage is affecting many airlines.

In February of this year, US airline group Republic Airways filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

The company blamed pilot shortage, which forced it to ground planes, for its bankruptcy petition.

The Indianapolis-based airline owns Republic Airline and Shuttle America, which employ 6,000 people.

Pilots are strictly regulated under law in terms of how many hours they are allowed to fly every year.

Original article can be found here: http://www.independent.ie

Grumman AA-1B Trainer, N8883L: Accident occurred March 26, 2016 near Stephenville Clark Regional Airport (KSEP), Stephenville, Erath County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration; Irving, Texas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
True Flight Aerospace, LLC; Valdosta, Georgia 

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8883L

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA134 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Stephenville, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 1B, registration: N8883L
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, before departing for a personal cross-country flight, he conducted a full preflight inspection, including a fuel check. As the airplane was approaching the destination airport, the engine lost power. The pilot’s attempts to regain power were unsuccessful. The pilot conducted a forced landing, during which the airplane impacted ground obstacles. 

After the airplane was recovered, fuel was found in a fuel gauge; however, no fuel was found in the fuel tanks. An examination of the airplane revealed no preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. A review of data from a video camera mounted in the cockpit revealed that the pilot said that the airplane was new to him and that he "just” ran out of fuel.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of engine power during cruise flight due to fuel exhaustion, which resulted from the pilot's inadequate preflight fuel planning and in-flight fuel management.

On March 26, 2016, about 1115 central daylight time, a Grumman American Aviation Corp. AA 1B airplane, N8883L, impacted terrain during a forced landing near Stephenville, Texas, following a loss of engine power. The pilot and his passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed along the route of flight about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operating on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Dallas Executive Airport (RBD), near Dallas, Texas, about 0958 and was destined for the Stephenville Clark Regional Airport (SEP), near Stephenville, Texas.

According to the pilot's accident report, a full preflight, to include a fuel check, was completed. He indicated that the flight departed from RBD and when the flight was about 20 miles east of SEP, he cancelled flight following when he had the destination airfield in sight. Approximately 18 miles out, the engine lost power while the airplane was at 4,500 feet above mean sea level while the left wing fuel tank was selected. After going through emergency procedures and turning the auxiliary fuel pump on, the pilot selected the right fuel tank and a restart was successful. The pilot indicated that he was not sure why the engine lost power. He pitched down and did a 300-foot descent at full power to regain airspeed in order to get to the airfield faster. Approximately four miles east of airport, the engine lost power again. He again went through emergency procedures, attempted a restart several times, but he could not get a restart. The pilot prepared the plane for an off-field landing on Highway 377 but saw oncoming traffic. He saw an open field and began to guide the plane to the open field. He leveled the wings and maintained airspeed to get to the open field. The airplane impacted the top of a horse trailer and the pilot was ejected from the airplane. The pilot and passenger were subsequently transported to a hospital.

The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. The pilot held a FAA third-class medical certificate that was issued in January of 2016. He reported that he had accumulated 131.9 hours of total flight time and 14.1 hours of total time in the accident airplane model.

N8883L was a 1974 model Grumman American Aviation Corp. AA 1B, low-wing, fixed-tricycle landing gear, two-place monoplane with serial number AA1B-0383. The airplane was powered by a 108-horsepower Lycoming O-235-C2C engine with serial number L-11776-15. The airplane's fuel system utilized a tubular main wing spar comprised of a two-cell fuel tank (one cell in each wing). Each fuel cell held 12 gallons of fuel, of which, 11 gallons were considered usable. Fuel quantity was indicated by vertical sight gauges on the left and right cabin walls, each sight gauge corresponded to the respective side fuel cell. According to fueling records, the airplane was serviced with 4.02 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline (avgas) on March 24, 2016.

At 1115, the recorded weather at SEP was: Wind from 190 degrees at 8 knots: visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 18 degrees C; dew point 9 degrees C; altimeter 29.95 inches of mercury.

The airplane wreckage and accident site was examined and documented by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector. Review of the inspector's photograph did not reveal any leaks or discoloration consistent with a fuel leak. The airplane had a nose down left wing low attitude. The fuel tank selector was found positioned near the right tank position. A liquid was observed in the right fuel gauge. However, no fuel was recovered when the airplane was disassembled by a recovery company for relocation.

In the pilot's accident report, he indicated that a mechanical malfunction occurred which caused the engine to stop producing power and that he could not get the engine restarted.

The airplane was relocated to a recovery yard where it was examined by an inspector from the FAA, an air safety investigator from the engine manufacturer, and by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator in charge. The engine's spark plugs were removed and the top plugs revealed a normal color when compared to a Champion Check-A-Plug chart. The carburetor was found separated from its intake mounting flange. Disassembly of the carburetor revealed its bowl contained a liquid that was subsequently collected. The liquid contained debris. The liquid did not contain water when tested with a water disclosing paste. An examination of the carburetor's fuel screen did not reveal any debris. The electric fuel pump screen contained debris. The electric fuel pump cap had debris adhering to its internal surface. Disassembly of the engine driven fuel pump did not reveal any anomalies. The tachometer indicated 4,338.53 hours. The engine produced a thumb compression when the propeller was rotated by hand. Spark was observed at the end of ignition leads when the propeller was turned by hand. Pressurized air was applied to each fuel line going the fuel tank selector and air exited the fuel line going to the carburetor when the respective side was selected. Each fuel tank was pressurized and no leaks were observed. The electric fuel pump screen, electric fuel pump cap, and collected liquid from the carburetor bowl were retained for examination. No anomalies were detected that would have precluded normal engine operations.

The liquid sample was sent to Core Laboratories/Saybolt for analysis. The liquid was found to be consistent with avgas.

The fuel screen, fuel pump cap, and particles found in the avgas in the carburetor bowl were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory. These samples were examined using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a diamond attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory in accordance to ASTM E1252-98 and ASTM E334-01 (American Society for Testing Materials E1252-98: Standard Practice for General Techniques for Obtaining Infrared Spectra for Qualitative Analysis and American Society for Testing Materials). The spectrometer was used to collect and process infrared wavelength absorbance spectra of the unknown material.

A comparison search was performed using a spectral library database for the spectra from each sample. The search did not find a strong spectral match for either a single material or a mixture; however, there were similarities to the spectra of several surfactants, which is a byproduct of the fuel refining processes as well as a common additive in aviation fuel.

The particulate material was then analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to determine the elemental composition of the particulate material. The composition of the material consisted mainly of aluminum, iron, lead, zinc, copper, and chromium. These metals are commonly found in aircraft fuel systems and fuel.

