Saturday, May 10, 2014

Cessna U206G Stationair, Adrenalin Skydivers, VH-FRT: Accident occurred March 22, 2014 at Caboolture Airfield (YCAB), Queensland, Australia

No clues yet on cause of fatal skydive crash 

The families of five people killed in an horrific plane crash at Caboolture Airfield could wait months before they discover the truth behind the tragedy.

A preliminary investigation report released late Friday showed the Australian Transport Safety Bureau was investigating a "range of scenarios" to determine what caused the skydiving plane to crash on March 22.

The report shed no light on what caused the crash, which killed pilot Andrew Aitken, 24, instructors Glenn Norman and Juraj Glesk, and engaged couple Joey King, 32, and Rahuia Hohua, 27.

The five aboard the Adrenalin Skydivers Cessna 206 did not stand a chance when the plane hit the ground and burst into flames soon after take-off.

The report says very few items could be recovered from the wreckage to help with the inquiry.

It said the plane had a current certificate of airworthiness and maintenance records were all up to date.

Mr Aitkin held a commercial pilot (airplane) license and had 1100 hours of flight experience under his belt.

It was a clear day by all witness accounts, when the doomed skydiving flight took off from the runway and crashed almost immediately.

Caboolture Airfield Safety Officer Bryan Carpenter described the crash as the worst disaster in the airfield's history.

He said the chaotic day and charred wreck was still fresh in the minds of the aviation fraternity.

"It's still all so vivid in our minds and we will be forever mindful that this sort of business means we require great care when flying and that we should all be aware of the hazards when flying, whichever sort of aircraft," Mr Carpenter said.

"It could not get worse than this crash and we never want to see it happen again.

"The aviation fraternity is aware that the ATSB is very thorough, and we have to live with that and let the investigation take its course before we can have some closure."

The report revealed the ground scarring and impact marks indicated the left wingtip touched the ground first, then the aircraft cartwheeled before coming to a rest about 35m beyond the initial impact point.

A number of aircraft components including the engine, propeller, flight control components and parts of the pilot's seat were taken from the scene for examination.

Video recorders were normally taken on the aircraft as part of the skydiving packages, but because of extensive damage no information was able to be downloaded.

As the investigation continues, the ATSB will look into the possibility of the pilot's seat sliding backwards, a load shift, partial power loss and turn back and flight control problems.

A final report is expected by March next year.


Source:   http://www.themorningbulletin.com.au


Preliminary investigation report and photos:   http://atsb.gov.au

Collision with terrain involving Cessna U206G, VH-FRT, Caboolture Airfield, Qld on 22 March 2014 
  
Investigation number: AO-2014-053
Investigation status: Active
Investigation in progress

On 22 March 2014, a Cessna Aircraft Company U206G aircraft, registered VH-FRT, was being used for commercial parachuting operations from Caboolture Airfield, Queensland. The aircraft landed at about 1050 Eastern Standard Time,[1] after completing the second flight of the day. Fuel was added to the aircraft from a refuelling facility located at the airfield, which was consistent with the operator’s normal processes.

At approximately 1124, the aircraft took off from runway 06 with the pilot, two parachuting instructors and two tandem parachutists on board. Shortly after take-off, witnesses located at the airfield observed the aircraft climb to about 150 to 200 ft above ground level before it commenced a roll to the left. The left roll steepened and the aircraft adopted a nose-down attitude until it impacted the ground in an almost vertical, left-wing low attitude. A post-impact, fuel-fed-fire destroyed the aircraft. The accident was not survivable.

  
Preliminary investigation report and photos:   http://atsb.gov.au

 

 NTSB Identification: WPR14WA154 
 Accident occurred Saturday, March 22, 2014 in Caboolture, Australia
Aircraft: CESSNA U206 - G, registration:
Injuries: 5 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 22, 2014 about 1123 local time, a Cessna 206 airplane, Australian registration VH-FRT, crashed shortly after takeoff near Caboolture, Australia. The airplane was substantially damaged and the pilot and four passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a sport parachute operation under the pertinent civil regulations of the government of Australia.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square
Canberra A.C.T. 2608
Australia
Tel: +612 6274 6054
Fax: +612 6274 6434
www.atsb.gov.au

Beechcraft Bonanza A36, N7346R, Seagull Flying Club, Inc: Mineta San Jose International Airport (KSJC), San Jose, California

A small plane crashed shortly after landing Friday night at Mineta San Jose International Airport.

The single engine plane's front landing gear collapsed while it was taxiing.

None of the three people on board was hurt.

The runway was closed during the response, but later reopened.

Airport officials say commercial flights weren't affected.

Story and photo:   http://abc7news.com


http://registry.faa.gov/N7346R

http://www.seagullfc.org

https://www.flickr.com


Grizzly Bay near Suisun City, California: Coast Guard air crew rescues 2 mariners, dog from Sacramento River Delta

ALAMEDA, Calif. — The Coast Guard rescued two people and one dog from the northern area of Grizzly Bay near Suisun City, Calif., Friday, at approximately 10:48 p.m.

Watchstanders from he Coast Guard  Sector San Francisco Command Center received notification from Coast Guard Station Vallejo that they were conducting a search for a disabled 19-foot blue and white recreational vessel with two mariners aboard that launched out of Suisun Marina. Crewmembers from Station Vallejo determined that due to the remote location of the vessel and the shallow water, their response boat was unsuited for the conditions.

A helicopter rescue crew from Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco was launched to assist the mariners.

The rescue crew safely hoisted both survivors and their dog Pritzie into the helicopter. They were then transported to Concord Airport where family members greeted them.

“That was an interesting rescue; it was the first time that I had the chance to rescue a dog,” said Petty Officer 3rd Class Corey Fix, an aviation survival technician. “I’ll always remember this case.”

Read more and photo:   http://coastguardnews.com

Chibok: Reasons U.S. has not deployed drones

As criticisms, protests and anger continue to trail the abduction of over 200 schoolgirls in Chibok, Borno State across the globe, Sunday Tribune can report that the international support towards finding the girls, which was led by the United States of America, did not include the country deploying drones or sending troops for strategic reasons bothering on Nigeria’s tacit disapproval, the complex approval-seeking process and the US’ policy of not wanting to ‘meddle in sovereign countries’ affairs.’

According to an online report published by an American media agency, NBCnews, US officials had offered to assist with everything possible to help Nigeria in the search for the missing girls, which has resulted in a global social media campaign #Bringbackourgirls,  but the Nigerian government was reportedly said to be mulling over allowing US drones fly over the troubled North-East zone.

Another reason said to have prevented the US from deploying drones to Nigeria, it was gathered, is the complexity surrounding the Boko Haram debacle, in which the US had been careful to be too involved evident in its decision not designate Boko Haram a Foreign Terrorists Organization despite widespread calls to do so, though indication emerged at the weekend that the US and Nigeria were already pushing for Boko Haram’s designation a terrorist organization by the United Nations. 

