Monday, May 26, 2014

Piper PA-28-140, N5768U: Incident occurred May 26, 2014 in Franklin, Kentucky

AIRCRAFT STRUCK POWERLINES AND FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, FRANKLIN, KY 

FAA Louisville FSDO-17: http://www.asias.faa.gov

SALE REPORTED:  http://registry.faa.gov/N5768U

Cross Plains pilot recounts Monday plane crash 

A Cross Plains pilot said Tuesday he felt thankful and blessed that he and his wife weren’t injured after their small plane crashed in Kentucky on Monday.

“It could have gone nine different ways of bad and it turned out OK,” said James E. McGaugh, Jr. “Never in my life have I been through something like this, and I hope I never will again.”

Problems for McGaugh began shortly after take-off, he said. He and his wife, Renee, were planning an afternoon trip to Gallatin to gain flight time in their 1969 Piper PA-28-140 fixed-wing single-engine aircraft and practice with a newly installed GPS system.

The couple has a hangar at the privately-owned Welcome Field Airport, McGaugh said. The facility sits about five miles from the Tennessee border and three miles west of Franklin, Ky.

“I was going down the runway, trying to take off, and once I took off, it just wouldn’t climb out or gain any altitude,” he said. “I did everything right, but the airplane wouldn’t respond. We hit the power lines and the plane’s engine stopped.”

McGaugh was able to land the plane in a corn field less than a mile away from Welcome Field Airport.

“It all happened in a matter of about 10 seconds, if it was that long,” he said, adding that all he could think about was his wife’s safety during the ordeal.

The couple has been married for nearly 31 years. They own Shipley’s Do-Nuts in Madison and have three grown daughters, ages 26, 25 and 21.

After the landing, the craft came to rest in an adjacent wheat field, about 25 feet away from where it landed and 200 feet from a private residence, according to Robert Palmer, director of the Simpson County Office of Emergency Management.

First responders were called to the scene near Tuck Road just before 3:30 p.m. on Monday, Palmer said.

“I was told we had a single-engine plane down with no injuries, but I didn’t really know what to expect as far as the shape of the airplane was concerned,” Palmer said. “It appeared the plane had minimal contact with the power lines, which was good news.

“Anytime you set an aircraft down where it doesn’t belong and walk away from it, I consider the pilot and any passengers to be pretty lucky. It certainly could have been worse for them.”

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) were dispatched to the scene on Tuesday to determine the cause of the crash.

The agency’s spokeswoman, Kathleen Bergen, declined to answer any specific questions regarding the crash.

“The FAA does not discuss open investigation,” she wrote in an email. “The information (from the investigation) will be turned over to the NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board), which will post a preliminary report at ntsb.gov in about 10 days.”

Once the FAA investigation is complete, the agency will release the aircraft back to McGaugh, Bergen said.

On Tuesday afternoon, McGaugh said he had been given the authority to move the plane back to his private hangar. He said he was planning to have the plane repaired. There was some damage to the aircraft’s propeller and some scuffs to the undercarriage, but a more thorough inspection of the engine would have to be scheduled for a later date, he said.

McGaugh has been a pilot since 1995. He and his wife bought the Piper, their only aircraft, this past April in Texas, he said. Before the crash, he had flown it about seven times without incident.


http://www.tennessean.com




WSMV Channel 4 


FRANKLIN, KY (WSMV) -

No injuries were reported after a small plane crashed into power lines Monday afternoon in Simpson County, KY.

Emergency officials say the plane missed a nearby landing strip and went down in a field near Tuck Road in Franklin.

The plane is still intact, and the two occupants on board - a husband and wife - were not hurt.

Officials say the pilot had just taken off from the private airstrip about a mile away when the plane experienced trouble. Witnesses say it appeared the single-engine plane couldn't get any lift after taking off.

The couple recently bought the plane in Springfield, they were on their way to Gallatin at the time of the crash.

The FAA will investigate the crash Tuesday morning.

 ==============

A Tennessee man and his wife escaped injury today when the man was forced to land his small plane in a cornfield near a private airstrip in Franklin.

Emergency responders were notified about the incident at 3:14 p.m., Simpson County Sheriff's Detective Eddie Lawson said.

The pilot told deputies he was attempting to take off but failed to get enough lift and clipped a power line at the end of the turf airstrip about two miles southwest of Franklin, Lawson said.

The pilot landed in an adjacent cornfield. No one was injured on the plane or on the ground, Lawson said.

Kentucky State Police have been called to investigate. The Federal Aviation Administration will also be notified.

Lawson did not know the identity of the pilot or the pilot's wife.


Source:  http://www.bgdailynews.com

Brockville Municipal Airport, Ontario, Canada

Pilot sustains serious injuries in Brockville plane crash

A single-engine plane crashed in a field near Brockville Airport Sunday night, seriously injuring the pilot.

The pilot was the lone occupant and he was pinned within the small plane and required the Jaws of Life to be extricated.

A spokesman for the Brockville Fire Department says the crash occurred around 6:45 p.m. Sunday night and the pilot was extricated just after 8 p.m. A farmer was in the field and saw the plane come down and then called it in.

The pilot was taken by air ambulance to an undisclosed hospital.


Source:   http://ottawacitizen.com

Clovis, New Mexico: Officials pleased with air show turnout, reception

A little thunder and rain wasn’t enough to keep air show enthusiasts away Sunday morning as the second and final day of the 2014 Cannon Air Force Base Open House and Air Show kicked off.

After a couple of hours of rain and a brief period of thunder, during which Cannon personnel secured air show attendees in aircraft hangars, the sun crept out from behind the clouds just in time for the Thunderbirds show.

“Despite weather obstacles, it was still a really great event,” Capt. Anastasia Wasem, of CAFB Public Affairs, said Monday. “The base team did a really great job pulling the event together.”

Wasem said Cannon security forces gave a total number of 25,000 people attending the event for the two days.

Base Commander Col. Tony Bauernfeind said Saturday afternoon at the end of the open house’s first day that base personnel were working hard to make the open house run smoothly and he was hearing positive feedback from community members.

“I thought it went outstanding,” Bauernfeind said of the first day. “Everybody I’ve talked to has said they’ve had a great time.”

Bauernfeind said Cannon personnel were grateful to all of the people who showed to the event Saturday and grateful to be able to share what they do with the local communities.

Wasem reiterated the appreciation of base personnel Monday morning.