A GoPro Hero HD camera was found in the area of the wreckage and was shipped, along with a Magellan GPS 315 device, to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for downloading and decoding. The GPS unit does not appear to have the capability to store tracks in non-volatile memory. However, video data from the camera revealed that it was mounted in the airplane between the pilot and passenger. The GoPro captured the front seat occupants, a portion of the instrument panel, engine controls, and a view outside of the windscreen. The study, in part, indicated that during the accident flight, the video showed the pilot's fuel management included switching fuel tanks and using fuel pumps. About 1104, the fuel pressure gauge indication dropped to near zero from about five psi. The engine exhibited sounds consistent with losing power. The pilot switched the fuel tank selector from the right tank to the left tank and turned the fuel pump on. The fuel pressure gauge returned to about five psi. About 1111, the fuel pressure gauge indication dropped to near zero again. The engine exhibited reduced RPMs consistent with a power loss. The engine surged during the descent and the vertical speed indicator showed a value near 800 feet per minute. The airspeed indicator showed a value near 80 mph. The stall warning horn was heard intermittently while the airplane was maneuvered toward a landing area during the descent. Trailers and vehicles can be seen while the airplane pitched up. The video showed the airplane impacted a trailer and the airplane then rolled to the right. The camera became liberated from its mount and it came to rest in nearby grass. The camera subsequently recorded the pilot walking in front of the camera. The recording, in part, contained the pilot's conversation when he stated that the "airplane's new to me" and that he "just run it out of fuel." The NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory onboard image recorder study is appended to the docket associated with this investigation.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA134
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Stephenville, TX
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 1B, registration: N8883L
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 26, 2016, about 1115 central daylight time, a Grumman American Aviation Corp. AA 1B airplane, N8883L, impacted terrain during a forced landing near Stephenville, Texas, following a loss of engine power. The pilot and his passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the forced landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed along the route of flight about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operating on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Dallas Executive Airport, near Dallas, Texas, about 0958 and was destined for the Stephenville Clark Regional Airport (SEP), near Stephenville, Texas.

According to initial information, the pilot reported an engine power loss occurred before the forced landing. The pilot and passenger were subsequently transported to a hospital.

The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. The pilot held a FAA third-class medical certificate that was issued in January of 2016.

N8883L was a 1974 model Grumman American Aviation Corp. AA 1B, low-wing, fixed-tricycle landing gear, two-place monoplane with serial number AA1B-0383. The airplane was powered by a Lycoming engine. The airplane's fuel system utilized a tubular main wing spar comprised of a two-cell fuel tank (one cell in each wing). Each fuel cell held 12 gallons of fuel, of which, 11 gallons were considered usable. Fuel quantity was indicated by vertical sight gauges on the left and right cabin walls, each sight gauge corresponded to the respective side fuel cell.

At 1115, the recorded weather at SEP was: Wind from 190 degrees at 8 knots: visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 18 degrees C; dew point 9 degrees C; altimeter 29.95 inches of mercury.





A father and son are recovering after a small plane crash near the airport in Stephenville late Saturday morning.

The Texas Department of Public Safety told NBC DFW that the pilot, 40-year-old Richard Abila, and his son, 17-year-old Aaron Abila, survived the crash. 

Emergency crews took them to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where they are being treated for non-life threatening injuries.

DPS said the two left a Dallas area airport earlier in the morning. They were on approach to Clark Field Municipal Airport around 11:00 a.m. when the 1974 Grumman Lynx ran out of fuel. The plane landed nose down near some horse trailers. It crashed a mile away from the airport.

The pilot and father Richard Abila ejected from the plane. DPS said emergency crews had to cut his son Richard out of the aircraft.

Both father and son are from Stephenville.

This is one of three plane crashes in North Texas on Saturday. A plane crashed next to a runway at the Addison airport. Another aircraft went down at Lake Dallas on Saturday afternoon.

Story and video:  http://www.nbcdfw.com







It was a close call for a father and son Saturday, when the single engine airplane they were traveling in crashed near Lewis Trailers about 11 a.m. after running out of fuel.

The 1974 Grumman Lynx was piloted by Stephenville resident Richard Abila, 40, who was traveling with his son Aaron Abila, 17, a junior at Stephenville High School.

"They were traveling from Dallas when the airplane ran out of fuel and crashed," said DPS spokesman Dub Gillum.

The pair was transported by air to John Peter Smith Hospital with serious, but non-life threatening injuries. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.yourstephenvilletx.com







STEPHENVILLE (March 26, 2016) – Richard Abila, 40 of Stephenville, and his son Aaron, 17 a Stephenville High School student, were headed from Dallas when their red and white 1974 Grumman Lynx ran out of fuel and crashed near the Lewis Trailer facility, just a mile from the airport in Stephenville, hitting three trailers before coming to a stop.

According to DPS and Erath County officials, Richard Abila, who was flying the plane, coasted down in an attempt to land, but the small aircraft flipped. Richard was ejected upon impact, but Aaron had to be extracted from the plane by first responders.

Both were transported via air ambulances to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth with non life-threatening injuries. Erath County Volunteer Fire Rescue, Erath County EMS, Erath County Sheriff’s Office and other first responders joined investigators from the Clark Municipal Field Airport in Stephenville and from the FAA on scene Saturday afternoon.

Beech 35-C33 Debonair, N2781T, Taylor Aero LLC: Incident occurred March 26, 2016 near Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF), Collier County, Florida

Date: 26-MAR-16 
Time: 19:52:00Z
Regis#: N2781T
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NAPLES
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT LOST POWER AND LANDED ON A ROAD. NAPLES, FL

Taylor Aero LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2781T



There was plenty of high drama Saturday afternoon in North Naples, as a small plane in trouble led people to call 911. 

Witnesses saw a plane in distress above Immokalee Road — a busy thoroughfare — shortly before 4 p.m. and contacted Collier County emergency dispatchers. They in turn informed sheriff’s deputies on the road.

Nathan Jones, the pilot, reported he was having engine trouble, said Krista Williamson, a Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman. Jones managed to carefully bring the aircraft down just after 4 p.m., along Logan Boulevard, north of Saturnia Grande Drive, which is just south of Immokalee Road.

“He did a phenomenal job landing the plane,” she said. 

None of the four aboard the plane was injured. A car driving by clipped the wing but no one was injured in that vehicle, Williamson said.

Members of the Sheriff’s Office Aviation Unit planned to investigate the crash, Williamson said.

