Friday, March 3, 2017

Beech G18S, Point to Point Air LLC, N103AF: Accident occurred March 03, 2017 in Metlakatla, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration/ Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Point to Point Air LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N103AF

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA017
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, March 03, 2017 in Metlakatla, AK
Aircraft: BEECH G18S, registration: N103AF
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 3, 2017, about 0815 Alaska standard time, a twin-engine Beechcraft G18S airplane, N103AF, is presumed to have sustained substantial damage during impact with ocean waters about two miles southwest of Metlakatla, Alaska following a total loss of engine power in the right engine. The airline transport pilot and airline transport pilot certificated passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to Point to Point Air, LLC and operated by the pilot as an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, when the accident occurred. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the route of flight. An instrument flight plan was filed and activated. The flight departed the Klawock Airport (PAKW), Alaska, at 0734, destined for Ketchikan International Airport (PAKT), Ketchikan, Alaska.

According to a written statement provided by the pilot, the airplane was loaded with just under 1000 pounds of geoduck clams destined for Ketchikan. During an instrument landing system (ILS) approach to PAKT runway 11, the pilot performed the missed approach procedure at decision height due to no visual contact with the runway environment. The pilot stated that the right engine seized during the climb out about 2,000 feet MSL. The pilot directed the passenger in the right front seat, to help navigate to Annette Island Airport and perform radio communications. The pilot stated that he attempted to feather the right engine by pulling the propeller control to the feather position, however the propeller would not feather. He stated that he was not able to maintain altitude, even at the designated single engine rate of climb airspeed of 120 knots and maximum power setting of 36.5 inHg manifold pressure and 2300 RPM on the left engine. The passenger declared an emergency with Anchorage Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) and requested radar vectors for terrain clearance. According to a written statement provided by the passenger, Anchorage ARTCC stated that they did not have radar coverage at the altitude at which the aircraft was operating. The airplane descended through the clouds on the west side of Annette Island about five miles north of Annette Island Airport. The pilot stated that the airplane exited the clouds at an altitude of between 100 and 200 feet with about 1 mile of inflight visibility. When the airplane descended through 50 feet, the pilot initiated a forced water landing in Smuggler's Cove near the coastline. The passenger transmitted the ditching intentions on the ARTCC frequency. According to the pilot, the right wing contacted the water first and the airplane yawed right. When the nose section contacted the water, it immediately separated from the airplane. Both occupants egressed through the left crew door and swam about 200 yards to shore. The pilot reported seeing fire on the surface of the water. The airplane then sank in about 14 fathoms (about 84ft) of water.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued an ALNOT (alert notice) at 0826. U.S. Coast Guard Sector Juneau directed a response vessel from Coast Guard station Ketchikan and an MH-60 helicopter from Air Station Sitka. The Metlakatla fire department launched a rescue boat and were first to arrive on scene about 30 minutes after the accident. The two survivors were transported to Metlakatla medical clinic and treated for minor injuries. According to the U.S. Coast Guard, the waves were 6 feet high at Smuggler's Cove when they arrived.


The closest weather reporting facility is Annette Island Airport (PANT), about three miles south of the accident site. At 0815, an aviation special weather report (SPECI) from PANT was reporting in part: wind 150 degrees at 14 knots gusting to 23 knots; sky condition, broken 600 feet, overcast 1,100 feet; visibility, 2 statute miles in light snow; temperature 2 degrees C; dewpoint -1 degrees C; altimeter, 29.46 inHg.



Authorities released the names of a pilot and passenger in a plane crash Friday morning near Metlakatla.

A wheeled, twin-engine Beech G-18 enroute from Klawock was trying to land at the Ketchikan airport about 8:30 a.m. Friday, Ketchikan Flight Service reported.

The pilot was Steven Hewitt of Seattle and Grant Hasting of Auburn, Wash., was the passenger.

The aircraft missed the Ketchikan runway on its first attempt and then lost power to one engine while circling back, according to Alaska State Troopers. Hewitt told air traffic control that he was going to attempt a beach landing, then radio communication was lost.

The plane went into the water near Smugglers Cove, south of Metlakatla just off of Annette Island, troopers reported. The plane sank, but the two men on board were able to swim the approximately 200 yards to shore. They were found by Annette Island Search and Rescue crews, and were taken to the Metlakatla clinic for treatment of minor injuries.