Similarly, Nigerian security forces’ alleged human rights abuses in the handling of the crisis was cited as another reason the US has refused to demonstrate full commitment to the situation, by deploying drones despite their being said to be apt in achieving quick results in bringing back the girls, as the law restricts assistance to militaries that are guilty of violating human rights.

Drones, also known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, according to experts, are capable of being stationed longer than manned aircraft, with the use of cameras and infrared sensors that are capable of detecting movement and heat to transmit live feeds to analysts on the ground.

Those in the know argued that drones would come in handy in the search for the missing girls believed to be held inside the vast Sambisa Forest in Borno State.

The report, however, stated that “the reason why the Nigerian government has not requested the remotely-piloted US surveillance drones is not clear.”

Attempts to speak with the military authorities to ascertain the veracity of the claim that the country has been skeptical about allowing US drones in the country was not successful, as at the time of filing this report.

But the report claimed that the US was frustrated at the inaction on the part of the Nigerian government, with the Pentagon Press Secretary, Rear Admiral John Kirby saying that “there are no active discussions with the Nigerian government about the use of unmanned aerial surveillance or drones”.

According to Kirby, the relatively small “coordination team” of US military, law enforcement FBI and intelligence officials is the only offer of assistance that the Nigerian government has accepted. He declined to say what else was offered and rejected by the Nigerian government, saying “we urge them (Nigerians) to use all resources at their disposal,” adding that the country has not deployed drones into Nigeria.  “No permission, no flights,” said a US official reportedly familiar with US intelligence options in sub-Saharan Africa.

Sunday Tribune further gathered that the US was also limited by the fact it would have to get permission from Nigeria’s neighboring countries of Cameroon, Chad and possibly Congo – “because the mission would also almost certainly involve overflights there, where Boko Haram troops also are active,”

 In a related development, US lawmakers had also been said to have shown little interest in sending troops to Nigeria in search of the abducted girls, another reason that might have played a role in the US’ decision not to deploy drones, which experts noted that it had in excess.

A report by The Hill stated that though the lawmakers wanted to help Nigeria recover the missing schoolgirls, they were not willing to approve the deployment of US troops.

The lawmakers, it was gathered, mostly urged indirect steps such as sanctions, intelligence sharing and assistance to the Nigerian military, rather than the deployment of US troops to get the girls back themselves. 


Source:  http://tribune.com.ng 

Why U.S. Drones Aren't Flying Over Nigeria (And What They Could Do if They Were)

 Though U.S. officials have offered to do everything possible to aid in the search for more than 200 kidnapped schoolgirls, the Nigerian government has yet to accept drone flights over its restive northeast corner, U.S. officials say.

The reason why the Nigerian government has not requested the remotely piloted U.S. surveillance drones is not clear.

Frustration over the inaction was evident at a Pentagon briefing Friday.

“There are no active discussions” with the Nigerian government about the use of “unmanned aerial surveillance,” or drones, said Rear Adm. John Kirby.

In fact, Kirby said, the relatively small “coordination team” of U.S. military, law enforcement FBI and intelligence officials is the only offer of assistance that the Nigerian government has accepted. Kirby declined to say what else may have been offered and rejected by the Nigerians, saying only, “We urge them (Nigerians) to use all resources at their disposal.”
 

Privately, a U.S. official familiar with U.S. intelligence options in the region, confirmed Kirby’s statement to NBC News that no drones have flown in pursuit of the missing girls. “No, not yet,” said the official , speaking on condition of anonymity. “No permission, no flights.”

The U.S. would have to get permission as well from neighboring countries -- Cameroon, Chad and possibly Congo – because the mission would also almost certainly involve overflights there, where Boko Haram troops also are active. “They cross those borders daily,” said one U.S. intelligence official.

Even without drones, experts and U.S. officials say, Washington has other hi-tech spy technology that could help in the search.

Dr. Jeffrey T. Richelson, author of the forthcoming “U.S. Intelligence Community,” a compendium of Washington’s intelligence capabilities, said the drone is the ideal platform for tracking Boko Haram and possibly locating the girls, who were abducted on April 14 from a state-run boarding school in Chibok.

“Drones have both the loitering capability and the stealth capability for a mission like this,” said Richelson. “You can keep a location in constant view rather than intermittent surveillance that you get with satellites.”

The U.S. has an agreement with the government of neighboring Niger to fly drones out of Niamey airport -- less than 1,000 miles west of the kidnapping site. But intelligence sources say it's not clear whether any drones are currently at the airport. One official noted it would take some time to set up support operations in any case.

U.S. officials confirm that Predator drones have flown out of Niamey previously for missions to track members of Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, a terrorist group based in nearby Mali.

The U.S. also could fly longer-range Global Hawks or MQ-9s on missions from as far away as the United Arab Emirates or England.

Eyes and ears in the sky

 
While some analysts have questioned the utility of using reconnaissance drones over the dense jungle where Boko Haram is believed to be holding the girls, Richelson said they have superior capabilities over aircraft or satellites.

“It's possible to equip (drones) with a fairly large variety of intelligence-collection packages, including a variety of imaging sensors as well as eavesdropping equipment,” he said. Richelson said those could include visible-light sensors, capable of picking out objects as small as guns; infrared sensors and phased array radar sensors, capable of observing movements or gatherings at night; and hyper-spectral image sensors, which can detect “when ground has been disturbed, vegetation has been cut.” The latter are “highly useful in forest areas” like the Sambisa Forest, a Boko Haram stronghold, said Richelson.

Electronic eavesdropping packages also could pick up communications that “travel by air ... walkie-talkie traffic, cell or satellite phones” and other forms of communication.

Richelson said that Global Hawks would be the most effective drones, as they can remain aloft for long periods of time. During that period, they can image up to 40,000 square miles of the targeted area without being detected, he said.

Another expert said the flying abilities of second-generation drones are extraordinary.

“Global Hawk can loiter for 60 hours,” said William M. Arkin, co-author of “Secret America,” a book on secret U.S. intelligence bases around the world. “Same with the MQ-9. The Predator can loiter for 22 hours at 500 miles per hour.”

They also have a longer range -- up to 9,500 miles – and can fly as high as 60,000 feet, meaning, “It's no longer a matter of having to be close in,” he said.

In other words, these “super drones” could be dispatched from their home base in al-Dharfa in the United Arab Emirates, or other bases where they have previously been stationed: Molesworth in England; Djibouti in west Africa; or Sigonella, Sicily, he said.

Arkin also dismissed the idea that the U.S. would be reluctant to commit such a valuable asset to Nigeria.

“We have excess capacity now,” he said, estimating that the U.S. now has an inventory of two dozen Global Hawks alone.

Low-orbit spy satellites


As valuable as the drones would be, Arkin said there is a new class of tactical spy satellites that fly in orbits a mere 55 miles above the Earth's surface that could prove even more useful.