Logan Boulevard was closed from Vanderbilt Beach Road to the south and Immokalee Road to the north for less than an hour. Periodic lane closers later in the evening snarled traffic a bit, as crews began moving the airplane around 7:15 p.m.

The four-seat 1967 Beechcraft Bonanza fixed-wing, single-engine aircraft left LaGrange, Georgia, bound for Naples Municipal Airport at 12:31 p.m. Saturday, stated information on flightaware.com, an airplane tracking website. The website had the aircraft arriving in Naples at 4:05 p.m.

The airplane is owned by Taylor Aero LLC in Lewes, Delaware. The corporation was issued registration for the Beechcraft in January 2014, flightaware.com information showed.

Williamson said she had little information about Jones, other than he’s not from Naples. The names of the three plane passengers remained unavailable Saturday night.

Original article can be found here: http://www.naplesnews.com




A plane made a hard landing on a North Naples street Saturday afternoon.

Collier deputies say it happened on Logan Boulevard N. at Saturnia Grande after the plane experienced engine trouble.

A family of four was onboard the Beechcraft Debonair. There were no injuries.

The FAA and NTSB will be notified.

One neighbor called it a success story.

"The plane in one piece. Five people walking away from it. Stopping before power lines. That's a pretty nice story," said Daniel Stewart, who lives nearby and also happens to be a commercial pilot.

After the plane landed, a car coming down Logan Blvd. clipped the wing. No one inside the car was injured.

Story and video:  http://www.nbc-2.com





No one was injured after the plane landed on Logan Boulevard at Saturnia Grande Drive, the Collier County Sheriff's Office said in a tweet posted to Twitter.

The Collier County Sheriff's Office is warning drivers to expect traffic delays.

The single-engine plane was scheduled to arrive at Naples Municipal Airport after 4 p.m. It took off from LaGrange Callaway Airport in LaGrange, Georgia at 12:31 p.m., according to Flightaware, a plane tracking website.

Krista Williamson, spokeswoman for the Collier County Sheriff's Office, said four people were on board the Beechcraft Debonair airplane.

"They started to have some engine trouble," she said "And the pilot very neatly started to land the plane."

Drivers should be aware the road will be closed for hours. Shortly after the plane landed, a vehicle clipped its wing, she said. No one was injured in that incident.

"I'm sure they're all shaken up," she said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.news-press.com



NAPLES, Fla. – A small plane force landed onto Logan Boulevard at Saturnia Grande Drive Saturday afternoon, the Collier County Sheriff’s Office said.

The plane was having engine trouble when it landed, the department said in a video on its Periscope account.

The plane’s landing gear was not deployed as it landed on the street.

None of the four passengers were injured.

Original article can be found here: http://www.winknews.com








Ekolot KR-030 Topaz, N717SP, NIU Group Ad Inc: Accident occurred March 26, 2016 at Lakeview Airport (30F), Lake Dallas, Denton County, Texas

NIU GROUP AD INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N717SP

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA164
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Lake Dallas, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/01/2016
Aircraft: PPHU EKOLOT KR-030 TOPAZ, registration: N717SP
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the landing touchdown with a crosswind, the tail of the airplane was "hit with a burst of strong wind" from a nearby lake. He reported that before being able to react, the wind blew the airplane off the left side of the runway. The nose wheel collapsed, the right main landing gear separated, and the airplane impacted terrain in a ditch. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot verified that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing in a crosswind, which resulted in a runway excursion and an impact with terrain.




AIRCRAFT: 2010 Ekolot KR 030 Topaz Light Sport SN# 30-03-10 N717SP

ENGINE:    Rotax 912 UL2  SN# 4.409.793   

PROPELLER:  Pesz KE AS1650/1950 SN# 417

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:       357.8 (as of 3/11/2016 last log entry)

PROPELLER:        357.8 (as of 3/11/2016 last log entry)

AIRFRAME:   357.8 (as of 3/11/2016 last log entry)                   

OTHER EQUIPMENT: Funkwerk Avionics ATR 833 Com; Funkwerk Avionics TRT 800H Mode 2 Transponder.   

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  During landing in gusty winds on 3/26 aircraft ground looped breaking off right main gear and nose gear.  Propeller strike with aircraft going off the side of the runway striking small brush.  

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Nose gear and right main gear broken off, wheel fairings broken, L & R wing tips damaged, aft fuselage cracked in several places behind cabin, lower tail fin damaged, propeller shattered and spinner dented. Aircraft dismantled for transport and storage.                        

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Air Salvage of Dallas.  Lancaster, TX           

REMARKS: Adjuster has aircraft logs   

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N717SP












Two small planes crashed Saturday in separate incidents in Denton and Erath counties.

On Saturday afternoon, a plane went down along the western shore of Lewisville Lake.

The crash site near Lakeview Marina in the community of Lake Dallas is less than a half-mile from Lakeview Airport.

According to initial reports, two people were aboard the aircraft, but their conditions are not available. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Hours earlier, in an unrelated incident, another small plane ran out of fuel and crashed in Stephenville.

The Texas Department of Public Safety said a father and son were on their way back from Dallas. They were airlifted to a Fort Worth hospital with serious injuries, but both are expected to survive.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wfaa.com

McDonnell Douglas (MDHI) 600N, N745BW: Accident occurred February 05, 2016 in Ashland, Jackson County, Oregon

Brim Equipment Leasing Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N745BW

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA081
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 05, 2016 in Ashland, OR
Aircraft: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS HELICOPTER 600N, registration: N745BW
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 5, 2016, about 1430 Pacific standard time, a McDonnell Douglas Helicopter (MDHI) 600N, N745BW, experienced a cracked main rotor blade at Ashland, Oregon. Brim Aviation was operating the helicopter under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial rated pilot was not injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to a main rotor blade. The cross-country positioning flight departed Alturas, California, about 1340, with a planned destination of Ashland. Visual instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that two helicopters departed Ogden, Utah, about 0830 with three intermediate stops including Alturas, which was the last one. All flight operations and characteristics had been normal, but he noted that the blades seemed minimally out of track. Upon departure from Alturas, he noticed a slight hop as he made an ascending right 180-degree turn out, but stated that he had experienced worse with gusting winds and door off operations. In straight and level flight, blade track appeared to be no different than on the previous legs. During descent into Ashland, he noticed that the hop had become more apparent when the blades were unloaded. He asked the trailing pilot to look at the rotor system for any abnormalities in flight, and the trail pilot indicted that they looked out of track. After landing, the pilot informed maintenance that the Track and Balance of both helicopters needed to be checked prior to the next operation. Maintenance personnel reported that there was a crack in one main rotor blade from the trailing edge forward to the spar at a point midspan near the beginning of the trim tab. The blade had a total time of 1,942 hours.