The weather in the Ketchikan area on Friday morning included heavy snow and strong winds.

Numerous agencies responded quickly, including Alaska State Troopers, Wildlife Troopers, U.S. Coast Guard, Ketchikan Volunteer Rescue Squad, Metlakatla Police Department and Annette Island Search and Rescue.


Source:   http://www.ktoo.org

JUNEAU, Alaska (KINY) - Two people were rescued after their plane made an emergency landing in the water near Ketchikan Friday. 

Kent Colby at Ketchikan Radio Center interviewed the Metlakatla Police Chief and provided News of the North with this report:

The Coast Guard reports the pilot of a BE18 Beechcraft missed the approach to the Ketchikan Airport due to icing on the airplane, diverted for an emergency landing on Annette Island, but had to make an emergency landing in the water in Smuggler's Cove near Annette Island.

Tribal and local partners assisted. Metlakatla police and fire rescue boat crews were the first to arrive, and transported the two survivors to Metlakatla Clinic. They were treated for minor injuries.

Coast Guard Sector Juneau watchstanders briefed the Alaska State Troopers and Annette Island Fire Department, and released an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast to mariners. A Coast Guard Station Ketchikan Response Boat-Medium crew and an Air Station Sitka MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew were directed to the scene.

The Station Ketchikan RB-M crew remains on scene to monitor the scene for potential pollution with Marine Safety Detachment Ketchikan personnel.

http://www.kinyradio.com

Both crew members on a plane that ditched in waters near Ketchikan Friday morning were able to escape with only minor injuries, according to federal officials.

Clint Johnson, the National Transportation Safety Board's Alaska chief, said the plane went down shortly after 8 a.m., when it failed to land at the Ketchikan airport during an instrument approach in snow showers. The aircraft set down off Annette Island.

Noreen Price, the NTSB investigator assigned to the incident, said that the Beech 18 — a twin-engine propeller plane, operated by Washington-based Point to Point Air — was on a flight from Klawock to Ketchikan at the time of the landing. No passengers were on board, Price said the company told her.

"On the radio, the crew reported that they had an engine failure during that missed approach," Price said. "They could not maintain altitude and they made an emergency landing."

After the Beech ditched, Price said, the plane's occupants got out and were able to swim to shore as the aircraft sank. A rescue boat from Metlakatla was sent to the area and picked up the crew.

The U.S. Coast Guard also sent a Ketchikan-based response boat and a Sitka-based MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter to the scene, according to a statement from the service. The Metlakatla boat crew took the occupants to a clinic in Metlakatla for care.

Weather in the area included winds at 34 mph, 6-foot seas and "restricted visibility," the Coast Guard statement said.

Source:  https://www.adn.com

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, N8524U: Incident occurred March 02, 2017 in Lake Hood, Anchorage, Alaska

http://registry.faa.govN8524U

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Anchorage, Alaska 

Aircraft on landing went off the end of the runway.  

Date: 02-MAR-17
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N8524U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA

Cessna 152, N6318M: Accident occurred February 04, 2017 at Tri-County Airport (1J0) Bonifay, Holmes County, Florida

http://registry.faa.govN6318M

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Birmingham 


Aircraft on landing, went off the runway into a ditch.  Delayed notification. 


Date: 02-FEB-17

Time: 20:30:00Z
Regis#: N6318M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C152
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BONIFAY
State: FLORIDA































AIRCRAFT: 1980 Cessna 152 N6318M, s/n: 15284670. Current tach 2929.9 and current Hobbs 1407.1.

Last annual inspection entry on 04/01/2016 reads TT 11253 and Tach 2024.6. 
                                                              
ENGINE: Lycoming IO-235-L2C, s/n: L-21535-15.  The log entry for the annual inspection on 04/01/2016 reads Tach 825.4, and TSMOH 2024.6. 

Engine overhauled on 06/03/2007, at 6,305.45 engine TT

PROPELLER:  McCauley 1A103/TCM6958

EQUIPMENT:   KMA 20, (2) KX 155s, KR87, and a GTX 320.  The DG has been removed and is NOT included with the salvage.
           
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  On landing at Tri County Airport, Bonifay, Florida on 02/04/17, the aircraft departed the runway and came to rest in a ditch with water. 

