Monday, September 24, 2012

Airport Manager Opening: Brainerd Lakes Regional (KBRD), Minnesota

The Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport, located in the heart of the Brainerd lakes area, is seeking an Airport Manager.  This senior management assignment is accountable for the strategic leadership and effective operation of the Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport.  The position requires an innovative, developmental leader with proven ability to provide long-term vision and strong business development results.  The position operates in a collaborative, public safety driven, results-oriented business environment, committed to excellence.

We are looking for an innovative leader that has demonstrated experience and success in business development, project management, staff development and technical proficiencies.  The position requires strong customer focus and excellent interpersonal communication skills.  The ideal candidate has a Bachelors Degree in a related field and knowledge gained through at least five years of practical experience.

Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.  The Airport also provides an attractive benefit package.

To apply, send application, resume, salary requirements and work-related references to:
Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport, Attention:  Search Committee, 16384 Airport Rd, Suite 5, Brainerd, MN  56401-5852      Phone:  218-825-2166

The employment application and Airport Manager job description can be found at our website: www.brainerdairport.com.  Applicants may be requested to submit an electronic copy of their resume upon request.  

Applications must be submitted no later than 4:30 pm, CDT, September 28, 2012.  Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport is an equal opportunity employer.

http://www.mnsu.edu

Aero Club Migliaro - Cremona, Italy: Presentation Pilatus PC-12 (Presentazione aerotaxi Pilatus PC-12)

 

Published on Sep 14, 2012 by Comune Cremona

 Presentazione dell'aerotaxi Pilatus PC-12 alle autorit√† cittadine e agli imprenditori cremonesi avvenuta all'Aeroclub Migliaro di Cremona (4 settembre 2012) 


Presentation dell'aerotaxi Pilatus PC-12 to the city authorities and entrepreneurs Cremona occurred Aeroclub Migliaro of Cremona (4 September 2012)

Leaky windscreen diverts Qantas flight

A 254-seat Perth-bound Qantas flight from Sydney was forced to divert to Adelaide last night when a cockpit windscreen developed a leak.

The Boeing 767-300 pilots reduced speed and altitude and QF583 limped "low and slow" to Adelaide where passengers were transferred to a smaller 162-seat Boeing 737-800.

Not all passengers could be accommodated on the smaller plane and 10 were taken to hotels and will be flown to Perth this morning.

Flight QF583 departed Sydney at 7.35pm and was scheduled to arrive in Perth at 10.35pm.

Qantas has confirmed the incident and is due to respond with further details this morning.

No one was injured during the incident.

Qantas says engineers are inspecting the aircraft and expected it to resume flying today.


http://news.ninemsn.com.au

A Perth-bound Qantas flight from Sydney has been forced to divert to Adelaide after a windscreen was found leaking. 

Qantas confirmed to AAP on Tuesday that QF583, a 254-seat Boeing 767-300, left Sydney at 7.35pm on Monday and was due to arrive in Perth at 10.35pm before it was diverted.

The pilots were forced to reduce speed and altitude and head for Adelaide after their cockpit windscreen reportedly developed a leak.

No one was injured during the incident and most passengers were transferred to a smaller 162-seat Boeing 737-800, which later arrived in Perth.

Some passengers remained in Adelaide and were expected to be transferred to Perth on Tuesday morning.

Qantas says engineers are inspecting the aircraft and expected it to resume flying on Tuesday.

http://au.news.yahoo.com

McDonnell Douglas 369FF N911BL: Accident occurred September 24, 2012 in Las Vegas, Nevada

NTSB Identification: WPR12TA436 
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Monday, September 24, 2012 in Las Vegas, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/11/2014
Aircraft: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS HELI CO 369FF, registration: N911BL
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

The pilot-in-command (PIC), who was giving instruction, was demonstrating a 270-degree autorotation in a gusting west wind at a density altitude of about 5,100 feet. The PIC began the autorotation heading south and turned left; the helicopter experienced a tailwind during the turn. The PIC reported that, because of the tailwind, soon after commencing the autorotation, he increased his bank angle to maintain his ground reference to the intended touchdown point. The pilot receiving instruction stated that, moments later, the helicopter was in a high descent rate, and its airspeed was decreasing. The helicopter impacted terrain in a tail-low attitude. Subsequently, the tailboom separated from the fuselage, the helicopter rolled onto its right side, and the right landing skid folded under the fuselage.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s failure to maintain sufficient airspeed while performing a 270-degree practice autorotation with a gusting tailwind at a high-density altitude.