The damage was reported to the National Transportation Safety Board on March 9, 2016.

American Airlines calls arrest of pilot 'serious matter,' apologizes to customers



ROMULUS, MI – American Airlines has released a statement in response to questions about a pilot arrested Saturday morning at Detroit Metropolitan Airport on suspicion of attempting to co-pilot a plan while intoxicated.

"This is a serious matter and we are assisting local law enforcement and the Federal Aviation Administration with the investigation. We will handle this matter appropriately as the safety and care of our customers and employees is our highest priority."

The airline cancelled its Flight 736, which was scheduled to leave at 6:55 a.m. for Philadelphia. Its customers are being reaccomodated on other flights, said airline spokeswoman Laura Nedbal.

"We apologize to our customers for the disruption to their travel plans."

Out of respect for the employee's privacy, further details are not being released.

The co-pilot, in his early 50s and from Pennsylvania, exhibited behavior that led to suspicion he might have been drinking while going through crew checks with the Transportation Security Administration, said Michael Conway, airport director for public affairs.

Airport police, contacted by TSA personnel about 6:40 a.m. March 26, responded and administered a field Breathalyzer, which the employee failed, Conway said. He was then taken to a "local jurisdiction" with a more sophisticated testing mechanism and also failed that test, Conway said.

He had allegedly intended to co-pilot the plane with an alcohol level beyond the legal limit, Conway said. He would not release the man's alcohol level or name. The investigation is ongoing and police are still developing evidence, he said.

The Federal Aviation Administration prohibits anyone from operating or attempting to operate an aircraft with a blood alcohol content of 0.04 percent or greater.

Everyone was shuffled off the plane because of what was said to be a problem with the co-pilot chair, said one passenger, Kristyn Bradley of Grosse Pointe Woods, who was headed to the Dominican Republic for spring break. "It was quite chaotic," she said.

She is glad to be safe and grateful the co-pilot was not allowed to fly. It is frightening to think he had the mindset it would be OK to go to work in such a condition. "It's pretty scary."

Original article can be found here: http://www.mlive.com

Rockwell Commander 114, N114P: Accident occurred March 26, 2016 at Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N114P

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA171
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Addison, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/01/2016
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL 114, registration: N114P
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that during the landing roll, the airplane began an "un-commanded" yaw to the right. The flight instructor further reported that the private pilot receiving instruction stated, "I can't control the yaw." The flight instructor reported that he applied rudder pressure to correct the yaw, but the airplane veered off the runway to the right, the left wing collided with an airport sign, and the nose gear collapsed.

The flight instructor further reported that a jack rabbit was found in the runway excursion path and blood was observed on the left main landing gear door. According to a Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector who traveled to the site of the accident, the jack rabbit was not hit on the runway surface. The jack rabbit was found in the grass adjacent to the runway surface.

The left wing was substantially damaged. 

The flight instructor and pilot receiving instruction did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The private pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll and the flight instructor's delayed remedial action, which resulted in a runway excursion, collision with an airport sign, and a nose gear collapse.




A small aircraft crash landed on a field at Addison Airport Saturday morning, officials have confirmed.

The pilot of a single-engine aircraft lost control on landing and landed in the grass beside the runway, according to Lynn Lunsford, FAA spokesperson.

Two people on board the plane were not hurt, Lunsford said.

The FAA launched an investigation into the crash.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.nbcdfw.com

Cessna 172 Skyhawk, N6238D, Skylane Aviation LLC: Fatal accident occurred March 26, 2016 at Yeager Airport (KCRW), Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA141
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Charleston, WV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N6238D
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor, who was controlling the airplane, and the student pilot were conducting an instructional flight. During the takeoff the airplane lifted off about 1,000 ft down the runway, pitched nose up, and rolled left to an inverted attitude before it impacted terrain next to the runway in a nose-down attitude. The student pilot recalled that as the airplane rotated during the takeoff, he heard the flight instructor exclaim, but could not recall any subsequent events. Postaccident examination of the flight controls revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Examination of the wreckage revealed witness marks along the flight instructor's seat tracks that corresponded with the seat in the nearly full-aft position. Given the flight instructor's stature, it is unlikely that this position would allow her to fully actuate the flight controls, and it is therefore unlikely she purposefully initiated the takeoff with her seat in this position. While one of the two locking pins that would have secured the seat from sliding fore and aft was found fractured, it is likely that the jockeying of the seat during the victim extraction process resulted in the fracture of the locking pin, and left the witness marks observed on the seat track. Examination of the wreckage and maintenance documents also revealed that the airplane was not equipped with a manufacturer-recommended secondary seat stop mechanisms for either of the pilot seats.

Review of operational and maintenance documents published by the airframe manufacturer showed the critical importance of ensuring that the pilot seats were secured prior to initiating a flight, and that accelerations such as those encountered during a takeoff could dislodge an unsecured seat. Had the flight instructor, who was performing the takeoff, not properly secured her seat prior to initiating the takeoff, it may have resulted in her seat sliding aft, and her inadvertent application of control inputs to the control yoke during the rotation and initial climb, consistent with steep climb, descent, and impact. The aft seat position could have also likely resulted in her inability to apply complete or sufficient control inputs to the rudder pedals, consistent with the left yaw/roll observed during the takeoff.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight instructor's failure to ensure that her seat was properly secured before initiating the takeoff, which resulted in a subsequent loss of control. Contributing was the lack of an installed secondary seat stop.

Brenda Joyce Willis Jackson, Flight Instructor
Her lifelong passion was flying. 
She obtained her pilot's license as a teenager before she could drive a car.



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston, West Virginia
Lycoming Engines; Milliken, Colorado
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Skylane Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6238D

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA141 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Charleston, WV
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N6238D
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 26, 2016, about 1208 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172N, N6238D, impacted terrain during an attempted takeoff at Yeager Airport (CRW), Charleston, West Virginia. The flight instructor was fatally injured, and the student pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to Skylane Aviation LLC and the flight was being conducted as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport about the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed for the local flight. 

The student pilot stated that the flight instructor let him taxi the airplane out from the fixed-base operator. The student was having difficulty with the brakes, so the instructor took over the controls and taxied the rest of the way to the runway and run-up area. 

The student pilot stated that he did not remember much after that. However, he did remember that air traffic control told them to expedite the takeoff because another aircraft was coming in for a landing and that the flight instructor then taxied out for takeoff. He recalled that as the airplane rotated during the takeoff, he heard the flight instructor exclaim, but could not recall any subsequent events. 