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:   

Damage includes but may not be limited to the following:   
    
Prop blades bent
Engine experienced prop strike
Nose gear broken and folded back
Mount broken
Firewall and belly structure aft damaged
Exhaust pipe crushed
Left wing tip damage and adjacent wing skins buckled
Left gear leg cover torn
Bottom of empennage is dented and scraped

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Tri County Airport, 1983 Tri County Airport Rd, Bonifay, FL 32425.

INQUIRIES/REMARKS:  DG is not included with salvage.  Hour meters in aircraft appear to not match log entries. 

Read more here: http://www.avclaims.com/N6318M.html

Piper PA-28-161, F I T Aviation LLC, N623FT: Incident occurred March 02, 2017 at Melbourne International Airport (KMLB), Brevard County, Florida

F I T Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N623FT

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office:  Orlando, Florida 

Aircraft while on the runway, engine caught fire and was extinguished. 

Date: 02-MAR-17
Time: 22:14:00Z
Regis#: N623FT
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
City: MELBOURNE
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-28-161, Indian Hills Community College, N30823: Incident occurred March 02, 2017 in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa

Indian Hills Community College: http://registry.faa.gov/N30823

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Des Moines, Iowa  

Aircraft force landed off the side of a road.

Date: 02-MAR-17
Time: 22:15:00Z
Regis#: N30823
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OSKALOOSA
State: IOWA

Cessna 310R, N3563G: Incident occurred March 02, 2017 in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N3563G

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Aircraft on landing sustained minor damage.  

Date: 03-MAR-17
Time: 15:50:00Z
Regis#: N3563G
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C310
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ALLENTOWN
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Accident occurred March 02, 2017 in Alpine, Brewster County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N28924 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Lubbock, Texas

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances. 

Date: 03-MAR-17
Time: 02:10:00Z
Regis#: N28924
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C182
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: ALPINE
State: TEXAS

Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (KPHF) executive director placed on administrative leave; Newport News city manager resigns from airport commission



The Peninsula Airport Commission’s use of taxpayer funds to pay off a $4.5 million debt of a failed airline has, two years on, sparked a major house-cleaning.

Newport News City Manager Jim Bourey resigned as a commissioner Thursday, saying he felt his decisions on the body, which included voting to guarantee a loan to People Express Airlines, were justified.

The commission ended its six-decade-old relation with the law firm of its attorney, Herbert V. Kelly Jr.

It put Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport executive director Ken Spirito on paid administrative leave.

And, for the first time, it said it regretted its dealings with People Express, which operated out of the airport for less than three months in 2014.

“This was a very stressful time for the the airport but we want to show that we are trying to be diligent and effective and efficient,” commission chairman George Wallace said at the end of a more than two hour closed door meeting. “We’re going to be be bigger and better than we have been.”


Executive Director Ken Spirito was placed on paid leave.


Wallace, former mayor of Hampton, said Spirito would remain on administrative leave while a state audit continues.

The state cut off funds to the airport in January after a review prompted by Daily Press stories about the loan payment uncovered the use of $3.55 million of state funds to help pay off the People Express debt.

“We want to protect the integrity of the audit and at the same time not put a cloud on Ken,” Wallace said.

“It’s like when an officer gets a serious complaint and is placed on administrative leave pending an investigation,” commissioner Rob Coleman said.

He said once the audit is completed, the commission will decide Spirito’s status going forward.

Spirito declined to comment as he left the airport, saying only: “I’m going home.”

That audit is likely to take some time because the commission is not providing documents investigators have requested, in some cases two or three times, and because commission staff have not made themselves available, Virginia Secretary of Transportation Aubrey Layne has said. Wallace said the documents the state wants are actually in the custody of TowneBank, which made the loan and which was made whole by the commission guarantee.

Airport attorney Kelly, who wrote the resolution empowering the commission’s then chairwoman to sign the loan guarantee, is a member of TowneBank’s Peninsula board. The resolution, which the commission approved after deciding in a closed session to guarantee the debt, did not mention that the body has decided to take on the risk of paying off People Express’ IOU.

Asked for reasons for the decision to end Kelly’s representation, Wallace said the commission just felt it was time for change.

Bourey announced his resignation from the board before the closed meeting.

“The past month has been a very difficult time for the airport and me personally. I am tremendously disappointed with the level of misinformation exists√ and the tremendous confusion for everyone that has been created,” he said.

“While I feel all the Commission’s actions that I supported were justified, I am resigning my position from the Commission immediately in the hope that this will allow for a fresh start for the Commission.”