“The base is really happy that we were able to provide this event to the community because they give so much to us all the time and it was great to be able to give back in this way,” Wasem said. “We’re looking forward to the next event where we can host something else of this nature for the community.”

Portales Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Karl Terry said he helped operate the chamber booth both days of the base’s open house and he met a large variety of people from Clovis, Portales and from out of town and all had positive reactions to the weekend event.

He said he met people from Houston, Oklahoma and Albuquerque, along with seeing many people from the surrounding region.

“I thought it went really well,” Terry said. “We were lucky we got rain and the air show in. That’s the best of both worlds.”

Clovis Mayor David Lansford said when he attended the air show Saturday, the feeling he noted from both local residents and Cannon personnel was pride.

“One thing I noticed when I went to the air show was the enthusiasm of people serving on CAFB,” Lansford said. “They were so delighted to have people out there on the flightline. They are so proud and happy to serve their country.”

“I think the people of Clovis and Portales are very proud that we have CAFB here in New Mexico,” he added. “We’re just bursting with pride when we think about the fact that we get to host Cannon here. I think it’s probably been the most successful air show we’ve ever had. It’s been a great weekend.”

Lansford also said Thunderbirds Executive Officer Maj. Joshua Wild told him Saturday that “ I haven’t been to a community that has given us such a warm welcome.”

Bauernfeind also commented earlier in the week while preparing for the event that Cannon personnel recognized what a  unique outpouring of support they have from the area communities.

“This community embraces this Air Force base and it’s because it’s part of our identity,” Lansford said. “We’re proud we can say that Clovis and Portales is home to CAFB.”

Source:  http://cnjonline.com

Cessna 182P Skylane, N21048: Accident occurred May 24, 2014 in Mammoth Lakes, California

CIANCI PAUL JR, N21048: http://registry.faa.gov/N21048

http://moonbirddesigndev.com

NTSB Identification: WPR14LA208
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 24, 2014 in Mammoth Lakes, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N21048
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 24, 2014, at 1500 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N21048, experienced a total loss of engine power and executed a forced landing onto a dirt road on the south side of Mammoth Lakes, California. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall during the landing sequence. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the commercial pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. The pilot and single passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at Bishop, California.

The pilot stated that while en route to Los Banos, on V231, 10 miles west of RBRTS intersection he lost the number 1 engine cylinder and then quickly experienced a total loss of engine power. He informed air traffic control (ATC) of the situation and diverted southeast towards Yosemite Mammoth Airport, which was 10 miles away. He realized that he was not going to make it to the airport. He turned the airplane into the wind and landed on a dirt road on the south side of the town of Mammoth Lakes. During the landing the right main landing gear collapsed and the engine firewall was damaged.

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A GRAVEL ROAD, NEAR MAMMOTH LAKES, CA
FAA Reno FSDO-11:   http://www.asias.faa.gov

Late Saturday afternoon, a couple and their dog flying over the Mammoth Lakes area apparently lost power but managed to maneuver what authorities called a controlled crash landing on Sherwin Creek Road.

Reports said the aircraft, which was a Cessna, was unable to maintain power. The pilot put down the plane just past the big propane tanks on the way to the campgrounds. The pilot, his wife and their dog all walked away uninjured, according to reports.

A tow truck moved the plane a short distance from where it crash-landed to an area which did not block the road. When 9-1-1 calls started to pour in, multiple agencies responded to the crash site.


Source:    http://www.sierrawave.net

Drones poised to help save lives, but regulations keep them grounded

(NBC News) - When the U.S. said this week it was sending 80 military service members to Nigeria to oversee drone aircraft searching for hundreds of abducted schoolgirls, it raised an obvious question: Why isn't that common here in America?

The reason is that the Federal Aviation Administration "never intended to regulate model aircraft," said Garry Richard Lane, a specialist in aviation law in New Hampshire, where legislation to restrict the use of drones failed last month.

Wait — "model aircraft"?

Saddled with definitions arrived at long before small remote-controlled aircraft became capable of carrying sophisticated equipment like high-definition cameras and professional sound gear, FAA regulations still consider unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, the playthings of hobbyists.

And federal regulations allow the use of hobby aircraft only below 400 feet in remote areas away from any airport and only for non-commercial purposes.

That means sophisticated rescue drones costing tens of thousands of dollars or more are regulated exactly like the $120 FunJet Ultra Kit you might find at your local Hobby Lobby.

UAVs are allowed in national airspace only under "very controlled conditions," the FAA says. Even police have to wait for a special "certificate of authorization" before they can send up a drone in a time-is-ticking search for a missing person.

The regulatory myopia could have tragic implications, said Lane, a licensed pilot.

If rescue crews have a drone in the back of a car, "They might find somebody within minutes alive, instead of dead by a helicopter" hours later, he told NBC News.

That's why a Texas volunteer search-and-rescue organization is suing the FAA after it ordered the group to stop using drones to find missing persons.

The organization, Texas EquuSearch Mounted Search and Recovery Team of Dickinson, calls camera-equipped model aircraft "the single most powerful search-and-rescue tool ... to save time during the crucial early hours of the search."

READ MORE | FAA Search-and-Rescue Drone Suit Could Have Widespread Impact


Texas EquuSearch is a nonprofit, and it doesn't charge anything for use of its aircraft. "But it accepts donations, and in the FAA's view, that's a commercial activity," Lane said.

And the FAA makes little distinction between civilians and law enforcement.

"If a police department tries to do the same darn thing, they are also getting paid," Lane said, so "that is also considered commercial use by the FAA."


Congress has ordered the FAA to draw up new regulations that sensibly accommodate UAVs. But in its November status report on the effort, the FAA called that "a significant challenge."

Just one critical component of any new FAA rules — publication of certification rules for pilots in drone-flying classes — could take until 2017, the agency said. Others might not be completed until 2026, the FAA projected.

Then there are the "security vetting for certification and training of UAS (unmanned air systems) related personnel, addressing cyber and communications vulnerabilities, and maintaining/enhancing air defense and air domain awareness capabilities in an increasingly complex and crowded airspace," the FAA said.

Lane is hoping the clamor of dozens of drone aviation companies that want to do business in the U.S. will expedite at least some form of interim regulation.

In a report it issued this month, the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, a Washington-based trade group, projected that fully integrating UAVs into the national air system would create more than 100,000 jobs and spin off $82 billion in economic impact within 10 years.

"There are all these companies that want to get into this market, but they can't," he said. "There's a lot of people putting pressure on the FAA. The pressure is there."