The ORS and TacSat satellites, which are used regularly over Afghanistan, could be quickly repositioned over Nigeria, without the need to get permission to use airspace of countries in the region.

“They do have hyper-spectral capabilities. They can give you data on where the ground was disturbed,” said Arkin, adding that he believes the U.S. currently has six such satellites in orbit. “They also have an interesting feature that allows them to slow down (in orbit).They are game changers. Compared to them, drones are limited.”

Richelson agreed, but said traditional higher-altitude spy satellites would be required to “get close to continuous coverage, reduce the gaps between (when) something is overhead.” But he that would require cooperation among a variety of countries, he said, including Russia, France and Israel, among others to maximize coverage.
 

Arkin and Richelson also said spy satellites, both conventional and the new lower orbit models, come with archives. If the U.S. had any positioned over west Africa at the time the girls were grabbed, for example, analysts could go back and see if the satellite’s data might provide valuable clues as to the hostages’ fate.

Richelson noted that spy satellites also have played a role in unmasking war crimes. In 1995, CIA analysts found photographic evidence from satellites of Bosnian Serb military units lining up 8,000 men and boys in front of mass graves in the Bosnian city of Srebrenica.


Story:   http://www.nbcnews.com

EXCLUSIVE: The Cameron crony, the private jet company, and a crash landing that cost taxpayers £100m

Robin Southwell is one of the PM's most trusted business leaders. But there is one blot on his career. Corporate Jet Services, a company that lays on planes for the rich and famous, collapsed in 2007 – costing its main creditor, HBOS, about £100m (and helping to bring about the bank's state bailout, at vast expense to the taxpayer). Tom Harper asks what was HBOS doing lending so much money to such a small firm. And how is it that Mr Southwell and other directors of the firm ended up buying back CJS for a knock-down price?

Take a look at pictures of David Cameron on one of his many globetrotting trips to boost British trade, and there's a good chance you'll see Robin Southwell at his side. The chief executive of the arms giant Eads UK, Mr Southwell is one of the country's most respected and influential businessmen. He was appointed a government ambassador for British industry in 2011, and has accompanied the Prime Minister on trips to India and the Middle East.

In 2012, when Mr Cameron was criticized for using a rented American-made Boeing plane during a business trip to Indonesia, Mr Southwell stepped in to offer him an Airbus model from his own fleet.

The Prime Minister appears to value the assistance of the business leader in developing markets overseas. But Mr Southwell is facing some awkward questions rather closer to home – questions which should also be directed to Bank of Scotland (HBOS), the multibillion-pound bank which had to be rescued by the British taxpayer at the height of the credit crisis because of a catalogue of reckless lending that brought it to the brink of extinction.

While running EADS UK, Mr Southwell, 54, was also a non-executive director and shareholder of Corporate Jet Services, an exclusive private jet group which owned planes hired out by the likes of David Beckham, Max Clifford and media mogul Richard Desmond.

However, an analysis of the company's brief but extraordinary five-year history sheds light on some of the decadent lending policies that led, according to the National Audit Office, to each and every taxpayer forking out £7,600 to prop up the disgraced banking industry.

When Corporate Jet Services (CJS) went bust just before the financial crash in September 2007, it had assets of only £2m. Yet according to an official receiver's report setting out its assets and liabilities, the company owed HBOS an astonishing £113m.

As its balance sheet collapsed, the beleaguered bank placed the company into administrative receivership with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), but then encouraged the accountancy giant to sell the profitable assets back to the same directors – including Mr Southwell – for what one expert now describes as a "knock-down price".

This decision was bizarre as the company – seemingly under the control of its directors, with Mr Southwell as a non-exec – had caused a loss to HBOS of about £100m, with the bank writing off £60m worth of debt on a single day in March 2008.

Seven months later, the British government was forced to spend more than £20bn of public money bailing out HBOS's reckless lending positions, helping to usher in the current "age of austerity" that still dominates life in Britain today.

Prem Sikka, professor of accounting at Essex Business School, said: "How can HBOS have lent £113m to a company with net assets of only £2m? Unsurprisingly, this kind of unsound judgement eventually resulted in a bailout of HBOS by taxpayers. There is a massive wealth transfer to directors who picked up assets at a negligible price, and insolvency practitioners who collected high fees while owing no duty of care to taxpayers or unsecured creditors.

"This insolvency should be examined by the Business Secretary Vince Cable. This is a huge write-off and the cost of this has been borne ultimately by the taxpayer. It raises further questions about the quality of management at HBOS and its relationship with some of its clients. The pre-pack management buy-out has enabled directors to acquire assets at knock-down prices. It has left unsecured creditors high and dry."

Mr Southwell said via his lawyers that he was appointed "at the express instruction of HBOS" to assist a company in difficulty, that at times decisions were taken with the "encouragement" of the bank and "if anyone is to blame for CJS's difficulties, it should firmly be laid at the door of HBOS".

David Cameron's business adviser said via his lawyers that his role was "legitimate and uncontroversial"; he always acted in a "prudent and professional manner" and that he was "not part of the dedicated executive management team".

When his new company bought the subsidiaries of Corporate Jet Services in 2007, Mr Southwell said he took part in the management buy-out only to save 250 jobs as there was no other alternative in the wake of the credit crunch.

Jet firm to the stars
Mr Southwell was first appointed as a director of CJS in 2002. His lawyers stated that he was a "non-executive director" and was installed "at the direct request of HBOS".

He also stressed that his involvement in the company was very much a hands-off capacity "to provide corporate governance and management advice at a board level in a non-executive role".

That notwithstanding, flight manifests from CJS, seen by The Independent on Sunday, show that Mr Southwell and his wife were passengers on one of the company's jets when it flew to the tax haven of Monaco – via Cannes – in December 2003. The Southwells were accompanied by an HBOS bank manager. His lawyers said this was a business trip exploring a "potential three-year sponsorship deal relating to an event in Monaco which had the potential to generate significant business for CJS on the UK to South of France route". They also said that the potential business partner had "specifically" asked to see one of the company's planes.

Read more, photo gallery and comments:  http://www.independent.co.uk

Florence Regional Airport (KFLO), South Carolina: Boardings down, but prognosis good

FLORENCE, S.C. — Florence Regional Airport has been a one-carrier airstrip since Delta packed its bags at the beginning of 2011.

Enplanements in 2010 in Florence set a record, topping more than 80,000. Florence Regional Airport Director Chuck Henderson said while the drop in boardings since then has been appreciable, he and other airport officials remain bullish on the airport’s future but know there is work to be done.

“Over the past four to five years (since Delta left), the numbers have declined, but overall we’ve seen a long-term annual growth rate of 2 percent,” he said.