The Newport News City Council, meanwhile, scheduled a closed session for 10 a.m. Tuesday to discuss the performance of one of its three appointees. Its notice did not specify which of those three — Bourey, City Clerk Mabel Washington or City Attorney Collins Owens — would be the subject of the discussion.

In its statement regretting the People Express deal, the commission said it would invite Williamsburg, James City County and York County to join Newport News and Hampton in sending representatives to its decision-making board. The commission used $700,000 from the Regional Air Service Enhancement Committee, a regional body funded by local governments that tries to woo airlines to the airport. That move prompted Hampton, James City County and York County to put a hold on their contributions to the group. The commission also used $300,000 of federal funds meant to pay for marketing and to guarantee revenue for the People Express service.

“With the lessons learned, the PAC intends to exercise greater due diligence and transparency moving forward,” the statement said. “We continue to hold the public trust as our guiding principle.”

In addition to inviting the other localities to join its board, the statement said the commission would cooperate fully with the state audit, and supported legislation approved by the General Assembly to reform the way the state gives funds to airports.

The statement marks a significant break. Spirito and members of the commission have argued that a state manual on the use of funds intended for improvements to public airport facilities allows for "air service development projects, " and that the loan guarantee was such a project.

Layne said the payment violates a 30-year-old state policy. Other Virginia airport executives have said they knew the state funds could not be used that way.

Story and video:  http://www.dailypress.com

Air India removes operations director Captain AK Kathpalia from his post - oldest pilot in the airlines, but was known for his unlawful attitude

National carrier Air India today removed its Executive Director (Operation) Capt. AK Kathpalia for not taking breathalyzer test.

He is the oldest pilot in the airlines and this wasn't the first time that a complaint was registered against him. Not long ago, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation had suspended him for three months

All pilots are required to take the breathalyzer test before they fly.

"Captain A Kathpalia operated AI DEL-BLR on January 19 without undergoing BA examine test which is contravention to the contain in CAR section-5 series-F part III issue III dated 4 August 2015," DGCA said in an order.

The order further adds, "Kathpalia was positioned as executive director operations in Air India. As per the law, it is mandatory to all pilots to examine pre-flight medical check-up before taking flight."

Kathpalia is also accused of risking the life of former Prime minister Dr Manmohan Singh while he flew him abroad.

The CCPA had objected to him being made ED (Operation), but the airline intervened. Unfortunately, this time the latter does not have any choice.

Original article can be found here:   http://indiatoday.intoday.in

Aero Commander S2R, Carson Flying Service Inc., N1755S : Accident occurred March 02, 2017 in Enid, Garfield County, Oklahoma

Carson Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N1755S

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Aircraft struck a wire and crashed onto a field.  

Date: 02-MAR-17
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N1755S
Aircraft Make: AERO COMMANDER
Aircraft Model: S2R
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: ENID
State: OKLAHOMA









ENID, Okla. — A Garber man survived the crash of the crop duster he was flying Thursday afternoon east of Enid.

Glen Walter Carson, 69, was admitted in stable condition to St. Mary's Regional Medical Center with head, hand and trunk injuries, according to an Oklahoma Highway Patrol report.

The crash happened at 3 p.m. one-half mile north of Longhorn Road and one-half mile west of 90th, about 3 miles south and 8 miles east of Enid. The plane went down in a private field.

According to the OHP report, Carson was flying a Aero Commander S2R aerial applicator, commonly referred to as a crop duster. He was spraying a field with a herbicide when he lost sight of the top static wire on a power pole. The plane hit the wire, causing it to go down, according to the report. The plane hit some trees, then hit the ground, traveling about 200 feet before it came to rest. 

Carson was able to crawl out of the wreckage and call for help before the plane caught fire and partially burned, according to the report.

The report lists Carson's condition as apparently normal and the cause of the accident at "pilot error."

Garfield County Sheriff Jerry Niles said the pilot was conscious and alert when first responders arrived.

Firefighters from Waukomis, Fairmont, Pioneer/Skeleton Creek and Douglas responded and put out the plane fire, which also sparked a grass fire. In addition to OHP, Garfield County Sheriff's Office, Garfield County Emergency Management and Life EMS responded to the accident.

Federal Aviation Administration was notified and also will investigate.