Jim Williams, the FAA manager in charge of the project, said earlier this month that the agency is working with several industries to allow limited commercial operations before final rules are issued. But in remarks at the Small Unmanned Systems Business Exposition in San Francisco, he issued a new caution about the danger of allowing even small drones to share airspace with jetliners.

After a pilot reported a near-midair collision with a drone near the Tallahassee Regional Airport in Florida in March, "the pilot said that the [drone] was so close to his jet that he was sure he had collided with it," Williams said at the San Francisco convention. While no damage was found, "this may not always be the case," he added.

That's a legitimate concern, Lane said, and any FAA regulations could require an authorized drone operator "to already be a commercial aircraft pilot" on top of earning "some kind of UAV license."

Lane said he's "optimistic that the FAA will start approving something in the relatively near future — maybe the next few months." But the nature of regulatory review and approval means any new rules are "not going to be in effect for another year and a half" in the best of scenarios, he said.

Then there's the hurdle of public perception. The main fears are that a drone might fall on someone's head (which has happened in other countries) and most of all, privacy — which Lane said is a misplaced concern.

"This isn't about police wanting to have a drone hovering in your backyard watching you in your living room or swimming pool," he said.

Besides, there are much more effective ways for cops to snoop on you than with a drone.

"If I'm a police officer, I'm not going to do it with a drone," Lane said. "A propeller makes noise. You'd hear, so you're going to notice."
Lane acknowledged that the FAA is "in a hard position," because "there's a whole range of sizes and there's a whole range of uses."

"Part of the problem the FAA has is what are all of these uses and how do we create regulations for the Predator-size drones and the smaller drones?" he asked.

But "they should have anticipated some of this long ago," he said.

READ MORE | Drone swarms could be lifesaver in disasters

There have been success stories involving the use of drones at disaster scenes and in missing persons cases, but there is so much more potential if drones are unshackled, Lane said.

"The tech is there, but we're waiting for the FAA to catch up," he said. "They can save lives right now."


Story, video and comments/reaction:  http://www.wrcbtv.com

Farr Field Airport (ME33), Harpswell, Maine

Plane makes emergency landing in Harpswell near Route 123

HARPSWELL — A plane made an emergency landing on a grass air strip in Harpswell on Sunday evening after running out of fuel.


Few details were available at 8 p.m., although Cumberland County dispatcher said the plane landed in the area of Route 123 — also known as Harpswell Neck Road — and Basin Cove Road.

The airstrip is off Birchmere Lane in Harpswell Neck, Cundy’s Harbor Fire Chief Ben Wallace Jr. said.

Brunswick Fire Lt. John Faith said a Brunswick rescue unit responded, but the occupants of the plane declined to be taken to the hospital.


The man and his wife, whose names were not available, were not injured.

“He did a good job,”  Harpswell Neck Fire Chief Frank Hilton said of the pilot. 

The plane sustained minor damage, and will need to be repaired before it can be flown.

Story and comments/reaction:  http://bangordailynews.com


Story:  http://www.sunjournal.com

Meyers OTW-160, N34341: Accident occurred May 26, 2014 in Tehachapi, California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY AND THROUGH A FENCE, TEHACHAPI, CA

FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01:   http://www.asias.faa.gov

DODD LEE P JR, N34341: http://registry.faa.gov/N34341

 



A Tehachapi man who did not wish to be identified crash a two-seater biplane just east of the runway at Tehachapi Municipal Airport just before 2 p.m. on Sunday, May 26.

The pilot and a passenger escaped uninjured.

According to Sgt. Kevin Paille of the Tehachapi Police Dept., the pilot was practicing touch-and-go maneuvers into the wind when a gust of wind caught the airplane and sent it downward and through the fence. It landed nose-down adjacent to Dennison Road near Goodrick, about 50 yards east of the airport.

The plane had a minor fuel leak following the crash but the fuel line was quickly turned off so there was no fire.

The two men aboard refused medical treatment.

Paille said the crash took place at 1:50 p.m. The Federal Aviation Authority and National Transportation Safety Board were notified but decided not to come on scene, Paille said, so the owner of the aircraft will be moving the airplane.

Sources: 


http://www.turnto23.com

http://www.tehachapinews.com

http://www.bakersfieldnow.com

 The Kern County Fire Department, which provided this photo, said this single engine plane was trying to land at Tehachapi Airport at 1:45 p.m. May 26 and flew past the end of the runway, landing nose-first into a road at the end of the airport. The pilot and his passenger got out by themselves.








Grumman American AA-1B Trainer, N8890L, Warriors To Wings Aero Club: Accident occurred May 23, 2014 in Chester, South Carolina

WARRIORS TO WINGS AERO CLUB:   http://registry.faa.gov/N8890L  

 NTSB Identification: ERA14FA260 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 23, 2014 in Chester, SC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/27/2015
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA1B, registration: N8890L
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane departed on a cross-country flight after the pilot purchased 11.92 gallons of fuel. A flight plan found in the wreckage with the accident pilot's name on listed the fuel onboard as 3 hours and 30 minutes and a flight distance of 240 miles. The airplane wreckage was located about 130 miles from the departure airport. Postaccident examination of the propeller indicated that the engine was not producing power at impact.

Examination of the wreckage and surrounding vegetation revealed no evidence of fuel within the fuel tanks and only slight amounts of blight, consistent with fuel spillage, on nearby vegetation at the accident site. Fuel staining was observed on the right wing, and the fuel cap did not have a detent. If the pilot had performed a preflight inspection of the airplane before departure, he would have noticed the fuel staining; thus it likely occurred during the accident flight, although it could not be determined why the pilot did not notice the loose fuel cap. Given the distance flown and cruise speed, the airplane's published fuel consumption indicates that the airplane would have consumed about 11 gallons of fuel in the 90 minutes of flight. Although both fuel tanks likely contained enough fuel for a flight longer than 90 minutes at takeoff, it is likely that any fuel in the right fuel tank was syphoned out during flight due to the loose fuel cap. Even though the estimated fuel consumption calculations showed that the total quantity consumed was less than what was indicated the flight plan, the lack of fuel observed at the accident site and the lack of evidence of any preexisting mechanical anomalies indicate that the total loss of engine power was likely the result of fuel exhaustion. Although the fuel selector valve's Teflon plunger was found fractured, which resulted in the selector valve binding, the fracture was consistent with impact damage.