Review of airport security surveillance video revealed that the airplane lifted off about 1,000 ft down runway 5, pitched up, rolled left, and then became inverted before it impacted terrain next to the runway in a nose-down attitude.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Flight Instructor

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. She also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine and instrument airplane ratings. She was issued an FAA second-class medical certificate on June 11, 2015. At the time of the medical examination, the flight instructor reported 1,694 total hours of flight experience. The flight instructor's personal flight logs were not located.

Student Pilot

The student pilot held a student pilot/FAA third-class medical certificate, issued on March 9, 2016. The student's logbook had two entries indicating 3 total hours of flight experience.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, high-wing, tricycle landing gear-equipped airplane was manufactured in 1979. It was powered by a 160-horsepower Lycoming O-320-H2AD engine and was equipped with a two-bladed McCauley propeller. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on October 20, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated 10,995.9 total hours of operation, and the engine had accumulated 1540.4 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated about 7 hours since the last annual inspection was completed.

Examination of the airframe logbooks revealed that the seat tracks were replaced on February 12, 2015. Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2011-10-09 was accomplished about 8 months later during the most recent annual inspection. The AD required the inspection of the seat tracks, including but not limited to, the visual inspection of the holes in each track for excessive wear, the seat tracks for dirt or debris, and the seat locking pin for limited vertical play.

The pilot and copilot seats were mounted onto a set of seat tracks, which allowed the seats to slide fore and aft. An adjustment bar was used to raise and lower two locking pins into one of twelve positions along each of the seat tracks, which would secure the seat to the desired position. The locking pins downward travel and positive locking action was aided via a spring mechanism that tensioned the adjustment bar (see figure 1).

Figure 1. Illustrated Parts Catalog, Seat Diagram.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was contained in a small area, and ground scars were consistent with the airplane impacting in a nose-low, right-wing-down attitude. The airplane impacted the ground about 20 yards left and midfield of runway 5 and came to rest inverted. The engine and propeller were forced up and into the instrument panel and cockpit area. The leading edges of both wings were crushed due to impact forces. The fuselage had one wrinkle in the skin behind the rear window. The rudder and elevator were intact and unremarkable. The flaps and aileron were intact and unremarkable. Control cable continuity was established to all flight controls. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate neutral trim setting. When the engine crankshaft was rotated by hand, valve train continuity was established, and thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. The propeller exhibited rotational scoring, and one blade tip was missing.

All four roller housing tangs (feet) on the flight instructor's seat were spread and bent. The seat tracks were gouged where they were in contact with the locking pins. One locking pin was fractured off at the roll pin. There were lockpin contact marks in the eleventh hole location from the front to back of the inboard seat rail, consistent with the seat being near the full-aft position at impact.

The inboard seat-position locking pin and outboard seat-post from the flight instructor's seat were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's Materials Laboratory for examination. The inboard seat position locking pin had fractured, and the overall deformation pattern adjacent to the fracture was consistent with bending deformation where the outboard side of the locking pin was in tension and the inboard side was in compression. The stop-pin hole below the fracture surface on the outboard side of the rod showed necking deformation, whereas the upper side of the hole remained close to its original diameter, consistent with the stop pin being in the upper side of the hole as the locking pin was bent. Contact marks were observed on the lower side of the stop-pin hole at the inboard end of the hole, consistent with contact along the roll pin split line on the compression side of the bending fracture.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Charleston, West Virginia, performed an autopsy on the flight instructor. The cause of death was reported to be "multiple injuries." The report also noted that the flight instructor's height was 69 inches.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. The results were negative for carbon monoxide and drugs.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The airplane's Pilot's Information Manual, before starting engine checklist, advised pilots to verify the seats, seat belts and shoulder harnesses are adjusted and locked. 

The Cessna Pilot Safety and Warnings Supplements document warned that a pilot should perform a visual check to verify that their seat was securely on the seat tracks and assure that the seat was locked in position. Failure to ensure that the seat was locked in position could result in the seat sliding aft during a critical phase of flight, such as initial climb. The airframe manufacturer also issued a Service Bulletin (SEB07-R06 Revision 6, issued June 11, 2015), which required the installation of a secondary seat stop for the pilot seat, and recommended one for the co-pilot seat. A secondary seat stop was not installed on either of the accident airplane's front pilot seats. The supplement also warned that there had been previous reported events involving seats slipping rearward or forward during acceleration or deceleration related to discrepancies in the seat mechanisms. The investigations following these events revealed discrepancies such as gouged lockpin holes, bent lockpins, excessive clearance between seat rollers and tracks, and missing seat stops. Also, dust, dirt, and debris accumulations on the seat tracks and in the intermediate adjustment hoes have been found to contribute to the problem.


NTSB Identification: ERA16FA141 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 26, 2016 in Charleston, WV
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N6238D
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 26, 2016, about 1208 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172N, N6238D, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain at the Yeager Airport (CRW) Charleston, West Virginia. The flight instructor was fatally injured and the student pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight. The airplane was owned by Skylane Aviation LLC. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of airport security surveillance video revealed the accident airplane lifted off about 1,000 feet down runway 5 in a nose high attitude. The airplane then rolled left and reached an inverted attitude before it impacted nose first beside the runway. The airplane came to rest inverted.

The debris area was compact and the ground scars were consistent with the airplane impacting nose first, right wing down attitude. Control cable continuity was established to all flight controls. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate neutral trim setting. When the engine crankshaft was rotated by hand, valve train continuity was established and thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. The propeller exhibited rotational scoring and one blade tip was missing.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane, which was issued on March 3, 2011. She held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single engine, and instrument airplane. She also held an FAA second-class medical certificate, issued June 11, 2015. At the time of the medical examination, the flight instructor reported 1,694 total hours of flight experience. The student pilot held a student pilot certificate issued on March 9, 2016, and held a third-class medical certificate, issued on the same date.

The four-seat, high-wing, tricycle landing gear airplane, serial number 17272656, was manufactured in 1979. It was powered by a Lycoming O-320-H2AD, 160-horsepower engine, equipped with a two-bladed McCauley propeller. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on October 20, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 10,995.9 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated 1540.4 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated about 7 hours since that inspection.

The recorded weather at CRW, at 1218, included winds from 330 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, and a clear sky.




Please Help The Farrars: https://www.gofundme.com 




Brenda Jackson, seen here in 2012, died Saturday when Cessna 172 she was in crashed on takeoff at Yeager Airport. Jackson, who grew up flying, had been a flight instructor at Yeager for the past four years.