On September 24, 2012, about 1600 Pacific daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas 369FF helicopter, N911BL, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing following a practice autorotation at North Las Vegas Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. The two pilots, who both held flight instructor certificates, sustained minor injuries. The helicopter was registered to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, and the flight was a public aircraft operation. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local training flight, which had originated from North Las Vegas Airport approximately 30 minutes before the accident. A flight plan had not been filed.

The pilot-in-command (PIC)/pilot-giving-instruction stated that he and the pilot receiving instruction were alternately practicing autorotations. He decided to demonstrate a 270-degree autorotation to the touchdown point on taxiway Zulu. He began the maneuver on a 180-degree heading, 800 feet above the ground and an airspeed of 85 knots. As he crossed his intended touchdown point, he rolled the throttle back to begin the autorotation. He thought the wind was about 180 to 230 degrees at 15 knots gusting to 26 knots. He entered a left turn. While in the turn, he reported that because of a tailwind he increased his bank angle to maintain his ground reference to the touchdown point. The pilot receiving instruction reported that moments later, the helicopter was in a high rate of descent and its airspeed was decreasing. The helicopter impacted terrain in a tail low attitude. Subsequently the tail boom separated from the fuselage, the helicopter rolled onto its right side, and the right landing skid support structure folded under the fuselage.

At 1605, the reported wind at North Las Vegas Airport, elevation 2,205 feet, was 270 degrees at 13 knots gusting to 22 knots. The calculated density altitude, using the barometric pressure of 29.77 inches of mercury, was 5,116 feet. 


NTSB Identification: WPR12TA436 
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Monday, September 24, 2012 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS HELI CO 369FF, registration: N911BL
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

On September 24, 2012, about 1600 Pacific daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas 369FF helicopter, N911BL, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing following a practice autorotation at North Las Vegas Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. The two pilots, who both held flight instructor certificates, sustained minor injuries. The helicopter was registered to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, and the flight was a public aircraft operation. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local training flight, which had originated from North Las Vegas Airport approximately 30 minutes before the accident. A flight plan had not been filed.

The senior of the two pilots stated that they were alternately practicing autorotations. While he was maneuvering the helicopter, it got into a high vertical sink rate and impacted terrain. The helicopter rolled onto its right side, separating its tail boom and damaging the main rotor system.


Two officers were hospitalized as a precaution after a Metro helicopter took a hard landing in North Las Vegas. It happened during a training incident just after 4 p.m. on Monday. The helicopter's pilot and one other officer were the only people on board. It's not clear what caused the helicopter's hard landing. Metro and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating was caused the incident.

NORTH LAS VEGAS, Nev. -- A Metro Police rescue helicopter was on its side at the North Las Vegas Airport Monday afternoon. According to police, the MD-500 helicopter ended up on its side near Metro's air support facility during what the department is describing as a training incident. The helicopter's pilot and second officer were taken to University Medical Center as a precaution. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating. 

Story and video:   http://www.8newsnow.com


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 911BL        Make/Model: 369F      Description: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS 369FF
  Date: 09/24/2012     Time: 2300

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: NORTH LAS VEGAS   State: NV   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  N911BL MCDONNELL DOUGLAS 369FF ROTORCRAFT ON LANDING, ROLLED OVER, NORTH 
  LAS VEGAS, NV

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:   2
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Public Use      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: LAS VEGAS, NV  (WP19)                 Entry date: 09/25/2012 

Pilatus Business Aircraft Ltd - A conversation with Pete Welles

 
Published on September 20, 2012 by Pilatus Aircraft Ltd 
 ~ 
Pete Welles speaks about his Pilatus PC-12 NG and features of the aircraft that made it the right choice for his missions.

Pilatus Business Aircraft Ltd - A conversation with Brian Cleary

 

Published on September 19, 2012 by Pilatus Aircraft Ltd
 ~ 
 Brian Cleary speaks about flying his Pilatus PC-12 NG and why he made the investment.

Pilatus Business Aircraft Ltd - A conversation with Wes Howard

 

Published on September 20, 2012 by Pilatus Aircraft Ltd 
Wes Howard speaks about Pilatus Aircraft Ltd, his experiences and his PC-12 NG.

Ohio State University aviation program inks preferred job pathway for pilot hopefuls with Dayton airline

Ohio State University is giving its aviation students a lift into the job market under an agreement signed Monday with Dayton-based PSA Airlines Inc.