The airplane was not reported overdue for several days and was located in a wooded area about 3 days after it had departed. The airplane's emergency locator transmitter (ELT) unit had an "ON/OFF/ARM" switch that was found in the "OFF" position. The ELT may have been deactivated by first responders; however, given that there were no reports of ELT signals being detected in the area from the day of the accident until the airplane was located, the ELT was likely in the "OFF" position before the flight and did not activate due to the switch position, which delayed the search and rescue of the occupants.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate inflight fuel monitoring, which resulted in fuel exhaustion and the subsequent total loss of engine power. Contributing to the accident was the loose fuel cap, which allowed fuel to syphon out in flight.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 23, 2014 about 1300 Eastern Daylight Time, a Grumman American AA1B, N8890L, was substantially damaged when it impacted several trees and terrain near Chester, South Carolina. The airplane had departed from Columbus County Municipal Airport (CPC), Whiteville, North Carolina, about 1130 and had an intended destination of Heaven's Landing (GE99), Clayton, GA. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated by Warrior to Wings Aero Club and the personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) radar data revealed that the accident flight was first detected at 1137:49, northwest of CPC, at an altitude of 1,200 feet above mean sea level (msl). The flight flew northwest and then turned towards the west south west. The last radar data near CPC was recorded at 1155:25 at 2,500 feet msl. Radar data obtained from Charlotte Approach Control revealed the accident airplane east of the accident location at 1301:00 at 2,600 feet msl. The last radar data was recorded at 1306:36 at 2,300 feet msl, near the accident location. No further radar data was located.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to FAA and pilot records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, helicopter and instrument airplane which was issued on October 23, 2013, issued on the basis of his military ratings. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued June 6, 2011, which was issued with no limitations. At the time of the medical examination the pilot reported zero (0) total hours of flight experience and zero (0) hours of flight experience in the 6 months prior to the medical certificate. The pilot's logbook was located within the wreckage. The last recorded entry was dated May 18, 2014 and indicated a pattern work flight at Albert J. Ellis Airport (OAJ), Jacksonville, North Carolina. Including that entry the total recorded flight time was 37.6 flight hours and included 9.5 flight hours in the accident aircraft make and model. According to information provided by the United States Marine Corps (USMC), the pilot had 243.7 total flight hours with the USMC and included 78.1 hours in a single-engine propeller airplane. There were no entries that indicated the pilot had ever flown to GE99.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA and aircraft maintenance records, the airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate on April 18, 1974, and was registered to Warriors to Wings Aero Club on April 13, 2013, following it purchase on April 12, 2013. It was a two-place, all-metal, low-wing monoplane with fixed-tricycle landing gear. It was powered by a Lycoming O-235-C2C 108-hp engine that had accrued 2,257.6 hours since new, with no entry of an overhaul recorded in any of the logbooks. It was also driven by a McCauley propeller 1A105 SCM 7153. According to the maintenance records, the last recorded tachometer entry was 2,254.4 flight hours, which correlated to the most recent 100-inspection entry for both the airplane and engine. The tachometer was located at the accident scene and indicated 2,257.6 hours.

The airplane's fuel system utilized a tubular main wing spar comprised of a two-cell fuel tank (one cell in each wing). Each fuel cell held 12 gallons of fuel, of which, 11 gallons were considered usable. Fuel quantity was indicated by vertical sight gauges on the left and right cabin walls, each sight gauge corresponded to the respective side fuel cell.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1255 recorded weather observation at Chester Catwaba Regional Airport (DCM), Chester South Carolina, located 8 miles to the northeast, included wind from 310 degrees at 8 knots, variable between 250 degrees and 350 degrees, visibility 7 miles, clear skies, temperature 32 degrees C, dew point 16 degrees C; barometric altimeter 30.03 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane was found on May 26, 2014, in a wooded area within a 500-acre private hunting club, located at 34 degrees 40.21 North latitude and 081 degrees 17.01 West longitude, approximately 400 feet prior to a clearing. The clearing was about 500 feet long and 200 feet wide with the longest section oriented in a southwest to northeast direction. The main wreckage was located inverted at an elevation of 484 feet msl. The debris was located within a compact area. The impact line from the first tree strike to the final resting location was about 35 feet in length and on a decent angle of about 38 degrees. The engine remained attached to the airplane with the engine mounts, lines, and cables, and was co-located with the main wreckage. The wreckage debris path was oriented on 273-degree heading from the initial tree strike to the main wreckage.

The area around the accident location was devoid of fuel smell; however, there was little evidence of blight on a few leaves in the surrounding foliage in the immediate vicinity of the impact location. However, the area of blight was not widespread in circumference.

Fuselage

The fuselage assembly, right wing, engine and propeller were located inverted at the base of tree. The left wing was located immediately underneath the wreckage at rest.

The top of the occupant compartment remained intact aft of the windscreen, the windscreen was fractured into multiple pieces. The right side of the airplane was cut by first responders to facilitate recovering of the occupants. The nose gear was impact separated and was located about 15 feet forward of the wreckage, and was one of the furthest pieces from the airplane.

Continuity to all flight control surfaces was confirmed from the T-bar at the base of the pilot control yoke to their associated control surface; except for the left aileron and flap. Both of the left wing flight controls were confirmed from the T-bar to the impact fracture point at the wing root and from that fracture point to the aileron and flap.

The flap indicator and associated flaps were in the up (retracted) position.

The fuel selector indicator was found between the left and right fuel tank detents. The fuel selector valve face plate had a mark on the plate in the same location between the left and right tank detent. The valve was removed from the airframe and the line fittings were removed to examine the position of the orifices. The fuel line that provided fuel to the engine and the fuel line associated with the left fuel tank were both found in the open position. The line associated with the right fuel tank was found in the closed position. Manipulation of the selector valve revealed limited movement within a 30 degree arc and the valve was disassembled. The Teflon plunger was found fractured approximately one-fourth of the way from the bottom of the plunger; the separated piece was found loose in the bottom of the valve body. The damage to the plunger was consistent with impact damage.

The airplane's ignition key was found selected to the "BOTH" position.

Vertical Stabilizer

The empennage assembly remained attached to the fuselage. However, the rudder and elevator were impact-damaged and remained attached to the empennage assembly via the cables. Both the elevator and rudder indicated impact damage and multiple fracture points. The left elevator had impact and scrape marks on the upper side of the surface. The marks were associated with a scrape mark found on the tree that it came to rest against. The tree scrape mark began about 25 feet agl on the tree trunk and ceased about 5 feet agl. The rudder remained attached to the elevator assembly. The rudder and elevator cables were in place, and remained in the pulley groove. The cables remained secured and were continuous to the rudder bar and the T-bar in the cockpit. The rudder stops were in place and secure.