Friends of Brenda Gilland, a flight instructor from Charleston, say she died in an accident at Yeager Airport Saturday. 
~

Brenda Jackson got her pilot’s license before she got her driver’s license.

She took her first flying lesson at age 14, after her she’d seen a flight instructor showing off his planes at the Beckley Mall.

“I want to do this,” she told her dad, back in 1973, according to family lore.

“Well, OK,” was all he could say.

She got her commercial pilot’s license in the late 1970s, soon after she graduated from Mount Hope High School. She was only the second woman in Fayette County ever to do so, she was told at the time.

Jackson, a flight instructor for Skylane Aviation in Charleston, died Saturday after the four-seat airplane she was in crashed on takeoff on the runway at Yeager Airport.

The other person in the plane, Arrin Farrar, 42, a student pilot, remained in serious condition at Charleston Area Medical Center on Monday.

“She loved life, she loved the Lord, loved flying, loved family,” said Jackson’s son, Ed Gilland. “She was nothing but a crazy country girl who just loved life.”

When Gilland, who lives in Fayette County, called his mother in the mornings, the calls tended to stick to a familiar pattern.

“What you heard, 99 percent of the time, was ‘How’s the family? Now I’m going flying,’ ” Gilland said. “That was her in a nutshell.”

Unless the weather was bad. Then she’d complain because she couldn’t fly.

“Anybody who does flight instruction does it because they love to fly, not because they’re getting rich,” said Mike Plante, a Yeager spokesman and licensed pilot.

Jackson flew airplanes 10 to 12 times per week, according to Joe Beam, her boss at Skylane Aviation and the owner of the Cessna 172N that crashed Saturday.

She’d been a flight instructor since 2012.

Despite her early start, flying had not been a constant presence in her life.

Soon after getting her pilot’s license, she married William Gilland, a drywall finisher. Family life and the couple’s two kids soon took over and flying time was pushed aside. William Gilland died about 15 years ago.

“I probably flew three hours in 21 years,” Jackson said in 2012.

She was a stay-at-home mom, working periodically as a telemarketer and cashier. With her son and daughter, she practiced a multi-disciplinary form of martial arts. All three became black belts.

About 10 years ago, Jackson’s daughter began taking flying lessons and convinced her mother to give flying another go.

She took her first lesson in decades at Yeager in 2009.

She was quite taken with her flight instructor, a man named Ernie Jackson, who recently had lost his wife of 50 years.

“I knew he was going to be someone very special to me,” Jackson said in 2012.

They married about a year later.

“She had my dad, and me and my sister, and that was one time in her life, and then she was single another part of her life, and then she met Ernie,” Gilland said. “She lived an awesome life.”

Beam helped her get her instructor certification in 2012, after medical problems kept her husband out of the air.

“She was meticulous in her flying and tried to do everything right and by the book,” Beam said.

Jackson also described herself as a cautious flier.

“I’ve been called a chicken quite a few times,” she said in 2012. “I say, ‘I would rather be a live chicken than a dead duck.’ ”

Jackson is survived by her husband, her son, daughter Nancy Welch and three grandchildren, Cameron, Hayden and Alexis.

It’s still not clear what caused Saturday’s crash or who was in control of the plane.

It had been 31 years since someone died in a plane crash at Yeager.

Dan Boggs, an air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, said he would release a preliminary report on the crash in about two weeks.

He’ll work from the plane’s wreckage and from video captured by surveillance cameras at Yeager.

The preliminary report will have factual information on things like the plane, who was in control and the weather.

A final report, on the probable cause of the crash, will take eight to 12 months.

On Monday, the plane lay in a spare hangar at Yeager’s Executive Air terminal; windows shattered, sheet metal crumpled, doors splayed open.

The nose and windshield are caved in. A propeller and the engine block had been removed. So had the two front seats.

An air freshener, “new car scent,” hung in the rear window.

As the instructor, Jackson likely would have been sitting in the right seat. Below the plane were a radio and a pilot’s headset, still connected by cord to the cockpit.

- See more at: http://www.wvgazettemail.com

The Cessna 172N Skyhawk that crashed at Yeager Airport on Saturday sits in a hangar at the airport on Monday, waiting for the National Transportation Safety Board to begin an investigation into the crash. Brenda Jackson, a flight instructor, was killed in the crash. Student pilot Arrin Farrar remained in serious condition Monday at CAMC.



CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A Charleston flight instructor is being remembered two days after she was killed in a plane crash at Yeager Airport.

Brenda Gilland Jackson, who worked for Skylane Aviation, died Saturday afternoon, according to airport spokesman Mike Plante. The plane was owned by Skylane, a private company based out of Yeager that does flight training along with other aviation services.

Arrin Jay Farrar, 42, of Plymouth, Maine, was injured and remains in serious condition at Charleston Area Medical Center. He was taking flight lessons as a student pilot.

“I had met Brenda, did not know her well, but you sort of feel it because she’s part of the Yeager Airport family,” Plante said on Monday’s MetroNews “Talkline.”

“I think all of us at the airport that knew her, or were aware of her, feel the gravity of the loss more acutely than you would in another kind of situation because of those bonds,” he added.

Jackson was inside the Cessna 172 Skyhawk four-seat aircraft that flipped over on Yeager’s runway 5 shortly after it took off at 12:08 p.m. A small fire erupted and the victims were pulled from the wreckage and taken to the hospital at 12:47 p.m., but Plante said it was a challenge to get them out.

“If you can imagine, the plane is on its back and so they’re suspended in their harnesses, their safety belts upside down, so the weight is on the harnesses, weight is on the buckles. I think there was also some leaking fuel and stuff like that,” he explained.

Plante said he did not want to speculate exactly where Jackson was inside the aircraft — if she was operating the plane or was in the passenger seat — but did say a report from the National Transportation Safety Board would provide more specific information.

“The NTSB is doing its work now. They’ll issue a preliminary report in about two weeks and then hopefully within about two to three months after that they’ll issue their final finding,” he said.

The investigation began Monday. NTSB Investigator Dan Boggs is in Charleston for the next few days to figure out a probable cause for the accident.

Yeager Airport is operating on a normal flight schedule.

Story and photo gallery:  http://wvmetronews.com


CHARLESTON, WV -

One man remains in serious condition at Charleston Area Medical Center after a fatal plane crash at Yeager Airport on Saturday, March 26, 2016. The woman on board that plane died at the hospital as a result of her injuries. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not confirm if the crash happened during a part of a flight school.But did confirm that the woman on board was a flight instructor and the man had his student pilot certificate. 