Airlines are worried about finding enough qualified pilots in the coming years because of a large number of pilots approaching mandatory retirement age by 2017 and required rest time rules that take effect in 2014 that will require additional hiring, according to PSA, a subsidiary of US Airways.

Read more:  http://www.bizjournals.com

San Antonio aircraft engine-repair facility moving

NEW BRANFELS, Texas (AP) — National Flight Services Inc. is moving an aircraft engine-repair facility to New Braunfels from nearby San Antonio.

Flight Services' owner, Tom Wiles, said Monday that the company will build a 20,000-square-foot facility at the New Braunfels Regional Airport by mid-April.

He said the company works on Honeywell turboprop engines used by regional airlines and general aviation.

New Braunfels officials said the facility will cost about $1.2 million and will be owned by the city.

National Flight Services is based in Toledo, Ohio, and has operations in Toledo and Lakeland, Fla.


http://www.wfaa.com

Just released to public - two near miss investigation dockets KORD

May 16 2011 Bombardier CRJ2 en route from Muskegon County, Michigan, to ORD, passed in close proximity to ExpressJet Airlines flight 6075 (BTA6075), an Embraer 145 departing ORD for Buffalo, New York. According to recorded FAA radar data, SKW6958 crossed runway 32L about 275 feet above and 480 feet behind BTA6075. Both aircraft were under control of ORD air traffic control tower (ATCT) at the time of the incident.

FAA released docket Sept 12/11 http://dms.ntsb.gov
Most info in number 4 - Chairman report


August 8, 2011, at approximately 1100 central daylight time, a near mid air collision (NMAC) occurred at Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD) when Chautauqua Airlines flight 5021 (CHQ5021), an ERJ-135 regional jet en route from La Crosse, Wisconsin to ORD, passed in close proximity to Trans State Airlines (LOF3367), an ERJ-145 regional jet departing ORD for Moline, IL. Radar data indicates that CHQ5021 crossed runway 32L about 125 feet above and 350 feet in front of LOF3367.

FAA released docket Sept 24/11 http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms/search/hitlist.cfm?docketID=51978&CFID=2871&CFTOKEN=67900912
Most info on number 4 - Chairman report

Bainbridge Island, Washington - Author offers pilots lessons on landing on the open ocean

 

Dave Montgomery, of Bainbridge Island, has written this book to help pilots think about what to do if they had to land a plane in the ocean.


By Tad Sooter 
Kitsap Sun 

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND — A commercial airliner maneuvering around thunderheads over the open ocean encounters a sudden, heavy hailstorm. Golf ball-sized chunks of ice batter the plane's fuselage. Its engines flame out one by one as the hail grows denser. The plane is going down.

Thirty harrowing minutes will pass before the disabled airliner splashes into frigid water. The decisions the pilot makes in that half-hour could determine whether his passengers live or die.

"There are a lot of fancy computers and things to help you from the ground," Bainbridge pilot Dave Montgomery said. "In reality, it all comes down to you."

That 30 minutes between a midair calamity and a water landing consume much of Montgomery's new book, "Blue Water Ditching: Training Professional Crewmembers for the Unthinkable Disaster." As the title suggests, it's a manual for successfully landing a plane on the ocean, miles from shore. 

Montgomery, a captain for private aircraft provider NetJets, believes his book fills a void in the world of commercial air travel. Pilots and flight attendants don't spend much time preparing for ocean landings, he said.

"There are a lot of aspects of over-water ditching that people haven't trained for," Montgomery said. "And I'm trying to not be too critical of the industry."

Read more and comments: http://www.kitsapsun.com

Jefferson City, Missouri: Teen flying high as state’s youngest pilot

Anastasia Crenshaw poses beside her single-engine Cessna on Sunday at the Jefferson City Memorial Airport. At 17, she’s one of the youngest pilots in Missouri. Photo by Gerry Tritz.


By Gerry Tritz 

Monday, September 24, 2012

While her peers at Jefferson City High School were getting their driver’s licenses, Anastasia Crenshaw was aiming higher.

Last month, the JCHS junior became the youngest licensed pilot in Missouri — a fleeting status she may have already lost. (Whenever someone obtains a license on or near his or her 17th birthday — the legal age to get a pilot’s license — he or she briefly inherits the status.)

Still, being a girl pilot is uncommon in a hobby and profession dominated by men. But Crenshaw doesn’t let herself be constrained by conventions, and she shoots for ....


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