The vertical stabilizer was separated, but remained in the immediate vicinity. The separation was consistent with impact damage.

Left Wing

The left outboard fiberglass wingtip section, was separated and found along the debris path. The fuel cap remained secure and in place and the fuel tank was devoid of fuel. The output from the fuel tank to fuselage was impact separated. The left flap inboard 21 inches was impact separated; however, was in the immediate vicinity of the left wing. The leading edge exhibited crush damage in the aft and slight positive direction. The aileron and flap control tube was fractured at the wingroot due to tensile overload. The left main gear remained attached to its attach point.

Right Wing

The right outboard fiberglass wingtip section, was separated and found along the debris path. The fuel cap remained in place; however, it had been opened by first responders during occupant recovery. The cap was observed loose on the filler neck and exhibited no positive detent at the fuel cap stop and was unable to seal on the filler neck. The fuel tank was devoid of fuel. The wingtip, which was light blue in color, exhibited staining, similar in color as 100LL fuel. The outboard section of the leading edge exhibited crush damage in the aft and positive direction. The inboard 25 inches, from the wingroot exhibited aft impact damage in the slight positive direction. The right main gear remained attached to its attach point.

Engine

The engine remained attached to the airframe via the mounts, cables and wires. The propeller remained attached to the propeller hub which remained attached to engine. The carburetor remained attached to the engine. Fractures were noted at the attach point for the oil sump as well as radial at the throttle plate shaft. The carburetor was disassembled and trace amounts of a blue fluid observed; however, the carburetor bowl was devoid of fluid. The metal floats remained attached, operated by hand, and exhibited no damage consistent with hydraulic deformation. The fuel inlet screen was removed and was free of debris. The carburetor heat gate operated smoothly with no abnormalities noted. The throttle plate exhibited impact damage but was able to operate. The engine driven diaphragm fuel pump was hand actuated and furnished suction and compression; however, it was devoid of fuel. The spark plugs were removed and appeared gray in color with normal wear and appeared to be recently cleaned. The engine was rotated utilizing a turning tool inserted at the vacuum drive pad and continuity was confirmed through to the propeller flange. Thumb suction and compression was confirmed on all four cylinders. The cylinders were examined utilizing a lighted borescope and all cylinders were normal in wear with no noted defects. The magnetos were removed and when spun utilizing a cordless drill, spark was observed on all 8 leads. The engine driven fuel pump was removed and disassembled the diaphragm was normal and free of debris, no abnormalities were noted. The oil dipstick was absent but oil was present throughout the engine.

The McCauley two bladed propeller, remained attached to propeller hub, and exhibited no S-bending or leading edge damage. However, the propeller flange had aft crushing damage, consistent with impact damage, around the circumference. One propeller blade had an aft bend about 7 1/4 inches from the outside diameter of the hub and chordwise scratches were observed on the backside (as viewed from the pilot seat). The outboard approximate 4 inches of the other propeller blade exhibited a slight bend at of the blade tip but otherwise was unremarkable and indicated no leading edge damage. The propeller signatures were consistent with no rotation at the time of the accident.

ELT

The ELT was co-located with the airplane; however, was impact-separated from the airframe and the antenna; it was located on the ground immediately underneath the tail section. The unit had an "ON/OFF/ARM" switch was found in the "OFF" position. The investigation could not determine if the ELT was deactivated by first responders or was not in the "ARM" or "ON" position at the time of impact. However, there were no reports of ELT signals being detected in the area from the day of the accident until the airplane was located.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on May 27, 2014, by York Pathology Associates, Rock Hill, South Carolina, as authorized by the Chester County Coroner's Office. The cause of death was reported as "blunt force trauma with sudden deceleration injuries."

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens from the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The following were the findings of the toxicological testing:
- Acetone detected in Blood
- 40 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Blood
- 24 (mg.dL) Ethanol detected in Urine
- NO ETHANOL detected in Brain
- 8 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Isopropanol detect4ed in Blood
- 12 (mg/dL, mg.hg) N-Propanol detected in Blood
- N-Propanol detected in Urine
- 33.8 (ug/ml, ug/g) Salicylate detected in Urine.

Additionally, putrefaction (which consists of the post-mortem creation of ethanol) was noted as yes.

According to the 2008 edition of Drug Facts and Comparisons, Salicylate is a metabolite of aspirin, an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication to treat aches and pains, as an antipyretic to reduce fever. According to the FAA's Aerospace Medical Research database, the therapeutic range of Salicylate 20 -250 ug/ml.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A receipt was located with the pilot's name imprinted and the airplane registration number on it showing 11.92 gallons of 100 LL fuel was purchased at 1121 on the day of the accident at CPC.

Owner's Manual

According to the Gulfstream Aerospace "Owner's Manual," Chapter 5 "Performance" the airplane's engine would consume between 4.5 and 6.5 gallons per hour, at 2,500 feet msl depending on the rpm utilized. The manual further states that, "Actual performance will vary from standard due to variations in atmospheric conditions, engine and propeller condition, mixture leaning technique, and other variables associated with the particular performance item." The performance further provided "notes" when utilizing the performance chart; one of the notes included "Fuel consumption is for level flight with mixture leaned. In the "Performance-Specifications" section, the manual cruise power setting was listed as 75 percent at 3,000 feet.

According to the Lycoming Operator's Manual, the burn rate, depending on percent of power could be as much as 10.7 gallons per hour. However, at 75 percent power, which correlated to 2,350 rpm, the fuel flow would be about 7.3 gallons per hour.

Electronic Data

An Apple iPad was located in the airplane and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. An exterior examination revealed the device had sustained extensive structural damage. The unit was disassembled and the internal board was removed. The internal board was sent to a chip-level recovery service for further recovery. The recovery service stated, "due to the severity and low-level nature of the failure in this case, no data was recoverable."

Flight Plan

An undated flight plan was located in the wreckage the flight plan showed a proposed departure time from Wilmington International Airport (ILM), Wilmington, North Carolina as "1300Z." The flight plan indicated a route of flight as direct to GE99; however, a handwritten note indicated "KHVS refuel top to 20 gal." The flight plan further indicated a true airspeed of 100 knots, a cruising altitude of 6,500 feet msl, an estimated time enroute of 2 hours 45 minutes, and fuel on board as 3 hours and 30 minutes. The flight plan listed the accident pilot as the pilot for the flight.