Currently, US Airways, soon to be American Airlines, only flies to Charlotte out of Florence. On average there are about five flights that come into the Florence airport, with 70 percent of seats filled on each flight. He said U.S. Airways would like to see that number closer to 75 percent. To make that happen, Henderson said he plans to work with the airline to market Florence more aggressively, reduce cancellations, control schedules and equipment issues.

“We need to ask ourselves if (the airport) is doing everything in our control to be as competitive an air service alternative as we can by maintaining our facilities, safety, security,” he said. “Driving to another airport is a gradual decision. We have to give people a reason to come to the airport.”

He cautions to describe U.S. Airways as a partnership because it is a business.

“If they can take their aircraft somewhere else and make more money, they’ll do it. That’s why it’s important to do everything we can as much as possible,” Henderson said.

Doing as much as possible includes trying to add another carrier. He said he is in constant contact with Delta to persuade them that Florence is a viable community.

“Everything I see and read shows me Florence is growing. That means a growth in travel, and it’s the message we want to share with other carriers and anyone else we can,” he said.

Florence ranks fifth, compared to the other five airports in the state, with 60,295 enplanements last year. The busiest airport was Charleston (1.47 million) enplanements, followed by Greenville/Spartanburg (917,937), Myrtle Beach (831,350) and Columbia (509,738). Florence ranked just ahead of Hilton Head (57,743).

Historically, Florence has seen an increase in enplanements from February to March over the past five years. Henderson said the arenas that are part of business in Florence include airline, aircraft maintenance, military and corporate aircraft. Airport deputy director and fixed base operator (FBO) manager John Ferguson said the fuel sales and maintenance business this year looks to be picking up.

“It does appear we are billing out more hours and more maintenance,” Ferguson said. “I think the economy is starting to turn around. People are getting out more to do flying and conducting more business in the air. I feel really good about the indicators we are seeing this year.”


Story and photos:   http://www.scnow.com

Aircraft mechanic Phil Smith, left, and Director of Maintenance Maurice Lemmond work on a Piper Seneca II on Friday, May 9, 2014, at Florence General Aviation at the Florence Regional Airport. The Fixed Base Operator provides fuel, aircraft maintenance and other services to aircraft. 


Line Chief Duane Peters attaches a fuel hose to a Bombardier Challenger 300 aircraft on Friday, May 9, 2014, at Florence General Aviation (FBO) at the Florence Regional Airport. The FBO said that this year fuel sales are showing a strong increase from previous years.

Fokker 100, IRS Airlines, 5N-SIK: Accident occurred May 10, 2014 in Ganla, Niger

The supervising Minister of Aviation, Dr Samuel Ortom, has ordered the Accident Investigation and Prevention Bureau (AIPB) and other relevant agencies to begin investigations into the accident which involved an IRS aircraft in Niger Republic on Saturday night.

Though the two pilots who were the only passengers on board the aircraft marked 5N- SIK, F100 survived the crash, the supervising minister still ordered the Accident Investigation and Prevention Bureau (AIPB) and other relevant agencies to investigate the circumstances surrounding the accident.

According to the spokesman for Aviation Parastatals, Mr. Yakubu Dati, “The supervising Minister of Aviation, Dr Samuel Ortom, has ordered the Accident Investigation and Prevention Bureau (AIPB) and other relevant agencies to investigate the circumstances surrounding the accident.”

Meanwhile, all efforts to get comment from the management of the IRS airline in Lagos on the crash proved abortive. There was no response to all calls made to the Managing Director of the airline, Mr. Yemi Dada.

Until the Saturday crash, IRS airline was one of the few domestic airlines with good safety record.

It would be recalled that a Nigerian cargo plane operated by Allied Airline, attempting to take off from the Kotoka International Airport in Accra, Ghana on Saturday June 2, 2012, crashed and killed 10 people and injured an unspecified number of others.

The plane smashed through the airport’s fence before slamming into cars and a bus loaded with passengers on a nearby street, officials said.

The crash happened in an area near the Kotoka International Airport, which sits near newly built high-rise buildings, hotels and the country’s Defence Ministry.

 AIB, Niger Republic probe plane crash 

The Nigerian Accident Investigation Bureau, AIB and the Ministry of Aviation, Niger Republic may jointly commence an investigation into the IRS Airlines plane crash which occurred in Ganla area of Niger.

AIB’s spokesman, Tunji Oketunbi, in a telephone interview with National Mirror yesterday, said that AIB and its Niger counterpart might jointly begin a probe of the crash.

One of the sons of the Inspector General of Police, IGP, Mohammed Abubakar, Jamin, was one of the two pilots involved in the crash.

Oketunbi, however, noted that Niger Republic, as the venue of occurrence, has the jurisdiction to carry out investigation into the cause of the crash under the International Civil Aviation Organization, ICAO rules, Annex 13.

Besides, he said that Nigeria too, as a state of registration, equally has the right to be represented during the investigation.

“It is Niger that has jurisdiction over it. We can participate in the investigation, but just as an observer. Under ICAO Annex 13, it is the country of the crash that will investigate, but we can participate as an observer,” he stated.

According to the spokesman, “That is the state of occurrence (Niger) and it has jurisdiction over the crash. The crash would be investigated by the country of occurrence, unless the country of occurrence says it cannot do it and call for our help. But over there in Niger, they do not have an independent body for accident investigation.”

He, however, told our correspondent that the crashed Fokker 100 plane was still in Niger, adding that the authority was already discussing with the airline involved in the crash.

Also, he noted that the agency had got in touch with the two pilots involved in the crash and would commence investigation immediately from the Nigerian angle on the cause of the crash.


Source:  http://www.yohaig.com

Jamil Abubakar
  

https://twitter.com/PilotJamboy

An IRS aircraft, which was returning from maintenance abroad, has crashed in Niger Republic, with two crew members on board, aviation sources said on Saturday.

The two crew, including the son of the Inspector General of Police, Muhammed Abubakar, survived the crash.

The plane, a Folker 100, with registration number 5NSIK, crashed at about 7:30 pm after it allegedly lost contact at Ganla.

The Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority of Nigeria confirmed the incident. IRS Airlines is owned by Alhaji Ishiaku Rabiu.

The airline has not been flying because it has only one functional aircraft. It had wanted to fix the second plane to commence operation.


Sources: 
http://www.pmnewsnigeria.com
http://theeagleonline.com.ng
http://newsdiaryonline.com

Jamil Abubakar, the first son of the Inspector General of Police survived a plane crash yesterday evening May 10th after the small plane he was co-piloting lost control and crashed in Ganla, Niger Republic.

The plane, an IRS airline, Folker 100, with registration number 5NSIK, was returning from maintenance abroad when it lost contact in Ganla and crashed. The two-crew members, including the IG's son survived the crash. The Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority confirmed the crash yesterday.

Three survivors of helicopter crash discharged from hospital; West Cape Three Points, Western Region in Ghana

Three out of the four survivors in the helicopter crash at the West Cape Three Points in the Western Region on Thursday have been discharged from hospital.