"I'd sit here and talk to her if I wasn't busy. I'd talk to her about aviation or life in general. She'd give me a lot of advice about a lot of things," said James Braxton about Brenda Gilland who died as a result of injuries sustained from the crash. 

Braxton knew Gilland for more than four years after working closely with her at the Executive Air terminal at Yeager Airport. The first time he met her he knew she was someone special. 

"The first time I came up here the lady was just like a mother to me up here. She was the nicest woman you could probably ever know," he said. 

He says she spent practically all her time up at the terminal being around what she loved.

"Weekends, seven days a week, regardless if its holidays, weather, snow sun, she'd be up here," he said. 

The plane is owned by Skylane Aviation, a Charleston based company that rents planes to private instructors. On Sunday, March 27, 2016, the day after the crash, the damaged plane was moved from where it crashed near the runway to a secure hangar on airport property. Braxton is still trying to get used to what work will be like without Gilland. 

"It's going to be lonesome, really not seeing her go up," he said.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is expected to take a few days examining all parts of the plane. 

"Our mission here is not just to determine what happened but also why it happened and then hopefully we can prevent future accidents which is our mission in life," said Dan Boggs, an Air Safety Investigator with the NTSB and the the investigator in charge for this crash. 

He said the NTSB will release an initial report in about two weeks and a final report with what they determine to be the probable cause of the incident won't be available for several months. 

The incident as a whole has deeply impacted those who spend their days at Yeager Airport. 

"The aviation community here just took a big hit," said co-worker of Braxton. 

Representatives from The airplane’s manufacturer and engine manufacturer are also in Charleston as part of the investigation.The last time there was a fatal crash involving a similar sized plane at Yeager Airport was in 1985. But that plane was coming in to land.

Story and video: http://www.statejournal.com










A woman who died when a small plane flipped and caught fire at Yeager Airport Saturday was a flight instructor who lived in Charleston, her friends say.


Friends of Brenda Gilland Jackson confirm she died in the accident that also injured a man just after noon on Saturday.


The aircraft, a  Cessna 172 Skyhawk, was on runway 5 when the incident happened around 12:15 p.m. The fire was extinguished, and the two people on board were removed and transported to the hospital with “significant injuries,” airport spokesman Michael Plante said Saturday.


The plane was owned by Skylane Aviation, a private company that does flight training among other aviation services. The company is owned by Joe Beam.


Dora Egnor, of Lincoln County, knew Jackson for three or four years, she said. Egnor was Jackson’s hair dresser. Jackson also gave Egnor’s grandson a flight lesson, she said. Egnor said Jackson loved her family and flying most of all.


“She was amazing because she was just a good woman, God-fearing,” Egnor said. “[She did] everything she could possibly do to help anyone in need.”


A Facebook profile for Jackson, which identified her as Brenda J. Gilland, said she went to Mount Hope High School, lived in Charleston and was self-employed. Jackson took her first flight lesson when she 14, according to a previous article in the Gazette.


Egnor said she was at work at the Southridge Wal-Mart on Saturday when she heard about the accident.


“One of the girls was flipping through her phone and she said, ‘you aren’t going to believe this,’ [and she] said it was a small-engine [plane], and I said, ‘Oh my God.’ I knew it was her before I even read about it.”


Egnor said Jackson told her once that when she died, it would be in her airplane.


“She was amazing; God gained a good angel,” Egnor said.


The name of the other passenger aboard the plane Saturday has not been released.


Dan Boggs, a safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, has arrived in Charleston and will be investigating the cause of the crash for the next two or three days. Until then he will not speculate as to what he thinks happened.


“We don’t know what happened,” Boggs said. “We don’t have any idea if it was mechanical. It’s going to take several weeks to put that storyline together.”


Saturday’s crash was the first fixed-wing fatality at Yeager Airport since 1985.


“Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of the victims,” airport director Terry Sayre said.



- Original article can be found here: http://www.wvgazettemail.com

Yeager Airport spokesman Mike Plante addressed reporters Sunday evening.
~

CHARLESTON, W.Va — An investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board says a detailed investigation will begin Monday into what caused a small plane to crash Saturday afternoon at Yeager Airport killing a woman and injuring a man.

“I cannot even guess about something probable cause right now,” NTSB investigator Dan Boggs told reporters Sunday evening. “We gather all of the facts and then we figure out what the probable cause will be.”

The initial report will come in about two weeks followed by a full report which could take up to a year.

Boggs credited the work of first responders at Yeager for helping secure the scene of the crash of the Cessna 172 and moving it to a secure location. That work has put the investigation a little ahead of schedule, he said.

The names of those involved still have not been released but several media reports and social media postings identify the woman as Brenda Gilland Jackson, a Charleston flight instructor. Official information about those involved would have to come from the state Medical Examiner’s office, according to Boggs.

The plane had a problem shortly after its 12:08 p.m. takeoff. There was a small fire after the crafted flipped over on runway 5. The victims were pulled from the wreckage at 12:47 p.m. and taken to CAMC General. The woman died a short time later. The man, who was piloting, was in serious condition Sunday.

Investigators will be looking for any perishable evidence while in Charleston along with any eyewitness statements, Boggs said.

“We will probably be here for two or three days and our mission here is to not only find out what happened but why it happened,” he said. “I do have the airframe manufacturer and the engine manufacturer here with me and we will be going through that aircraft piece by piece.”

The plane was registered in Charleston and was being operated by a private citizen, Boggs said.

Original article can be found here:   http://wvmetronews.com


A woman who died when a small plane flipped and caught fire at Yeager Airport Saturday was a flight instructor who lived in Charleston, her friends say.

Friends of Brenda J. Gilland confirm she died in the accident that also injured a man just after noon on Saturday.

The aircraft, a Cessna 172 Skyhawk four-seat plane, was on runway 5 when the incident happened around 12:15 p.m. The fire was extinguished, and the two people on board were removed and transported to the hospital with “significant injuries,” airport spokesman Michael Plante said Saturday. One person died from injuries around 3:20 p.m.

Dora Egnor, of Lincoln County, knew Gilland for three or four years, she said. Egnor was Gilland’s hairdresser. Gilland also gave Egnor’s grandson a flight lesson, she said. Egnor said Gilland loved her family and flying most of all.

“She was amazing because she was just a good woman, God-fearing,” Egnor said. [She did] everything she could possibly to do help anyone in need.”

Egnor said she was at work at the Southridge Walmart on Saturday when she heard about the accident.