According to flight planning software, the direct routing from CPC to GE99 was on a 288-degree course and was 238.1 nautical miles. Reviewing that route of flight revealed that the accident location was along the course and was 129.2 nautical miles from the departure airport.

According to a representative of Lockheed Martin Flight Service Station, "no weather briefing or flight plan services were found" for the accident airplane for the days around the departure date.

Flying Club

According to a representative of the flying club that owned the airplane, the club rented the airplane to the members at a "dry rate." They further reported that the pilot member was required to purchase fuel themselves and that the flying club did not provide fuel for the airplane. It was further reported that the plane would have had a minimum of 30 minutes of fuel prior to the flight as that was the regulation required minimum fuel for a visual flight rules flight. They further reported that the accident pilot had planned to depart the home base airport and land at another airport to purchase fuel prior to continuing on to the intended destination.


CHESTER, SC (WBTV) - A North Carolina Marine and a woman from Rhode Island have been identified after they were killed in a plane crash in Chester County.

According to the Chester County Coroner, 24-year-old Ericson Davis and 22-year-old Anisa Rossi were killed when their plane crashed 3.4 miles south of Chester in a wooded area off Highway 72.

Davis is a US Marine and Rossi is from Rhode Island, WBTV has learned.

The wreckage was found on Monday, but investigators say the plane went down several days ago.

Federal Aviation Administration officials say the plane, an AA1 aircraft.  The plane, which officials identified as N8890L, was registered to Warriors to Wings Aero Club.

The flight departed from Wilmington on Friday and was headed to Heaven's Landing Airport in Clayton, Georgia, according to the FAA.

A "concerned party" contacted reported the missing aircraft Sunday and a search began. The plane was found when authorities picked up on its beacon in the area.

Officials have not released a possible cause of the crash.

According to Lt. Hector Alejandro with the United States Marine Corps, Davis was a member of the same 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing based in New River Air Station as Steven Hancock, who was killed after falling out of an Osprey aircraft during exercises last week in Bladen County.

The men were in different squadrons, but part of the same wing.

http://www.fox19.com






















Authorities say a New River Air Station pilot and his friend were killed in a South Carolina plane crash.

The Chester County coroner identified the victims as 24-year-old Ericsson Davis, and 22-year-old Anisa Rossi.

The plane was registered to the Warriors To Wings Aero Club in Sneads Ferry. The wreckage was found Monday, according to federal authorities.

A Georgia real estate developer says Davis was an Osprey pilot and was going to look at property to build his dream house. Mike Ciochetti says when they never showed up, he at first thought he had been stood up until a friend of Davis called to tell him the plane had crashed.

The Marine Corps confirms that Davis was stationed at New River.

Davis is the second New River Marine to die within the past week due to an accident. Last Monday night, Lance Corporal Steven Hancock fell from an Osprey while it was flying over Bladen County.

That mishap remains under investigation.





Warriors to Wings Aero Club, N8890L



WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) -   Wreckage from a plane that took off from Wilmington Friday has been found in Chester County, South Carolina with two reported fatalities.

FAA officials say the flight departed from Wilmington on Friday and was headed to Heaven's Landing Airport in Clayton, GA. A concerned party contacted the FAA to report that the aircraft was missing, and the agency issued an Alert Notice (ALNOT) late yesterday advising airports, local authorities, and search and rescue officials, which triggered a search.

Chester County Sheriff Alex Underwood said he got a call from civil air patrol late this morning that a beacon from the plane was hitting in the area.

He says the plane is upside down in pine trees about two miles off Highway 72. Crews removed the bodies of a man and woman from the plane. They have not yet released the identities of the victims.

Sheriff Underwood says officials with the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will be on scene Tuesday morning, and that is when crews will remove the wreckage.

Officials at Wilmington International Airport say the plane had the FAA Identification N8890L, registered to the Warriors to Wings Aero Club in Sneads Ferry, NC. Local airport officials say the pilot did not file a flight plan.


UPDATE:  Two people are dead after personal aircraft that departed from a Wilmington airport crashed in South Carolina.

A Wilmington International Airport official confirmed Monday evening that a  Grumman American AA-1B Trainer aircraft departed from the airport on Friday and crashed near Chester, S.C..

The aircraft had a destination of Heaven’s Landing in Clayton, Ga., with an intermediary stop at Hartsville Regional Airport in Hartsville, S.C..

Gary Broughton, the operations director at Wilmington International Airport, said the airport was contacted on Sunday evening to verify the plane had in fact taken off, because neither of the two passengers had called family members to tell them they had arrived at their destination. Broughton would not release the names of those on board.

The plane, registered to the Warriors To Wings Aero Club in Sneads Ferry, is stored at Wilmington International Airport. The club’s address is listed as Wallace. Broughton confirmed that the FAA had no flight plan filed and therefore could not comment on the time of departure or crash.

Warrior to Wings Aero Club provides cost effective flight training through the use of donated flight instruction time as well as a cooperative effort by flight instructors, according to its web site at w2waero.com.

Attempts to reach the Warriors To Wings Aero Club, the Chester County Emergency Management and Sheriff’s Office and the South Carolina Federal Aviation Administration were unsuccessful.

Missing plane found in Chester County, 2 dead

Two people were found dead after a plane crashed in wooded area in Chester County, emergency management officials said on Monday late afternoon.

The plane was found around 4 p.m. near the Broad River, 10 miles south of the Chester-Catawba Regional Airport, said Eddie Murphy, director of Chester County Emergency Management. Murphy said he was told the plane was headed to Georgia.

The single-engine aircraft was reported missing late Sunday night, said Lt. Robert McCullough with S.C. Department of Natural Resources. The search for the plane started on Monday morning when DNR officials sent up their own plane to aid the search.

The plane was headed to Clayton, Georgia. It had taken off from Wilmington, N.C. on Friday, McCollough said.

Officials had been attempting to track the plane, Murphy said, and he was notified on Monday morning that they believed it was in Chester County.

Local authorities and DNR spent the majority of Monday looking for the aircraft. From the air, DNR officials spotted it and at least two officers went on foot to the crash site, McCullough said.

Officials found the downed plane and the two dead passengers in a heavily-wooded area, he said.

McCullough said he has been told that the plane was a rental aircraft. The identity of the two people on board has not yet been released.