Mr. Albert Taylor, Director of Air-traffic Services of the Ghana Aviation Authority (GCAA), told the Ghana News Agency on Saturday that one of the survivors who was in critical condition and flown to the 37 Military Hospital in Accra is responding to treatment.

The other missing person among the eight involved in the helicopter crash has not been found but some helicopters had joined the search party to look for him.

Mr. Taylor said the relatives of those who lost their lives in the crash had been informed about the tragic incident however he declined to mention their names.

The accident claimed three lives when an Ivorian registered rotorcraft, TUHAA, which was contracted by Lukoil Company to transport workers to the oil rigs on the Jubilee Oilfield, crashed four-and-half nautical miles offshore. GNA

Debris recovered from crashed chopper


 The search team prowling the waters where a helicopter belonging to oil company Lukoil plunged into the sea on Thursday resulting in the death of at least three out of eight passengers have retrieved parts of the crashed chopper.

The fuselage is, however, yet to be retrieved while the team is still looking for one passenger feared dead after four survivors were rescued Thursday. Aviation authorities say three of the survivors are responding well to treatment while the fourth has been transferred to Accra for closer care.

It is still unclear what may have caused the accident that was detected a few hours after the crew failed to arrive at destination. Meanwhile, the Ghana Civil Aviation Authority (ACAA) has launched a full-scale investigation into the circumstances that led to the crash of the Ivorian registered helicopter with the registration identity as TUHAA.

The authority said they would not hazard any hasty suggestions as to what caused the accident until investigations were concluded. 


Story and photos:   http://www.ghanaweb.com

Lukoil Update on Helicopter Crash Offshore Ghana 
 by  OAO Lukoil
Press Release
Friday, May 09, 2014

Lukoil Overseas, operator of international upstream projects of Lukoil Group, confirmed Friday that on Thursday, May 8, a helicopter crashed in the coast waters of the Republic of Ghana 3.4 nautical miles (5.4 kilometers) from Takoradi.

The transportation helicopter operated by the local airline carrier and on contract to Lukoil was on a routine crew shuttle mission transporting contractor personnel from the airport in Takoradi to the Jack Ryan (UDW drillship) chartered by Lukoil to conduct exploration activities offshore Ghana.

There were eight persons onboard the helicopter, including two crew members of the local airline carrier and six representatives of several contracting service companies. There were no Lukoil employees onboard.

Three fatalities have been confirmed and one person remains missing. Four survivors have been transported for medical attention to local hospitals and currently remain under medical observation, they have no known serious injuries.

A search and rescue mission was launched immediately with support from the Ghana Navy and Air Force and other operators in the area. A search is currently underway to locate one missing person. An investigation is launched to identify the causes of accident.

Lukoil Overseas extends its sincere condolences to the families of those who have lost their lives in this tragic accident.



Mooney M20TN Acclaim, N563JK, Chaparral Equipment Leasing LLC: Accident occurred May 10, 2014 near Stinson Municipal Airport (KSSF), San Antonio, Texas

 http://registry.faa.gov/N563JK

NTSB Identification: CEN14LA234
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 10, 2014 in San Antonio, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/19/2014
Aircraft: MOONEY AIRPLANE CO INC M20TN, registration: N563JK
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he intended to practice takeoffs and landings, and he completed the first takeoff and landing without incident. While on the base leg of the landing pattern after the second takeoff, the pilot pushed the throttle forward, and the engine stopped producing power. He was unable to regain engine power, so he made a forced landing into a small clearing, which resulted in substantial damage and a serious injury. The postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The fuel-injected engine was shipped to the manufacturer for further examination and an engine run, during which the engine demonstrated the ability to produce rated horsepower.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination and testing of the engine revealed no anomalies.

On May 10, 2014, about 1305 central daylight time, a Mooney M20TN, N563JK, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a loss of engine power while landing at the Stinson Municipal Airport (SSF), San Antonio, Texas. The private pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the Chaparral Equipment Leasing LLC under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed SSF about 1250 on a local flight.

The pilot reported that the preflight was normal and the airplane was fueled with 70 gallons of aviation fuel. He did one takeoff and landing on runway 14 without incident. He performed another takeoff from runway 14 and he extended the upwind before turning crosswind due to another airplane landing on runway 09. He erroneously turned final on runway 09, but the SSF tower air traffic controller (ATC) alerted him that he was lined up for runway 09. He corrected course and entered a base leg for runway 14. 

The pilot reported that the airspeed dropped below 80 knots, so he pushed the throttle forward 1/2 to 3/4 throttle; however, the engine stopped producing power. He was unable to regain engine power so he made a forced landing into a small clearing along the banks of a river and baseball fields. The pilot did not flare the airplane due to the low airspeed and confined area, so the airplane impacted the terrain hard. The AmSafe airbags installed in the airplane deployed during the ground impact. The pilot crawled out of the cabin and onto the wing where first responders assisted him. 

The on-site examination of the airplane wreckage by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors revealed that there appeared to be no apparent reason for the loss of engine power. The airplane wreckage was transported to a storage facility for further examination.

The examination of the airplane wreckage revealed that two of the propeller blades were bent aft, and the third was still straight. The throttle, mixture, and propeller controls were checked for continuity, and the continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the associated components on the engine. All fuel lines were connected forward of the engine firewall. There was no evidence of a fuel leak forward of the firewall. The fuel manifold on the top of the engine was removed for examination. Fuel was found in the fuel manifold. There was no evidence of obstructions, water contamination, or any malfunction of the fuel manifold. Due to impact damage, the engine was sent to Continental Motors for examination and an engine run. 

On September 10, 2014, an examination and engine run were conducted at Continental Motors. The engine exhibited impact damage concentrated at the left side exhaust. The left side exhaust runner, turbo and tail pipe were impact damaged and replaced for the test run. The external surfaces of the engine were undamaged with the exception of the No. 6 cylinder rocker cover, which was replaced for the test run. Both left and right turbo cans were replaced for the test run. A dye penetrant inspection was performed on the crankshaft propeller mount flange; there were no crack signatures evident. The fuel manifold valve was reinstalled for the test run.

Upon installation in the test cell, the fuel pump had a leak at the mixture shaft and was replaced with a slave pump and the engine was run using the slave pump. The original fuel pump was placed on the test bench for a determination of the leak source. On the test bench, no leak was observed from the fuel pump. The pump was reinstalled on the engine and a second test run with all of the original components was completed. On this run there were no leaks present at the fuel pump or mixture shaft area. 