Source:  http://www.enidnews.com

Directorate General of Civil Aviation should ensure that lessors furnish aircraft information for probe: Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau

Aviation regulator Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) should put in place norms to ensure lessors provide information about their aircraft leased to domestic airlines whenever there is a probe, as per a recommendation by Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau  (AAIB).

It has been made by the AAIB while submitting its report on an emergency landing incident of a SpiceJet aircraft last year.

The report, which was submitted to the DGCA in November 2016, was made public this week.

SpiceJet's Mumbai-Delhi flight, with 158 people on board, had made an emergency landing at the Mumbai airport on March 19, 2016. The A-319 aircraft involved in the incident was wet-leased from Bulgarian operator BH Air.

No one was injured in the incident.

Under DGCA regulations, a domestic airline operator is required to maintain a detailed maintenance and operational information about leased aircraft.

In its report, AAIB said BH Air "did not respond to the request of SpiceJet (the lessee) for incident information that was made after the validity of the wet lease period".

When a plane is taken on wet lease, the lessor also provides crew, maintenance and insurance.

Against this backdrop, the report has recommended that provisions should be there to ensure lessors share information about aircraft whenever required for the investigation purpose.

"Provision should be made in DGCA regulations to ensure the lessor must provide aircraft incident/accident information to the lessee whenever required for incident investigation," it said.

AAIB investigates serious incidents and accidents involving Indian aircraft that are referred to it by the civil aviation ministry.

During the investigation, AAIB found that the leased aircraft had suffered failure of hydraulic system.

Source:  http://www.business-standard.com

Cessna 340A, Southern Aircraft Consultancy Inc. Trustee, N340DW: Accident occurred March 02, 2017 at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (KFXE), Broward County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Southern Aircraft Consultancy Inc. Trustee: http://registry.faa.gov/N340DW

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA121

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, March 02, 2017 in Ft Lauderdale, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 340, registration: N340DW
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On March 2, 2017, about 1034 eastern standard time, a privately owned and operated Cessna 340A, N340DW, was substantially damaged when the landing gear collapsed during landing at the Fort Lauderda
le Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The airline transport pilot was not injured. The local flight departed FXE about 0930. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the post maintenance test flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was to perform a post maintenance check. He departed FXE to the northwest, and performed "maneuvers and aircraft systems checks" before returning to FXE. On approach for runway 9, he observed a "three-green landing gear down indication." During the landing roll, the left main landing gear collapsed, the left propeller struck the runway, and the airplane veered off the left side of the runway and came to rest in the grass.

Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed that the airplane had been substantially damaged. The left wing aft spar was bent, the left wing tip tank, wing flaps, and leading edge were impact damaged, and the left propeller blade tips were curled back.

The pilot stated that the airplane had previously experienced a landing gear collapse, had undergone repairs, and this was the first flight since those repairs.

According to airplane maintenance records, the airplane had undergone extensive maintenance in December of 2015, including replacement of the left aileron, left inboard and outboard flaps, and removal, inspection, and servicing of all three landing gear. According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector, FAA records indicated the landing gear collapse occurred in the Bahamas, on April 21, 2014. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on January 19, 2017. At the time of the inspection, the airplane had accrued 3,977 total hours of operation.


The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination.



FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. (WSVN) - A small plane has reportedly skidded off the runway at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport Thursday morning.

According to Fort Lauderdale Police, the Cessna 340 plane had just touched down when its left main landing gear collapsed.

A couple who was nearby the scene described what they saw. “Obviously, one wheel isn’t in the proper position,” said the unnamed man. “All I know is what I heard from you, that the wheel came up when he landed. It’s sad because it’s quite a bit of damage.”

Police said only the pilot was on-board the aircraft, and no injuries were reported.

Fire trucks arrived to the scene as a precaution, but no fire began as a result of the rough landing.

One runway at the airport is closed until the aircraft can be towed to a nearby hangar. A second runway is open for departing flights only at this time.

The FAA remains on the scene to investigate.

Story and video:  http://wsvn.com



Authorities responded after a small plane skidded off the runway at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport Thursday morning.

The Cessna 340A was landing around 10:45 a.m. when its left main landing gear collapsed, officials said.

Footage showed the twin-engine plane in a grassy area off the runway.

Officials said the pilot was the only person on board and that there were no injuries.

Two runways were closed until the plane could be brought to a hangar.

Source:  http://www.wptv.com