Check back for more details.


2 dead after plane crashes near Chester 

CHESTER COUNTY, S.C. -- The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating a fatal plane crash in Chester County.

The FAA says the wreckage of an
Grumman American AA-1B Trainer  aircraft was found on Monday about 10 miles southwest of Chester.

Two people were aboard the plane when it crashed, and authorities say both suffered fatal injuries. Their identities have not yet been released.

The flight, which has been missing for days, departed from Wilmington, North Carolina, on Friday, and was headed to Heaven's Landing Airport in Clayton, Georgia, the FAA says.

Further information is expected to be released by local authorities.


Two people confirmed dead after missing aircraft is found in Chester County

A flight departing from Wilmington, North Carolina Friday never made it to its destination in Clayton, Georgia.

A concerned individual contacted the Federal Aviation Administration to report the aircraft missing and the agency issued an Alert Notice late Sunday to alert airports, local authorities, as well as search and rescue officials.

Authorities in Chester County, South Carolina contacted the Federal Aviation Administration about wreckage of an Grumman American AA-1B Trainer aircraft found Monday afternoon.


Two people are confirmed dead. 


The Federal Aviation Administration  is investigating.

Source:   http://www.myfoxcarolinas.com

Papua New Guinea: Fuel Subsidies, Tax Cut For Rural Aviation



Civil Aviation Minister, Davis Stevens, says the government will be looking at subsiding fuel for smaller airlines to make air travel more affordable to rural airstrips. The announcement comes with the launch of the newly formed Rural Airstrips Authority. 

Stevens made the announcement at the weekend at the Bulolo airstrip which recorded the highest number of airlifts in the world in the 1930s.
 
In the Gold rush years of the 1920s and 1930s, Bulolo Airstrip, was the busiest on the planet. It was here that aviation history was made with the most airlifts between Bulolo and Salamaua. Mining in the Wau Bulolo area made air travel viable with the area producing an average of three tons of gold every year.

Today, this airstrip privately owned by Bulolo forest products, sees very little action. While this airfield is well maintained, the same can’t be said about rural airstrips in other parts of the country. 

Many have not been maintained and planes have stopped going there because the cost of air transport has risen considerable. At the weekend, civil aviation Minister, Davis Stevens said the government is looking at making air transport cheaper by cutting taxes and subsidizing fuel.
 
Papua New Guinea used to have more than 1000 operational airstrips. In the 60s and 70s, we had among the highest number of third level commercial flights into rural areas. Today, there are a little over 200 airstrips.

Since taking office, the civil aviation minister has found that the government doesn’t have a working policy on rural airstrips. That’s meant that while funding was allocated, there has been no clear direction on airstrip maintenance and upkeep.
 
North Coast Aviation is one of the few airlines still operating in Morobe province. Their planes go to places like Kabwum and Garaina that have no road access.

It’s a vital service. The airline’s management wouldn’t comment on camera but said fuel costs make travel to rural areas as expensive as Air Niugini flights to Port Moresby.

Fuel subsidies and the recently created rural airstrips authority, will bring much needed attention to places once forgotten. But funding remains the biggest problems for the authority.

 
Source:  http://www.emtv.com.pg

Stolp SA-300 Starduster Too, N4493: Accident occurred May 25, 2014 in Newton, North Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N4493

NTSB Identification: ERA14FA256
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 25, 2014 in Newton, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/24/2014
Aircraft: STOLP STARDUSTER SA-300, registration: N4493
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane spiral to the ground. A review of a video recorded by another witness revealed that, during the flight, the airplane entered a left spin and completed about seven revolutions before descending behind a treeline and impacting a wheat field. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation.
A flight instructor reported that the pilot had been attempting to teach himself aerobatics in his experimental, amateur-built airplane before the accident and that he had provided the pilot one aerobatic lesson in the pilot’s airplane. The flight instructor noted that the pilot’s knowledge and skill level with spin entry and recovery were inadequate. The pilot subsequently contacted the flight instructor on two more occasions and requested more training. The flight instructor agreed to do the training as long as it was performed in his airplane; however, the pilot would not agree to use the instructor’s airplane and did not receive further aerobatic training.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to recover from an intentional spin. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s lack of adequate spin entry and recovery training.


HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 25, 2014, about 2005 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Stolp Starduster SA-300, N4493, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged when it impacted a wheat field following an intentional spin near Newton, North Carolina. The private pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight originated from Laneys Airport (N92), Maiden, North Carolina, about 1945.

The airplane was based at N92. According to a flight instructor, prior to the accident flight, the pilot had been attempting to teach himself aerobatics in the accident airplane. The flight instructor encouraged the pilot to receive formal training, but the pilot preferred to fly his own airplane. The flight instructor agreed on one occasion to provide training in the pilot's airplane. They performed steep turns, stalls, and slow flight uneventfully. They then performed several spins, including power on, power off, and accelerated spin entries; however, the pilot's knowledge and skill level were not quite adequate and the flight instructor terminated the spin training early. Additionally, the flight instructor noticed some deficiencies with the airplane during landing and advised the pilot not to fly it until repairs could be completed. The pilot subsequently contacted the flight instructor on two more occasions and requested more training. The flight instructor agreed to the training, as long as it was performed in his Decathlon, which the pilot did not agree to.

Three witnesses, who lived near the accident site, observed the airplane in level flight when the engine noise decreased and it entered a spin. The airplane continued to spin and descended toward the ground. One witness stated that the prior to the spin, the airplane performed a few tricks and a couple of stalls. A second witness stated that the airplane stopped spinning about 300 feet above the ground, but continued to nose dive into a wheat field. The third witness recorded a video of the accident sequence and a copy was forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, D.C., for further review.

Review of the video revealed that the airplane entered a left-turn spin and completed about seven revolutions before disappearing behind a treeline.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, which was issued on December 11, 2011. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on November 6, 2013. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 115 hours. The pilot's logbook was not recovered.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The two-seat tandem, bi-wing, fixed tailwheel airplane, serial number 224, was constructed from a kit of steel tubing, with the wing and tail surfaces covered in fabric. The wing spars were constructed of wood. The kit was manufactured in 1971 and the airplane was issued an FAA airworthiness certificate in 1980. It was powered by a Lycoming O-320, 150-horsepower engine, equipped with a Sensenich two-blade, fixed-pitch propeller.