The engine experienced a normal start on the first attempt. The engine rpm was advanced in steps for warm-up in preparation for full power operation. The engine throttle was advanced to 1,200 rpm and held for five minutes to stabilize. The engine throttle was advanced to 1,600 rpm and held for five minutes to stabilize. The engine throttle was advanced to 2,450 rpm and held for five minutes to stabilize. The engine throttle was advanced to full open position and held for five minutes to stabilize. The engine throttle was rapidly advanced from idle to full throttle six times where it performed normally without any hesitation or interruption in power. The right magneto had a 240 rpm drop during testing caused by impact damaged ignition leads that were not replaced for the engine test run. Throughout the test phase, the engine accelerated normally without any hesitation or interruption in power, and demonstrated the ability to produce rated horsepower.




SAN ANTONIO — A Little League baseball game was just getting started Saturday afternoon when a young boy playing outfield began sprinting from his position toward his dugout.

“People were yelling, 'No! What are you doing?'” SA 5 Diamonds Vice President John Luna said. “He was the only one who saw it.”

Seconds later, a single-engine aircraft bound for the Stinson Municipal Airport soared over the field, barely making it over the outfield fence before crashing at the edge of a creek between Flores Street and Roosevelt Avenue.

“I thought it was going to explode,” said 12-year-old Hector Gonzalez, who was sitting in the dugout when the plane barreled into a fence at the edge of the SA 5 Diamonds' baseball facilities.

Jim Plair was coaching third base when the plane made impact just after 3 p.m. He rushed across the field and jumped a fence to get to the pilot, who managed to pull himself out of the aircraft.

“I thought it was coming in kind of low,” he said.

The pilot, who has not yet been identified, missed the baseball diamonds by feet.

“He did a wonderful job,” Plair said. “The pilot should be commended. He did the right thing.

SAPD Sgt. Trey Roussel said the pilot told authorities he lost power on approach to the airport. At about 700 feet, it became clear he wasn't going to make it to the landing field.

After the impact, the pilot was able to walk under his own power, though several witnesses helped him away from the mangled, single-engine aircraft smashed against a fence.

The pilot was taken to Mission Trails Baptist Hospital with what authorities described as nonlife-threatening injuries.

No other injuries were reported.

A San Antonio Fire Department hazmat crew was at the scene to make sure no fuel was spilling out of the plane.

Roussel said nothing appeared to have leaked.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board will pick up the investigation to determine what caused the crash.


http://www.mysanantonio.com













 
SAN ANTONIO -- A local baseball game was interrupted when an airplane crashed just a few feet away in south San Antonio Saturday.

The wreck happened just after 2 p.m. in the 4100 block of Roosevelt Ave., near the baseball field at the Five Diamonds Ball Park, close to Stinson Airport.

The pilot was reportedly attempting to land, according to the San Antonio Police Department. People said the plane appeared to have lost power before crashing.

Police said the pilot did indeed lose power. The pilot told investigators that he was looking for the best place to land and ended up in a gravel area between two ball fields.

Photos of the wreckage revealed a small white plane that did not appear to have much damage to its frame; however a nearby tree was knocked down by the aircraft.

Witnesses told KENS 5 the pilot got himself out of the plane and was walking around and talking before being transported to an area hospital. The baseball coach at the game said he helped the man cool off inside a truck because it was hot outside.

The coach described the pilot as a 'hero' for managing to crash land the plane away from the baseball field and avoid the kids.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration website, the plane is a single-engine Mooney aircraft that is owned by a local equipment leasing firm.


This story is developing. Visit KENS 5 for more details as they become available.


SAN ANTONIO -   A small plane crashed near Stinson Municipal Airport Saturday afternoon, coming down dangerously close to kids' baseball games.

That plane crashed around 2:15 p.m. just west of Stinson.

Witnesses say the plane came down close to baseball fields at Five Diamonds where children's games were going on.

Police say the pilot was alone in the plane and approaching Stinson when he lost power and realized he would not make the runway.

They say he managed to avoid a baseball field and crashed about 50 feet beyond the center field fence.

Police say the plane's pilot did not appear seriously hurt.

EMS transported him to the hospital to be checked out.

The plane crashed on the edge of a brushy area and a creek near S. Flores and Roosevelt.

That's just across the road from Stinson's runways.


Source:  http://www.ksat.com

Drone technology outpacing regulations

CHESTERFIELD, Mo. – A U.S. airliner nearly collided with a drone over Florida in March, but the FAA just released this information on Friday.

A pilot of the regional jet says he came dangerously close to a quote, "small remotely piloted aircraft" near the Tallahassee airport.

According to experts, a drone getting sucked into a jetliner engine could have catastrophic consequences. And just this week, a drone crashed into a downtown St. Louis skyscraper.

Rory Paul runs Volt Aerial Robotics, a drone manufacturing company based in Chesterfield. Paul says more accidents are likely to happen, until regulations catch up with the technology.

"It's the wild west of drones," said Paul. "The FAA and the federal government haven't kept pace. This technology three years ago didn't exist."

Paul says some regulation could be beneficial for both hobbyist and businesses like his.

"Guidelines, certifications, etc.," said Paul.

Story, video and comments:   http://www.ksdk.com

High-Ho, The Derry-O, The Farmer And The Drone

There was a near-miss in the skies above Tallahassee recently. According to a Federal Aviation Administration official, an American Airlines regional jet with a "small, remotely piloted aircraft" — a drone — cruising 2,300-feet above sea level.

Exactly who was flying the unmanned aircraft remains unknown, but drones are becoming increasingly common in U.S. skies. This week in North Dakota, the FAA began allowing tests of drones for agricultural purposes.

Congress has ordered the FAA to create new rules to safely integrate drones into U.S. airspace by 2015, but many of North Dakota's farmers aren't waiting for the FAA to act.

Jim Reimers' family has been farming on the North Dakota prairie for five generations. Driving out to his family's land northwest of Jamestown, the empty, vast spaces are striking. The sky and the field stretch as far as you can see.

"In the early 1890s is when my great grandfather came out and started farming in this area," Reimers says. Today, the Reimers' family farm stretches out over 30,000 acres.

That's more than twice the size of Manhattan, and each growing season the Reimers walk a lot of it, looking for pests and checking the health of the crops.

"You don't cover the whole field. You can't," Reimers says.

But knowing exactly what is going on inside each field is essential, and that's where the drones come in.

It's All About The Data

Catching a fungus early, documenting damage when cattle break into your fields, knowing which fields aren't flourishing so you can write them off; all these decisions can make or break a growing season. Unmanned, semi-autonomous little airplanes promise to be able to do all of that.

So this year, Reimers and his brother invested about $20,000 in a couple of small drones to begin scanning their fields. These little drones weigh less than 10 pounds each. The Reimers can fly them remotely, or the drones can be programmed to fly themselves on a grid to map and image an entire field.

The drones collect huge amounts of data, and modern farming is a data-driven business. "[That's] my role on the farm; that is all I do," Reimers says.

Like a software programmer or Web developer, Reimers runs an endless series of tests on his land, altering things like crop density, fertilizer and planting width. Modern, GPS-enabled farm equipment not only can drive itself, it's accurate within inches and can adjust precisely how much fertilizer or pesticide to spray.