“One of the girls was flipping through her phone and she said, ‘you aren’t going to believe this,’ [and she] said it was a small-engine [plane], and I said ‘oh my god.’ I knew it was her before I even read about it.”

Egnor said Gilland told her once that when she died, it would be in her airplane.

“She was amazing; God gained a good angel,” Egnor said.

Federal investigators were expected to begin working to determine the cause of the accident Sunday, Plante said Saturday.

A press briefing has been scheduled for 5 p.m.

- See more at: http://www.wvgazettemail.com



CHARLESTON, WV -

UPDATE (11:25 p.m. 3/26/16)

One woman is dead after a plane crash at Yeager Airport early in the afternoon on March 26, 2016. Two people were on board when it crashed during takeoff and flipped upside down.

Yeager Airport spokesperson Mike Plante says a fire caused by the crash was put out in a few minutes. Then the two inside the four seat plane were taken to Charleston area Medical Center where the woman who was on board died from her injuries.

Family and friends tell 13 News Brenda J. Gilland is the woman who died in the midday crash. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)  would not say if the incident during a part of flight school. But it would confirm Brenda Gilland was a flight instructor and the male on board who is now in critical condition has his student pilot certificate.

"The aircraft is based locally here so it makes the loss all the more difficult for the airport community," said Plante.

The plane is a Cessna 172 Skyhawk, a small plane owned by Skylane Aviation which is a Charleston based company that rents planes to private instructors. The investigation into the crash is under way but it will likely be months until a cause is determined.

"That's why the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) does its' work very slowly and methodically because their job is to issue a report that hopefully if its a mechanical issue or some other kind of issue like that they'll be able to prevent similar incidences from occurring," said Plante.

He remembers the last time a plane touched down without its landing gear but doesn't remember the last time there was a crash like this.

"This is the first incident that I can remember for a long time in which an aircraft actually impacted the ground not under control," he said.

The incident closed the airport for a few hours. Gary Alford was at the terminal waiting for his wife to land on a commercial flight from Atlanta around the time the crash occurred.

"All the sudden the sirens went off and I didn't know what was going on, fire trucks started going all out to the runways and so on and I was afraid something had happened to the Delta flight," he said.

The Robinsons were waiting to go to San Diego.

"We noticed a lot of uniform people kind of racing to the windows to look out so we followed and then learned about the small plane crash," said Craig Robinson.

The male involved in crash is still in critical condition.

The NTSB will start their part of the work into finding out the cause of the crash Sunday, March 27, 2016.  

A crash involving a plane slightly bigger in Eastern Kanawha county killed two people in April 2014. The plane from the incident on Saturday, March 26, 2016 will remain beside the runway where it crashed until the investigation is complete. The airport will operate normally while that is done. 

UPDATE (3:19 p.m. 3/26/16)

According to crews on scene at Yeager Airport, a woman who was on board a small plane that flipped during a landing Saturday afternoon, has died due to her injuries. 

UPDATE (2:34 p.m. 3/26/16)

According to crews on scene, Yeager Airport is back open

UPDATE (12:56 p.m. 3/26/16)

Yeager Airport is closed until further notice after a single-engine plane flipped over on landing Saturday afternoon, according to airport spokesman Mike Plante.

At approximately 12:15 p.m., a Cessna 172 Skyhawk overturned upon landing on runway 5. There was a small fire, but it was extinguished quickly. The two people on board were removed from the aircraft and transported to the hospital.

The Yeager Airport National Guard and Charleston Fire Departments responded to the incident.

UPDATE (12:47 p.m. 3/26/16)

Yeager Airport spokesman Mike Plante said the airport will remain closed until further notice.

ORIGINAL

A single-engine plane flipped over on the runway Saturday afternoon at Yeager Airport.

There appears to be at least two injuries with one entrapment.

The Yeager Airport National Guard and Charleston Fire Departments are responding.

Original article can be found here: http://www.tristateupdate.com



CHARLESTON, WV (WCHS/WVAH) — One person was killed and another seriously injured in a plane crash at Yeager Airport Saturday afternoon.

Yeager Airport spokesman Mike Plante said a female passenger was killed and another was seriously injured when a single-engine Cessna Skyhawk 172 crashed during takeoff on runway five. He said the plane flipped onto its top and there was a small fire.

He said the NTSB and FAA have been called in to investigate the incident and determine the cause of the crash.

Two people were injured after a small aircraft crashed at Yeager Airport Saturday afternoon.

Yeager Airport spokesman Mike Plante said a single-engine Cessna Skyhawk 172 crashed during takeoff on runway five. He said the plane flipped onto its top and there was a small fire.

Emergency crews quickly arrived on scene to extinguish the flames and got the two passengers out of the aircraft.

Plante said both passengers were injured and transported to the hospital, but the extent of their injuries have not been released.

Plante said the runway at Yeager Airport was closed as the investigation into the incident continued. No flights were going in or out of Yeager Airport for more than two hours. The airport reopened the runway at about 2:30 p.m.

He said the NTSB and FAA have been called in to investigate the incident and determine the cause of the crash.

Stay tuned to Eyewitness News for the latest updates.

Multiple emergency crews are on the scene of a plane crash at Yeager Airport.

Dispatchers said a single-engine, Cessna 172 crashed off of runway five at the airport at about 12:15 p.m. Saturday.

They said it appears there are at least two passengers in the crash, but crews have yet to release other details.

The runway is closed, and no estimated time has been given for when it will be reopened.

Original article can be found here: http://wchstv.com 





UPDATE @ 3:38 p.m


CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) --One person has died after a small plane flipped on the runway at Yeager Airport.

Yeager Airport Spokesperson Mike Plante says one person has died from injuries sustained during the crash.

One other person was injured in that crash.

They remain in critical condition.

UPDATE @ 2:41 p.m.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) -- Yeager Airport is back open after a small plane flipped on the runway.

It happened just after noon.

Two people were injured and are reported to be in critical condition.

There is no update on their conditions at this time.

Crews on scene tell WSAZ the plane will stay where it is until the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration conduct an investigation as to why it crashed.

ORIGINAL STORY 3/26 @ 1:20 p.m.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) -- Two people are in critical condition after their plane flipped on the runway at Yeager Airport.

It happened just after noon Saturday.

A spokesperson for Yeager Airport says a Cessna 172 Skyhawk overturned on landing at Yeager Airport on runway 5.

According to spokesperson Mike Plante, there was a small fire that has been extinguished.

Two people were injured in the crash.

Dispatchers say the two are in critical condition and were taken to the hospital.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wsaz.com