According to the aircraft logbooks, the airplane's most recent condition inspection was completed on May 20, 2009. At that time, the airplane had accumulated 873.4 total hours of operation. The engine had accumulated 1,623.5 total hours of operation; of which, 1,054.5 hours were accumulated since the last major overhaul was performed in 1966. According to the tachometer, the airplane had flown about 40 hours from the time of the condition inspection until the accident.

The airplane was involved in a prior accident in 2010 and was sold by a salvage facility to the pilot. The pilot made a logbook entry on June 16, 2012, noting that the engine was in airworthy condition; however, the pilot was not qualified to perform a condition inspection on the airplane.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Hickory Regional Airport (HKY), Hickory, North Carolina, was located about 14 miles northwest of the accident site. The recorded weather at HKY, at 1953, was: wind from 190 degrees at 3 knots; visibility 10 miles; few clouds at 9,000 feet; temperature 23 degrees Celsius; dew point 16 degrees Celsius; altimeter 30.15 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

The airplane impacted a wheat field and came to rest in a flat, upright attitude, on a magnetic heading about 130 degrees. The bi-wing had partially separated from the fuselage and was canted forward. The left and right ailerons remained attached to their respective upper and lower wings. The empennage remained intact and exhibited little damage. Control continuity was confirmed from the elevator and rudder to the rear cockpit control stick. The aileron system was constructed of push-pull tubes, which were impact damaged and continuity could not be confirmed. Continuity was also confirmed from the elevator trim tab to the pilot's seat (rear).

The cockpit was crushed, but the pilot's seat and 4-point harness remained intact. The forward fuselage fuel tank was compromised and an odor of fuel was present. The engine remained partially attached the fuselage. The two propeller blades remained attached to the hub. The propeller flange had cracked and the propeller separated from the crankshaft. The airplane was not insured and not immediately recovered from the wheat field.

Following its recovery, the engine was further examined by an FAA inspector. The inspector noted cable continuity to the carburetor. The carburetor fuel screen was clean and the oil screen was absent of metallic particles. Due to impact damage, the crankshaft could only rotate about 1 inch, but the inspector was able to verify that all pistons moved and gears at the rear accessory section turned. Both magnetos produced spark at all leads when rotated by hand and the spark plugs exhibited normal wear. The throttle cable remained attached to the carburetor and the mixture control arm remained attached to the upper portion part of the carburetor assembly.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on May 28, 2014, by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The cause of death was attributed to multiple injuries and no findings that could be considered causal to the accident were reported.

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results were negative for carbon monoxide, alcohol, and drugs.



NTSB Identification: ERA14FA256
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 25, 2014 in Newton, NC
Aircraft: STOLP STARDUSTER SA 300, registration: N4493
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 25, 2014, about 2005 eastern standard time, an experimental, amateur-built Stolp Starduster SA-300, N4493, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged when it impacted a wheat field, while maneuvering near Newton, North Carolina. The private pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight originated from Laneys Airport (N92), Maiden, North Carolina, about 1945.

The airplane was based at N92. According to a flight instructor, prior to the accident flight, the pilot had been attempting to teach himself aerobatics in the accident airplane. The flight instructor encouraged the pilot to receive formal training, but the pilot preferred to fly his own airplane. The flight instructor agreed on one occasion to provide training in the pilot's airplane. They performed steep turns, stalls, and slow flight uneventfully. They then performed several spins, including power on, power off, and accelerated spin entries; however, the pilot's knowledge and skill level were not quite adequate and the flight instructor terminated the spin training early. Additionally, the flight instructor noticed some deficiencies with the airplane during landing, and advised the pilot not to fly it until repairs could be completed. The pilot subsequently contacted the flight instructor on two more occasions and requested more training. The flight instructor agreed to the training, under the condition that the training be completed in his Decathlon, a condition which the pilot would not agree to.

Three witnesses, who lived near the accident site, observed the airplane in level flight when the engine noise decreased and it entered a spin. The airplane continued to spin and descended toward the ground. One witness stated that the prior entering to the spin, the airplane performed a "few tricks" and several aerodynamic stalls. A second witness stated that the airplane stopped spinning about 300 feet above the ground, but continued to nose dive straight to the ground. The third witness recorded a video of the accident sequence and a copy was forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, D.C., for further review.

The airplane came to rest in a flat, upright attitude, on a magnetic heading about 130 degrees. The bi-wing had partially separated from the fuselage and was canted forward. The left and right ailerons remained attached to their respective upper and lower wings. The empennage remained intact and exhibited little damage while the cockpit was crushed. The forward fuselage fuel tank was compromised and an odor of fuel was present. The engine remained partially attached to the fuselage. Further examination of the wreckage was planned following recovery.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration third-class medical certificate was issued on November 6, 2013. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 115 hours.


FAA Charlotte FSDO-68:   http://www.asias.faa.gov





James B.  Thomas 
~


NEWTON, N.C. —   A pilot was killed Sunday when his plane crashed in a Catawba County field.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators arrived at the crash site Monday morning on Balls Creek Road.

Channel 9 found out that the pilot had been up for only about 15 to 20 minutes when the crash happened out in a wheat field.
     
Neighbors describe seeing the plane in trouble before it went down.

Brenda Blackburn could see the plane flying around her home late Sunday along Balls Creek Road. She said the small plane's engine quit several times before the crash.

"Just a plane a swirling, and all of the sudden the engine died, and it went down and we heard a crash,” she said.

Just down the road, Keith Lee was playing volleyball when he noticed the plane. Lee, who is also a pilot, said the plane was flying at about 1,500 feet while making maneuvers over the southern part of Catawba County.

"He was chopping the throttle, banking it on steep banks, but he was doing it on a real slow speed," Lee said.

The plane is registered to James Thomas, from Denver. Friends said he had taken off from a grass field at Laney's Airport, 4 miles away. Family members said he had been flying for about four years.

Charles Laney was one of the last people to talk with him.

"I told him to be careful. He's a very good guy. Good person. Do anything in the world for you,” Laney said.

The NTSB is just starting its investigation.

An Eyewitness News crew could see where both wings, along with the propeller, came off the home-built aircraft during the crash. Channel 9 asked investigators what they think might have happened.

"From what I saw it looked like a strictly vertical descent. The best way I can describe it is pancake,” said Robert Gretz, senior air safety investigator.

Investigators think they will be able to tell a lot more once they move the plane out of the field and look underneath. A preliminary report will be ready within five to 10 days.

Read our past coverage:Small plane crash in Newton Sunday kills one.


Source:  http://www.wsoctv.com