If farmers know exactly how each field is faring, they may spray less. For the Reimers family that could mean hundreds of thousands of dollars in savings each year. It could increase their yield and margins while reducing stress on the land.

Regulation Red Tape


Like the Reimers, hundreds — and perhaps thousands — of farmers are already buying little drones. Many of them don't have formal training to fly drones, though, and that makes some regulators nervous.

This week saw the first-ever FAA-sanctioned test flight for agriculture. In attendance was John Nowatzki, an agricultural machine systems specialist at North Dakota State University. He says getting regulatory approval for the test took months.

"It's been very frustrating," he says. "I have not been involved in any kind of research that has taken this amount of administrative time."

The FAA has tried to ban the commercial use of drones while it tests and writes new rules, but lots of farmers aren't waiting, Nowatzki says.

"I don't think they are following all the rules," he says. "But on the other hand, they are certainly being conscious of any issues that might be dangerous."

License To Drone

Bob Becklund runs the Northern Plains Unmanned Aerial Systems test site. It's one of six facilities around the country selected by the FAA to test commercial uses of unmanned aircraft.

"Our mission is to help the FAA figure out the complicated technical procedural rules, requirements, whatever it may be, to help integrate unmanned aircraft safely," he says.

Becklund worries that as more untrained farmers take to the air with small drones, they could endanger other pilots like crop dusters. He'd like to see the FAA require licenses for anyone flying a drone, even little ones. Some day, he'd like the Northern Plains test site to get into the business of certifying these pilots and unmanned aircraft safety.

Many farmers say those rules are unnecessary, and Notwazki worries regulation could ground the industry.

"You could stand from dawn to dusk in one of these North Dakota fields and you are not going to see any airplanes flying," he says. "If you do, it will be just one and chances are it will be flying at 30,000 feet."

Accidents Happen


A recent federal court case has thrown into doubt whether the FAA has the authority to stop anyone from flying small drones, and even small farmers here have taken notice.

Don Larson farms about 300 acres near Grand Forks. The farm is not his full-time gig, but he's passionate about it.

"This year will be my 47th consecutive year of putting in a crop," Larson says, but it's his first year flying a drone.

A couple of weeks ago, his little drone flew away on him. He lost control and it took off. Larson spent the next six hours searching before finding it crashed in front of a neighbor's house.

As more and more hobbyists, consultants and landowners take to the sky, more little accidents seem inevitable. For now, Larson has decided to put his drone on a leash. Until he gets more experience and works out the bugs, he's only flying his little craft if it's firmly tethered to the ground.

Story, video, listen to the story, photo and comments:  http://www.npr.org

Quad City Challenger II, N824SH: Fatal acccident occurred May 10, 2014 in Attica, Indiana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:    http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN14LA243
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 10, 2014 in Attica, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/02/2016
Aircraft: HOFFIUS STOWE CHALLENGER II, registration: N824SH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a personal flight in the amateur-built light sport airplane. The airplane was maneuvering at low altitude before it descended and then impacted the ground. Examination of the airplane revealed no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions.

The forward fuselage and right wing were crushed, consistent with a nose-low, right-wing-low impact. The airplane's attitude at impact was consistent with a steep descending right turn that would occur after a stall. Based on the available information, it is likely that the pilot did not maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering at a low altitude and exceeded the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

The airspeed indicator was marked for airspeeds from 40 to 340 mph, but the airplane's stall speed was 32 mph, and its maximum speed was 105 mph. The large discrepancy between the airplane's performance capability and the airspeed indicator markings made the airspeed indicator inappropriate for installation in the accident airplane and would not have provided the pilot airspeed information as he neared the stall speed. The lack of appropriate airspeed information due to the inappropriate airspeed indicator likely contributed to the pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed and prevent the stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed and his exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack while maneuvering at low altitude, which led to an aerodynamic stall and loss of control. Contributing to the accident was the installation of an inappropriate airspeed indicator that did not provide airspeed indications near the airplane’s stall speed. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT 
On May 10, 2014, about 1342 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built Challenger II airplane, N824SH, impacted the ground following a loss of control near Attica, Indiana. The pilot was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from a private airstrip near Covington, Indiana at an unconfirmed time. 

It was reported that the airplane was maneuvering at low altitude prior to the accident. The airplane then descended and impacted the ground. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION 
The pilot, age 72, held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land airplane rating. His most recent medical examination was on November 23, 1992. At the time of that examination, the pilot reported having 235 hours total flight time. 

The accident airplane met the definition of a "Light Sport Airplane", and as such did not require the pilot to hold a valid medical certificate. Regulations permitted the pilot to fly as a Light-Sport pilot as long as he had a valid driver's license and was in compliance with 14 CFR 61.53 "Prohibition on operations during medical deficiency". 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION 
The accident airplane was an amateur-built airplane constructed from a kit. The airplane was a high-wing monoplane with tricycle landing gear. It could seat two occupants in a tandem seating arrangement and was constructed primarily of aluminum with a fabric covering. The airplane was powered by a Hirth model 2703 engine. The engine was a 2-cylinder 2-cycle engine rated to produce 55 horsepower. According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the pilot was not the original builder of the airplane and had purchased the airplane in 1992. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION 
At 1254, the recorded weather conditions at the Purdue University Airport, Lafayette, Indiana, about 15 miles northeast of the accident site were: Wind variable at 3 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clear skies; temperature 21 degrees Celsius; dew point 5 degrees Celsius; Altimeter setting 29.96 inches of mercury. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION 
The aft fuselage and tail surfaces of the airplane remained intact. The forward fuselage was crushed and the tip of the right wing also had crush damage. The left wing was intact and remained attached to the fuselage. The damage to the right wing and fuselage were consistent with a right wing low, nose low impact. Postaccident examination of the airplane confirmed flight control system continuity from the cockpit to all control surfaces. The airplane's engine could not be rotated by hand. A subsequent teardown examination of the engine confirmed that impact damage had prevented the engine from rotating. No preimpact anomalies were detected in regard to the engine examination. The airplane had several electronic engine instruments installed; however, the instrument manufacturer confirmed that the units installed had no recording capability. No pre-impact anomalies were discovered during examination of the airplane. 

Investigators noted that the airspeed indicator installed in the amateur-built airplane was marked for speeds from 40 to 340 miles per hour. According to the airworthiness documentation, the airplane had a stall speed of 32 miles per hour, and a maximum speed of 105 miles per hour. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 
An autopsy of the pilot listed the cause of death as spinal cord disruption due to the accident. 

Toxicology testing was performed by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. Testing results were negative for all substances in the screening profile.

http://registry.faa.gov/N824SH

NTSB Identification: CEN14LA243
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 10, 2014 in Attica, IN
Aircraft: HOFFIUS STOWE CHALLENGER II, registration: N824SH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 10, 2014, about 1342 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built Challenger II airplane, N824SH, was destroyed when it impacted the ground following an apparent loss of control near Attica, Indiana. The pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight originated from a private airstrip near Covington, Indiana at an unconfirmed time.  

ATTICA - One person is dead after the experimental aircraft he was piloting fell out of the sky and crashed into a yard 3 miles south of Attica.

Charles H. Coffing, 72, of Covington was flying the aircraft he owned Saturday afternoon when for an unknown reason it nose-dived into the ground near Rob Roy's covered bridge.

Coffing was pronounced dead at the scene by the Fountain County Coroner's Office.

About 1:30 p.m., Attica dispatchers received a 911 call notifying them of the crash in a yard off East Covered Bridge Road.

Responding to the scene were Indiana State Police, Attica police and fire departments, the Fountain County Sheriff's Office and Fountain County EMS.

Coffing's family was notified Saturday afternoon.

Indiana State Police Trooper Sean Swaim said his agency contacted the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, which dispatched a crew to the scene. Those agencies are tasked with investigating civil aviation-related accidents.

"The priority was to find if we had any injuries," Swaim said. "Once we figured out it was a deceased person, our rules kind of changed. I started contacting my dispatch to get a hold of the FAA since this is an aircraft.

"We're not really set to deal with aircraft on our side. Right now (our goal) is to just maintain scene security until they arrive."

According to FAA records, the aircraft was a fixed-wing, single-engine experimental aircraft. The plane, which was categorized as "amateur built," was registered to Coffing out of Covington.

Upon notification of a plane crash, the NTSB activates its Go Team — a group of anywhere from three to 12 specialists from the board's Washington, D.C., headquarters.

The team will be tasked with combing through all aspects of the crash as it seeks to determine the cause. That includes investigating the aircraft and its pilot's history, documenting the wreckage site and evaluating weather and other possible factors.

The investigation process typically lasts several months.

http://www.jconline.com



Jarid Larson, left., of Attica Police Department, and Trooper Sean Swaim of Indiana State Police prepare to photograph the scene after a plane crash Saturday, May 10, 2014, off East Covered Bridge Road about three miles south of Attica. According to Trooper Swaim, an ultralight experimental plane crashed around 1:30 in the area known as Rob Roy. The pilot of the plane, Charles Coffing, 72, of Covington, was killed in the accident. 

Attica Fire Department firefighters respond after a plane crash Saturday, May 10, 2014, off East Covered Bridge Road about three miles south of Attica. 


Attica Fire Department firefighters respond after a plane crash Saturday, May 10, 2014, off East Covered Bridge Road about three miles south of Attica. 


 Police investigate following a plane crash Saturday, May 10, 2014, off East Covered Bridge Road about three miles south of Attica. According to Trooper Sean Swaim of Indiana State Police, an ultralight experimental plane crashed around 1:30 in the area known as Rob Roy. The pilot of the plane, Charles Coffing, 72, of Covington, was killed in the accident




Residents walk back to their homes after a plane crash Saturday, May 10, 2014, off East Covered Bridge Road about three miles south of Attica.





Attica Fire Department firefighters respond after a plane crash Saturday, May 10, 2014, off East Covered Bridge Road about three miles south of Attica. According to Trooper Sean Swaim of Indiana State Police, an ultra-light experimental plane crashed around 1:30 in the area known as Rob Roy. The pilot of the plane, Charles Coffing, 72, of Covington, was killed in the accident.




One person is dead after the aircraft he was piloting fell out of the sky and crashed into a yard three miles south of Attica.

Charles Coffing, 72, of Covington, was flying the aircraft Saturday afternoon when for an unknown reasons it nose dived into the ground.

Coffing was pronounced dead at the scene by the Fountain County Coroner's Office.

At approximately 1:30 p.m., Attica dispatchers received a 911 call notifying them of the crash in a yard off East Covered Bridge Road.

Responding were Indiana State Police, Attica Police and Fire departments, Fountain County Sheriff's Department and Fountain County EMS.

Coffing's family was notified of the death Saturday afternoon.

Indiana State Police Trooper Sean Swaim said his agency contacted the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration who dispatch an investigation crew to the scene. Those agencies are tasked with investigating all aviation related accidents, a process which usually takes at least several months.

"The priority was to find if we had any injuries," Swaim said. "One we figured out it was a deceased person our rules kind of changed. I started contacting my dispatch to get ahold of the FAA since this is an aircraft.

"We're not really set to deal with aircraft on our side. Right now (our goal) is to just maintain scene security until they arrive."

According to FAA records, the aircraft was a fixed wing single-engine experimental aircraft. The plane, which was categorized as "amateur built," was registered to Coffing out of Covington.

Source:   http://www.indystar.com

Indiana State Police
Lafayette District 14
Lafayette, IN  

Fountain County- 

Today at approximately 1:30 p.m, Indiana Stare Police along with the Fountain County Sheriff’s Department were advised of an airplane crash on Covered Bridge Road about three miles south of Attica, IN.

Preliminary information by Trooper Sean Swaim has revealed that what appears to be an ultralight aircraft has crashed near the Rob Roy Covered Bridge. It has claimed the life of Charles H. Coffing, 72 from Covington, IN. Coffing was flying the aircraft when for an unknown reason, the plane nosed dived into the ground. Coffing was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Fountain County Coroner’s Office. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been notified and are en route to the scene. All other information will be forth coming from their spokesperson.

Assisting at the scene was the Attica Police Department, Attica Fire Department, Fountain County EMS, Fountain County Sheriff’s Department and the Fountain County Coroner’s Office.

ATTICA, Ind. - A Covington man was killed Saturday when the ultralight plane he was piloting crashed three miles south of Attica.

Indiana State Police say Charles H. Coffing, 72, of Covington, Ind., was flying the aircraft around 1:30 p.m. Saturday when, for an unknown reason, the plane nose-dived into the ground.

Coffing was pronounced dead at the scene by the Fountain County Coroner's Office.
  
FOUNTAIN CO., Ind. (WLFI) – According to Indiana State Police, a small plane crash killed a Fountain County man Saturday afternoon.

It happened around 1:30 p.m. Saturday near East Covered Bridge Road in Fountain County.

Police said the unidentified man was flying a single seat ultralight plane, when it crashed into a residential yard next to the Rob Roy Bridge.

Indiana State Police, Attica Police and Fire Departments, Fountain County EMS, and the Fountain County Coroner were all called to the scene.

Police are waiting on the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board to arrive at the scene.


FOUNTAIN COUNTY, Ind. (WISH) – An ultralight plane crashed in Fountain County Saturday afternoon, Indiana State Police confirm. 

ISP said around 2:30 p.m. that officers with their department and the Fountain County Sheriff’s Department were on the scene of the crash.

It happened on Covered Bridge Road, about three miles south of Attica.

No other information was released.